What Is An Adverbial Phrase?

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What Is An Adverbial Phrase

What is adverbial phrase example?

Adverbial phrases – An adverbial phrase (or adverb phrase ) is a group of words that acts as an adverb to modify the main clause of a sentence. Adverbial phrases can be made up of two adverbs. These are typically formed by adding a qualifier or intensifier (e.g., “incredibly,” “rather,” “very,” “somewhat”) before another adverb.

Examples: Adverbial phrases with two adverbs Bri ate her breakfast very quickly, Detective Jones caught the thief quite easily, Other types of adverbial phrases include prepositional phrases (e.g., “in the afternoon”), and infinitive phrases (e.g., “to get a haircut”). These phrases don’t necessarily include any adverbs but do play the same role as an adverb in the sentence.

Examples: Adverbial prepositional phrases and adverbial infinitive phrases The store closes at six o’clock, To become a better musician, Cassie practiced every day. Like adverbs, adverbial phrases serve a range of functions, some of which are explained below.

Type Function Example
Manner Explain how something happens Emir spoke of his daughter with pride,
Place Explain where something happens I threw my coat on the chair,
Purpose Explain why something happens I’m going to the airport to pick up my aunt and uncle,
Time Explain when something happens Let’s go for a walk after dinner,

What are 5 examples of adverbial phrases?

How to use adverbial phrases in sentences

In silence The class read the book in silence.
In the classroom Everyone was well-behaved in the classroom.
Before school Charley needed to find his homework before school.
In the distance I could see a car coming in the distance.
Very slowly The plant was growing very slowly.

What do adverbial phrases mean?

Table of Contents – Two or more words that perform the role of an, when put together, can be identified as an adverbial phrase. Like an adverb, an adverbial phrase will also answer questions such as ‘when’, ‘where’, ‘why’, ‘how’ and ‘how often’. An adverbial phrase modifies or provides extra information about a, a, an adjective or another adverb in the sentence.

An adverbial phrase, according to the Oxford Learner’s Dictionary, is defined as a phrase that can be used for “adding more information about place, time, manner, cause or degree to a verb, an adjective, a phrase or another adverb.” “An adverb phrase or adverbial phrase is a group of words based on an adverb, such as ‘very slowly’ or ‘ fortunately for us.’ An adverb phrase can also consist simply of an adverb”, according to the Collins Dictionary.

To be able to form an adverbial phrase, you should know the different components that constitute an adverbial phrase. Take a look at the points given below to learn how an adverbial phrase can be formed. There is no particular rule that an adverbial phrase should definitely contain at least one adverb.

– words used to classify a person, place, animal, thing or idea – words that substitute a noun – words used to describe a noun – words that describe the position of a particular noun or pronoun – words such as ‘a’, ‘an’, ‘the’ used to determine the noun

You can easily form an adverbial phrase if you know how the different components that constitute an adverbial phrase can be used. Let us take a look at some points that you have to keep in mind when forming and using adverbial phrases.

The very first point that you have to bear in mind is that there can be more than one adverbial phrase in a sentence. Secondly, remember that you can position the adverbial phrase in any part of the sentence according to its importance. You can place it in the beginning of the sentence if that is what governs the action done by the subject. In other cases, you can place the adverbial phrase at the end if that is just some extra information and does not drive the sentence. As far as the is concerned, use a immediately after the adverbial phrase if it is placed in the beginning. If the adverbial phrase is positioned somewhere in the middle of the sentence, make sure you place the adverb phrase within commas or, in other words, use a comma before and after the adverbial phrase. There is no particular need for a comma or any other punctuation mark if the adverbial phrase is placed towards the end of the sentence.

Now, let us look at how an adverbial phrase can be formed. An adverbial phrase can be formed using the following combinations:

A preposition, an article and a noun A preposition, a pronoun and a noun An adjective and an adverb An adverb, a preposition and a noun or a pronoun A preposition, an article, an adjective and a noun Multiple adverbs and an adjective Multiple adverbs – one adverb describing another

Here are some words (in bold) that will help you form and identify adverbial phrases easily. Check them out.

HOW WHEN WHERE WHY HOW OFTEN
In anger Before sunrise Right next to her To console her Every month
Like a snail Exactly in three hours At every signal For a much-need break Every now and then
Sincerely happy Earlier than expected By the store So as to finish the work Rarely
Very quickly As soon as possible Next to the play area Owing to the extension Annually
Somewhat sad Even before the announcement Around the main road Due to her continuous efforts All Fridays
A lot more sophisticated Within a matter of a few months In all major cities Because of the heavy rains As often as required
With a duct tape After the lockdown On this swing In order to find out Every few minutes

It is possible that you might get confused between an adverbial phrase and an as their functions are very similar. Take a look at the table given below to help you perceive the factors that make an adverbial phrase different from an adverbial clause.

Adverbial Phrase Adverbial Clause

An adverbial phrase is just a part of a sentence that is employed to provide more information about the action done by the subject, an adjective, another adverb or even another phrase.

An adverbial clause is a group of words that gives some extra information about another clause and aids in the completion of the idea or thought being communicated.

An adverbial phrase need not necessarily have a subject or a verb.

An adverbial clause should contain a subject and a verb.

Examples:

In the spring season, travelling can be a pleasant and satisfying activity. Unfortunately for him, it started raining the moment he left home.

Examples:

As soon as I reach the spot, I will give you a call. She decided not to go to work tomorrow because she was too sick.

Going through a number of adverbial phrases can help you in comprehending the formation and usage of adverbial phrases in a much better manner. Adverbial phrases referring to time answer the question ‘when’.

My mom was angry with me for getting home really late. Around noon, we all had completed the tasks for the day. My aunt told me that she will be coming to India in the month of September, Until last year, Devi struggled to adapt to the city and its culture. Everyone started losing their interest towards the end of the show,

Adverbial phrases that refer to the position or place in which the action is taking place answer the question ‘where’. Adverbial phrases of this type also include prepositional phrases which function like an adverb.

There is a new supermarket right in front of my house, My father asked us to remember that he had parked the car right next to the overbridge, We walked over the bridge, Children play in the park, Adults and teenagers are seen walking on the pavements,

Adverbial phrases that represent the manner in which an action is being carried out by the subject can be identified by asking the question, ‘how’.

Anand waited silently and patiently. Luckily for my sister, she always got her way. Everything went on surprisingly well. The teacher asked the students to fill in the evaluation forms very carefully. We were able to finish it quite easily.

Adverbial phrases that refer to the frequency of an action can be identified by asking the question, ‘how often’.

Almost every year, we take a trip to the North. Norah and her family visit her grandparents very often. Manassa bakes a new set of cookies every week, Only rarely do we get an opportunity to take a break and go somewhere. Every alternate weekend, my friends and I get together for dinner.

Some adverbial phrases refer to the reasons why a particular action is taking place. This type of adverbial phrase can be identified by asking the question ‘why’.

Due to the sudden rains, we had to cancel our plans. All schools will be closed for a week owing to the heavy snow storms, To keep up with the developments in the field of technology, my brother read every single blog on the technological advancements around the world. The little boy’s mother scolded him for breaking the glass bowl. I went to Chennai just to visit my friend.

Now that you know how an adverbial phrase is formed and the difference between an adverbial phrase and an adverbial clause, try working out the following exercise. Identify the adverbial phrases in the following sentences.1. On the way to the hospital, I met my friend from school.2.

  • Owing to the pandemic, my sister’s batch was exempted from writing exams.3.
  • Saurab’s friends reached the hilltop exactly in an hour.4.
  • Probably, by the end of June, we can expect heavy rains.5.
  • The science teacher asked us to do our records neatly and carefully.6.
  • All of them did it exactly as informed.7.

All of a sudden, there was a fire in the building.8. Throughout the year, the residents of the area faced difficulties with power and water supply.9. The children were seemingly quiet.10. Gautham’s friends could not make it to the wedding in time due to the traffic jam.

  1. Check the answers given below to find out if you have identified the adverbial phrases correctly.1.
  2. On the way to the hospital, I met my friend from school.2.
  3. Owing to the pandemic, my sister’s batch was exempted from writing exams.3.
  4. Saurab’s friends reached the hilltop exactly in an hour,4.
  5. Probably, by the end of June, we can expect heavy rains.5.

The science teacher asked us to do our records neatly and carefully,6. All of them did it exactly as informed,7. All of a sudden, there was a fire in the building.8. Throughout the year, the residents of the area faced difficulties with power and water supply.9.

  • The children were seemingly quiet,10.
  • Gautham’s friends could not make it to the wedding in time due to the traffic jam,
  • Two or more words that perform the role of an adverb, when put together, can be identified as an adverbial phrase.
  • Like an adverb, an adverbial phrase will also answer questions such as ‘when’, ‘where’, ‘why’, ‘how’ and ‘how often’.

An adverbial phrase modifies or provides extra information about a verb, a phrase, an adjective or another adverb in the sentence. An adverbial phrase, according to the Oxford Learner’s Dictionary, is defined as a phrase that can be used for “adding more information about place, time, manner, cause or degree to a verb, an adjective, a phrase or another adverb.” “An adverb phrase or adverbial phrase is a group of words based on an adverb, such as ‘very slowly’ or ‘ fortunately for us.’ An adverb phrase can also consist simply of an adverb”, according to the Collins Dictionary.

Nouns Pronouns Adverbs Adjectives Articles Determiners

Here are a few examples of adverbial phrases:

All schools will be closed for a week owing to the heavy snow storms, Every alternate weekend, my friends and I get together for dinner. The teacher asked the students to fill in the evaluation forms very carefully. My father asked us to remember that he had parked the car right next to the overbridge, Until last year, Devi struggled to adapt to the city and its culture.

: Adverbial Phrase – Definition, Formation, Usage & Examples

What is an adverbial phrase for kids?

What is an adverbial phrase? An adverbial phrase is a group of two or more words which act together like an adverb to add further detail to a verb, adjective, or other adverbs in a sentence. For example:

John ate his breakfast extremely quickly,

In this sentence, the adverbial phrase is ‘extremely quickly’. The word ‘extremely’ is emphasising the quick pace at which John ate. The sentence could have just contained one adverb, for example:

John ate his breakfast quickly,

Whilst this does still tell the reader how John ate his breakfast; the use of the adverbial phrase adds more detail to the sentence and suggests more about the character and plot of the story. Words such as ‘really’, ‘more’, ‘very’ and ‘extremely’ are commonly used to form adverbial phrases by making the adverb they are paired with stronger.

What is a adjectival phrase example?

Adjectival Phrase Examples ‘ The old man walked slowly.’ – ‘old man’ is modifying the noun ‘man.’ ‘The small dog barked loudly.’ – ‘small dog’ is modifying the noun ‘dog.’ ‘The blue sky was beautiful.’ – ‘blue sky’ is modifying the noun ‘sky.’

How do you identify adverbial and adjective phrases?

An adjective phrase modifies a noun or a pronoun. An adverb phrase modifies a verb, an adjective, or an adverb.

What is the difference between an adverb phrase and an adverbial phrase?

Adverbial Phrases – An adverbial phrase is a group of words that function as an adverb. While an adverb is a single word in many cases, an adverbial phrase consists of more than one word to add more information to a verb, adjective, another adverb, or an entire sentence.

  1. An adverbial phrase can function as an adverb even without containing an adverb in the group of words.
  2. Adverbial phrases often contain a preposition,
  3. Adverb I will sit here silently,
  4. Adverbial Phrase I will stay here in silence,
  5. Adverb She will drop by later,
  6. Adverbial Phrase She will drop by when she gets off from work,

Example I went to the store to get some groceries, In this sentence, the adverbial phrase “to get some groceries” is used to describe the purpose of going to the store. Example He parked his car over there near the park, In this sentence, the adverbial phrase “over there near the park” is used to describe the place where he parked his car.

How do you identify adverbial phrases and clauses?

What’s the difference between an adverbial clause and an adverbial phrase? – An adverbial clause is similar to, but not the same as, an adverbial phrase. Both are groups of words that play the adverb role, but with one key difference: An adverbial clause contains a subject and a verb, while an adverbial phrase does not. Here are a few examples of adverbial phrases:

Andrei eats his lunch with gusto, We thought, through logic, that the next bus would come at 3:10.

And here are similar examples of adverbial clauses:

Andrei eats his lunch faster than everyone else eats, We thought, because the bus has been so predictable lately, that the next one would come at 3:10.

How many types of adverbial phrases are there?

Types of adverbial phrase – Broadly, six types of phrases function adverbially, with prepositional phrases being the most common. Like anything adverb, adverbial phrases are generally, but not always, quite mobile in a sentence and can occupy multiple positions.

What is an adverbial phrase of time?

Rule 1: We use adverbial phrases of time to describe when something happens or for how long. They usually come at the beginning or the end of the sentence or clause. We have a meeting to attend tomorrow afternoon. Tomorrow afternoon is a an adverbial phrase of time.

How do you identify adverbials?

Frequently asked questions – What are the different types of adverbials? An adverbial is a word or group of words that modifies a verb, an adjective, an adverb, or a whole clause. Adverbs (e.g., ‘quickly’) are one-word adverbials. Adverbial phrases (e.g., ‘after dinner’) and adverbial clauses (e.g., ‘although it’s raining’) are adverbials formed using multiple words.

  • Can you end a sentence with an adverb? Many types of adverbs (adverbs of manner, adverbs of time etc.) can be used at the end of a sentence to modify a verb, adjective, or other adverb (e.g., ‘you read quietly’).
  • Adverbial phrases (e.g., ‘at two o’clock’) and adverbial clauses (e.g., ‘wherever I go’) can also be placed at the end of a sentence to modify a preceding clause.

What is a fronted adverbial? A fronted adverbial is an adverb or adverbial that is placed at the start of a sentence. Many adverbials, including sentence adverbs (e.g., ‘unfortunately’), adverbial phrases (e.g., ‘after work’) and adverbial clauses (e.g., ‘because you are smart’), can be used as fronted adverbials,

What is an example of an adverbial start of a sentence?

The adverbial words or phrases are placed at the start of the sentence and come before the verb. For example, ‘ later in the evening, I found my missing cat ‘.

What is an example of an adverb phrase of reason?

Adverb clauses of cause or reason Adverb clauses of cause or reason are introduced by the subordinating conjunctions because, as, since and that.

I sing because I like singing. He thinks he can get anything because he is rich. Since he has apologized we will take no further action against him. As he was not there I left a message with his mother. I am glad that you have come. My parents were disappointed that I didn’t get the scholarship. He was furious that his book was panned by most reviewers.

Notes The conjunction that is often omitted.

I am glad you like it, OR I am glad that you like it. They were disappointed you weren’t in, OR They were disappointed that you weren’t in.

As and since are used when the reason is already known to the listener.

As it is raining again we will have to cancel the match.

As and since-clauses are relatively formal. In an informal style, the same idea can be expressed with so.

It is raining again, so we will have to cancel the match.

Because-clauses are used to give information which isn’t already known to the reader or listener.

Because he had not paid the bill, his electricity was cut off.

Note that a because-clause can stand alone. As and since-clauses cannot be used like this.

‘Why are you looking at her like that?’ ‘ Because she smiled at me.’ (NOT As she smiled at me.) (NOT Since she smiled at me.)

: Adverb clauses of cause or reason

Can an adverb be a phrase?

Adverb Phrases An adverb may be a single word, such as quickly, here or yesterday, However, adverbs can also be phrases, some made with prepositions, others made with infinitives. This page will explain the basic types of adverb phrases (sometimes called “adverbial phrases”) and how to recognize them.

Can you start a sentence with an adjectival phrase?

A Guide to Use Adjectives to Start a Sentence – INK One of the easiest ways to improve one’s writing is to use adjectives to start a sentence, Teachers and professors constantly advise their students to write strongly, an order that often comes across unclear and vague.

  • Adjectives help you add more color to your sentence.
  • You can actually use adjectives to start a sentence
  • When writing adjective sentences, you need to keep in mind its limited use,

An adjective describes a noun. It tells you what the noun is, for example, a new car is described as red.

  • The adjectives we use to describe nouns can be simple or complex.
  • An adjective like “strong” and “red” is simple, or a complex adjective like “ugly”, “tall”, “short”, or “complicated” would all describe the noun.
  • An adjective may also modify multiple nouns.
  • Example

The word large, used as an adjective, may it describes. So, it describes a certain size. Similarly, an adjective like, wide, used on the noun, it’s, would add to the noun a description for a wider aspect Adjectives are used to add more description to the idea you are trying to express through your sentence.

  1. There are adjectives that describes a person, and some that are used to describe an object, event, place, feeling, or emotion.
  2. Using adjectives can be a handy and quick way to introduce your reader to the relevant piece of information discussed.
  3. Add an adjective if you want to say more than that.
  4. Example

If I said, that this book was good, I had just said that it was a good book. The reader could understand that I’m talking about the book, but they may not know much more than that. But I would have said that this book is really good if I had taken a more detailed and descriptive approach. What Is An Adverbial Phrase Photo by Sincerely Media on Unsplash An adjective in a sentence can be chosen for general purposes. Practice in simple sentences is easy. Example The bird flew its auburn wings into the sky. Auburn is an adjective in the example. Usually, adjectives describe nouns.

  • Changing auburn wings to auburn’s wings is as simple as changing the wings.
  • Start the sentence appropriately with the words.
  • Initial sentence: “The bird has its auburn wings spread out into the sky.

As they take flight, their auburn wings move to the front to begin the adjective phrase. “Awing of the bird, they swept the night sky.”. Write a sample sentence. Start with three simple sentences. The adjective and its noun should be separated, and then put them at the beginning of the sentence.

  • Once you feel comfortable reworking simple sentences, move onto longer, more complex phrases.
  • Once you’re comfortable with adjectives, you can create more complex ones.
  • In addition to a few words, adjective phrases are not necessary.
  • Example Take the following sentence, “The sad man went to the store with his broken umbrella, but they refused to refund his money.”.

There are two adjectives in the sentence: sad and broken. Move to the front and say, “Broken umbrella in hand, the sad man walked to the store but couldn’t get a refund”. If someone asked you to describe something, you most likely would have used an adjective (i.

Noun naming an attribute). Currently, established phrase structure, Although they can occur in virtually any order, native English speakers have special disciplines about which order is more appropriate. Several types of words are present in a sentence. Nouns usually appear at the start of a sentence, and adjectives should precede the noun.

Let’s look at an underlying adjective order in English and see if the same principles can be applied to academic editing. The order in which multiple adjectives are used in a sentence tends to vary greatly. In English, the usual limit is two or three adjectives modifying a noun.

  • In Paris, scientists discovered this beautiful-pink-French butterfly at the PARC Floral.
  • Animal rights activists were concerned that this product was unnecessarily tested on an endangered-young-brown-African monkey.
  • Newly diagnosed diseases are unpleasant, with a big, circular red patch on the forehead skin.

It would be awkward or complicated to describe one noun or pronoun using more than three descriptive types of adjectives. Therefore, adherence to English’s proper order of adjectives is always worthwhile. Remember that you can use adjectives to start a sentence.

Why is it called an adjectival phrase?

An adjective phrase, as the term suggests, is a phrase that functions just like an adjective in a sentence. It is a group of words that are put together in order to qualify the noun or pronoun that acts as the subject or object of a sentence. It is also referred to as an ‘adjectival phrase’.

What are examples of adjective and adverbial phrases?

ADJECTIVE PHRASES The house with the driveway of red brick is ours. ADVERB PHRASES After school I rode my bicycle to a friend’s house.

How do you identify an adverbial clause?

Examples: –

Aaron was made to practise the song for the competition until he sang it perfectly. Angel kept rambling on and on as if she wanted to prove that she is broke. The dog got so comfortable with my brother after he cuddled her for a while. We felt time was very slow because we were sitting idly. You will be able to go to the theatres to watch movies as long as there is no lockdown.

Identify the adverb clauses in the following sentences: 1. Diaz came first in the dance competition because he had practised for almost two months.2. If you like it, you can take it.3. Danny follows a strict diet in order to stay fit.4. Unless he is interested in the plot of a movie, he does not watch it.5.

Hector, in order to reach school early, decided to take the metro today.6. When the clock strikes twelve, you will have to stop writing.7. Make sure you buy it only if you like it.8. The football gallery at Loyola, where we used to sit and talk, has been demolished.9. Although he finished working with his project, he continued to make corrections.10.

Those green shoes, even though they are too big for him, goes with his style. Were you able to identify them? Let us find out if you got it right.1. Diaz came first in the dance competition because he had practised for almost two months,2. If you like it, you can take it.3.

  1. Danny follows a strict diet in order to stay fit.4.
  2. Unless he is interested in the plot of a movie, he does not watch it.5.
  3. Hector, in order to reach school early, decided to take the metro today.6.
  4. When the clock strikes twelve, you will have to stop writing.7.
  5. Make sure you buy it only if you like it.8.

The football gallery at Loyola, where we used to sit and talk, has been demolished.9. Although he finished working with his project, he continued to make corrections.10. Those green shoes, even though they are too big for him, goes with his style. An adverb clause, as the name suggests, is a clause that does all the functions of a normal adverb.

The dog got so comfortable with my brother after he cuddled her for a while. We felt time was very slow because we were sitting idly. My friend, because he does not like working in the IT field, started his own company. Digital money, even though it has been made legal all around the world, is not accepted or considered safe by common people. Although they drove really fast, they could not reach there in time. Before you make your decision, make sure you think this through.

: Adverb Clauses – Definition, How to Use & Examples