What Time Is It At The North Pole?

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What Time Is It At The North Pole

Is there a time at the North Pole?

Time – In most places on Earth, local time is determined by longitude, such that the time of day is more or less synchronised to the position of the Sun in the sky (for example, at midday, the Sun is roughly at its highest). This line of reasoning fails at the North Pole, where the Sun is experienced as rising and setting only once per year, and all lines of longitude, and hence all time zones, converge.

What is the time in Earth in North Pole?

What time is it at the North Pole? | Notes and Queries | guardian.co.uk

  • What time is it at the North Pole?
  • Harold Somers, Manchester

We have had this one before. The concept of time of day becomes meaningless at the North Pole, but there is a long-established convention that GMT is used. Pelham Barton, Birmingham U.K.

  • Greenwich mean time. The same is true at the South pole, and the entire surface of the moon.
    1. Bernard O’Leary, Dublin Ireland
  • The time of day at the poles has no practical significance; it is either Summer or Winter (or somewhere in between). Of course, the moment you take a step you are technically in a time zone. The closer you are to the equator, the greater the contrast between night and day and therefore the greater significance of the time of day.
    • Chris Wright, Twickenham UK

As all the lines of longtitude meet at the North Pole, theoretically, it could be any time throughout twenty four hours. However, it generally taken to be whatever time it is Greenwich Mean Time. Ray Mitcham, Southport U.K.

  • By convention the time at the North (and South) Pole is Zulu time, also known as GMT. This applies to a large region around both poles.
    1. Simon Blake, Shrewsbury England
  • Both poles run on GMT, as does space, and before you ask no there isn’t such a thing as space daylight savings time!
    • Iain Lambert, Slough UK

: What time is it at the North Pole? | Notes and Queries | guardian.co.uk

What is the time in South Pole?

Time Zones Currently Being Used in Antarctica –

Offset Time Zone Abbreviation & Name Example City Current Time
UTC -3 ART Argentina Time Carlini Base Thu, 04:32:03
CLST Chile Summer Time Palmer Station Thu, 04:32:03
UTC +2 CEST Central European Summer Time Troll Station Thu, 09:32:03
UTC +5 MAWT Mawson Time Mawson Thu, 12:32:03
UTC +6 VOST Vostok Time Vostok Station Thu, 13:32:03
UTC +7 DAVT Davis Time Davis Thu, 14:32:03
UTC +8 CAST Casey Time Casey Thu, 15:32:03
UTC +10 DDUT Dumont-d’Urville Time Dumont d’Urville Station Thu, 17:32:03
UTC +12 NZST New Zealand Standard Time Mario Zucchelli Station Thu, 19:32:03

How do you calculate time at the North Pole?

There is no time zone defined for exactly the two points the North Pole and the South Pole. People those places do follow the time determination laid down for ships at sea, in spite Antarctica is not an ocean. The shipmaster or base master determines what time there is to be used.

Is time slower in the North Pole?

Priyamvada Natarajan replies : – Jeremy Bernstein is right to note that Einstein himself, using his theory of special relativity, got the prediction of clock speeds wrong in 1905. He incorrectly predicted that due to the earth’s rotation, a clock at the equator would run slower than one at the poles.

Einstein did not anticipate his own theory of general relativity, which he would need to get it right—this would come in 1915. In a 2005 article in Physics Today titled “A Small Puzzle from 1905,” the physicists Alex Harvey and Engelbert Schucking pointed out that Einstein made this error by failing to take into account an effect of general relativity positing that clocks more deeply embedded in a gravitational field would run slower.

Clocks run slightly faster at the equator compared to the poles because the earth’s rotation produces a slight bulge at the equator. However, the earth is also rotating faster at the equator. These two effects compensate for each other exactly, causing clocks to actually run at the same rate in both locations.

Harvey and Schucking give another explanation for why the rates of polar and equatorial clocks must be the same. They write that in the moving earth frame, both clocks are at rest, and since both clocks are at the same effective gravitational potential, they tick at the same rate. But as I mention in “What Scientists Really Do,” these two effects do not compensate exactly for a clock on earth and one aboard a GPS satellite.

While Einstein did not anticipate his theory of general relativity, a recently discovered unpublished manuscript among his papers at Hebrew University, written in 1931, shows he was curiously prescient in another instance. Despite his initial resistance to Edwin Hubble’s discovery of the expanding universe, and even after his public embrace of it, Einstein struggled privately with the idea.

Is time Faster in the North Pole?

The poles are closer to the center of the Earth and are thus deeper in the Earth’s gravity well than is the equator. The combined effects of gravitational and special relativistic time mean that clocks at sea level tick at the same rate. More precisely, clocks at the surface of the geoid tick at the same rate.

Why time has no meaning at the North Pole?

Sign up for Scientific American ’s free newsletters. ” data-newsletterpromo_article-image=”https://static.scientificamerican.com/sciam/cache/file/4641809D-B8F1-41A3-9E5A87C21ADB2FD8_source.png” data-newsletterpromo_article-button-text=”Sign Up” data-newsletterpromo_article-button-link=”https://www.scientificamerican.com/page/newsletter-sign-up/?origincode=2018_sciam_ArticlePromo_NewsletterSignUp” name=”articleBody” itemprop=”articleBody”> In October 2019 the icebreaker RV Polarstern sat trapped in thick sea ice atop the central Arctic Ocean—the only landmark in a vast expanse of nothingness. Another icebreaker, the Akademik Fedorov, approached it slowly, hauling a load of supplies and personnel. Scientists and crew lined the balconies of each ship, gripping the ice-crusted banisters as they peered across the void. They could see the smiling faces of their colleagues just feet away—but they were two time zones apart. At the North Pole, 24 time zones collide at a single point, rendering them meaningless. It’s simultaneously all of Earth’s time zones and none of them. There are no boundaries of any kind in this abyss, in part because there is no land and no people. The sun rises and sets just once per year, so “time of day” is irrelevant as well. Yet there rests the Polarstern, deliberately locked in ice for a year to measure all aspects of that ice, the ocean beneath it and the sky above. The ship is filled with 100 people from 20 countries, drifting at the mercy of the ice floe, farther from civilization than the International Space Station. I’ve been supporting communications for the mission remotely from landlocked Colorado, where time is stable. My world is a bewildering contrast to the alien one the ship’s scientists are living and working in—where time functions and feels different than anywhere else on the planet. No Time Zones Since the expedition began last September, the Polarstern ‘s time zone has shifted more than a dozen times. When the Akademik Fedorov and Polarstern parked side by side, they were still hours apart. But with no other people within hundreds of miles in all directions and with no cues from the permanently dark sky, the very concept of a time “zone” seemed meaningless. At Earth’s other pole, time zones are quirky but rooted in utility. In Antarctica there is land and dozens of research stations scattered across thousands of square miles. At most stations, permanent buildings house laboratories, living quarters and social spaces. Each mini civilization has adopted its own time zone that corresponds with the home territory that built each place. At the North Pole, it’s all ocean, visited only rarely by an occasional research vessel or a lonely supply ship that strayed from the Northwest Passage. Sea captains choose their own time in the central Arctic. They may maintain the time zones of bordering countries—or they may switch based on ship activities. Sitting here in my grounded office, it is baffling to think about a place where a single human can decide to create an entire time zone at any instant. Last fall the Polarstern captain pushed the time zone back one hour every week, for six weeks, to sync up with incoming Russian ships that follow Moscow time. With each shift, the captain adjusted automatic clocks scattered around the ship. Researchers paused to watch the hands of analog clocks spin eerily backward. And every time the time changed, it jostled the delicate balance of clock-based communication—between instruments deployed on the ice, between researchers onboard, and between them and their families and colleagues on faraway land. No Time If drifting without established time zones isn’t alienating enough for people onboard, add the unsettling reality that there is no time of day either. What we think of as a single day, flanked by sunrise and sunset, happens just once per year around the North Pole. So I can’t help but wonder: Does a single day up North last for months? Is a year just a day long? The Polarstern was engulfed by darkness in October after a three-week-long sunset—just as the other pole saw the first bits of a three-week sunrise after months of black. Once polar night takes over, there is only relentless darkness. Looking out from the ship’s deck, a person sees a horizonless cavity—unless it is dotted by needles of light spouting from the headlamps of a couple of distant human beings at work—an otherworldly scene not unlike being on the moon. Inside the ship is just as bizarre. How can 100 people function if there is no day, no night, no morning, no evening? The voice of the German ship captain blasting over an intercom system is the sound of a wake-up call at 8 A.M.—whenever “8 A.M.” happens to be. People file into the mess hall for meals, held at predetermined intervals. Scientists head out to the ice to check on equipment or meet in laboratories at equally rigid periods. The ship operates like a windup toy, disconnected from the spinning of the planet, which normally dictates time. “Time” is just an operational ritual, intended to create the illusion of regularity. When scientists’ fingers are warm enough, they may occasionally send a limited satellite text to their bustling worlds far away. Communication with friends and colleagues who are in dozens of time zones involves convoluted time conversions—a reminder that the people on the ship are in suspended animation. A fleeting text message is only a momentary connection to a distant existence. Weeks and months blur together. There’s no television, no news, no people passing by. Holidays come and go without festive displays in supermarkets or incessant holiday songs on car radios. The very concept of “December” feels fabricated. Each repetition of the operational rituals between subsequent periods of sleep feels identical, like living the same “day” again and again. The only thing that truly reminds the team that time still ticks forward is data collection. Research instruments dot the frozen landscape around the ship, collecting measurements of the ice, the ocean, the sky—all on Coordinated Universal Time, which is based, ironically, on the position of the sun relative to Earth. The science, however, progresses undisturbed. Data collection has followed its own time since the Polarstern shoved off last September, liberated from the mental whiplash the humans endure. For the people onboard, monitoring the ever progressing data gives them a sense of the forward arrow of time. Otherwise, that sense can only come with facial hair that grows—and with the smell of fresh bread: when the odor wafts through the ship, it must be “Sunday.” When scientists leave the Polarstern, they experience true timelessness. Some instruments are set up miles away on the ice, reachable only by helicopter. It’s so dark during the flights that researchers looking out the window can’t tell how far away the ground—or rather the ice floating on the ocean—is. The helicopter drops them on the surface and takes off again, the sound of whirring blades fading into the distance. Then it’s true silence. All sense of time is irrelevant. Researchers may be huddled together, their headlamps creating a tiny pool of light in the blackness, like astronauts floating in space. Their head is heavily bundled from the cold, so all they hear is the beating of their own heart. That rhythm becomes the only tangible measure to track the passing of time. A polar bear guard stands watch as the researchers work, trying to scan the horizon for danger. The polar bear, the animal that actually patrols the dark, frozen landscape, has no concept of time either. Maybe the bear feels only the pulse of Earth as it spins. What Matters May Be Experience My first of only a few calls from Colorado to the ship involved weeks of planning and trying and failing to connect with a satellite dish up there that could be blown over or buried under snow at any moment. When I finally made a connection, I held my breath and listened to a faint ring, then a long, cold pause. The muffled, husky voice of a Russian radio attendant answered, “RV Polarstern, this is Igor.” A few weeks later I worked to organize a San Francisco–based press conference for the expedition. Our goal: connect journalists with ship-based researchers by phone in real time. Logistics meant connecting with colleagues in five time zones on land while trying to nail down the “time” of a ship that could drift into another time zone at any instant. It felt like throwing darts blindfolded at a moving target. We pulled it off, and soon after I was on a plane home. When the wheels hit the tarmac, I grabbed my phone to text my husband that I had landed safely. When I toggled off airplane mode, I saw the time jump from 8 P.M. to 9 P.M. in an instant. Time is weird everywhere. Maybe time is defined not by numbers or zones or the spinning of Earth—but by what we experience. When I entered my house, I was eagerly greeted by my dogs. I fed them their dinner—their favorite “time” of day. Right about then, researchers on the ship were eating a bowl of warm oats before hitting the ice—”time” to check those instruments again. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.

Which pole is colder?

Really cold, or really, really cold? – Both the Arctic (North Pole) and the Antarctic (South Pole) are very cold because they get very little direct sunlight. The Sun is always low on the horizon, even in the middle of summer. In winter, the Sun is so far below the horizon that it doesn’t come up at all for months at a time.

  • So the days are just like the nights — cold and dark.
  • Even though the North Pole and South Pole are “polar opposites,” they both get the same amount of sunlight.
  • But the South Pole is a lot colder than the North Pole.
  • Why? Well, the poles are polar opposites in other ways too.
  • The Arctic is an ocean surrounded by land.

The Antarctic is land surrounded by ocean. The Arctic is the North Pole, and the South Pole is in Antarctica. The poles are on the top of the Earth, and on the bottom of the Earth, respectively. Based on these maps, you can see that the Arctic is an ocean surrounded by land, while Antarctica is land surrounded by ocean on all sides.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech. The ocean under the Arctic ice is cold, but still warmer than the ice in the glacier Antarctic! So the ocean warms the air a bit. Antarctica is dry — and high. Under all of Antarctica’s ice and snow is land, not ocean. And it has many mountains. The height of the surface is called “elevation” — much of Antarctica’s mountains are very tall and rise super high above sea level.

So, the Antarctic is at a much higher elevation than the Arctic. The average elevation of Antarctica is about 7,500 feet (2.3 kilometers). And the higher you go, the colder it gets. The Antarctic ice is super thick — up to 3 miles thick! The Antarctic ice forms a huge plateau that sits high above sea level. This 3-D topographical view of Antarctica gives an idea of its high elevations and mountains. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech. The main reason that the South Pole is so much colder than the North Pole is because of the strength of the winds blowing around the poles.

Time of year Average (mean) temperature
North Pole South Pole
Summer 32° F (0° C) −18° F (−28.2° C)
Winter −40° F (−40° C) −76° F (−60° C)

Is it always midnight at the North Pole?

Geography – 0:22 Timelapse video of Lapland ‘s midnight sun in Rovaniemi, Finland Because there are no permanent human settlements south of the Antarctic Circle, apart from research stations, the countries and territories whose populations experience midnight sun are limited to those crossed by the Arctic Circle : Canada ( Yukon, Nunavut, and Northwest Territories ), Finland, Greenland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden, and the United States (state of Alaska ).

  1. The largest city in the world north of the Arctic Circle, Murmansk, Russia, experiences midnight sun from 22 May to 22 July (62 days).
  2. A quarter of Finland’s territory lies north of the Arctic Circle, and at the country’s northernmost point the Sun does not set at all for 72 days during summer.
  3. In Svalbard, Norway, the northernmost inhabited region of Europe, there is no sunset from approximately 19 April to 23 August.

The extreme sites are the poles, where the Sun can be continuously visible for half the year. The North Pole has midnight sun for 6 months, from late March to late September.

Does the South Pole have 24 hours of darkness?

How much daylight is there in Antarctica during summer and winter? – As you move closer to the poles, the periods of winter darkness and summer daylight increase. The polar circles (both the Antarctic Circle at 66°34′ S and Arctic Circle at 66°34′ N) mark the latitude beyond which the sun remains completely below the horizon on Midwinter’s Day, and completely above the horizon on Midsummer’s Day.

On Antarctica’s coast, where our stations are located, there are usually a couple of weeks in mid-winter (around 21 June) when the sun does not rise, and a couple of weeks in summer around Christmas when the sun does not set. Compare the graphs below for Mawson and Davis. Davis is located further south than Mawson, so it gets less sunlight hours during winter.

At the poles themselves, the seasonal changes are even more pronounced.24-hour daylight occurs for several months over summer, while in winter there is complete darkness for several months. The diagrams below show how the length of day changes as you travel north, from the South Pole to Dome A, Davis, Mawson, Casey, Macquarie Island, Heard Island, and finally, Kingston in Tasmania.

Is there night at South Pole?

Winter Darkness, Summer Light – The closer you get to the poles, the more extreme the differences in daylight are throughout the year. At the equator there are about 12 hours and 7 minutes a day where the sun is above the horizon throughout the year with a variation of 2 minutes. The equator has the shortest period of twilight before sunrise and after sunset of anywhere on the planet, when the sun rises and sets it does so quickly and the transition from or to full dark night is swift. Twilight – The closer to the poles you get, the longer the twilight period each day which can stretch to several hours. Twilight is defined as being the period where the sun is less than 18 degrees below the horizon, in the summer months in Antarctica, even at midnight, the sun may be less than this amount below the horizon, so the full darkness of night is never reached before the sun starts to come up again.

Snapshots – Each horizontal bar on the charts represents a single day on the 21st of each month and so is a snapshot of that day and not necessarily an average for that month. This is done for the sake of making the data easier to interpret and less cluttered. South Pole – The transition from day to twilight is very quick at the South Pole at the equinoxes.

So while on the 21st of March, the sun is still above the horizon, so there is a whole daylight bar, two days later on the 23rd of March the sun is below the horizon, so there would be a whole twilight bar. Similarly in September the 21st is full daylight while two days earlier on the 19th it would be full twilight.

How do they tell time at the poles?

What time zones are used at the North Pole and South Pole? Asked by: Gary Dineen, Ireland The rotation of the Earth means that time zones are dictated by the lines of longitude connecting the two poles. But at the poles themselves, all these lines converge, meaning that technically the poles are in all the time zones simultaneously.

  1. In practice, polar explorers and scientists simply choose whatever time zone is most convenient.
  2. Those working at McMurdo Station (pictured) in Antarctica, for example, have chosen to use New Zealand local time.
  3. Read more: Subscribe to for fascinating new Q&As every month and follow on Twitter for your daily dose of fun science facts.

: What time zones are used at the North Pole and South Pole?

Is the North Pole dark for 6 months?

6 MONTHS OF DAYLIGHT, 6 MONTHS OF DARKNESS – The Arctic is a region of complete contrast between continuous daylight in summer and the darkness of a seemingly interminable winter. The Arctic Circle is in fact the line that joins all the points where the Sun does not cross the horizon at the solstices: it does not set at all on 21June and does not rise at all on 21 December.

  • The Sun’s unusual position is due to the fact that the Earth’s axis of rotation is inclined rather than perpendicular to the Sun.
  • So “inside the Arctic Circle” is not an abstract notion: it is the geographic zone from where one can experience the fabled “midnight sun”.
  • Once inside the Circle, as you move further north the number of 24-hour nights in winter and 24-hour days in summer gradually increases.

At the North Pole itself, daylight and darkness each last exactly 6 months. An example here is Longyearben in Spitsbergen: the Polar night lasts 3 months (November, December and January) and the continuous daylight lasts 4 months (May-August). The period of continuous daylight is longer because the rays of sunlight curve downwards slightly as they pass through the very cold lower layers of the atmosphere, which means the Sun can still be “seen” even though it is actually below the horizon.

Is there 24 hours of daylight at the North Pole?

Daylight, Darkness and Changing of the Seasons at the North Pole Illustrated with images from the North Pole Web Cam Winter The darkest time of year at the North Pole is the Winter Solstice, approximately December 21. There has been no sunlight or even twilight since early October.

In summertime, the sun is always above the horizon at the North Pole, circling the Pole once every day. It is highest in the sky at the Summer Solstice, after which it moves closer to the horizon, until it sinks below the horizon, at the Fall Equinox.

The North Pole stays in full sunlight all day long throughout the entire summer (unless there are clouds), and this is the reason that the Arctic is called the land of the ” Midnight Sun “*. After the Summer Solstice, the sun starts to sink towards the horizon.

Is North Pole still cold?

June 29, 2023 at 2:40 pm What Time Is It At The North Pole Both the Arctic (North Pole) and the Antarctic (South Pole) are cold because they don’t get any direct sunlight. The sun is always low on the horizon, even in the middle of summer. In winter, the sun is so far below the horizon that it doesn’t come up at all for months at a time.

  • So the days are just like the nights—cold and dark.
  • Even though the North Pole and South Pole are “polar opposites,” they both get the same amount of sunlight.
  • But the South Pole is a lot colder than the North Pole.
  • Why? Well, the Poles are polar opposites in other ways too.
  • The Arctic is ocean surrounded by land.

The Antarctic is land surrounded by ocean. The ocean under the Arctic ice is cold, but still warmer than the ice. So the ocean warms the air a bit. Antarctica is dry—and high. Under the ice and snow is land, not ocean. And it’s got mountains. The average elevation of Antarctica is about 7,500 feet (2.3 km).

  • And the higher you go, the colder it gets.
  • Average (mean) temperature North Pole Summer: 32° F (0° C) Average (mean) temperature South Pole Summer: −18° F (−28.2° C) Average (mean) temperature North Pole Winter: −40° F (−40° C) Average (mean) temperature South Pole Winter: −76° F (−60° C) The Arctic ice is shrinking.

If the ice were on a diet, we would say that it was very successful. But, just as with people on diets, shrinking too much is not healthy. The Arctic ice is shrinking because the ocean under the ice is warming. The warming ocean means Earth’s climate is getting warmer.

Who owns North Pole?

Future – It was stated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change on March 25, 2007, that riches are awaiting the shipping industry due to Arctic climate change, This economic sector could be transformed similar to the way the Middle East was by the Suez Canal in the 19th century. Wikinews has related news: However, much research commentary since 2008 has thrown cold water on narratives that the Arctic will experience a rush for resources that could lead to conflict between states. The potential value of the North Pole and the surrounding area resides not so much in shipping itself but in the possibility that lucrative petroleum and natural gas reserves exist below the sea floor.

  • Such reserves are known to exist under the Barents, Kara, and Beaufort Seas.
  • However, the vast majority of the Arctic known to contain gas and oil resources is already within uncontested EEZs.
  • While these EEZs leave much of the Central Arctic Ocean high seas, Canada, Russia, Denmark (via Greenland), and Norway have all announced extended continental shelf claims that cover almost the entire Arctic seabed.

This would mean that legal rights to oil, gas, and other resources in and on the seabed would belong exclusively to the Arctic coastal states, which would have sole jurisdiction to manage their resources. On September 14, 2007, the European Space Agency reported ice loss had opened up the Northwest Passage “for the first time since records began in 1978”, and the extreme loss in 2007 rendered the passage “fully navigable”.

Further exploration for petroleum reserves elsewhere in the Arctic may now become more feasible, and the passage may become a regular channel of international shipping and commerce if Canada is not able to enforce its claim to it. Foreign Ministers and other officials representing Canada, Denmark, Norway, Russia, and the United States met in Ilulissat, Greenland in May 2008, at the Arctic Ocean Conference and announced the Ilulissat Declaration,

Among other things the declaration stated that any demarcation issues in the Arctic should be resolved on a bilateral basis between contesting parties.

How long is night at the North Pole?

Within the ring of the Arctic Circle is a phenomenon that defies all sense of time – months go by where the sun never rises and the night reigns supreme for week after week. This is the polar night. What is the polar night? The polar night is the term for when night lasts for more than 24 hours inside the polar circles.

In this case, ‘night’ is defined as when the centre of the Sun is below the horizon. Not all latitudes are situated north enough to experience sustained total darkness; instead their brightest moments are levels of polar twilight that occur in the early afternoon before evening approaches and the darkness intensifies.

What causes the polar night? The polar night is caused by the rotation of the earth in relation to the position of the sun. The earth rotates on a titled axis of around 23.5 degrees. As a result of this axial tilt, there are periods of the year where the Arctic Circle and the Antarctic Circle are either completely exposed or obscured from the sun.

When they are obscured it causes the prolonged darkness known as the polar night, while when they are exposed it creates a prolonged period of daylight known as the midnight sun. You can see the axial tilt of the Earth visualised in the image below, as one pole is totally exposed to the sun while the other is completely obscured: How long does the polar night last? The full length of the polar night depends on your latitude.

The average duration for most destinations is around 30 days, but more northerly locations can enjoy as almost two months of darkness. If you were situated at one of the poles this would last for around 11 weeks. Where can I experience the polar night? In Sweden’s most northern city of Kiruna, the polar night lasts for approximately 28 twenty-four-hour periods.

In the Norwegian city of Tromsø, the dark hours can last for up to a month a half. If you visit Hammerfest, both the northernmost city in the world and one of the two oldest towns in Norway, the polar night lasts for almost two months. Experience the polar night for yourself If you would like to experience the polar night for yourself, we are eager to help.

With are expertise, we can create a tailor made holiday package that combines the polar night with many of our destinations’ other exciting sights and sounds – the most popular being the Northern Lights, Take the first step to your dream vacation and contact us,

How long does a day last at the North Pole?

Locations around Earth’s equator only receive about 12 hours of light each day. In contrast, the north pole receives 24 hours of daylight for a few months in the summer and total darkness for months in the winter. These two annual times of light and dark are separated by a long sunrise and a long sunset.

Do the poles have their own time zones?

What time zones are used at the North Pole and South Pole? Asked by: Gary Dineen, Ireland The rotation of the Earth means that time zones are dictated by the lines of longitude connecting the two poles. But at the poles themselves, all these lines converge, meaning that technically the poles are in all the time zones simultaneously.

In practice, polar explorers and scientists simply choose whatever time zone is most convenient. Those working at McMurdo Station (pictured) in Antarctica, for example, have chosen to use New Zealand local time. Read more: Subscribe to for fascinating new Q&As every month and follow on Twitter for your daily dose of fun science facts.

: What time zones are used at the North Pole and South Pole?

Is it always midnight at the North Pole?

Geography – 0:22 Timelapse video of Lapland ‘s midnight sun in Rovaniemi, Finland Because there are no permanent human settlements south of the Antarctic Circle, apart from research stations, the countries and territories whose populations experience midnight sun are limited to those crossed by the Arctic Circle : Canada ( Yukon, Nunavut, and Northwest Territories ), Finland, Greenland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden, and the United States (state of Alaska ).

The largest city in the world north of the Arctic Circle, Murmansk, Russia, experiences midnight sun from 22 May to 22 July (62 days). A quarter of Finland’s territory lies north of the Arctic Circle, and at the country’s northernmost point the Sun does not set at all for 72 days during summer. In Svalbard, Norway, the northernmost inhabited region of Europe, there is no sunset from approximately 19 April to 23 August.

The extreme sites are the poles, where the Sun can be continuously visible for half the year. The North Pole has midnight sun for 6 months, from late March to late September.

Why is the North Pole not on maps?

In addition, the North Pole is a floating ice cap, so there is no fixed location to map. This makes it even more difficult to show the North Pole accurately on Google Maps.