What Teams Are Left In The World Cup?

0 Comments

What Teams Are Left In The World Cup

Which team eliminated in World Cup 2023?

Spain knocked out of World Cup, Lithuania spring surprise over U.S.

What teams are going out of the World Cup?

Teams out of the World Cup: Every nation eliminated –

The table below was updated throughout the 2022 tournament as teams fell by the wayside. The most recent team eliminated is at the top. Host nation Qatar were the first team ousted, and they were followed by Canada as both failed to pick up a single point in their first two matches of the group stage.

  1. A total of 16 teams were eliminated after the group stage, and another eight were knocked out in the Round of 16.
  2. The group stage closed on Friday, Dec.2, and the Round of 16 was completed on Dec.6, with the quarterfinals wrapping up in two days on Dec.9-10.
  3. The semis were also played over two days on Dec.13-14.

The third-place match (Dec.17) preceded the final on Dec.18.

Nation FIFA
Ranking
Date
Eliminated
Stage
Eliminated
How
Eliminated
France 4 Dec.18 Final Loss vs. Argentina (penalties)
Morocco 22 Dec.14 Semifinals Loss vs. France
Croatia 12 Dec.13 Semifinals Loss vs. Argentina
England 5 Dec.10 Quarterfinals Loss vs. France
Portugal 9 Dec.10 Quarterfinals Loss vs. Morocco
Netherlands 8 Dec.9 Quarterfinals Loss vs. Argentina (penalties)
Brazil 1 Dec.9 Quarterfinals Loss vs. Croatia (penalties)
Switzerland 15 Dec.6 Rd of 16 Loss vs. Portugal
Spain 7 Dec.6 Rd of 16 Loss vs. Morocco (penalties)
South Korea 28 Dec.5 Rd of 16 Loss vs. Brazil
Japan 24 Dec.5 Rd of 16 Loss vs. Croatia (penalties)
Senegal 18 Dec.4 Rd of 16 Loss vs. England
Poland 26 Dec.4 Rd of 16 Loss vs. France
Australia 38 Dec.3 Rd of 16 Loss vs. Argentina
USA 16 Dec.3 Rd of 16 Loss vs. Netherlands
Serbia 21 Dec.2 Groups Loss vs. Switzerland
Cameroon 43 Dec.2 Groups Switzerland win vs. Serbia
Uruguay 14 Dec.2 Groups Goals scored tiebreaker
Ghana 61 Dec.2 Groups Loss vs. Uruguay
Germany 11 Dec.1 Groups Goal difference tiebreaker
Costa Rica 31 Dec.1 Groups Loss vs. Germany
Belgium 2 Dec.1 Groups Draw vs. Croatia
Mexico 13 Nov.30 Groups Goal difference tiebreaker
Saudi Arabia 51 Nov.30 Groups Loss vs. Mexico
Tunisia 30 Nov.30 Groups Win by Australia vs. Denmark
Denmark 10 Nov.30 Groups Loss vs. Australia
Iran 20 Nov.29 Groups Loss vs. USA
Wales 19 Nov.29 Groups Loss vs. England
Ecuador 44 Nov.29 Groups Loss vs. Senegal
Canada 41 Nov.27 Groups Loss vs. Croatia AND
Morocco win vs. Belgium
Qatar 50 Nov.25 Groups Loss vs. Senegal AND
NED-ECU draw

MORE: Which team has won the most World Cups in history?

What Teams Are Left In The World Cup

Who qualified for World Cup 2023 football?

How to watch the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 Round of 16 – For UK viewers, all fixtures are broadcast live on the BBC or ITV, as well as the broadcaster’s respective streaming services, iPlayer and ITVX. In the US, Fox are broadcasting all fixtures on their live channel, FOXSports.com and the FOX Sports App. GBR

Who got Egypt out of the World Cup?

Losing to Senegal in the World Cup African qualifiers in March this year meant that Egypt lost out on an appearance in Qatar 2022 which would have been their fourth World Cup.

Has anyone won the World Cup without losing?

1934 (Italy) – A slightly different format with Italy winning the trophy. Just 16 teams took part so it was a straight knockout competition. Italy went on to win it and were thus the only team not to lose. They beat USA 7-1, drew 1-1 with Spain then beat them 1-0 in the replay, won 1-0 against Austria and triumphed over Czechoslovakia in the final.

Is US still in World Cup 2023?

Jeff Carlisle, U.S. soccer correspondent Aug 9, 2023, 02:06 PM ET Close

Jeff Carlisle covers MLS and the U.S. national team for ESPN FC.

When Sweden eliminated the U.S. women’s national team from the 2023 Women’s World Cup on Sunday, it marked the end of an era. It had been 4,403 days since the Americans last felt the sting of World Cup elimination, that being the 2011 Women’s World Cup final against Japan,

  • Now, in a little less than two weeks, a new World Cup champion will be crowned.
  • There was a certain inevitability about the USWNT’s demise, too – after all, no team wins forever.
  • Yet the U.S.
  • Team’s World Cup exit felt more seismic, as if years of cracks appearing in the American game – poor performances in youth World Cups, the paucity of creative players, the wake-up call at the last Olympics, to name a few – suddenly became chasms, ending in a World Cup run that was far below the U.S.

team’s usual standard. So is the end of this era for the U.S. a harbinger of an even more severe backslide? Is the U.S. looking at no longer being a dominant force in the international game? That depends on one’s definition. Does “dominant” mean winning trophies or being a contender? Throughout its history, the USWNT was at least the latter, and the team won often enough to accomplish the former.

During the Americans’ spell as World Cup champions, they failed to win the gold medal at two Olympic games. This included a quarterfinal exit in 2016 to Sweden that bore an eerie resemblance – a defeat via a penalty shootout in a game that the Americans dominated – to Sunday’s encounter. The U.S. also went 16 years between World Cup wins in 1999 and 2015, but that was interspersed with three Olympic triumphs.

All of this points to the fact that there have been ebbs and flows to the U.S. team’s preeminence. The problem in 2023 is that with the exception of the Sweden game, the U.S. didn’t ever look like a contender, recording its worst finish at a major tournament.

The preceding Olympics weren’t much better even as the U.S. claimed a bronze medal, hence the doubts about where the U.S. is heading. – Women’s World Cup : Landing page | Schedule | Rosters | News – Stream on ESPN+: LaLiga, Bundesliga, more (U.S.) How the U.S. got to this point is, in some respects, down to its own success.

Even as it was winning World Cups and Olympic gold medals, the U.S. was setting a standard it wanted other countries to emulate. And that is precisely what more nations have done, albeit with their own twists. Investment at the club level (mostly in Europe) has increased, which has raised standards.

Initially, that resulted in teams like England, the Netherlands and Spain rising through the ranks. Now, that impact is having a ripple effect in other countries like Colombia – which has eight players on its 23-player roster who play in Europe – as well as Morocco, which has 13 players in Europe, nine of them in France, England or Spain,

(Morocco have also financial backing from the royal family, which has focused on grassroots efforts to give young players a chance to develop.) There’s also the obvious fact that when teams rise up, others must fall. That was the case in this World Cup, with Brazil, Canada and Germany all failing to get out of the group stage. play 0:51 How much blame lies with Andonovski for USWNT’s World Cup failure? Luis Miguel Echegaray questions the tactics of head coach Vlatko Andonovski after the USWNT crashed out of the Women’s World Cup vs. Sweden. “Women are playing in countries that never had access to the game before,” said OL Reign GM Lesle Gallimore, who also has been a collegiate head coach and commissioner of a youth league.

  • So it’s just the natural evolution of the sport and the world’s game.
  • I’m not trying to sound whiny about it, but I do think when you step back from the pill of our early exit, and maybe people not enjoying the performance as much – I’m sad about it too – I am just as elated at the growth of the game globally and how much people are paying attention.” The increased investment has had an effect beyond just additional playing opportunities.

The number of teams that are more organized and skillful is higher than it’s ever been. The third group stage game, against Portugal, was a case in point: Portugal boasted a 56% to 44% possession edge in its 0-0 draw against the U.S., a game Portugal nearly won.

This has served to erode the historical U.S. advantages of fitness and athleticism. University of Virginia women’s head coach Steve Swanson served as Jill Ellis’ assistant on the United States’ World Cup-winning sides of 2015 and 2019. He is among those who don’t think the U.S. is a diminishing force, and warns against an overreaction to the Americans’ performance at this World Cup.

For example, it’s a small sample of games. Would the post-tournament conversation be the same if the U.S. had played better, but lost a quarterfinal to Japan? Or if players like Mal Swanson (no relation to Steve) or Catarina Macario had been available? For Swanson, it doesn’t matter how the team did.

  • There are issues that need to be addressed and he wants a critical analysis of everything, from talent identification to how the player pipeline functions.
  • You don’t want to miss the problems as opposed to the symptoms,” he said.
  • One issue Steve Swanson notes is the kind of player the U.S.
  • Is producing.

He estimates that because other national teams are so much fitter and more organized, there is 40% less space in which to operate than there was even five years ago. That puts an even greater premium on players who can make decisions and problem-solve in tight spaces.

  1. We aren’t going to out-athlete, out-compete and have a better mentality than these teams anymore,” Swanson said.
  2. That might have been good 20 years ago.
  3. It’s not now.
  4. I’m not saying that can’t be our bread and butter, or that it can’t give us an edge.
  5. But just because we’re fit, athletic and have a great mentality doesn’t guarantee wins, especially at that level.

There’s got to be much more of an onus on decision-making and the technical side. And those are things that we need to change throughout our different growth periods and phases.” In a country the size of the U.S., that won’t be easy, given that the “pay-to-play” system at the youth levels, and the emphasis on winning at the expense of skill, are entrenched. play 0:51 How much blame lies with Andonovski for USWNT’s World Cup failure? Luis Miguel Echegaray questions the tactics of head coach Vlatko Andonovski after the USWNT crashed out of the Women’s World Cup vs. Sweden. At present, not every National Women’s Soccer League ( NWSL ) team has a youth program.

The league doesn’t have a homegrown player rule either, though that is in the works. In light of the abuse news that engulfed the NWSL over the past two years, the league has instead, quite rightly, been focusing on getting its on-field product and player safety systems right. But instituting homegrown initiatives would increase the number of ways to become a professional.

World Cup Qualified vs. REJECTS Players

It wouldn’t be just a “college or bust” scenario, with a few high school outliers like Alyssa Thompson thrown in. “I think everyone has to be patient. It’s not something that we’re going to solve overnight,” Gallimore said. “I’m still a believer that there doesn’t have to be one linear route to wear the crest.

  • But I do think the pro game now has evolved.
  • Our own league has evolved to the point where we have to have a presence in that space and what that looks like in developing a player who’s able to thrive as a professional.” All that said, the U.S.
  • Still has some exceptional players.
  • The likes of Naomi Girma, Lindsey Horan and Sophia Smith form the basis of a talented group, while the Sweden game was a reminder that the U.S.

can still outplay one of the world’s best teams. It’s also worth noting that the U.S. system is helping to produce performers like Jamaica’s Khadija “Bunny” Shaw for other national teams. That’s why University of North Carolina women’s head coach Anson Dorrance, who managed the U.S.

To its first World Cup win in 1991, said he “isn’t in a panic” about what happened in New Zealand and Australia, pointing out that the eventual return of Mal Swanson and Macario is “going to completely change things.” “We’ve got a pipeline,” Dorrance said. “We’ve obviously got to solve problems in certain parts of the field.

We’ve got the population to solve those problems. So, I’m not worried about the soft pockets on the field for us, because I think those are going to be absolutely resolved.” play 1:13 Alex Morgan ‘not planning’ retirement after World Cup exit Alex Morgan says she has no immediate plans to retire after the USWNT was eliminated from the World Cup by Sweden. Despite the optimism for the future, the doubts raised at the past two major tournaments are hard to ignore.

  • For the U.S.
  • To be in the conversation again when it comes to contending for trophies, changes need to be made in terms of how the U.S.
  • Does things, and those changes must go beyond who the next coach will be.
  • The USSF is tasked with driving that change though there are doubts there too, especially after the development academy was shuttered in 2020.

“I just think our federation can’t change directions every time the people change,” Gallimore said. “I think they have to commit to something and really commit to it and do it. Do it in a real way that’s sustainable. That’s probably the sharpest way I can put it.” Most of those changes likely won’t happen in time for the Paris Olympics, which kick off in less than a year.

Is India out of World Cup 2023?

ICC Cricket World Cup 2023 Schedule – The schedule for the ICC World Cup 2023 Schedule has been released by ICC. The 2023 ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup will be held in India from October 5 to November 19, 2023. The upcoming World Cup will feature a total of 10 teams.

Is Argentina eliminated from the World Cup 2023?

Argentina and Brazil were eliminated in the group stage of the Women’s World Cup. An impressive Colombia, however, reached the quarter-finals – their best-ever showing.

How are teams eliminated in the World Cup?

T he final round of the group stage of the World Cup brings with it a multitude of possibilities for each team to advance in the tournament. This year’s contest in particular—which has already seen thrilling last-minute goals, stunning comebacks, and shock defeats of favorites—is anything but predictable.

And with so many ways it can play out, every kick over the next four days will matter. The group stage in its current form actually makes up most of the World Cup, comprising 48 of the 64 games. Within each group of four teams, it’s a round-robin-style competition to finish in the top two spots based on points: three points are earned for a win, one for a draw, and zero for a loss.

The bottom two teams from each of the eight groups are eliminated from the tournament. And while finishing first or second ensures a team moves on to the Round of 16, the specific order in which they advance is important, too. The winner of Group A plays the runner-up of Group B, the runner-up of A plays the winner of B, and so on for Groups C and D, E and F, and G and H.

There’s something special about this stage’s final round. As of Monday evening, each team in all eight groups has faced off against two other teams in their group and has one remaining game to accumulate any more points. The stakes are raised for these third matchups, as every team knows it’s their last chance to do what they need to do to stay in the tournament.

And unlike in the first two rounds, the final two matches for each group are played simultaneously, making it a nerve-wracking 90 minutes for all teams involved—and for the fans who are trying to monitor every potential outcome.

How close was Sweden’s goal?

Sweden’s goal that went in by millimeters to eliminate USWNT from the World Cup, in 3 agonizing photos What a way for the USWNT to go home from the 2023 World Cup. A 0-0 tie in regulation and in extra time led to a penalty kicks shootout to determine who would move on to the next round, and after a back-and-forth that included missed kicks, one that hit the post, a save from Alyssa Naeher it all came down to Lina Hurtig. What Teams Are Left In The World Cup (Photo by Robert Cianflone/Getty Images) What Teams Are Left In The World Cup (Photo by Robert Cianflone/Getty Images) What Teams Are Left In The World Cup (Photo by Robert Cianflone/Getty Images) Here’s the replay:

After review, the penalty is good and Sweden wins 🇸🇪🇺🇸:✅✅✅❌❌✅❌🇸🇪:✅✅❌❌✅✅✅ — FOX Soccer (@FOXSoccer)

Alyssa Naeher nearly kept it out 🧤 — FOX Soccer (@FOXSoccer) : Sweden’s goal that went in by millimeters to eliminate USWNT from the World Cup, in 3 agonizing photos

What is the penalty for Sweden vs USA?

FIFA Women’s World Cup These were the updates from Sweden vs USA in the round of 16 Women’s World Cup match on August 6, 2023. Sweden knock out holders USA 5-4 on penalties in a madcap shootout, with the final penalty kick confirmed by VAR.

Who won out of USA and Sweden?

ESPN

Aug 6, 2023, 01:11 PM After 120 minutes of enthralling soccer in Melbourne and a penalty shootout that had to be seen to be believed, the defending World Cup champions are OUT as Sweden won 5-4 on penalties over the U.S. The pivotal spot-kick: U.S. goalie Alyssa Naeher got a piece of Lina Hurtig’s shot, only for it to loop over the goalline; despite Naeher’s second attempt to keep it out, the goalline technology showed that the ball was in.

What does FIFA stand for?

FIFA — Soccer’s World Governing Body – Founded in 1904 to provide unity among national soccer associations, the Federation Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) boasts 209 members, rivaling that of the United Nations, and is arguably the most prestigious sports organization in the world.

FIFA was established on May 21, 1904, by seven national associations — Belgium, Denmark, France, Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland — to “promote the game of Association Football (as opposed to rugby or American football), to foster friendly relations among National Associations, Confederations, and their officials and players, by promoting the organization of football matches at all levels, and to control every type of association football by taking steps as shall be deemed necessary or advisable.” FIFA’s birth was a result of the growing number of international games shortly after the dawn of the 20th century.

Soccer leaders in Europe felt that such expanded competition required a governing body, and under the leadership of Robert Guerin, a French journalist, the seven founding members gathered in Paris to shape the future of the sport. Guerin, FIFA’s first president, presided over the organization from 1904 to 1906.

  • Seven other men have also served as FIFA president, including Jules Rimet for 33 years from 1921 to 1954.
  • Currently, Italy’s Gianni Infantino serves as FIFA president, having been elected in 2016’s Extraordinary Congress held in the wake of corruption allegations against numerous FIFA Officials that resulted in former president Joseph “Sepp” Blatter stepping aside and then being banned from FIFA by its Ethics Committee.

FIFA’s general secretary since 2009, Infantino will serve a three-year term as FIFA president. Under FIFA’s governance soccer has become the world’s most popular sport. According to the Federation’s 2006 “Big Count,” the game is played by more than 150 million registered athletes — including 10 million women — and viewed by billions of fans in stadiums and on television worldwide.

  1. The 2014 World Cup in Brazil was broadcast in more than 200 countries.
  2. Inside the stadiums, a total of 3,429,873 spectators attended the 64 matches – an average of 53,592 per match – the second highest aggregate attendance behind USA 1994 (68,991).
  3. As soccer’s ultimate administrative authority, FIFA governs all facets of the game: regulating the rules of play, overseeing the transfers of players internationally, organizing international competitions such as the FIFA World Cup, establishing standards for refereeing, coaching and sports medicine, and encouraging soccer’s development around the world.

Among the official world championships staged by FIFA are the World Cup, the Women’s World Cup, the Under-20 World Cup, the Under-20 Women’s World Cup, the Under-17 World Cup, the Under-17 Women’s World Cup, the FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup and the Futsal World Cup.

Additionally, FIFA oversees the men’s and women’s Olympic Football Tournament staged under the auspices of the International Olympic Committee every four years. FIFA has also staged the FIFA Confederations Cup, a competition between each of its confederations’ champions, and the FIFA Club World Cup, which was held at the beginning of 2000 for the first time in Brazil President Giani Infantino General Secretary Markus Kattner Headquarters: FIFA House – 11 Hitzigweg – 8030 Zurich, Switzerland Correspondence Address: FIFA – P.O.

Box 85 – 8030 Zurich, Switzerland Phone: 41-43-222-7777 – Fax: 41-43-222-7878 – Website: www.fifa.com

Who is 3rd place in the World Cup 2023?

OKC Thunder: 2023 FIBA World Cup Results, Recap And Outlook MANILA, PHILIPPINES – SEPTEMBER 10: Shai Gilgeous-Alexander #2 of Canada drives against Mikal, Bridges #5 of the United States in the second quarter during the FIBA Basketball World Cup 3rd Place game at Mall of Asia Arena on September 10, 2023 in Manila, Philippines.

  1. Photo by Yong Teck Lim/Getty Images) Getty Images Over the course of the past two weeks the 2023 FIBA World Cup has taken place, which is one of the world’s premier basketball events.
  2. During this time, 32 teams represented their respective countries on a stage that featured some of the top talent across the globe.

The Oklahoma City Thunder had representation from five players across three teams, each of which finished in the top 10 of the tournament. It was a great opportunity for these individuals to step up and play at an extremely high level ahead of the upcoming season.

  • This was an event that was important due to the ability to qualify for the 2024 Olympics, so there were real stakes on the line.
  • While the experience that Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, Lu Dort, Josh Giddey, Jack White and Davis Bertans each had was very different, all five of these players left the tournament better than before.

Let’s take a look at each of these players’ performances as well as how their respective teams fared. Canada (6-2) With a loaded roster, Canada had the talent to win the entire event. However, they ultimately fell in the semifinals against Serbia, missing out on a chance to compete in the championship.

Nonetheless, Canada took on the United States in the third place game, winning in overtime and finishing the highest the country ever has at this tournament. This was the most successful Canadian team in history. Latvia (6-2) A squad that was one of the most surprising in this event, Latvia proved they have a bright future ahead.

After making it to the quarterfinals Latvia lost to Germany, who was undefeated and ultimately won the tournament. Considering where Latvia was expected to finish in this tournament, heading back home after earning fifth place is a huge success. Australia (4-2) Considering the Boomers were one of the favorites to potentially win this tournament, it was somewhat of a disappointing outcome.

You might be interested:  What Flour For Yorkshire Puddings?

What teams have been eliminated from the FIFA Women’s World Cup?

Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?

Nation FIFA Ranking Date Eliminated
Japan 11 Aug.11
Morocco 72 Aug.8
Jamaica 43 Aug.8
Denmark 13 Aug.7

How many countries are in Qatar World Cup?

How many teams are in the World Cup? – The 2022 men’s World Cup in Qatar will be the last to feature 32 teams before the field expands to 48 teams for the 2026 World Cup. The FIFA men’s World Cup has involved 32 teams for the last six editions, since France 1998.

Africa (CAF): 5 Asia (AFC): 4 (plus 1 playoff qualifier) Europe (UEFA): 13 North/Central America & Caribbean (CONCACAF): 3 (plus 1 playoff qualifier) Oceania (OFC): 1 playoff qualifier South America (CONMEBOL): 4 (plus 1 playoff qualifier)

The four playoff qualifiers in the list above participated in, featuring one nation from each of four different regions. Those matchups determined the final two qualifiers for the 2022 World Cup: Asia vs. South America, and North America vs. Oceania.

Asia vs. South America: Australia (3rd in Asian qualifying group) beat Peru (5th in South America) in a penalty shootout on June 13 to claim a place in Qatar. The Socceroos, into their fifth straight World Cup, defeated the United Arab Emirates 2-1 in an Asian confederation playoff just to earn the chance to face Peru. North America vs. Oceania: Costa Rica (4th place in North America) advanced to the World Cup after beating New Zealand (Oceania winner) 1-0 on June 14 for the final ticket to Qatar. The Ticos joined Germany, Spain and Japan in Group E.

The final European World Cup berth was also determined in June 2022. Wales beat Ukraine 1-0 in a single-elimination playoff final on June 5. (Wales and Ukraine defeated Austria and Scotland, respectively, to reach the final.) The final European qualifying spot was pushed to the June window after Ukraine requested the postponement from the original March date due to the Russian invasion of the country.

How many soccer teams make the World Cup?

Taking place quadrennially, the FIFA Men’s World Cup™ sees 32 nations compete against each other for the prize.

Who came 4th in the World Cup 2023?

References –

  1. ^ Jump up to: a b “Everything you need to know about the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Archived from the original on 25 November 2022, Retrieved 26 November 2022,
  2. ^ “FIFA Council approves further transfer system reforms and announces key FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 dates”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association.20 May 2021. Archived from the original on 18 June 2021, Retrieved 20 May 2021,
  3. ^ “NZ Football”, www.nzfootball.co.nz, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  4. ^ “New Zealand makes history with country’s first World Cup victory ever”, FOX Sports, Retrieved 9 September 2023,
  5. ^ “Spain win first Women’s World Cup, beating England 1–0”, Al Jazeera,20 August 2023, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  6. ^ “How Spain became the holders of all three Women’s World Cups”, FIFA.com, FIFA.20 August 2023. Archived from the original on 22 August 2023, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  7. ^ “Sweden win fourth Women’s World Cup third-place medal; Australia end up in fourth place in highest ever finish”, CBSSports.com,19 August 2023, Retrieved 9 September 2023,
  8. ^ “USA beat Netherlands for fourth title”, BBC.7 July 2019. Archived from the original on 21 July 2019, Retrieved 24 October 2022,
  9. ^ Burhan, Asif (6 August 2023). “Defending Champions USWNT Eliminated From Women’s World Cup By Sweden”, Forbes, Archived from the original on 6 August 2023, Retrieved 6 August 2023,
  10. ^ “AFC President Sheikh Salman praises ‘greatest-ever’ FIFA Women’s World Cup in Australia and New Zealand”, Arab News,21 August 2023, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  11. ^ Martelli, Joel (20 August 2023). “Only the start for Matildas as FIFA Women’s World Cup hailed as best ever”, Seven News, Retrieved 29 August 2023,
  12. ^ reporters, Stuff sports (7 August 2023). “New Zealand and Australia the best attended FIFA Women’s World Cup in history”, Stuff, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  13. ^ “The best Women’s World Cup in history”, Francs Jeux, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  14. ^ AfricaNews (18 August 2023). “Women’s world cup “the biggest and best of all time”- FIFA”, Africanews,
  15. ^ reporters, Stuff sports (7 August 2023). “New Zealand and Australia the best attended FIFA Women’s World Cup in history”, Stuff, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  16. ^ “1991 Women’s World Cup: Celebrating The Historic Tournament”, History of Soccer,21 January 2023. Archived from the original on 19 June 2023, Retrieved 19 June 2023,
  17. ^ “US defeats Netherlands to win record 4th Women’s World Cup title”, CNBC.7 July 2019. Archived from the original on 19 June 2023, Retrieved 19 June 2023,
  18. ^ “Women’s World Cup 2019: USA beat Netherlands to win fourth title”, BBC.7 July 2019. Archived from the original on 21 July 2019, Retrieved 19 June 2023,
  19. ^ “Match schedule confirmed for FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023”, FIFA,1 December 2021. Archived from the original on 1 December 2021, Retrieved 1 December 2021,
  20. ^ “Match schedule: FIFA Women’s World Cup Australia & New Zealand 2023” (PDF), FIFA. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2 December 2021, Retrieved 20 June 2023,
  21. ^ “Match schedule and kick-off times confirmed for Australia & New Zealand 2023”, FIFA.24 October 2022. Archived from the original on 24 October 2022, Retrieved 24 October 2022,
  22. ^ “Final rematch among FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 Draw headlines”, FIFA.22 October 2022. Archived from the original on 22 October 2022, Retrieved 22 October 2022,
  23. ^ “FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™ targets over 100,000 fans for epic opening matchday”, FIFA.31 January 2023. Archived from the original on 30 January 2023, Retrieved 31 January 2023,
  24. ^ Jump up to: a b “New payment model guarantees support for every FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™ team and player”, FIFA.9 June 2023. Archived from the original on 18 June 2023, Retrieved 18 June 2023,
  25. ^ Cootes, Isobel (16 July 2023). “What players at the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™ will be paid”, Optus Sports, Archived from the original on 17 July 2023, Retrieved 17 July 2023,
  26. ^ Kunti, Samindra. “Lise Klaveness: FIFA Must Stick To Prize Money Promises At Women’s World Cup”, Forbes, Archived from the original on 27 July 2023, Retrieved 27 July 2023,
  27. ^ Aarons, Ed; Molina, Romain (3 August 2023). “Fifa investigating claims Zambia coach rubbed player’s chest at World Cup”, The Guardian, ISSN 0261-3077, Archived from the original on 5 August 2023, Retrieved 5 August 2023,
  28. ^ “FIFA starts bidding process for FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association.19 February 2019. Archived from the original on 22 November 2020, Retrieved 21 February 2019,
  29. ^ Jump up to: a b c “FIFA Council unanimously approves expanded 32-team field for FIFA Women’s World Cup”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association.31 July 2019. Archived from the original on 9 June 2020, Retrieved 31 July 2019,
  30. ^ “FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023: Overview of the bidding process (updated version, August 2019)” (PDF), FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association.3 September 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on 5 August 2021, Retrieved 3 September 2019,
  31. ^ “FIFA receives record number of expressions of interest in hosting FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association.18 March 2019. Archived from the original on 24 May 2021, Retrieved 19 March 2019,
  32. ^ “Belgium and Bolivia drop out as eight countries remain in race to host 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup”, insidethegames.biz,3 September 2019. Archived from the original on 1 October 2020, Retrieved 3 September 2019,
  33. ^ “Bidding process for FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 continues with eight member associations”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association.3 September 2019. Archived from the original on 12 May 2021, Retrieved 3 September 2019,
  34. ^ “One Vision”, As One 2023, Football Federation Australia. Archived from the original on 13 December 2019, Retrieved 12 December 2019,
  35. ^ “FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023: four bids submitted”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association.13 December 2019. Archived from the original on 22 November 2020, Retrieved 13 December 2019,
  36. ^ “Brasil retira candidatura a sede da Copa do Mundo Feminina FIFA 2023” (in Brazilian Portuguese). Brazilian Football Confederation,8 June 2020. Archived from the original on 26 January 2021, Retrieved 26 June 2020,
  37. ^ “Japan FA to withdraw from Bid to host the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023”, Japan Football Association,22 June 2020. Archived from the original on 23 June 2020.
  38. ^ “Australia and New Zealand selected as hosts of FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association.25 June 2020. Archived from the original on 27 June 2020, Retrieved 25 June 2020,
  39. ^ “FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 Voting Results” (PDF), FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association.25 June 2020. Archived from the original (PDF) on 25 June 2020, Retrieved 25 June 2020,
  40. ^ “Australia and New Zealand to host 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup”, Asian Football Confederation,26 June 2020. Archived from the original on 29 June 2023, Retrieved 29 June 2023,
  41. ^ “FIFA President Infantino hails France 2019, outlines proposals for future of women’s game”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association.5 July 2019. Archived from the original on 17 July 2019, Retrieved 5 July 2019,
  42. ^ “Key figures from the FIFA Women’s World Cup Canada 2015”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association.7 July 2015. Archived from the original on 11 July 2015, Retrieved 3 October 2016,
  43. ^ Mather, Victor (5 July 2019). “FIFA President Proposes Expansion of Women’s World Cup and Doubling of Prize Money”, The New York Times, Archived from the original on 16 October 2021, Retrieved 28 June 2020,
  44. ^ Mackey, Ed (1 June 2023). “Women’s World Cup 2023: Everything you need to know (and some things you didn’t)”, The Athletic, Archived from the original on 6 June 2023, Retrieved 5 June 2023,
  45. ^ “As One. Australia and New Zealand bidding to host the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023” (PDF), Football Federation Australia, New Zealand Football. Archived (PDF) from the original on 6 April 2023, Retrieved 14 December 2019 – via FIFA.com.
  46. ^ “Dominic Perrottet reopens Sydney Football Stadium while admitting rebuild damaged Coalition”, ABC News,27 August 2022. Archived from the original on 6 June 2023, Retrieved 5 June 2023,
  47. ^ “FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™ Bid Evaluation Report published – three bids submitted to FIFA Council”, FIFA.com,10 June 2020. Archived from the original on 24 September 2021, Retrieved 10 June 2020,
  48. ^ “New turf rolled out ahead of FIFA Women’s World Cup” (Press release). Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries,12 April 2023, Retrieved 5 June 2023,
  49. ^ Tan, Christopher (8 May 2023). “FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023: Big names visit Kingsway and Sorrento to inspect venues”, PerthNow, Archived from the original on 6 June 2023, Retrieved 5 June 2023,
  50. ^ “FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 Host Cities and Stadiums announced”, FIFA.com, FIFA. Archived from the original on 31 March 2021, Retrieved 31 March 2021,
  51. ^ “Australia and New Zealand are hosting the FIFA 2023 Women’s World Cup. Here’s how the tournament will work”, ABC News, Australian Broadcasting Corporation.25 June 2020. Archived from the original on 26 June 2020, Retrieved 26 June 2020,
  52. ^ Jump up to: a b c Lewis, Samantha (27 November 2021). “2023 Women’s World Cup is already changing the game for First Nations communities”, ABC News, Archived from the original on 15 July 2022, Retrieved 15 July 2022,
  53. ^ Dator, James (7 July 2023). “FIFA allowing the Women’s World Cup to honor indigenous people is a rare W”, SB Nation, Archived from the original on 21 July 2023, Retrieved 21 July 2023,
  54. ^ Lewis, Rhett (28 May 2022). “Womens World Cup 2023: Dates, Schedule And Kick-Off Times”, History Of Soccer, Archived from the original on 7 October 2022, Retrieved 22 August 2022,
  55. ^ Chammas, Michael (24 April 2022). “Women’s World Cup lockout to cause two-month fixture chaos for NRL”, The Sydney Morning Herald, Archived from the original on 16 August 2023, Retrieved 16 August 2023,
  56. ^ “Stadium Australia”, FIFA.com, Archived from the original on 6 December 2022, Retrieved 7 December 2022,
  57. ^ “Sydney Football Stadium”, FIFA.com, Archived from the original on 6 December 2022, Retrieved 7 December 2022,
  58. ^ “Brisbane Stadium-womens-world-cup-2023”, FIFA.com, Archived from the original on 6 December 2022, Retrieved 7 December 2022,
  59. ^ “Eden Park”, FIFA.com, Archived from the original on 6 December 2022, Retrieved 7 December 2022,
  60. ^ “Wellington Regional Stadium”, FIFA.com, Archived from the original on 6 December 2022, Retrieved 7 December 2022,
  61. ^ “Melbourne Rectangular Stadium”, FIFA.com, Archived from the original on 6 December 2022, Retrieved 7 December 2022,
  62. ^ “Perth Rectangular Stadium”, FIFA.com, Archived from the original on 6 December 2022, Retrieved 7 December 2022,
  63. ^ “Hindmarsh Stadium”, FIFA.com, Archived from the original on 6 December 2022, Retrieved 7 December 2022,
  64. ^ “Dunedin Stadium”, FIFA.com, Archived from the original on 6 December 2022, Retrieved 7 December 2022,
  65. ^ “Waikato Stadium”, FIFA.com, Archived from the original on 6 December 2022, Retrieved 7 December 2022,
  66. ^ “Team Base Camps confirmed for FIFA Women’s World Cup Australia & New Zealand 2023”, FIFA.com, FIFA. Archived from the original on 13 December 2022, Retrieved 12 December 2022,
  67. ^ “All 32 FIFA Women’s World Cup™ Team Base Camps now confirmed”, FIFA.com, FIFA. Archived from the original on 22 March 2023, Retrieved 21 March 2023,
  68. ^ Roche, Calum (22 March 2023). “FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023: find out where every team is based”, Diario AS, Archived from the original on 6 June 2023, Retrieved 5 June 2023,
  69. ^ “Concacaf to launch new senior women’s national team competitions to benefit entire Confederation” (Press release). Concacaf,10 December 2020, Retrieved 5 June 2023,
  70. ^ “USWNT defeats Canada in CONCACAF W Championship final, secures berth in 2024 Paris Olympics”, The Athletic,18 July 2022. Archived from the original on 6 June 2023, Retrieved 5 June 2023,
  71. ^ “FIFA suspends Chad and Pakistan football associations”, FIFA.7 April 2021. Archived from the original on 16 May 2022, Retrieved 16 May 2022,
  72. ^ “Rwanda Government asks Federation to withdraw 2022 Women’s AFCON qualifier”, Sports News Africa,13 October 2021. Archived from the original on 19 October 2021, Retrieved 13 October 2021,
  73. ^ “Sudan – Algeria: the Greens will not play their return match”, california18.com, CA18.26 October 2021. Archived from the original on 27 October 2021, Retrieved 16 May 2022,
  74. ^ “CAF Statement on the Women’s AFCON Qualifier: Equatorial Guinea vs DR Congo”, CAF,22 October 2021. Archived from the original on 16 March 2022, Retrieved 16 May 2022,
  75. ^ “Withdrawal of Sao Tome from the qualifiers of the TotalEnergies Women’s AFCON 2022”, CAF,24 October 2021. Archived from the original on 24 October 2021, Retrieved 24 October 2021,
  76. ^ “Kenya Government asks Federation to withdraw 2022 Women’s AFCON qualifier”, fufa,28 January 2022. Archived from the original on 28 January 2022, Retrieved 26 January 2022,
  77. ^ “Latest update on the AFC U23 Asian Cup Uzbekistan 2022 – Qualifiers”, Asian Football Confederation.29 July 2021. Archived from the original on 23 October 2021, Retrieved 16 May 2022,
  78. ^ “It’s now down to Indonesia-Singapore in Group C”, ASEAN Football Federation.8 September 2021. Archived from the original on 4 November 2021, Retrieved 12 September 2021,
  79. ^ “Vietnam to play three AFC Women’s Asian Cup 2022 qualifiers”, Voice of Vietnam.18 August 2021. Archived from the original on 4 November 2021, Retrieved 17 September 2021,
  80. ^ “Latest update on the AFC Women’s Asian Cup India 2022”, AFC.24 January 2022. Archived from the original on 23 January 2022, Retrieved 16 May 2022,
  81. ^ “More calendar changes for 2021”, Oceania Football Confederation.16 December 2020. Archived from the original on 23 May 2022, Retrieved 15 May 2022,
  82. ^ “FIFA/UEFA suspend Russian clubs and national teams from all competitions”, FIFA (Press release).28 February 2022, Retrieved 28 February 2022,
  83. ^ “Update on FIFA Women’s World Cup and men’s youth competition”, FIFA.25 December 2020. Archived from the original on 22 June 2022, Retrieved 15 May 2022,
  84. ^ “New Zealand to host first ever FIFA Women’s World Cup Play-Off Tournament”, FIFA.4 July 2022. Archived from the original on 24 November 2022, Retrieved 5 July 2022,
  85. ^ Jump up to: a b Thomas, Joshua (7 March 2023). “FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023: Which teams have qualified for the tournament in Australia and New Zealand?”, The Sporting News, Archived from the original on 6 June 2023, Retrieved 5 June 2023,
  86. ^ Frith, Will (7 September 2022). “Italy and Netherlands qualify for 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup”, She Kicks, Retrieved 5 June 2023,
  87. ^ “FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 – Africa Watch”, Boxscore News, Boxscore World Sportswire.17 May 2023. Archived from the original on 18 May 2023, Retrieved 18 May 2023,
  88. ^ “2023 Women’s World Cup – 100 days to go until Australia and New Zealand co-host tournament”, BBC,11 April 2023. Archived from the original on 18 May 2023, Retrieved 18 May 2023,
  89. ^ “FIFA Women’s Ranking – 9 June 2023”, FIFA. Archived from the original on 17 June 2023, Retrieved 18 June 2023,
  90. ^ “Regulations – FIFA Women’s World Cup AU NZ 23” (PDF), FIFA. Archived (PDF) from the original on 14 December 2022, Retrieved 30 May 2023,
  91. ^ “Auckland/Tāmaki Makaurau to host the Draw for the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 in October”, FIFA,12 May 2022. Archived from the original on 16 December 2022, Retrieved 13 May 2022,
  92. ^ “New Zealand to host FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™ Draw”, Government of New Zealand,13 May 2022. Archived from the original on 21 September 2022, Retrieved 21 September 2022,
  93. ^ “Procedures for the Final Draw for the FIFA Women’s World Cup Australia New Zealand 2023” (PDF), FIFA.8 October 2022. Archived (PDF) from the original on 8 October 2022, Retrieved 8 October 2022,
  94. ^ “Star-studded line-up for FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™ draw”, FIFA Plus, Fédération internationale de Football Association. Archived from the original on 20 October 2022, Retrieved 22 October 2022,
  95. ^ “Women’s Draw Seedings FIFA Women’s World Cup Australia New Zealand 2023”, FIFA.14 October 2022. Archived from the original on 16 December 2022, Retrieved 14 October 2022,
  96. ^ Jump up to: a b “Match officials appointed for FIFA Women’s World Cup Australia & New Zealand 2023™”, FIFA.com,9 January 2023. Archived from the original on 9 January 2023, Retrieved 9 January 2023,
  97. ^ “Trailblazer: Palestine’s Heba Saadieh is creating history and more”, FIFA.com,13 January 2023. Archived from the original on 18 May 2023, Retrieved 18 May 2023,
  98. ^ “Saadia to become first Palestinian referee at FIFA Women’s World Cup”, insidethegames.biz,8 January 2023. Archived from the original on 21 May 2023, Retrieved 18 May 2023,
  99. ^ “Sources: World Cup to use NFL-style VAR calls”, ESPN,30 June 2023. Archived from the original on 1 July 2023, Retrieved 1 July 2023,
  100. ^ FIFA Media (18 August 2023). “Final match officials” (Tweet), Retrieved 18 August 2023 – via Twitter,
  101. ^ Jump up to: a b c Sharp-Wiggins, Blake; Khan, Jo (20 July 2023). “A missing star and an upset win: Women’s World Cup opening night – in pictures”, The Guardian, ISSN 0261-3077, Archived from the original on 26 July 2023, Retrieved 26 July 2023,
  102. ^ Jump up to: a b c d e Hytner, Mike; Khan, Jo (20 July 2023). “New Zealand 1–0 Norway: Women’s World Cup 2023 Group A – as it happened”, The Guardian, ISSN 0261-3077, Archived from the original on 20 July 2023, Retrieved 26 July 2023,
  103. ^ Jump up to: a b “A PESAR DE UN ATENTADO MORTAL, EL MUNDIAL FEMENINO SE INAUGURÓ CON ÉXITO”, El Gráfico (in Spanish).20 July 2023. Archived from the original on 22 July 2023, Retrieved 20 July 2023,
  104. ^ Jump up to: a b Knuckey, Brodyn (20 July 2023). “Football Ferns stun Norway to claim first-ever World Cup win”,1 News, Archived from the original on 20 July 2023, Retrieved 20 July 2023,
  105. ^ Marnie Vinall; Billie Eder (20 August 2023). “As it happened Women’s World Cup: Spain are Women’s World Cup champions with masterclass 1–0 defeat of England in final”, The Age, Retrieved 20 August 2023,
  106. ^ Athletic, The (15 August 2023). “Spain vs Sweden live updates”, The Athletic, Archived from the original on 15 August 2023, Retrieved 15 August 2023,
  107. ^ “Football fever grips Australia as Matildas’ adventures continue”, FIFA.14 August 2023, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  108. ^ Crawford, Fiona (11 August 2023). “From handing out their own flyers, to sell-out games: how the Matildas won over a nation”, The Conversation, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  109. ^ Barrett, Jonathan (16 August 2023). “Matildas brand more valuable than any other national sports team, marketing expert says”, The Guardian, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  110. ^ Foster, Craig (14 August 2023). “The Matildas’ courage is changing the Australian narrative. The question is: what next?”, The Guardian, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  111. ^ Shephard, Tory (19 August 2023). “Albanese government to pledge $200m for women’s sport after Matildas inspire Australia”, The Guardian, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  112. ^ Orr, Aleisha (13 August 2023). “Matildas’ win over France reportedly delivers biggest TV audience since Cathy Freeman race”, SBS News, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  113. ^ “Matildas’ Women’s World Cup semifinal loss to England sets TV audience record”, ABC News,17 August 2023, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  114. ^ Bowring, Declan (15 August 2023). “Where to watch the Matildas vs England Women’s World Cup semifinal live in Sydney”, ABC News, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  115. ^ Shams, Housnia (13 August 2023). “Two Sydney stadiums open as live sites for Matildas World Cup semifinal clash against England”, ABC News, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  116. ^ Karp, Paul (15 August 2023). “Peter Dutton rejects proposed Matildas public holiday as ‘stunt’ and ‘ego trip’ for Anthony Albanese”, The Guardian, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  117. ^ “Football Australia ‘seriously’ considering bid for men’s World Cup”,7NEWS,21 August 2023, Retrieved 23 August 2023,
  118. ^ Jump up to: a b c d “Regulations: FIFA Women’s World Cup Australia & New Zealand 2023” (PDF), FIFA. Archived (PDF) from the original on 14 December 2022, Retrieved 14 December 2022,
  119. ^ “FIFA Women’s World Cup awards: Bonmati wins Golden Ball”, FIFA,20 August 2023. Archived from the original on 21 August 2023, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  120. ^ “Caicedo stunner wins Hyundai Goal of the Tournament”, FIFA.29 August 2023, Retrieved 3 September 2023,
  121. ^ “Australia-NZ unveils ’23 Women’s World Cup logo”, ESPN,28 October 2021. Archived from the original on 4 January 2022, Retrieved 4 January 2022,
  122. ^ “Beyond Greatness in 2023”, FIFA.com, Archived from the original on 6 August 2023, Retrieved 4 January 2022,
  123. ^ Snape, Jack (19 July 2023). “Women’s World Cup ticket sales break record with close to 1.4m sold on eve of 2023 tournament”, The Guardian, Archived from the original on 19 July 2023, Retrieved 20 July 2023,
  124. ^ “FIFA offers free Women’s World Cup tickets amid poor NZ sales”, ESPN. Reuters.13 July 2023. Archived from the original on 18 July 2023, Retrieved 20 July 2023,
  125. ^ Johannsen, Dana (27 July 2023). “FIFA Women’s World Cup: After sluggish start, tickets sales hit important milestone in New Zealand”, Stuff, Archived from the original on 27 July 2023, Retrieved 27 July 2023,
  126. ^ “FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 Comes to FIFA 23”,28 June 2023. Archived from the original on 1 July 2023, Retrieved 1 July 2023,
  127. ^ “FIFA 23 Receives FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 Update and Predicts USA to Win”,30 June 2023. Archived from the original on 1 July 2023, Retrieved 1 July 2023,
  128. ^ “With 100 days to Women’s World Cup, calls for gender equity grow”, Al Jazeera,11 April 2023. Archived from the original on 18 May 2023, Retrieved 18 May 2023,
  129. ^ “FIFA urges broadcasters pay what the women’s game deserves”, Reuters,20 October 2022. Archived from the original on 22 October 2022, Retrieved 22 October 2022,
  130. ^ Ingle, Sean (2 May 2023). “Fifa threatens Women’s World Cup broadcast blackout in Europe”, The Guardian, ISSN 0261-3077, Archived from the original on 16 May 2023, Retrieved 16 May 2023,
  131. ^ “FIFA and EBU extend agreement for FIFA Women’s World Cup™ rights and commit to promoting women’s football”, EBU,14 June 2023. Archived from the original on 14 June 2023, Retrieved 15 June 2023,
  132. ^ “NHK to Broadcast All Nadeshiko Games”, The Yomiuri Shimbun, The Japan News.14 July 2023. Archived from the original on 15 July 2023, Retrieved 15 July 2023,
  133. ^ “FIFA and adidas extend partnership until 2030”, FIFA.21 November 2013. Archived from the original on 28 June 2017, Retrieved 10 May 2017,
  134. ^ Matthews, Sam (22 November 2005). “Coca-Cola renews Fifa football sponsorship until 2022”, Campaign. Archived from the original on 27 August 2017, Retrieved 10 May 2017,
  135. ^ “Hyundai and Kia renew FIFA partnerships until 2030, with Boston Dynamics and Supernal to showcase future mobility solutions”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association.25 May 2023. Archived from the original on 25 May 2023, Retrieved 25 May 2023,
  136. ^ “Qatar Airways Commemorates Collaboration with FIFA”, Qatar Airways.22 August 2023, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  137. ^ Wilson, Bill (18 March 2016). “Fifa signs China’s Wanda as partner”, BBC News, Archived from the original on 11 June 2019, Retrieved 6 December 2018,
  138. ^ “FIFA announces Visa as first-ever FIFA Women’s Football Partner”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Archived from the original on 21 December 2021, Retrieved 21 December 2021,
  139. ^ “Xero named as FIFA Women’s Football Partner”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Archived from the original on 12 April 2022, Retrieved 13 April 2022,
  140. ^ “FIFA announces AB InBev as official beer sponsor of FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™ and FIFA World Cup 2026™”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Archived from the original on 8 June 2023, Retrieved 8 June 2023,
  141. ^ “FIFA announces partnership with blockchain innovator Algorand”, FIFA.1 May 2022. Archived from the original on 29 April 2023, Retrieved 3 May 2023,
  142. ^ “Booking.com announced as Official Online Travel Sponsor for the FIFA Women’s World Cup Australia & New Zealand 2023™”, FIFA.19 July 2023. Archived from the original on 19 July 2023, Retrieved 19 July 2023,
  143. ^ McCaskill, Steve (17 October 2022). “Fifa signs up Globant to build out Fifa+ DTC platform”, SportsPro Media, Retrieved 17 October 2022,
  144. ^ “Mengniu becomes an Official FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™ Sponsor”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association, Retrieved 14 July 2023,
  145. ^ “FIFA and McDonald’s renew long-standing partnership, with collaboration continuing for FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™ and FIFA World Cup 2026™”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Archived from the original on 16 May 2023, Retrieved 16 May 2023,
  146. ^ “Unilever personal care brands unveiled as Official Sponsors of FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™” (Press release). Unilever,12 May 2023, Retrieved 15 May 2023,
  147. ^ “Cisco joins FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™ as Official Network Infrastructure Provider”, www.fifa.com, Archived from the original on 19 April 2023, Retrieved 20 April 2023,
  148. ^ “Commonwealth Bank announced as FIFA Women’s World Cup Australia & New Zealand 2023™ Official Supporter”, www.fifa.com, Archived from the original on 13 November 2022, Retrieved 13 November 2022,
  149. ^ “Jacob’s Creek announced as FIFA Women’s World Cup Australia & New Zealand 2023™ Official Supporter”, www.fifa.com, Archived from the original on 6 April 2023, Retrieved 7 April 2023,
  150. ^ “FIFA and Optus join forces to empower women’s sport and inspire the next generation”, www.fifa.com, Archived from the original on 23 June 2023, Retrieved 23 June 2023,
  151. ^ “TAB become first betting agency to become official supporter of a FIFA World Cup”, Stuff.co.nz.25 June 2023. Archived from the original on 26 June 2023, Retrieved 26 June 2023,
  152. ^ “Team Global Express announced as FIFA Women’s World Cup Australia & New Zealand 2023™ Official Supporter”, www.fifa.com, Archived from the original on 19 April 2023, Retrieved 18 April 2023,
  153. ^ “Yadea Named Tournament Supporter of FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™ in Asia-Pacific”, www.fifa.com, Archived from the original on 3 July 2023, Retrieved 3 July 2023,
  154. ^ Jump up to: a b “FIFA sells out all partnership packages for the FIFA Women’s World Cup Australia & New Zealand 2023”, www.fifa.com, Archived from the original on 21 July 2023, Retrieved 20 July 2023,
  155. ^ “BMO named Official Supporter of FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™ in North America”, www.fifa.com, Archived from the original on 27 June 2023, Retrieved 27 June 2023,
  156. ^ “Frito-Lay North America signs on as Tournament Supporter for FIFA Women’s World Cup Australia & New Zealand 2023™”, www.fifa.com, Archived from the original on 31 May 2023, Retrieved 30 May 2023,
  157. ^ “FIFA announces GEICO as Tournament Supporter in North America for FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™”, www.fifa.com, Archived from the original on 19 July 2023, Retrieved 19 July 2023,
  158. ^ “Claro to be an Official Telecommunications Operator in Brazil of the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™”, www.fifa.com, Archived from the original on 16 July 2023, Retrieved 15 July 2023,
  159. ^ Estrela Bet (18 July 2023). “Official Brazilian supporters of the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023” (Tweet), Retrieved 22 August 2023 – via Twitter,
  160. ^ “Inter Rapidísimo announced as FIFA Women’s World Cup Australia & New Zealand 2023™ Official Supporter”, www.fifa.com, Archived from the original on 23 February 2023, Retrieved 24 February 2023,
  161. ^ Jump up to: a b “2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup Mascot Unveiled”, FIFA.com,19 October 2022. Archived from the original on 20 April 2023, Retrieved 19 October 2022,
  162. ^ Banks, Jonathan C.; Mitchell, Anthony D.; Waas, Joseph R. & Paterson, Adrian M. (2002): An unexpected pattern of molecular divergence within the blue penguin ( Eudyptula minor ) complex. Notornis 49 (1): 29–38. PDF fulltext Archived 3 February 2020 at the Wayback Machine
  163. ^ Jump up to: a b “Official Match Ball for the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™ unveiled by adidas”, Archived from the original on 18 March 2023, Retrieved 5 April 2023,
  164. ^ Odedra, Renuka (14 August 2023). “adidas unveil 2023 Women’s World Cup Oceaunz final match ball”, Goal.com, Archived from the original on 14 August 2023, Retrieved 14 August 2023,
  165. ^ “Kelly Lee Owens Shares “Unity”, the Theme Song for the 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup: Listen”, Pitchfork.com,28 October 2021. Archived from the original on 28 October 2021, Retrieved 29 October 2021,
  166. ^ Zhou, Naaman (28 July 2023). “The Thrill on the Ground at the Women’s World Cup”, The New Yorker, ISSN 0028-792X, Retrieved 3 August 2023,
  167. ^ “Benee and Mallrat set to release official Fifa Women’s World Cup song”, Stuff.co.nz,20 June 2023. Archived from the original on 20 June 2023, Retrieved 20 June 2023,
  168. ^ “Official Song for FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™ announced: Do It Again – BENEE ft. Mallrat”, FIFA.com,29 June 2023. Archived from the original on 29 June 2023, Retrieved 29 June 2023,
  169. ^ Brandle, Lars (20 July 2023). “Tones And I Sets-up FIFA Women’s World Cup”, The Music Network, Archived from the original on 24 July 2023, Retrieved 24 July 2023,
  170. ^ Hogan, Heather (17 July 2023). “Megan Rapinoe’s Nike World Cup Commercial is Lesbian Anime”, Autostraddle, Archived from the original on 26 July 2023, Retrieved 26 July 2023,
  171. ^ “Kick off the Fifa Women’s World Cup 2023 with the best ads so far”, The Drum, Archived from the original on 26 July 2023, Retrieved 26 July 2023,
  172. ^ Let It Rip | Megan Rapinoe | Nike Football, archived from the original on 26 July 2023, retrieved 26 July 2023
  173. ^ Like a Lioness | Nike Football, archived from the original on 26 July 2023, retrieved 26 July 2023
  174. ^ “Ms Banks Is The Sound Of The Women’s World Cup”, ELLE,30 May 2019. Archived from the original on 26 July 2023, Retrieved 26 July 2023,
  175. ^ Solomon, Kate (18 July 2023). “Call Me a Lioness: Melanie C, Self Esteem and more record song for Women’s World Cup”, The Guardian, ISSN 0261-3077, Archived from the original on 26 July 2023, Retrieved 26 July 2023,
  176. ^ Call Me A Lioness, archived from the original on 26 July 2023, retrieved 26 July 2023
  177. ^ “Mel C and Wolf Alice contribute to Lionesses’ World Cup song”, BBC News,19 July 2023. Archived from the original on 26 July 2023, Retrieved 26 July 2023,
  178. ^ Jump up to: a b c “Sofie Junge Pedersen interview: Denmark midfielder on leading historic climate action ahead of the Women’s World Cup”, Sky Sports,13 July 2023. Archived from the original on 14 July 2023, Retrieved 21 July 2023,
  179. ^ “FIFA allows anti-discrimination armbands at Women’s World Cup”, Al Jazeera,30 June 2023. Archived from the original on 25 July 2023, Retrieved 25 July 2023,
  180. ^ “New Zealand and Australia indigenous flags to fly at FIFA Women’s World Cup”, Insidethegames.biz,7 July 2023. Archived from the original on 16 July 2023, Retrieved 8 July 2023,
  181. ^ Khan, Jo (7 July 2023). “Fifa allows First Nations flags to fly at Women’s World Cup”, The Guardian, Archived from the original on 24 July 2023, Retrieved 8 July 2023,
  182. ^ Holmes, Tracey (7 July 2023). “FIFA to allow First Nations flags at Women’s World Cup”, ABC News Australia, Archived from the original on 24 July 2023, Retrieved 25 July 2023,
  183. ^ Jump up to: a b “Women’s World Cup stars to offset climate impact of flights to tournament”, The Independent,13 July 2023. Archived from the original on 14 July 2023, Retrieved 14 July 2023,
  184. ^ Onyeagwara, Nnamdi (13 July 2023). “Women’s World Cup stars create player-led climate action initiative”, The Athletic, Archived from the original on 14 July 2023, Retrieved 14 July 2023,
  185. ^ Sethna-McIntosh, Kyra (12 July 2023). “Women’s World Cup players launch football’s biggest climate campaign”, The Guardian, ISSN 0261-3077, Archived from the original on 14 July 2023, Retrieved 14 July 2023,
  186. ^ “Germany players commit some of their Women’s World Cup bonuses to grassroots programs”, AP News,24 July 2023. Archived from the original on 25 July 2023, Retrieved 25 July 2023,
  187. ^ Jump up to: a b “Press release: Women’s World Cup 2023 – UN Women and FIFA join forces for gender equality”, UN Women – Headquarters,19 July 2023. Archived from the original on 21 July 2023, Retrieved 21 July 2023,
  188. ^ Miller, Nick. “The stars and storylines that could define the Women’s World Cup”, The Athletic, Archived from the original on 22 July 2023, Retrieved 22 July 2023,
  189. ^ “FIFA rejects calls for 26-woman squads in 2023 World Cup, despite pleas from Sarina Wiegman and Martina Voss-Tecklenburg”, Sky Sports, Archived from the original on 1 June 2023, Retrieved 31 May 2023,
  190. ^ Christenson, Marcus (17 May 2023). “Player release date for Women’s World Cup agreed but FA set to stick to plans”, The Guardian, ISSN 0261-3077, Archived from the original on 3 June 2023, Retrieved 3 June 2023,
  191. ^ “Fifa drops controversial Visit Saudi sponsorship of Women’s World Cup”, Independent.co.uk,16 March 2023. Archived from the original on 19 March 2023, Retrieved 19 March 2023,
  192. ^ Pathak, Manasi (3 May 2023). “FIFA responsible for undervaluing Women’s World Cup, says Dodd”, Reuters, Archived from the original on 16 May 2023, Retrieved 16 May 2023,
  193. ^ “New FIFPRO report warns of uneven Women’s World Cup qualifying across confederations – FIFPRO World Players’ Union”, FIFPRO, Archived from the original on 20 July 2023, Retrieved 20 July 2023,
  194. ^ Panja, Tariq (28 June 2023). “FIFA Will Allow Rainbow Armbands at Women’s World Cup”, The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331, Archived from the original on 30 June 2023, Retrieved 30 June 2023,
  195. ^ Zeigler, Cyd (30 June 2023). “Women’s World Cup captains can kind of wear Pride rainbow armband, sort of”, Outsports, Archived from the original on 30 June 2023, Retrieved 30 June 2023,
  196. ^ Jump up to: a b “Live: Auckland shooting: Multiple people believed dead, police officer hit”, Stuff,19 July 2023, Retrieved 19 July 2023,
  197. ^ “Deadly shooting ‘overshadows’ start of World Cup”, BBC Sport, Archived from the original on 26 July 2023, Retrieved 26 July 2023,
  198. ^ Gordon, Oliver (20 July 2023). “Shooting casts shadow over day one of World Cup – ABC Radio”, ABC, Archived from the original on 26 July 2023, Retrieved 26 July 2023,
  199. ^ “Women’s World Cup Kicks Off Under Shadow of Deadly NZ Shooting”, Bloomberg,20 July 2023. Archived from the original on 20 August 2023, Retrieved 26 July 2023,
  200. ^ “Hosts New Zealand stun Graham Hansen’s Norway in World Cup opener”, sport,20 July 2023. Archived from the original on 26 July 2023, Retrieved 26 July 2023,
  201. ^ Sullivan, Helen (19 July 2023). “Auckland shooting live updates: New Zealand PM says Women’s World Cup will go ahead after gunman kills two – latest news”, The Guardian, ISSN 0261-3077, Archived from the original on 19 July 2023, Retrieved 19 July 2023,
  202. ^ Armah, Mildred (20 July 2023). “FIFA Women’s World Cup Fan Festival closed after shooting in Auckland”, Stuff, Archived from the original on 22 July 2023, Retrieved 20 July 2023,
  203. ^ Hytner, Mike (20 July 2023). “Women’s World Cup 2023: opening game to go ahead as players speak about Auckland shooting”, The Guardian, ISSN 0261-3077, Archived from the original on 20 July 2023, Retrieved 20 July 2023,
  204. ^ Jump up to: a b Rollo, Phillip (20 July 2023). “FIFA Women’s World Cup teams honour victims of Auckland shooting”, Stuff, Archived from the original on 22 July 2023, Retrieved 20 July 2023,
  205. ^ Lucas, Katherine (20 July 2023). “World Cup ‘to proceed as planned’ with tributes prepared after fatal Auckland shooting”, inews, Archived from the original on 25 July 2023, Retrieved 25 July 2023,
  206. ^ “New Zealand: Shooting in Auckland before World Cup kills two”, BBC News,19 July 2023. Archived from the original on 24 July 2023, Retrieved 26 July 2023,
  207. ^ “Women’s World Cup: Australia and New Zealand kick-off tournament with wins as security increased after shooting”, Sky News, Archived from the original on 26 July 2023, Retrieved 26 July 2023,
  208. ^ “Auckland shooting: Two people and a gunman killed on eve of Women’s World Cup”, Sky Sports, Archived from the original on 26 July 2023, Retrieved 26 July 2023,
  209. ^ “Two critical after downtown Auckland shooting – gunman flees on Lime scooter”, NZ Herald,5 August 2023. Archived from the original on 5 August 2023, Retrieved 5 August 2023,
  210. ^ Rankin, Anna (4 August 2023). “New Zealand: one person dies in hospital after Auckland shooting”, The Guardian, ISSN 0261-3077, Archived from the original on 5 August 2023, Retrieved 5 August 2023,
  211. ^ “Football Ferns escape Auckland hotel through thick smoke in stairwell after fire”, NZ Herald,24 July 2023. Archived from the original on 24 July 2023, Retrieved 24 July 2023,
  212. ^ “Football Ferns’ security boosted after hotel fire, players dash from ‘devastating’ blaze”, NZ Herald,24 July 2023. Archived from the original on 24 July 2023, Retrieved 24 July 2023,
  213. ^ “New Zealand Women’s World Cup team evacuated because of hotel fire in second security incident”, AP News,22 July 2023. Archived from the original on 24 July 2023, Retrieved 24 July 2023,
  214. ^ “New Zealand’s World Cup team evacuated after hotel fire”, DW,23 July 2023. Archived from the original on 24 July 2023, Retrieved 24 July 2023,
You might be interested:  What Do Ticks Look Like?

Who came 4th in the World Cup 2023?

References –

  1. ^ Jump up to: a b “Everything you need to know about the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Archived from the original on 25 November 2022, Retrieved 26 November 2022,
  2. ^ “FIFA Council approves further transfer system reforms and announces key FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 dates”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association.20 May 2021. Archived from the original on 18 June 2021, Retrieved 20 May 2021,
  3. ^ “NZ Football”, www.nzfootball.co.nz, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  4. ^ “New Zealand makes history with country’s first World Cup victory ever”, FOX Sports, Retrieved 9 September 2023,
  5. ^ “Spain win first Women’s World Cup, beating England 1–0”, Al Jazeera,20 August 2023, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  6. ^ “How Spain became the holders of all three Women’s World Cups”, FIFA.com, FIFA.20 August 2023. Archived from the original on 22 August 2023, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  7. ^ “Sweden win fourth Women’s World Cup third-place medal; Australia end up in fourth place in highest ever finish”, CBSSports.com,19 August 2023, Retrieved 9 September 2023,
  8. ^ “USA beat Netherlands for fourth title”, BBC.7 July 2019. Archived from the original on 21 July 2019, Retrieved 24 October 2022,
  9. ^ Burhan, Asif (6 August 2023). “Defending Champions USWNT Eliminated From Women’s World Cup By Sweden”, Forbes, Archived from the original on 6 August 2023, Retrieved 6 August 2023,
  10. ^ “AFC President Sheikh Salman praises ‘greatest-ever’ FIFA Women’s World Cup in Australia and New Zealand”, Arab News,21 August 2023, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  11. ^ Martelli, Joel (20 August 2023). “Only the start for Matildas as FIFA Women’s World Cup hailed as best ever”, Seven News, Retrieved 29 August 2023,
  12. ^ reporters, Stuff sports (7 August 2023). “New Zealand and Australia the best attended FIFA Women’s World Cup in history”, Stuff, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  13. ^ “The best Women’s World Cup in history”, Francs Jeux, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  14. ^ AfricaNews (18 August 2023). “Women’s world cup “the biggest and best of all time”- FIFA”, Africanews,
  15. ^ reporters, Stuff sports (7 August 2023). “New Zealand and Australia the best attended FIFA Women’s World Cup in history”, Stuff, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  16. ^ “1991 Women’s World Cup: Celebrating The Historic Tournament”, History of Soccer,21 January 2023. Archived from the original on 19 June 2023, Retrieved 19 June 2023,
  17. ^ “US defeats Netherlands to win record 4th Women’s World Cup title”, CNBC.7 July 2019. Archived from the original on 19 June 2023, Retrieved 19 June 2023,
  18. ^ “Women’s World Cup 2019: USA beat Netherlands to win fourth title”, BBC.7 July 2019. Archived from the original on 21 July 2019, Retrieved 19 June 2023,
  19. ^ “Match schedule confirmed for FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023”, FIFA,1 December 2021. Archived from the original on 1 December 2021, Retrieved 1 December 2021,
  20. ^ “Match schedule: FIFA Women’s World Cup Australia & New Zealand 2023” (PDF), FIFA. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2 December 2021, Retrieved 20 June 2023,
  21. ^ “Match schedule and kick-off times confirmed for Australia & New Zealand 2023”, FIFA.24 October 2022. Archived from the original on 24 October 2022, Retrieved 24 October 2022,
  22. ^ “Final rematch among FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 Draw headlines”, FIFA.22 October 2022. Archived from the original on 22 October 2022, Retrieved 22 October 2022,
  23. ^ “FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™ targets over 100,000 fans for epic opening matchday”, FIFA.31 January 2023. Archived from the original on 30 January 2023, Retrieved 31 January 2023,
  24. ^ Jump up to: a b “New payment model guarantees support for every FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™ team and player”, FIFA.9 June 2023. Archived from the original on 18 June 2023, Retrieved 18 June 2023,
  25. ^ Cootes, Isobel (16 July 2023). “What players at the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™ will be paid”, Optus Sports, Archived from the original on 17 July 2023, Retrieved 17 July 2023,
  26. ^ Kunti, Samindra. “Lise Klaveness: FIFA Must Stick To Prize Money Promises At Women’s World Cup”, Forbes, Archived from the original on 27 July 2023, Retrieved 27 July 2023,
  27. ^ Aarons, Ed; Molina, Romain (3 August 2023). “Fifa investigating claims Zambia coach rubbed player’s chest at World Cup”, The Guardian, ISSN 0261-3077, Archived from the original on 5 August 2023, Retrieved 5 August 2023,
  28. ^ “FIFA starts bidding process for FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association.19 February 2019. Archived from the original on 22 November 2020, Retrieved 21 February 2019,
  29. ^ Jump up to: a b c “FIFA Council unanimously approves expanded 32-team field for FIFA Women’s World Cup”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association.31 July 2019. Archived from the original on 9 June 2020, Retrieved 31 July 2019,
  30. ^ “FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023: Overview of the bidding process (updated version, August 2019)” (PDF), FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association.3 September 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on 5 August 2021, Retrieved 3 September 2019,
  31. ^ “FIFA receives record number of expressions of interest in hosting FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association.18 March 2019. Archived from the original on 24 May 2021, Retrieved 19 March 2019,
  32. ^ “Belgium and Bolivia drop out as eight countries remain in race to host 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup”, insidethegames.biz,3 September 2019. Archived from the original on 1 October 2020, Retrieved 3 September 2019,
  33. ^ “Bidding process for FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 continues with eight member associations”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association.3 September 2019. Archived from the original on 12 May 2021, Retrieved 3 September 2019,
  34. ^ “One Vision”, As One 2023, Football Federation Australia. Archived from the original on 13 December 2019, Retrieved 12 December 2019,
  35. ^ “FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023: four bids submitted”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association.13 December 2019. Archived from the original on 22 November 2020, Retrieved 13 December 2019,
  36. ^ “Brasil retira candidatura a sede da Copa do Mundo Feminina FIFA 2023” (in Brazilian Portuguese). Brazilian Football Confederation,8 June 2020. Archived from the original on 26 January 2021, Retrieved 26 June 2020,
  37. ^ “Japan FA to withdraw from Bid to host the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023”, Japan Football Association,22 June 2020. Archived from the original on 23 June 2020.
  38. ^ “Australia and New Zealand selected as hosts of FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association.25 June 2020. Archived from the original on 27 June 2020, Retrieved 25 June 2020,
  39. ^ “FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 Voting Results” (PDF), FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association.25 June 2020. Archived from the original (PDF) on 25 June 2020, Retrieved 25 June 2020,
  40. ^ “Australia and New Zealand to host 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup”, Asian Football Confederation,26 June 2020. Archived from the original on 29 June 2023, Retrieved 29 June 2023,
  41. ^ “FIFA President Infantino hails France 2019, outlines proposals for future of women’s game”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association.5 July 2019. Archived from the original on 17 July 2019, Retrieved 5 July 2019,
  42. ^ “Key figures from the FIFA Women’s World Cup Canada 2015”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association.7 July 2015. Archived from the original on 11 July 2015, Retrieved 3 October 2016,
  43. ^ Mather, Victor (5 July 2019). “FIFA President Proposes Expansion of Women’s World Cup and Doubling of Prize Money”, The New York Times, Archived from the original on 16 October 2021, Retrieved 28 June 2020,
  44. ^ Mackey, Ed (1 June 2023). “Women’s World Cup 2023: Everything you need to know (and some things you didn’t)”, The Athletic, Archived from the original on 6 June 2023, Retrieved 5 June 2023,
  45. ^ “As One. Australia and New Zealand bidding to host the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023” (PDF), Football Federation Australia, New Zealand Football. Archived (PDF) from the original on 6 April 2023, Retrieved 14 December 2019 – via FIFA.com.
  46. ^ “Dominic Perrottet reopens Sydney Football Stadium while admitting rebuild damaged Coalition”, ABC News,27 August 2022. Archived from the original on 6 June 2023, Retrieved 5 June 2023,
  47. ^ “FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™ Bid Evaluation Report published – three bids submitted to FIFA Council”, FIFA.com,10 June 2020. Archived from the original on 24 September 2021, Retrieved 10 June 2020,
  48. ^ “New turf rolled out ahead of FIFA Women’s World Cup” (Press release). Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries,12 April 2023, Retrieved 5 June 2023,
  49. ^ Tan, Christopher (8 May 2023). “FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023: Big names visit Kingsway and Sorrento to inspect venues”, PerthNow, Archived from the original on 6 June 2023, Retrieved 5 June 2023,
  50. ^ “FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 Host Cities and Stadiums announced”, FIFA.com, FIFA. Archived from the original on 31 March 2021, Retrieved 31 March 2021,
  51. ^ “Australia and New Zealand are hosting the FIFA 2023 Women’s World Cup. Here’s how the tournament will work”, ABC News, Australian Broadcasting Corporation.25 June 2020. Archived from the original on 26 June 2020, Retrieved 26 June 2020,
  52. ^ Jump up to: a b c Lewis, Samantha (27 November 2021). “2023 Women’s World Cup is already changing the game for First Nations communities”, ABC News, Archived from the original on 15 July 2022, Retrieved 15 July 2022,
  53. ^ Dator, James (7 July 2023). “FIFA allowing the Women’s World Cup to honor indigenous people is a rare W”, SB Nation, Archived from the original on 21 July 2023, Retrieved 21 July 2023,
  54. ^ Lewis, Rhett (28 May 2022). “Womens World Cup 2023: Dates, Schedule And Kick-Off Times”, History Of Soccer, Archived from the original on 7 October 2022, Retrieved 22 August 2022,
  55. ^ Chammas, Michael (24 April 2022). “Women’s World Cup lockout to cause two-month fixture chaos for NRL”, The Sydney Morning Herald, Archived from the original on 16 August 2023, Retrieved 16 August 2023,
  56. ^ “Stadium Australia”, FIFA.com, Archived from the original on 6 December 2022, Retrieved 7 December 2022,
  57. ^ “Sydney Football Stadium”, FIFA.com, Archived from the original on 6 December 2022, Retrieved 7 December 2022,
  58. ^ “Brisbane Stadium-womens-world-cup-2023”, FIFA.com, Archived from the original on 6 December 2022, Retrieved 7 December 2022,
  59. ^ “Eden Park”, FIFA.com, Archived from the original on 6 December 2022, Retrieved 7 December 2022,
  60. ^ “Wellington Regional Stadium”, FIFA.com, Archived from the original on 6 December 2022, Retrieved 7 December 2022,
  61. ^ “Melbourne Rectangular Stadium”, FIFA.com, Archived from the original on 6 December 2022, Retrieved 7 December 2022,
  62. ^ “Perth Rectangular Stadium”, FIFA.com, Archived from the original on 6 December 2022, Retrieved 7 December 2022,
  63. ^ “Hindmarsh Stadium”, FIFA.com, Archived from the original on 6 December 2022, Retrieved 7 December 2022,
  64. ^ “Dunedin Stadium”, FIFA.com, Archived from the original on 6 December 2022, Retrieved 7 December 2022,
  65. ^ “Waikato Stadium”, FIFA.com, Archived from the original on 6 December 2022, Retrieved 7 December 2022,
  66. ^ “Team Base Camps confirmed for FIFA Women’s World Cup Australia & New Zealand 2023”, FIFA.com, FIFA. Archived from the original on 13 December 2022, Retrieved 12 December 2022,
  67. ^ “All 32 FIFA Women’s World Cup™ Team Base Camps now confirmed”, FIFA.com, FIFA. Archived from the original on 22 March 2023, Retrieved 21 March 2023,
  68. ^ Roche, Calum (22 March 2023). “FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023: find out where every team is based”, Diario AS, Archived from the original on 6 June 2023, Retrieved 5 June 2023,
  69. ^ “Concacaf to launch new senior women’s national team competitions to benefit entire Confederation” (Press release). Concacaf,10 December 2020, Retrieved 5 June 2023,
  70. ^ “USWNT defeats Canada in CONCACAF W Championship final, secures berth in 2024 Paris Olympics”, The Athletic,18 July 2022. Archived from the original on 6 June 2023, Retrieved 5 June 2023,
  71. ^ “FIFA suspends Chad and Pakistan football associations”, FIFA.7 April 2021. Archived from the original on 16 May 2022, Retrieved 16 May 2022,
  72. ^ “Rwanda Government asks Federation to withdraw 2022 Women’s AFCON qualifier”, Sports News Africa,13 October 2021. Archived from the original on 19 October 2021, Retrieved 13 October 2021,
  73. ^ “Sudan – Algeria: the Greens will not play their return match”, california18.com, CA18.26 October 2021. Archived from the original on 27 October 2021, Retrieved 16 May 2022,
  74. ^ “CAF Statement on the Women’s AFCON Qualifier: Equatorial Guinea vs DR Congo”, CAF,22 October 2021. Archived from the original on 16 March 2022, Retrieved 16 May 2022,
  75. ^ “Withdrawal of Sao Tome from the qualifiers of the TotalEnergies Women’s AFCON 2022”, CAF,24 October 2021. Archived from the original on 24 October 2021, Retrieved 24 October 2021,
  76. ^ “Kenya Government asks Federation to withdraw 2022 Women’s AFCON qualifier”, fufa,28 January 2022. Archived from the original on 28 January 2022, Retrieved 26 January 2022,
  77. ^ “Latest update on the AFC U23 Asian Cup Uzbekistan 2022 – Qualifiers”, Asian Football Confederation.29 July 2021. Archived from the original on 23 October 2021, Retrieved 16 May 2022,
  78. ^ “It’s now down to Indonesia-Singapore in Group C”, ASEAN Football Federation.8 September 2021. Archived from the original on 4 November 2021, Retrieved 12 September 2021,
  79. ^ “Vietnam to play three AFC Women’s Asian Cup 2022 qualifiers”, Voice of Vietnam.18 August 2021. Archived from the original on 4 November 2021, Retrieved 17 September 2021,
  80. ^ “Latest update on the AFC Women’s Asian Cup India 2022”, AFC.24 January 2022. Archived from the original on 23 January 2022, Retrieved 16 May 2022,
  81. ^ “More calendar changes for 2021”, Oceania Football Confederation.16 December 2020. Archived from the original on 23 May 2022, Retrieved 15 May 2022,
  82. ^ “FIFA/UEFA suspend Russian clubs and national teams from all competitions”, FIFA (Press release).28 February 2022, Retrieved 28 February 2022,
  83. ^ “Update on FIFA Women’s World Cup and men’s youth competition”, FIFA.25 December 2020. Archived from the original on 22 June 2022, Retrieved 15 May 2022,
  84. ^ “New Zealand to host first ever FIFA Women’s World Cup Play-Off Tournament”, FIFA.4 July 2022. Archived from the original on 24 November 2022, Retrieved 5 July 2022,
  85. ^ Jump up to: a b Thomas, Joshua (7 March 2023). “FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023: Which teams have qualified for the tournament in Australia and New Zealand?”, The Sporting News, Archived from the original on 6 June 2023, Retrieved 5 June 2023,
  86. ^ Frith, Will (7 September 2022). “Italy and Netherlands qualify for 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup”, She Kicks, Retrieved 5 June 2023,
  87. ^ “FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 – Africa Watch”, Boxscore News, Boxscore World Sportswire.17 May 2023. Archived from the original on 18 May 2023, Retrieved 18 May 2023,
  88. ^ “2023 Women’s World Cup – 100 days to go until Australia and New Zealand co-host tournament”, BBC,11 April 2023. Archived from the original on 18 May 2023, Retrieved 18 May 2023,
  89. ^ “FIFA Women’s Ranking – 9 June 2023”, FIFA. Archived from the original on 17 June 2023, Retrieved 18 June 2023,
  90. ^ “Regulations – FIFA Women’s World Cup AU NZ 23” (PDF), FIFA. Archived (PDF) from the original on 14 December 2022, Retrieved 30 May 2023,
  91. ^ “Auckland/Tāmaki Makaurau to host the Draw for the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 in October”, FIFA,12 May 2022. Archived from the original on 16 December 2022, Retrieved 13 May 2022,
  92. ^ “New Zealand to host FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™ Draw”, Government of New Zealand,13 May 2022. Archived from the original on 21 September 2022, Retrieved 21 September 2022,
  93. ^ “Procedures for the Final Draw for the FIFA Women’s World Cup Australia New Zealand 2023” (PDF), FIFA.8 October 2022. Archived (PDF) from the original on 8 October 2022, Retrieved 8 October 2022,
  94. ^ “Star-studded line-up for FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™ draw”, FIFA Plus, Fédération internationale de Football Association. Archived from the original on 20 October 2022, Retrieved 22 October 2022,
  95. ^ “Women’s Draw Seedings FIFA Women’s World Cup Australia New Zealand 2023”, FIFA.14 October 2022. Archived from the original on 16 December 2022, Retrieved 14 October 2022,
  96. ^ Jump up to: a b “Match officials appointed for FIFA Women’s World Cup Australia & New Zealand 2023™”, FIFA.com,9 January 2023. Archived from the original on 9 January 2023, Retrieved 9 January 2023,
  97. ^ “Trailblazer: Palestine’s Heba Saadieh is creating history and more”, FIFA.com,13 January 2023. Archived from the original on 18 May 2023, Retrieved 18 May 2023,
  98. ^ “Saadia to become first Palestinian referee at FIFA Women’s World Cup”, insidethegames.biz,8 January 2023. Archived from the original on 21 May 2023, Retrieved 18 May 2023,
  99. ^ “Sources: World Cup to use NFL-style VAR calls”, ESPN,30 June 2023. Archived from the original on 1 July 2023, Retrieved 1 July 2023,
  100. ^ FIFA Media (18 August 2023). “Final match officials” (Tweet), Retrieved 18 August 2023 – via Twitter,
  101. ^ Jump up to: a b c Sharp-Wiggins, Blake; Khan, Jo (20 July 2023). “A missing star and an upset win: Women’s World Cup opening night – in pictures”, The Guardian, ISSN 0261-3077, Archived from the original on 26 July 2023, Retrieved 26 July 2023,
  102. ^ Jump up to: a b c d e Hytner, Mike; Khan, Jo (20 July 2023). “New Zealand 1–0 Norway: Women’s World Cup 2023 Group A – as it happened”, The Guardian, ISSN 0261-3077, Archived from the original on 20 July 2023, Retrieved 26 July 2023,
  103. ^ Jump up to: a b “A PESAR DE UN ATENTADO MORTAL, EL MUNDIAL FEMENINO SE INAUGURÓ CON ÉXITO”, El Gráfico (in Spanish).20 July 2023. Archived from the original on 22 July 2023, Retrieved 20 July 2023,
  104. ^ Jump up to: a b Knuckey, Brodyn (20 July 2023). “Football Ferns stun Norway to claim first-ever World Cup win”,1 News, Archived from the original on 20 July 2023, Retrieved 20 July 2023,
  105. ^ Marnie Vinall; Billie Eder (20 August 2023). “As it happened Women’s World Cup: Spain are Women’s World Cup champions with masterclass 1–0 defeat of England in final”, The Age, Retrieved 20 August 2023,
  106. ^ Athletic, The (15 August 2023). “Spain vs Sweden live updates”, The Athletic, Archived from the original on 15 August 2023, Retrieved 15 August 2023,
  107. ^ “Football fever grips Australia as Matildas’ adventures continue”, FIFA.14 August 2023, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  108. ^ Crawford, Fiona (11 August 2023). “From handing out their own flyers, to sell-out games: how the Matildas won over a nation”, The Conversation, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  109. ^ Barrett, Jonathan (16 August 2023). “Matildas brand more valuable than any other national sports team, marketing expert says”, The Guardian, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  110. ^ Foster, Craig (14 August 2023). “The Matildas’ courage is changing the Australian narrative. The question is: what next?”, The Guardian, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  111. ^ Shephard, Tory (19 August 2023). “Albanese government to pledge $200m for women’s sport after Matildas inspire Australia”, The Guardian, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  112. ^ Orr, Aleisha (13 August 2023). “Matildas’ win over France reportedly delivers biggest TV audience since Cathy Freeman race”, SBS News, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  113. ^ “Matildas’ Women’s World Cup semifinal loss to England sets TV audience record”, ABC News,17 August 2023, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  114. ^ Bowring, Declan (15 August 2023). “Where to watch the Matildas vs England Women’s World Cup semifinal live in Sydney”, ABC News, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  115. ^ Shams, Housnia (13 August 2023). “Two Sydney stadiums open as live sites for Matildas World Cup semifinal clash against England”, ABC News, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  116. ^ Karp, Paul (15 August 2023). “Peter Dutton rejects proposed Matildas public holiday as ‘stunt’ and ‘ego trip’ for Anthony Albanese”, The Guardian, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  117. ^ “Football Australia ‘seriously’ considering bid for men’s World Cup”,7NEWS,21 August 2023, Retrieved 23 August 2023,
  118. ^ Jump up to: a b c d “Regulations: FIFA Women’s World Cup Australia & New Zealand 2023” (PDF), FIFA. Archived (PDF) from the original on 14 December 2022, Retrieved 14 December 2022,
  119. ^ “FIFA Women’s World Cup awards: Bonmati wins Golden Ball”, FIFA,20 August 2023. Archived from the original on 21 August 2023, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  120. ^ “Caicedo stunner wins Hyundai Goal of the Tournament”, FIFA.29 August 2023, Retrieved 3 September 2023,
  121. ^ “Australia-NZ unveils ’23 Women’s World Cup logo”, ESPN,28 October 2021. Archived from the original on 4 January 2022, Retrieved 4 January 2022,
  122. ^ “Beyond Greatness in 2023”, FIFA.com, Archived from the original on 6 August 2023, Retrieved 4 January 2022,
  123. ^ Snape, Jack (19 July 2023). “Women’s World Cup ticket sales break record with close to 1.4m sold on eve of 2023 tournament”, The Guardian, Archived from the original on 19 July 2023, Retrieved 20 July 2023,
  124. ^ “FIFA offers free Women’s World Cup tickets amid poor NZ sales”, ESPN. Reuters.13 July 2023. Archived from the original on 18 July 2023, Retrieved 20 July 2023,
  125. ^ Johannsen, Dana (27 July 2023). “FIFA Women’s World Cup: After sluggish start, tickets sales hit important milestone in New Zealand”, Stuff, Archived from the original on 27 July 2023, Retrieved 27 July 2023,
  126. ^ “FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 Comes to FIFA 23”,28 June 2023. Archived from the original on 1 July 2023, Retrieved 1 July 2023,
  127. ^ “FIFA 23 Receives FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 Update and Predicts USA to Win”,30 June 2023. Archived from the original on 1 July 2023, Retrieved 1 July 2023,
  128. ^ “With 100 days to Women’s World Cup, calls for gender equity grow”, Al Jazeera,11 April 2023. Archived from the original on 18 May 2023, Retrieved 18 May 2023,
  129. ^ “FIFA urges broadcasters pay what the women’s game deserves”, Reuters,20 October 2022. Archived from the original on 22 October 2022, Retrieved 22 October 2022,
  130. ^ Ingle, Sean (2 May 2023). “Fifa threatens Women’s World Cup broadcast blackout in Europe”, The Guardian, ISSN 0261-3077, Archived from the original on 16 May 2023, Retrieved 16 May 2023,
  131. ^ “FIFA and EBU extend agreement for FIFA Women’s World Cup™ rights and commit to promoting women’s football”, EBU,14 June 2023. Archived from the original on 14 June 2023, Retrieved 15 June 2023,
  132. ^ “NHK to Broadcast All Nadeshiko Games”, The Yomiuri Shimbun, The Japan News.14 July 2023. Archived from the original on 15 July 2023, Retrieved 15 July 2023,
  133. ^ “FIFA and adidas extend partnership until 2030”, FIFA.21 November 2013. Archived from the original on 28 June 2017, Retrieved 10 May 2017,
  134. ^ Matthews, Sam (22 November 2005). “Coca-Cola renews Fifa football sponsorship until 2022”, Campaign. Archived from the original on 27 August 2017, Retrieved 10 May 2017,
  135. ^ “Hyundai and Kia renew FIFA partnerships until 2030, with Boston Dynamics and Supernal to showcase future mobility solutions”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association.25 May 2023. Archived from the original on 25 May 2023, Retrieved 25 May 2023,
  136. ^ “Qatar Airways Commemorates Collaboration with FIFA”, Qatar Airways.22 August 2023, Retrieved 21 August 2023,
  137. ^ Wilson, Bill (18 March 2016). “Fifa signs China’s Wanda as partner”, BBC News, Archived from the original on 11 June 2019, Retrieved 6 December 2018,
  138. ^ “FIFA announces Visa as first-ever FIFA Women’s Football Partner”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Archived from the original on 21 December 2021, Retrieved 21 December 2021,
  139. ^ “Xero named as FIFA Women’s Football Partner”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Archived from the original on 12 April 2022, Retrieved 13 April 2022,
  140. ^ “FIFA announces AB InBev as official beer sponsor of FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™ and FIFA World Cup 2026™”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Archived from the original on 8 June 2023, Retrieved 8 June 2023,
  141. ^ “FIFA announces partnership with blockchain innovator Algorand”, FIFA.1 May 2022. Archived from the original on 29 April 2023, Retrieved 3 May 2023,
  142. ^ “Booking.com announced as Official Online Travel Sponsor for the FIFA Women’s World Cup Australia & New Zealand 2023™”, FIFA.19 July 2023. Archived from the original on 19 July 2023, Retrieved 19 July 2023,
  143. ^ McCaskill, Steve (17 October 2022). “Fifa signs up Globant to build out Fifa+ DTC platform”, SportsPro Media, Retrieved 17 October 2022,
  144. ^ “Mengniu becomes an Official FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™ Sponsor”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association, Retrieved 14 July 2023,
  145. ^ “FIFA and McDonald’s renew long-standing partnership, with collaboration continuing for FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™ and FIFA World Cup 2026™”, FIFA.com, Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Archived from the original on 16 May 2023, Retrieved 16 May 2023,
  146. ^ “Unilever personal care brands unveiled as Official Sponsors of FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™” (Press release). Unilever,12 May 2023, Retrieved 15 May 2023,
  147. ^ “Cisco joins FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™ as Official Network Infrastructure Provider”, www.fifa.com, Archived from the original on 19 April 2023, Retrieved 20 April 2023,
  148. ^ “Commonwealth Bank announced as FIFA Women’s World Cup Australia & New Zealand 2023™ Official Supporter”, www.fifa.com, Archived from the original on 13 November 2022, Retrieved 13 November 2022,
  149. ^ “Jacob’s Creek announced as FIFA Women’s World Cup Australia & New Zealand 2023™ Official Supporter”, www.fifa.com, Archived from the original on 6 April 2023, Retrieved 7 April 2023,
  150. ^ “FIFA and Optus join forces to empower women’s sport and inspire the next generation”, www.fifa.com, Archived from the original on 23 June 2023, Retrieved 23 June 2023,
  151. ^ “TAB become first betting agency to become official supporter of a FIFA World Cup”, Stuff.co.nz.25 June 2023. Archived from the original on 26 June 2023, Retrieved 26 June 2023,
  152. ^ “Team Global Express announced as FIFA Women’s World Cup Australia & New Zealand 2023™ Official Supporter”, www.fifa.com, Archived from the original on 19 April 2023, Retrieved 18 April 2023,
  153. ^ “Yadea Named Tournament Supporter of FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™ in Asia-Pacific”, www.fifa.com, Archived from the original on 3 July 2023, Retrieved 3 July 2023,
  154. ^ Jump up to: a b “FIFA sells out all partnership packages for the FIFA Women’s World Cup Australia & New Zealand 2023”, www.fifa.com, Archived from the original on 21 July 2023, Retrieved 20 July 2023,
  155. ^ “BMO named Official Supporter of FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™ in North America”, www.fifa.com, Archived from the original on 27 June 2023, Retrieved 27 June 2023,
  156. ^ “Frito-Lay North America signs on as Tournament Supporter for FIFA Women’s World Cup Australia & New Zealand 2023™”, www.fifa.com, Archived from the original on 31 May 2023, Retrieved 30 May 2023,
  157. ^ “FIFA announces GEICO as Tournament Supporter in North America for FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™”, www.fifa.com, Archived from the original on 19 July 2023, Retrieved 19 July 2023,
  158. ^ “Claro to be an Official Telecommunications Operator in Brazil of the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™”, www.fifa.com, Archived from the original on 16 July 2023, Retrieved 15 July 2023,
  159. ^ Estrela Bet (18 July 2023). “Official Brazilian supporters of the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023” (Tweet), Retrieved 22 August 2023 – via Twitter,
  160. ^ “Inter Rapidísimo announced as FIFA Women’s World Cup Australia & New Zealand 2023™ Official Supporter”, www.fifa.com, Archived from the original on 23 February 2023, Retrieved 24 February 2023,
  161. ^ Jump up to: a b “2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup Mascot Unveiled”, FIFA.com,19 October 2022. Archived from the original on 20 April 2023, Retrieved 19 October 2022,
  162. ^ Banks, Jonathan C.; Mitchell, Anthony D.; Waas, Joseph R. & Paterson, Adrian M. (2002): An unexpected pattern of molecular divergence within the blue penguin ( Eudyptula minor ) complex. Notornis 49 (1): 29–38. PDF fulltext Archived 3 February 2020 at the Wayback Machine
  163. ^ Jump up to: a b “Official Match Ball for the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™ unveiled by adidas”, Archived from the original on 18 March 2023, Retrieved 5 April 2023,
  164. ^ Odedra, Renuka (14 August 2023). “adidas unveil 2023 Women’s World Cup Oceaunz final match ball”, Goal.com, Archived from the original on 14 August 2023, Retrieved 14 August 2023,
  165. ^ “Kelly Lee Owens Shares “Unity”, the Theme Song for the 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup: Listen”, Pitchfork.com,28 October 2021. Archived from the original on 28 October 2021, Retrieved 29 October 2021,
  166. ^ Zhou, Naaman (28 July 2023). “The Thrill on the Ground at the Women’s World Cup”, The New Yorker, ISSN 0028-792X, Retrieved 3 August 2023,
  167. ^ “Benee and Mallrat set to release official Fifa Women’s World Cup song”, Stuff.co.nz,20 June 2023. Archived from the original on 20 June 2023, Retrieved 20 June 2023,
  168. ^ “Official Song for FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™ announced: Do It Again – BENEE ft. Mallrat”, FIFA.com,29 June 2023. Archived from the original on 29 June 2023, Retrieved 29 June 2023,
  169. ^ Brandle, Lars (20 July 2023). “Tones And I Sets-up FIFA Women’s World Cup”, The Music Network, Archived from the original on 24 July 2023, Retrieved 24 July 2023,
  170. ^ Hogan, Heather (17 July 2023). “Megan Rapinoe’s Nike World Cup Commercial is Lesbian Anime”, Autostraddle, Archived from the original on 26 July 2023, Retrieved 26 July 2023,
  171. ^ “Kick off the Fifa Women’s World Cup 2023 with the best ads so far”, The Drum, Archived from the original on 26 July 2023, Retrieved 26 July 2023,
  172. ^ Let It Rip | Megan Rapinoe | Nike Football, archived from the original on 26 July 2023, retrieved 26 July 2023
  173. ^ Like a Lioness | Nike Football, archived from the original on 26 July 2023, retrieved 26 July 2023
  174. ^ “Ms Banks Is The Sound Of The Women’s World Cup”, ELLE,30 May 2019. Archived from the original on 26 July 2023, Retrieved 26 July 2023,
  175. ^ Solomon, Kate (18 July 2023). “Call Me a Lioness: Melanie C, Self Esteem and more record song for Women’s World Cup”, The Guardian, ISSN 0261-3077, Archived from the original on 26 July 2023, Retrieved 26 July 2023,
  176. ^ Call Me A Lioness, archived from the original on 26 July 2023, retrieved 26 July 2023
  177. ^ “Mel C and Wolf Alice contribute to Lionesses’ World Cup song”, BBC News,19 July 2023. Archived from the original on 26 July 2023, Retrieved 26 July 2023,
  178. ^ Jump up to: a b c “Sofie Junge Pedersen interview: Denmark midfielder on leading historic climate action ahead of the Women’s World Cup”, Sky Sports,13 July 2023. Archived from the original on 14 July 2023, Retrieved 21 July 2023,
  179. ^ “FIFA allows anti-discrimination armbands at Women’s World Cup”, Al Jazeera,30 June 2023. Archived from the original on 25 July 2023, Retrieved 25 July 2023,
  180. ^ “New Zealand and Australia indigenous flags to fly at FIFA Women’s World Cup”, Insidethegames.biz,7 July 2023. Archived from the original on 16 July 2023, Retrieved 8 July 2023,
  181. ^ Khan, Jo (7 July 2023). “Fifa allows First Nations flags to fly at Women’s World Cup”, The Guardian, Archived from the original on 24 July 2023, Retrieved 8 July 2023,
  182. ^ Holmes, Tracey (7 July 2023). “FIFA to allow First Nations flags at Women’s World Cup”, ABC News Australia, Archived from the original on 24 July 2023, Retrieved 25 July 2023,
  183. ^ Jump up to: a b “Women’s World Cup stars to offset climate impact of flights to tournament”, The Independent,13 July 2023. Archived from the original on 14 July 2023, Retrieved 14 July 2023,
  184. ^ Onyeagwara, Nnamdi (13 July 2023). “Women’s World Cup stars create player-led climate action initiative”, The Athletic, Archived from the original on 14 July 2023, Retrieved 14 July 2023,
  185. ^ Sethna-McIntosh, Kyra (12 July 2023). “Women’s World Cup players launch football’s biggest climate campaign”, The Guardian, ISSN 0261-3077, Archived from the original on 14 July 2023, Retrieved 14 July 2023,
  186. ^ “Germany players commit some of their Women’s World Cup bonuses to grassroots programs”, AP News,24 July 2023. Archived from the original on 25 July 2023, Retrieved 25 July 2023,
  187. ^ Jump up to: a b “Press release: Women’s World Cup 2023 – UN Women and FIFA join forces for gender equality”, UN Women – Headquarters,19 July 2023. Archived from the original on 21 July 2023, Retrieved 21 July 2023,
  188. ^ Miller, Nick. “The stars and storylines that could define the Women’s World Cup”, The Athletic, Archived from the original on 22 July 2023, Retrieved 22 July 2023,
  189. ^ “FIFA rejects calls for 26-woman squads in 2023 World Cup, despite pleas from Sarina Wiegman and Martina Voss-Tecklenburg”, Sky Sports, Archived from the original on 1 June 2023, Retrieved 31 May 2023,
  190. ^ Christenson, Marcus (17 May 2023). “Player release date for Women’s World Cup agreed but FA set to stick to plans”, The Guardian, ISSN 0261-3077, Archived from the original on 3 June 2023, Retrieved 3 June 2023,
  191. ^ “Fifa drops controversial Visit Saudi sponsorship of Women’s World Cup”, Independent.co.uk,16 March 2023. Archived from the original on 19 March 2023, Retrieved 19 March 2023,
  192. ^ Pathak, Manasi (3 May 2023). “FIFA responsible for undervaluing Women’s World Cup, says Dodd”, Reuters, Archived from the original on 16 May 2023, Retrieved 16 May 2023,
  193. ^ “New FIFPRO report warns of uneven Women’s World Cup qualifying across confederations – FIFPRO World Players’ Union”, FIFPRO, Archived from the original on 20 July 2023, Retrieved 20 July 2023,
  194. ^ Panja, Tariq (28 June 2023). “FIFA Will Allow Rainbow Armbands at Women’s World Cup”, The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331, Archived from the original on 30 June 2023, Retrieved 30 June 2023,
  195. ^ Zeigler, Cyd (30 June 2023). “Women’s World Cup captains can kind of wear Pride rainbow armband, sort of”, Outsports, Archived from the original on 30 June 2023, Retrieved 30 June 2023,
  196. ^ Jump up to: a b “Live: Auckland shooting: Multiple people believed dead, police officer hit”, Stuff,19 July 2023, Retrieved 19 July 2023,
  197. ^ “Deadly shooting ‘overshadows’ start of World Cup”, BBC Sport, Archived from the original on 26 July 2023, Retrieved 26 July 2023,
  198. ^ Gordon, Oliver (20 July 2023). “Shooting casts shadow over day one of World Cup – ABC Radio”, ABC, Archived from the original on 26 July 2023, Retrieved 26 July 2023,
  199. ^ “Women’s World Cup Kicks Off Under Shadow of Deadly NZ Shooting”, Bloomberg,20 July 2023. Archived from the original on 20 August 2023, Retrieved 26 July 2023,
  200. ^ “Hosts New Zealand stun Graham Hansen’s Norway in World Cup opener”, sport,20 July 2023. Archived from the original on 26 July 2023, Retrieved 26 July 2023,
  201. ^ Sullivan, Helen (19 July 2023). “Auckland shooting live updates: New Zealand PM says Women’s World Cup will go ahead after gunman kills two – latest news”, The Guardian, ISSN 0261-3077, Archived from the original on 19 July 2023, Retrieved 19 July 2023,
  202. ^ Armah, Mildred (20 July 2023). “FIFA Women’s World Cup Fan Festival closed after shooting in Auckland”, Stuff, Archived from the original on 22 July 2023, Retrieved 20 July 2023,
  203. ^ Hytner, Mike (20 July 2023). “Women’s World Cup 2023: opening game to go ahead as players speak about Auckland shooting”, The Guardian, ISSN 0261-3077, Archived from the original on 20 July 2023, Retrieved 20 July 2023,
  204. ^ Jump up to: a b Rollo, Phillip (20 July 2023). “FIFA Women’s World Cup teams honour victims of Auckland shooting”, Stuff, Archived from the original on 22 July 2023, Retrieved 20 July 2023,
  205. ^ Lucas, Katherine (20 July 2023). “World Cup ‘to proceed as planned’ with tributes prepared after fatal Auckland shooting”, inews, Archived from the original on 25 July 2023, Retrieved 25 July 2023,
  206. ^ “New Zealand: Shooting in Auckland before World Cup kills two”, BBC News,19 July 2023. Archived from the original on 24 July 2023, Retrieved 26 July 2023,
  207. ^ “Women’s World Cup: Australia and New Zealand kick-off tournament with wins as security increased after shooting”, Sky News, Archived from the original on 26 July 2023, Retrieved 26 July 2023,
  208. ^ “Auckland shooting: Two people and a gunman killed on eve of Women’s World Cup”, Sky Sports, Archived from the original on 26 July 2023, Retrieved 26 July 2023,
  209. ^ “Two critical after downtown Auckland shooting – gunman flees on Lime scooter”, NZ Herald,5 August 2023. Archived from the original on 5 August 2023, Retrieved 5 August 2023,
  210. ^ Rankin, Anna (4 August 2023). “New Zealand: one person dies in hospital after Auckland shooting”, The Guardian, ISSN 0261-3077, Archived from the original on 5 August 2023, Retrieved 5 August 2023,
  211. ^ “Football Ferns escape Auckland hotel through thick smoke in stairwell after fire”, NZ Herald,24 July 2023. Archived from the original on 24 July 2023, Retrieved 24 July 2023,
  212. ^ “Football Ferns’ security boosted after hotel fire, players dash from ‘devastating’ blaze”, NZ Herald,24 July 2023. Archived from the original on 24 July 2023, Retrieved 24 July 2023,
  213. ^ “New Zealand Women’s World Cup team evacuated because of hotel fire in second security incident”, AP News,22 July 2023. Archived from the original on 24 July 2023, Retrieved 24 July 2023,
  214. ^ “New Zealand’s World Cup team evacuated after hotel fire”, DW,23 July 2023. Archived from the original on 24 July 2023, Retrieved 24 July 2023,
You might be interested:  What Is A Cscs Card?

Is India still in World Cup 2023?

ICC Cricket World Cup 2023 Schedule – The schedule for the ICC World Cup 2023 Schedule has been released by ICC. The 2023 ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup will be held in India from October 5 to November 19, 2023. The upcoming World Cup will feature a total of 10 teams.

Who is the player of the tournament in World Cup 2023?

Golden Ball: Aitana Bonmati – The Golden Ball is awarded to the tournament’s best player and, at this edition, Spain’s newly crowned world champion Aitana Bonmati was presented with the prize. Bonmati managed three goals and two assists throughout the 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup and was a hugely influential figure in her nation’s winning campaign.

Who performed World Cup 2023?

FIFA is thrilled to announce that the Official Walkout Anthem of the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™, ‘Bring it On’, performed by Tones and I, BIA, and Diarra Syllaz, will be brought to life on stage during the highly anticipated semi-final clash between Sweden and Spain at the FIFA Fan Festival™ in Sydney/Gadigal tonight