What Time Is Happy Valley On?

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What Time Is Happy Valley On

What time is the Happy Valley on?

In what is a throwback to how TV used to be, Happy Valley is shown every Sunday night at 9pm. The traditional broadcasting method seems to have worked for the BBC, as the show has pulled in huge audiences and kept the nation in tenterhooks.

What channel is Happy Valley on tonight?

BBC One – Happy Valley.

Is Happy Valley on for 2 hours tonight?

What time is Happy Valley’s final episode on? – Happy Valley’s final episode will air at 9pm on Sunday, February 5 on BBC One. The finale will be slightly longer than the previous episodes of this series, at an hour and ten minutes rather than just an hour.

What time did Happy Valley start?

When does Happy Valley start? – The first episode will be shown on Sunday, January 1, on BBC One at 9pm and on BBC iPlayer. Happy Valley won’t be released as a box set, but will instead be shown weekly.

What time is Happy Valley on in the UK?

How many Happy Valley episodes are there? – Season 3 has six episodes, which are being released weekly on Sundays at 9pm on BBC One and BBC iPlayer. The finale will air on Sunday, 5 February. Season 3 won’t be available to binge until the series concludes, meaning we’ll all have to watch the series the old-fashioned way together on Sunday evenings.

Is Happy Valley on every night?

Viewers are delighted that BBC One drama Happy Valley is returning. Starring Sarah Lancashire in the lead role of Catherine Cawood it has been almost seven years since the drama was last aired in 2016. The drama will return to BBC One at 9pm on Sunday, January 1.

The show will be aired weekly and will not be dropped as a box set onto BBC iPlayer, meaning fans will have to wait each week to watch more. Happy Valley will air episode two on Sunday, January 8 and the show is expected to remain in the same slot on Sundays at 9pm on BBC One throughout. There will be six episodes in the series each an hour long.

READ MORE: The Doctor Who fallout which led to Christopher Eccleston leaving the series after just a year as Time Lord Sally Wainwright, the writer, creator and executive producer of the show explained the show was always only ever going to be three series long.

  1. She said: “The intention developed through conversations I had with Sarah to make it a three-parter, to make a trilogy.
  2. We always said this would be the final season and it is very definitely the final season.” Series three will see Catherine once again come face to face with Tommy the man who raped Catherine’s daughter and the man Catherine places as responsible for her daughter’s suicide.

Tommy’s increasingly complicated relationship with his son and Catherine’s grandson Ryan will also be a focus of the plot and you can read everything you need to know about Happy Valley series three here. Elsewhere Catherine is still battling the drug problem that is rife in Calder Valley, where Catherine lives and works, as she nears retirement.

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Is Happy Valley only on BBC?

Where to watch Happy Valley online – What Time Is Happy Valley On Sarah Lancashire as Catherine Cawood in Happy Valley. Credit: BBC/Lookout Point/Matt Squire Happy Valley season 3 is available to watch on BBC iPlayer, All episodes became available to watch on the platform after they aired on BBC One. All episodes from the previous seasons are available to stream, too.

Is Happy Valley on BBC?

BBC One – Happy Valley – Available now.

Is Happy Valley on Netflix now?

You can no longer watch Happy Valley on Netflix, season 1 and 2 of the crime drama were previously on the streaming platform but were removed in March 2020.

What time is Happy Valley on on BBC One on a sunday?

Happy Valley will come to an end for good on Sunday, February 5. After three seasons and a six-year hiatus the police drama starring Sarah Lancashire as Catherine Cawood, James Norton as Tommy Lee Royce and Siobhan Finneran as Clare Cartwright, will officially say goodbye to its fans.

Whatever fills the police drama’s spot on BBC One at 9pm on Sunday nights has big boots to fill given the outpouring of love Happy Valley, written by Sally Wainwright, has received since it kicked off on New Year’s Day. And it looks like fans of BBC drama and thrillers are in for a treat, as bosses have confirmed what will air in the 9pm slot on Sunday, February 12.

The Gold is the brand new drama attempting to fill the hole Happy Valley will no doubt leave behind. It has a star-studded cast list including Hugh Bonneville (Downton Abbey, Paddington 1 and 2), Jack Lowden (Small Axe: Mangrove, Slow Horses), Dominic Cooper (The Preacher, The Devil’s Double), Charlotte Spencer (The Duke, Cinderella), and Tom Cullen (Becoming Elizabeth, Black Mirror).

Read more: All the unmissable dramas coming to ITV, BBC, Channel 5 and Netflix in February 2023 BBC’s The Gold has been described as a pulsating dramatisation of a true story in 1983 which saw six armed men break into the Brink’s-Mat security depot near London’s Heathrow Airport where they inadvertently stumbled across gold bullion worth £26m.

A synopsis for the new series reads: “On the 26 th November 1983, six armed men broke into the Brink’s-Mat security depot near London’s Heathrow Airport, and inadvertently stumbled across gold bullion worth £26m. What started as ‘a typical Old Kent Road armed robbery’ according to detectives at the time, became a seminal event in British criminal history, remarkable not only for the scale of the theft – at the time the biggest in global history – but for its wider legacy.

  1. The disposal of the bullion caused the birth of large-scale international money laundering, provided the dirty money that helped fuel the London Docklands property boom, united blue and white collar criminals and left controversy and murder in its wake.
  2. Inspired by extensive research and interviews with some of those involved in the events, The Gold is a pulsating dramatisation which takes a journey into a 1980s world awash with cheap money and loosened morals to tell this extraordinary and epic story for the first time in its entirety.” For more showbiz and television stories get our newsletter here,

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Is that the end of Happy Valley?

How Sally Wainwright’s series evolved from police procedural to psychological study of Catherine Cawood. – What Time Is Happy Valley On “It was always meant to be a psychological portrait of Catherine and the secrets that we never tell.” Photo: Matt Squire/Lookout Point/AMC What Time Is Happy Valley On “It was always meant to be a psychological portrait of Catherine and the secrets that we never tell.” Photo: Matt Squire/Lookout Point/AMC Happy Valley was a show with a lot of cops, bad guys galore, and a lead character who appears on the key artwork in her cop uniform.

A police sergeant in the windy Yorkshire dales, where the accents are strong and the women are stronger, Catherine Cawood takes her job seriously and chasing bad guys even more seriously. But Happy Valley was never a cop show in the eyes of creator Sally Wainwright. “It was always meant to be a psychological portrait of Catherine and the secrets that we never tell,” says the prolific British television writer.

“It’s about her, and she just happens to be a cop.” Played for three seasons by Sarah Lancashire — who recently crossed over to American TV stardom with her near-perfect take on Julia Child in Julia — Catherine Cawood is the kind of blunt, no-b.s. woman who seems like she could simultaneously read you your Miranda rights while teaching you to tie your shoes.

  1. She’s divorced but still friends with her ex-husband, cohabitates with her ex-junkie sister, and is the sole guardian of her grandson, Ryan (Rhys Connah), whose mother killed herself due to postpartum depression stemming from the rape that impregnated her.
  2. In the first episode, Ryan’s biological father, Tommy Lee Royce (James Norton), is released from jail, kicking off a three-season obsession between Tommy and Catherine, both blaming the other for their lot in life.

The characters and crimes orbiting Catherine and Tommy certainly make for binge-worthy television, but it is the push-pull of their central struggle that kept audiences hooked through a near-decade gap between the show’s premiere on BBC One in April 2014 and the recently aired finale of the third and final season (or “series,” for Brits like Wainwright).

In that time, Happy Valley won Best Drama Series, and Wainwright won Best Writer: Drama, for both seasons one and two at the BAFTA Television Awards. Wainwright has spent the last 20-plus years creating beloved British television like At Home With the Braithwaites, Jane Hall, Unforgiven, Last Tango in Halifax (in which Lancashire also stars as essentially the polar opposite of Catherine), and Gentleman Jack, the HBO co-production about 19th-century Yorkshire landowner, diarist, and open lesbian Anne Lister.

And despite an ambivalence toward cop shows — “I am personally a bit critical of just how many cop shows get green-lit. I think it’s a bit unimaginative and a bit lazy of the commissioners” — she also created a classic police procedural in Scott & Bailey, starring Gentleman Jack ‘s Suranne Jones (clearly, she has her favorite performers) and Lesley Sharp as two Manchester police detectives.

  • Some of those series overlapped with Happy Valley ‘s run, which Wainwright points to as the primary reason for the delay between the second and third, final season.
  • But reflecting on the show’s ending, she says that the prolonged buildup to Catherine and Tommy’s final confrontation turned out to be “the only way we could have done it.” This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

It contains plot details about all three seasons of Happy Valley and spoilers for the finale episode, which is now streaming on AMC+ and Acorn TV, Happy Valley didn’t get its third and final season until seven years after its second, and even the first and second seasons had a two-year gap in between.

Why the long pauses? It was purely to do with other work. When I was writing Happy Valley, I was also writing Last Tango in Halifax, so they were going out in tandem and I can’t remember exactly, but I suspect I had to write a whole series of Last Tango before I could go back to Happy Valley series two.

And then Gentleman Jack got green-lit and that was incredibly hard work. Also, I always wanted time to elapse for the character of Ryan. I didn’t want to recast Rhys Connah. It always amazes me that other shows can turn over series so quickly, and I think it shows sometimes in the lack of quality.

So, I wanted to do it justice, do it properly, and I wanted to write it myself. Was no one rushing you? No, because all the people I was working with, the BBC, knew that I wanted to tell the story of what happened when Ryan was old enough to have enough agency to go and see Tommy in jail by himself, which he couldn’t do under the age of 16.

Had you told Rhys this was always the plan, back when he was 10 years old? It was always communicated to everyone pretty clearly. But it wasn’t just me, Sarah and James were both very busy. We had to plan really carefully in advance when we could get the scripts ready and when Sarah and James would have availability to shoot the thing.

And they were both very keen to come back and finish it off, which was lucky because their careers have both just gone stellar. It was all a bit of a no-brainer; it’s odd to be asked, “Why did you do something so unusual?” For me that was the only way we could have done it, really. Photo: Matt Squire/Lookout Point/AMC When did you conceive of the final season, then, and how everything would go down? I think I had a broad plan that there would be some big confrontation between Catherine and Tommy, but I didn’t really address the minutiae of it until I sat down to start constructing that final series.

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But you always knew that it was only three seasons? Yeah. When we were filming series two, me and Sarah talked really clearly about just doing one more series and it being a really definite finale. We wanted the impact that it’s had because we’ve been really clear that it’s the end rather than drag onto four and five series and become a pale shadow of itself.

  • I guess then you run the risk of it becoming more of a police-procedural show, which I believe is something you wanted to avoid.
  • It was always kind of meant to be a psychological portrait of Catherine and the secrets that we never tell.
  • It’s about her and she just happens to be a cop rather than it being a cop show.

That being said, Happy Valley was your second drama with police in it after Scott & Bailey, Of course, you’ve written about plenty of other topics, but is there something about cops that interests you in particular? No, not really. I mean, I am interested in that I’ve worked really closely with police officers on both shows and it is genuinely interesting, but I get a bit weary of how much cop drama there is on television.

  1. It’s like, If in doubt, put some cops in, because people will watch cops, and I think it’s a bit lazy.
  2. I was quite pleased that I hadn’t written a cop show right up until Scott & Bailey, and then Scott & Bailey got a massive audience and I thought, Oh yeah, it’s cops,
  3. When I was working on the first series of Happy Valley, it was meant to be a bit more of a cop show.

The original concept was that there’d be ongoing crimes every week, the story of the week. And in practice, when I actually sat down and wrote it, that first concept went out the window because the story with Catherine and Tommy just took over completely.

There are so few shows out there about women over a certain age, and yet that’s your primary source of material. Is this a case of writing what you know or something else? When I look at the pattern of the way I’ve written through my life, I tend to write about women the same age as myself. I think it’s just me reflecting my perceptions of life as I’m experiencing them.

The thing I’m writing at the moment is about women of a certain age and menopause. I mean, there’s another aspect to it that’s quite a lot more funky than that, but it’s not been announced yet so I probably shouldn’t really be talking about it. But certainly it’s full of stuff that I get angry about at the moment, about things that I’ve observed as a woman of 59 now, how you are observed as you get older, the way you’re treated as you get older, the things that happen to you when you get older.

  • You’ve said that your female characters arrive “fully formed” in your imagination.
  • Can you break that down as it pertains to Catherine Cawood? Catherine did come pretty fully formed, not least because I had Sarah in mind to play her, and very early on she agreed to do it.
  • It always helps if I’ve got somebody in my mind — I can hear their voice, I know what they look like, I know what their mannerisms are.

I was also working closely with Lisa Farrand, who was my police adviser on Happy Valley, She was Catherine Cawood. She’s been a constable in West Yorkshire, and we’d known each other since we were 6, so we had a really easy dialogue all the time, which massively informed the character of Catherine and the show.

  • So, constructing Catherine was never a battle; she was just kind of there.
  • There’s also a bit of hero worship for me, too.
  • Catherine is someone I’d like to be and who I never could be because I’m just not like that.
  • It’s like creating your fantasy heroine but still, everything has to be very grounded or it just doesn’t work.

She’s like a Marvel hero, but an everyday Marvel hero. What’s been Lisa’s reaction to seeing herself portrayed through Catherine onscreen? I think she enjoys being involved in TV because she retired around the same time we began developing the show and it kind of gave her a new lease on life.

  1. She loves being on the set and is very useful and helpful.
  2. I think she gets a lot out of it and puts a lot into it.
  3. She’s a huge part of the creation of the show.
  4. Was she there through the end of filming? She doesn’t come on set every day.
  5. She comes on whenever we’re doing any police-work stuff, making sure that everything looks as correct as it can look.

Even things like interview strategies. We also had a detective adviser, Janet Hudson, who was a retired detective chief superintendent. She came in to help with the interview techniques when the detectives interview Tommy in series three. Let’s talk about the last episode in some detail.

  • When Tommy is sitting in Catherine’s living room crying and looking at the photo album, was that a point to humanize him a bit? We did quite a lot of research about psychopaths, and the thing about psychopaths is that they are capable of feeling affection for their own children.
  • I talked to Gwen Adshead, who’s a very well-respected criminal psychologist, and she said that on the grand scale of things, Tommy isn’t that bad as a psychopath.

So it was credible that Ryan is a good thing in his life. It was always a bit scary that that could become sentimental, and I really didn’t want it to be sentimental. But at the same time, I wanted to try and find some sympathy for Tommy. He is in a bit of a fix by the end, with his damaged hands, and he’s now murdered a lot of other people; there’s not going to be a good way out for him at that stage in the drama.

  • Photo: Matt Squire/Lookout Point/AMC What I wanted to do, dramatically, was to make the audience as sympathetic as they could be without spoiling his character and suddenly making him a nice guy.
  • And I wanted to push it with Catherine and make her as tough and obnoxious as I could.
  • To really invert the dynamic.

I mean, she is tough all the way through, and difficult to like at times, but I suppose I never want to make any characters black-and-white. It was trying to get into those gray areas where good people behave badly and bad people occasionally behave well.

  • That final scene between Catherine and Tommy in the kitchen, what did you want to happen in that moment for both of them? It was quite a tough scene to write because, again, it was that balance of not ever allowing it to become sentimental, never allowing us to be too soft on Tommy.
  • I had Sarah read the first draft of that scene and she came back with some notes which were really helpful.

And I did change it based on what she said. What was something she gave a note on? I can’t remember anything specific because she came up to my house, it was like two days before Christmas, and we just spent all day talking about it. It wasn’t specific notes, it was more just a broad conversation about everything.

  • And she was really helpful.
  • The script didn’t change massively, it was quite subtle tonal stuff.
  • Again, it was about getting the balance as right as we could.
  • But back to what I was trying to achieve with the scene: What I wanted above all things was for the audience to go away feeling that it wasn’t an anti-climax, that we delivered, that it was a worthy culmination of a three-part series.

Often, a show is successful and then you build to a climax and then the climax is a damp squib because you want to go on and do more. But I wanted it to have a definite climactic, cathartic ending. But the gumption of him to say to Catherine, “I forgive you” — I would’ve lit him on fire myself! Well, he thinks she’s ruined his life in the same way that she thinks he’s ruined hers.

As a psychopath, he doesn’t really think much outside himself. And he couldn’t get over the fact that he didn’t know he had a son. It’s such a shock to him in series one when he realizes he’s got a child that is 8 years old, and he never even knew him. Catherine was already obsessed with him because of what he did to her daughter, but it’s not until that point in series one that Tommy became as obsessed and as angry with Catherine for not letting him know he had a child.

The line that always makes me laugh when I watch that scene is — and it’s the way James delivered it — when he says, “You’re just not very bright.” Exactly. There are those awkward, almost silly moments during such a serious scene. I suspect more times like that are a bit absurd.

  • It’s the kind of banal, sordid reality of life.
  • When he finally lights the match and sets himself on fire, Catherine seems to watch him burn, to let it happen, if just for a moment.
  • Is that true or am I misinterpreting that? She’s seen a tiny chink of something in him that wasn’t just as bad as she thought.

A tiny, tiny chink. And in that moment, she just wants to do the right thing. Because that’s what cops are like, at least the women cops I know — it’s so ingrained in them to do the right thing not because they’re cops, but because that’s the kind of women they are.

The women I know who have become cops, they would bend over backwards to do the right thing, even if it went against their own interests. I think it’s a bit of a battle for her. And of course, it was meant to mirror the end of series one where she refuses to let him die and insists on putting the fire out because she doesn’t want him to get off easy by dying, she wants him to suffer.

But in that last scene, she wanted to save him. She did want to save him. Happy Valley Was Never a Cop Show

Where is Happy Valley aired?

Happy Valley is back for a third and final series and has already garnered much praise from viewers. The last instalment of the BBC crime drama, created and written by Sally Wainwright, returned on New Year’s Day after an almost seven-year break. During the first episode of the new series, Sarah Lancashire’s character Sergeant Catherine Cawood discovered the remains of a gangland murder victim in a drained reservoir.

The gruesome find sparked a chain of events which lead back to her former nemesis and the father of her grandson Ryan: Tommy Lee Royce. Fans of the popular show might recognise the show’s backdrop but where exactly is it set ? Read more: Happy Valley series three precise filming locations, streets and police station As TV writer Sally Wainwright was born in Huddersfield and brought up in Sowerby Bridge, it is perhaps unsurprising that Happy Valley is set in Yorkshire.

The majority of the BBC show, which first aired in 2014, was filmed in Calder Valley which encompasses picturesque and charming towns such as Todmorden, Hebden Bridge and Sowerby Bridge. Filming for the latest series started in January 2022 in the market town Halifax and crews were also spotted in Boothtown and Hebden Bridge, Former Sowerby Bridge Police Station and Park Wood Crematorium in Elland also served as filmsets. Both series one and two won the Baftas for drama series and writing, while Sarah Lancashire won the leading actress prize for the second series. Happy Valley airs weekly on Sundays at 9pm on BBC One and BBC iPlayer. The final episode will air on Sunday, February 5. Read next:

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What time is Happy Valley on tomorrow?

Happy Valley season 3 release schedule The show will air weekly at 9pm on Sundays on BBC One and is not being released as a boxset.

Is Happy Valley worth watching?

Happy Valley is the best show on TV What Time Is Happy Valley On BBC Ever get the feeling, as you contemplate the superabundance of content competing for your frazzled eyeballs, that your critical faculties, such as they were, have become so blunted by overexposure to mediocre middlebrow so-called prestige TV that you have lost any sense of what is worth watching (not much) and what’s not (everything else)? The symptoms of this condition are not merely passive acceptance of any based-on-a-true-story bollocks the streamers barf all over your sofa — although that particular raising of the white flag is bad enough — but, crazily, palpable excitement over the prospect of yet another bleed-the-IP-dry Marvel offshoot, or an interminable overbudgeted Tolkien spin-off, or a hyperextended adaptation of a true crime podcast, or one of those hysterical docudramas about a tech wunderkind who — surprise! — turned out to be a colossal shyster, or even a nine part series based on a zombie video game.

  1. See my colleague Henry Wong’s not entirely obliging ) It happens to all of us, in the end, this surrender to the lame and undeserving, such is the insidious cultural dominance of Netflix, Disney, Apple, Amazon and the rest.
  2. The so-called golden age of TV (meaning American TV) is now entering its third decade, and its glow is more than a little tarnished.

We started out with the Sopranos and Six Feet Under, and we’ve ended up settling for another series of Euphoria, a grotty teen skin flick bafflingly received as a coruscating insight into the lives of Gen Z American hotties. Admit it, it’s got so bad you’ve even considered giving Severance a go.

  • Don’t do it! Help is at hand! Because over on BBC1, on Sunday nights, one of the great screen performances of modern times is playing out, in gripping hour-long episodes that reveal the stuff the streamers produce as the meretricious codswallop it really is.
  • The third series of Sally Wainwright’s Happy Valley, starring the monumental Sarah Lancashire as Yorkshire police officer Catherine Cawood, is better than anything HBO or FX or AMC or any of the streamers has produced in a decade.
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I want you to know that this is not an opinion. It is an established scientific fact, arrived at by a long and painful series of rigorously controlled viewing experiments conducted by me over the past few months. Here’s how I got there, and how you can, too: an unfailing remedy for the thickheadedness caused by the overconsumption of boring TV, an instant corrective to the this-shit’ll-do-for-fifty-minutes-and-then-I’ll slope-off to-bed approach to modern leisure time.

  • Once you could have slipped a disc in your DVD to escape the noise.
  • Now, you must slip a disc in your back, as I did last summer.
  • Go for the lower back, ideally the disc between L5 and S1 (don’t worry, your chiropractor can point these out to you), to ensure it’s pushing as hard as possible on your sciatic nerve.

Now see what your patience for pleased-with-itself imported genre television is like. See what your patience for anything is like, but especially cynical pop trash masquerading as — do us a favour — art, For convenience, let’s call this the Slipped Disc Test, the ultimate arbiter of quality in drama, comedy, documentary, whatever.

The question: can a TV show be so involving, so compelling, so enjoyable that your correspondent (me) is able, for the duration of an episode, to forget the insistent stabbing pains shooting down his left leg, from hip to heel, and surrender to the story on screen? In common with most people, though perhaps less willingly, I watched a fair amount of TV over Christmas and the New Year.

In order to do this I had to either lie flat on my back on the living room floor, or stand up straight, hovering in the doorway like a child who’s supposed to be in bed. Sitting for longer than about ten minutes is, at the present time, completely out of the question.

  • You might as well suggest I watch Andor (please) standing on my head.
  • Or complete the entirety of Monster: The Jeffrey Dahmer Story (yuck) while swinging from a trapeze.
  • It’s just not going to happen.
  • Some shows I watched performed tolerably well on the Slipped Disc Test.
  • There’s an excellent dramedy on Disney + called Reservation Dogs (see what they did there?), following the lives of a group of teens and their families on a Native American reservation in Oklahoma.

It is funny and sweet and nicely observed and it grants entrée to a world and its rituals that I know nothing about — but am persuaded, by the strength of the writing and performances, is authentically depicted. (It must be a good show for me to tolerate it, because it numbers among its creatives the writer-director Taika Waititi, who made JoJo Rabbit, which I believe to be hands down the worst film of the twenty-first century so far.) In the case of Reservation Dogs, I find myself able to stand through an entire episode (around 40 minutes) without wincing, moaning, or wandering off to the kitchen in search of snacks.

The second series of Slow Horses, on Apple, also had me periodically enthralled. The acting was uniformly terrific — especially Gary Oldman, clearly having the time of his life — but the show felt overplotted and after a while, what with my condition, I became confused by events, and then my interest drained away.

I started doing stretching exercises and making pained noises and was told, in no uncertain terms, to “do one”, because I was spoiling it for others. My children happily gorged on Wednesday, on Netflix, and the scenes I saw were, indeed, delicious. But as someone who is unlikely, even when and if I recover full use of my legs, to take part in sped-up Tik-Tok dance crazes, I felt like I should leave the kids to their indulgence.

Every other moment of festive season TV was agony, Prince Harry worst of all: you don’t need a slipped disc in your lower back to recognise a right royal pain in the arse. But one show transported me, with the instantaneous effect of an anaesthetic shot straight into the bloodstream, to a place of no pain.

It leapt the Bad Back Barrier and aced the Slipped Disc Test. That show is Happy Valley. What Time Is Happy Valley On BBC There is, and has long been, a belief endemic to supposedly sophisticated British people that automatically assumes that American TV beats homegrown TV, every time. That’s why all the po-faced, high-concept, megabucks American dramas get the awards and the attention and the social likes and become the subject of what passes for watercooler chat in the age of Zoom and WFH.

  • Even in 2023, in the face of mounting evidence to the contrary (did I mention Euphoria ?), mainstream American culture, with its sexily glamorous sheen, can persuade us that it is somehow better, simply by virtue of its Americanness, than anything we make here.
  • This misapprehension pertains still, despite our latter-day embrace of Scandi noir and French comedies and Italian thrillers, and even the occasional British effort.

( It’s A Sin, the best TV show of 2022, and Top Boy, the second-best TV show of 2022.) I, too, have felt this cultural cringe. Initially it caused me to overlook Happy Valley, the first series of which aired in 2014. (Stupid, stupid me.) Happy Valley is not glamorous.

  • There are no Oscar-winning stars slumming it because the movie studios don’t make ‘em like they used to.
  • It is not set among gorgeous rich people in New York or California.
  • It does not spark fashion trends, or digital memes.
  • You won’t know or care who its lead actors are shagging, IRL.
  • Zendaya isn’t in it.

(Well, she’s not in it yet, At the time of writing we are only three episodes into the third and final season. Maybe Zendaya will pop up towards the end, wrapping fish in a chippy? She should be so lucky.) Happy Valley — the title is ironic— is a crime drama set in contemporary Yorkshire.

If it had been set in contemporary America — somewhere gritty in the Appalachian Rust Belt — it would have starred Nicole Kidman, looking weary and yet still somehow impeccable, and been precisely 43 per cent less interesting, and 78 per cent more acclaimed. Besides the marvellous Lancashire (she’s actually from Oldham) it stars Siobhan Finneran, as Sgt Cawood’s recovering alcoholic sister, and James Norton, in the role that made his name, as a terrifying psychopath, James Lee Royce, ex-husband of Cawood’s dead daughter, and father of her grandson, Ryan (Rhys Connah, excellent throughout).

I first saw Happy Valley on a long-haul flight a few years ago, only persuaded to do so by the paucity of good movies on offer. I watched season one on the way out, and season two on the way back. Both flights, erm, flew by. They were clearly more memorable than the trip, which I have otherwise forgotten.

The show is generic, in that it’s about a dedicated and professional police officer, hard as gravel on the outside, soft as snow within, whose private life is as messy and occasionally as tormented as those of the people who she encounters in her work. Nothing new there. It is a melodrama, with numerous twisty subplots, many of which would be lurid enough to strain credulity had we not all heard of equally horrifying stories on the news.

In the new series we have already encountered prescription drug abuse, domestic violence and coercion, organised crime, and murder. Happy Valley is about secrets and lies, the things people hide as much as those they show. It’s about small lives, and big themes. Happy Valley is distinguished by the harsh beauty of its setting, the bone-dry wit of Wainwright’s writing, the believability of her characters and their complicated and nuanced relationships, a fantastic ensemble cast — but most of all, it’s distinguished by Lancashire’s performance.

  • Happy Valley is really very good indeed when she’s not on screen, and on another level when she is.
  • Her Catherine Cawood is magnificent, a truly formidable person, brilliantly and movingly realised.
  • Grief-stricken, guilt-ridden, furiously angry, she is nevertheless altogether admirable.
  • No one suffers fools gladly, that’s a silly phrase, but Cawood’s stern, unforgiving demeanour, her penetrating stare, her brusque, no-nonsense but unfailingly compassionate attitude, her selflessness, her intelligence and her humanity: all of this Lancashire conveys without seeming to do anything but go about Cawood’s business, occasionally stopping dead still and staring silently into space.

It is a performance of immense subtlety, with tiny, almost imperceptible tells signalling huge emotional shifts. Few actors can achieve so much while appearing to do so little. I bow to no slavering fanboy in my admiration for Kate Winslet, rightly lauded for her performance as a middle aged cop on the edge in last year’s Mare of Easttown, but here Lancashire proves her equal.

  1. Winslet, we all agree, is in the front rank of screen actors, right up there with Meryl Streep and Cate Blanchett and the other great stars of the day.
  2. These are the actors who work with the biggest names in Hollywood, on the chewiest parts, and take home the Oscars for their pains.
  3. Lancashire, as British viewers of a certain age will know, is still most famous for her breakout role, as Raquel, the dizzy barmaid, on Coronation Street, from the late Eighties on.

Since then, she has worked steadily and successfully on terrestrial TV. She is a household name, an OBE, a stalwart of quality British drama. She’s unlikely to get the lead in a Hollywood blockbuster now — she’s 58, and she doesn’t appear to have taken steps to make herself look 38 — and you so probably won’t see her picking up an Academy Award anytime soon.

  1. But who needs it? This her moment of triumph.
  2. This is her towering performance.
  3. Take it from me: you don’t want to miss it.
  4. Or don’t take it from me, take it from the Slipped Disc Test.
  5. Happy Valley is the best thing on telly, by a country mile.
  6. Hips don’t lie.
  7. Happy Valley continues on BBC1 this Sunday and on iPlayer now.

: Happy Valley is the best show on TV

Why is Happy Valley so good?

James Norton, who plays Tommy Lee Royce in the series, said: ‘Happy Valley is a must-see because you have one of the best writers in the world, at the top of her game. You have Sarah Lancashire, also an absolute legend in our industry, giving the performance of her life. An amazing cast, Siobhan Finneran and others.

Can I watch Happy Valley outside UK?

Why do we need VPN to Watch Happy Valley Season 3 in Outside UK? – You will need a VPN to watch BBC Happy Valley series 3 outside UK as the series will premiere on BBC iPlayer, BBC iPlayer is a UK-only platform and is only available there, so you will need a VPN to watch it. What Time Is Happy Valley On BBC iPlayer restricts its services to users Outside UK due to licensing restrictions. Where can I watch Season 3 of Happy Valley? If you are outside UK, use a VPN like ExpressVPN to change your location to the UK and unblock the platform to watch BBC iPlayer Happy Valley season 3.

Why is it called Happy Valley UK?

(Photo: Acorn TV) There’s not long to wait – Happy Valley ‘s third and final season is due to premiere on BBC America, AMC+, and Acorn TV in May. But in the meantime, you can watch the thrilling first season on Acorn TV from Monday, March 13. It’s a gripping and profoundly emotive six-parter that introduces us to no-nonsense Yorkshire cop Sergeant Catherine Cawood ( Sarah Lancashire ), her troubled sister Clare ( Siobhan Finneran ), her innocent grandson Ryan ( Rhys Connah ), and of course her terrifying criminal nemesis Tommy Lee Royce ( James Norton ).

To whet your appetite, here are some things you may not know about the zeitgeist-grabbing crime series created by Sally Wainwright,1. The show’s title comes from a local nickname for Calder Valley, where it is set and largely filmed. Wainwright was born in Huddersfield and raised in nearby Sowerby Bridge, which are both locations featured in the series.

“I always work closely with police advisors, who are old police officers who have worked in the area, and one of them told me that is what they call the Valley because of issues with drugs,” the creator explained earlier his year. “For me, it reflected the show.

It’s dark, but it has also got a lot of humor.” 2. Wainwright has hailed two other TV series as a particular inspiration. Namely: Juliet Bravo, a 1980s BBC drama about a female police inspector, and Nurse Jackie, the US dramedy in which Edie Falco stars as high-functioning New York City nurse Jackie Peyton.

” Nurse Jackie had a profound effect on me and I wanted to create my own Jackie Peyton, by turning her into a police officer,” Wainwright told Radio Times, “There was also a 2009 documentary called Shed Your Tears and Walk Away by Jez Lewis, about the drug and alcohol culture in Hebden Bridge among a certain age group.

It’s really heart-breaking but brilliant. I got the cast to watch it before we started filming season one. It helped set the tone for what we were trying to achieve.” 3. The song used at the beginning and end of every episode is “Trouble Town” by Jake Bugg. Bugg first released this evocative bluesy rock song in 2012, a couple of years before Happy Valley premiered.4.

Wainwright wrote Catherine Cawood with Sarah Lancashire in mind. The two women had previously worked together on Last Tango in Halifax, a lighter Yorkshire-set series co-starring Nicola Walker, Derek Jacobi, and Anne Reid, “I knew I wanted to write something else for Sarah after Last Tango in Halifax, because she was so fantastic in it.

  • And we are more or less the same age,” Wainwright told GQ,
  • When people get older, they just have more stuff going on in their lives, they have more life experience, more personality, and more skeletons in their closets.” 5.
  • Playing Tommy Lee Royce has literally given Norton nightmares in the past.
  • The actor spoke about the mental toll of playing his malevolent Happy Valley character at a recent screening event, saying : “I do remember from the first series, I had really violent scenes.
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It was written and filmed much darker, and I would spend ages beating her up. It goes into your subconscious and somehow it emerges in your dreams.” 6. Lancashire and Siobhan Finneran have known each other for more than 40 years. And they definitely get along well in real life.

“We first met when I was 17,” Finneran told The Guardian, “She’s a couple of years older and was doing this brilliant theater studies course at Oldham College, which I’d applied to. Sarah and some other students performed at the open day. We met then and eventually did a play together. We’ve both got a slightly warped sense of humor and we both like a cake.

It’s always a joy to work with another actress who actually eats cake.” 7. Rhys Connah had never acted on screen before he landed the role of Ryan. Despite his inexperience, Wainwright has said he was the “only actor” who could play Catherine’s grandson.

I had never auditioned for anything before and I didn’t get the full script, because I was nine and it’s very violent,” Connah told GQ, “I remember reading two different scenes and I didn’t think anything of it until a few weeks later when I got the call saying they wanted me for it. Then I remember being on set and having to be told directly: ‘Don’t look at the camera!'” 8.

The show has some very famous fans. Wainwright has revealed that Amy Schumer sent her a message raving about Happy Valley, And Norton told The Big Issue : “Apparently Bob Dylan ‘s a massive fan. It’s mad, isn’t it? I love that Bob Dylan is watching this show.” 9. What Time Is Happy Valley On (Photo: @grappolohuddersfield / Instagram) 10. After wrapping the season finale, Lancashire gave candles to the entire cast and crew. But not just any candle – a special candle that she made in collaboration with local company Yorkshire Soap. Sharing a photo of “The Happy Valley Trilogy” candle on Twitter, the company added : “During this time she donated to us the police hat and shoulder numbers from season 3 that went on to raise an amazing £4,500 ($5,400) at a charity event organized by The Halifax Ukrainian Club.” Fans of the show can buy the candle, too, with all profits going to a hospice chosen by Lancashire and Wainwright. What Time Is Happy Valley On (Photo: @yorkshiresoap / Twitter) Are you looking forward to returning to Happy Valley ?

Is Happy Valley on Prime UK?

Watch Happy Valley, Series 3 | Prime Video.

What age is Happy Valley for?

Home media – BBC Shop released Happy Valley series one on DVD, in regions two and four, on 16 June 2014. The DVD includes two discs, featuring 351 minutes’ worth of footage, and has an age certificate of 15. All six episodes of the series were released on iTunes, both in standard and high definition.

Is Happy Valley once a week?

How many episodes of Happy Valley are there? – There are SIX episodes in Happy Valley’s third and final series, airing on Sunday nights at 9pm on BBC One for the next few weeks. Happy Valley is not being released as a box set online, therefore fans cannot binge watch the series, it is instead shown weekly at 9pm on Sundays. What Time Is Happy Valley On Happy Valley newsletter To get the latest Happy Valley news direct to your inbox, sign up to our celebs & TV newsletter here.

Why is there a delay in Happy Valley?

How long has passed between series 2 and 3? – Happy Valley was last on screens back in 2016 with seven years between the second outing and the final one. Creator and director Wainwright always planned for a huge gap between the seasons as part of her vision for the story.

  • Wainwright wanted actor Rhys Connah, who plays Ryan Cawood the son of psychopath Tommy Lee Royce (played by James Norton), to grow older and reprise the role rather than recasting him.
  • Connah first appeared in Happy Valley back in 2014 when he was just eight-years-old and is now in his teens.
  • READ MORE: Happy Valley season 3: Everything we know so far about the new series Along with starring in Happy Valley, Connah also appeared in Wainwright’s To Walk Invisible: The Brontë Sisters, The White Princess, The Messenger and The Snow Maze.

Most recently, he starred in The Runaways before returning to Happy Valley which marks his most high-profile role to date. Speaking to media including Express.co.uk, Happy Valley executive producer Will Johnston said: “Sally and Sarah made this really conscious decision at the end of series two that it would only return once more after a seven-year gap.

  1. And the two vital things is that Ryan is now at an age to make his own decisions about his life and the relationships in it and Catherine is on the brink of retirement.
  2. And those felt like such juicy things to explore.
  3. In the police you have to retire at a certain age, so it was really prescribed that it would return after this gap.” Sadly, he also confirmed this would be the very last outing and there would be no more episodes after both Wainwright and lead star Lancashire – who is better known as hard-nosed Yorkshire cop Catherine Cawood – made the joint decision to end on a trilogy.

Reflecting on co-star Connah, Siobhan Finneran, who portrays Clare Cartwright, said: “He has less energy than he did when he was nine. Yeah, he’s great.” Reflecting on the sequences between Clare and Catherine, Finneran said: “It’s like coming home those scene and I think having had a break from it, that those scenes with me and Sarah does feel like familiar and ‘oh, we’re back at home’ doing the cups of tea chats and all that kind of thing.” Moreover, Norton said it was a “unique” experience coming back to Happy Valley after so long with most shows only having a gap of one or two years between seasons.

Interestingly, the Grantchester star said in the interim all the characters had had time to “ferment” and continued to exist without being played. Therefore, when Norton again put on the mantle of Tommy, the character had gone through a period of development. Physically, Tommy had grown out his shaved head and was now sporting a long mane of shoulder-length hair, which he said Wainwright wanted in order to give him a “Christ-like” look and show his own change during this period.

DON’T MISS. This Morning fans ‘switch off’ Holly and Phillip as they blast special Bradley Walsh says ‘I’m going’ as he mocks Cliff Richard BBC viewers ‘switch off’ Sports Personality Of the Year Teasing how the show would end and Tommy’s arc, Norton went on to say: “Let’s just say, Sally’s signature, I mentioned it earlier, that the rug pulled, I think there’s a few of those still to come.

It gets bigger and bigger and more expansive and surprising right until the end and for us. “You think you know the character and then there’s this whole potential other route they can take and that’s the beauty of Sally’s writing.” The cast and crew remained tight-lipped about how the show would end, but they did say there would be a definite ending to the story which would hopefully leave the audience satisfied.

Happy Valley airs on BBC One tonight at 9pm

What time is Happy Valley on on BBC One on a sunday?

Happy Valley will come to an end for good on Sunday, February 5. After three seasons and a six-year hiatus the police drama starring Sarah Lancashire as Catherine Cawood, James Norton as Tommy Lee Royce and Siobhan Finneran as Clare Cartwright, will officially say goodbye to its fans.

  1. Whatever fills the police drama’s spot on BBC One at 9pm on Sunday nights has big boots to fill given the outpouring of love Happy Valley, written by Sally Wainwright, has received since it kicked off on New Year’s Day.
  2. And it looks like fans of BBC drama and thrillers are in for a treat, as bosses have confirmed what will air in the 9pm slot on Sunday, February 12.

The Gold is the brand new drama attempting to fill the hole Happy Valley will no doubt leave behind. It has a star-studded cast list including Hugh Bonneville (Downton Abbey, Paddington 1 and 2), Jack Lowden (Small Axe: Mangrove, Slow Horses), Dominic Cooper (The Preacher, The Devil’s Double), Charlotte Spencer (The Duke, Cinderella), and Tom Cullen (Becoming Elizabeth, Black Mirror).

Read more: All the unmissable dramas coming to ITV, BBC, Channel 5 and Netflix in February 2023 BBC’s The Gold has been described as a pulsating dramatisation of a true story in 1983 which saw six armed men break into the Brink’s-Mat security depot near London’s Heathrow Airport where they inadvertently stumbled across gold bullion worth £26m.

A synopsis for the new series reads: “On the 26 th November 1983, six armed men broke into the Brink’s-Mat security depot near London’s Heathrow Airport, and inadvertently stumbled across gold bullion worth £26m. What started as ‘a typical Old Kent Road armed robbery’ according to detectives at the time, became a seminal event in British criminal history, remarkable not only for the scale of the theft – at the time the biggest in global history – but for its wider legacy.

“The disposal of the bullion caused the birth of large-scale international money laundering, provided the dirty money that helped fuel the London Docklands property boom, united blue and white collar criminals and left controversy and murder in its wake. “Inspired by extensive research and interviews with some of those involved in the events, The Gold is a pulsating dramatisation which takes a journey into a 1980s world awash with cheap money and loosened morals to tell this extraordinary and epic story for the first time in its entirety.” For more showbiz and television stories get our newsletter here,

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When can I watch all episodes of Happy Valley?

Where to watch Happy Valley online – What Time Is Happy Valley On Sarah Lancashire as Catherine Cawood in Happy Valley. Credit: BBC/Lookout Point/Matt Squire Happy Valley season 3 is available to watch on BBC iPlayer, All episodes became available to watch on the platform after they aired on BBC One. All episodes from the previous seasons are available to stream, too.

When can I watch series 4 of Happy Valley?

The last episode of the six-part series, which is being published weekly, ran on BBC One on Sunday, February 5. – What Time Is Happy Valley On Agencies Happy Valley has finally returned to the BBC for its third season after a seven-year absence, significantly enhancing Sunday nights. Sarah Lancashire reprises her role in the crime drama as sergeant Catherine Cawood draws closer to retirement.

  • Has a fourth season of Happy Valley been announced? Although we truly hate to announce, it appears like Happy Valley’s third season will be the last.
  • Will Johnston, the show’s executive producer, reportedly told the audience at a BFI screening that there are no plans for Happy Valley to return for a fourth season.

Johnston stated, at the screening, that both the series’s star Sarah Lancashire and its creator Sally Wainwright agreed that Happy Valley would only return once more. It’s absolutely not coming back, according to Sally and Sarah, who believe that it’s possible to have too much of a good thing.

Johnston said, “In reality, we’ve suspended all activity. I genuinely hope that when the story comes to an end, even if it is the last time you ever see the characters from Happy Valley, you will feel that it was a proper way to say farewell. You still have a few weeks before the ending.” What have the actors and crew had to say about the conclusion of the show? Now, let us know how the Happy Valley cast feels about the programme coming to an end.

The ultimate Happy Valley recap S1-S2 | BBC

Creator Sally Wainwright told a media outlet that she believes the series finale was “excellent job” done. It will also seem like a definitive conclusion. By the end of the third season, the viewers will be “reeling,” according to James Norton, who plays the killer Tommy Lee Royce,

When can I watch episode 4 of Happy Valley?

More about Happy Valley season 3 – What Time Is Happy Valley On According to producer Nicola Shindler, the third season of Happy Valley centers on Catherine’s grandson Ryan, who was conceived by Catherine’s daughter, who was raped by Royce. The official synopsis of the season is as follows: “When Catherine discovers the remains of a gangland murder victim in a drained reservoir it sparks a chain of events that unwittingly leads her straight back to Tommy Lee Royce.

  1. Her grandson Ryan is now sixteen and still living with Catherine, but he has ideas of his own about what kind of relationship he wants to have with the man Catherine refuses to acknowledge as his father.
  2. Still battling the seemingly never-ending problem of drugs in the valley and those who supply them, Catherine is on the cusp of retirement.” The new of Happy Valley will air this Sunday, January 22, 2023, at 4:30 pm EST.

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