What Is A Main Clause?

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What Is A Main Clause

What is a main clause easy definition?

Difference between a Main Clause and a Subordinate Clause – Learning what makes a main clause different from a subordinate clause will help you understand a lot more clearly how to use them. Take a look at the table given below.

Main Clause Subordinate Clause
It contains a subject and a verb and can stand alone. It contains a subject and a verb but cannot stand alone. It merely complements the rest of the sentence.
It can be used in a simple sentence, a compound sentence and a complex sentence. It can be used in a complex sentence and a compound-complex sentence.
Coordinating conjunctions and correlative conjunctions can be used to combine main clauses to form compound sentences and subordinating conjunctions can be used to a main clause and a subordinate clause to form a complex sentence. Subordinating conjunctions can be used to link a subordinate clause and a main clause when forming complex sentences.
For example: I had tea and chicken samosas. Jose had finally decided to go for a trip for it had been months since he even got out of the house. For example: After I reach home, I will give you a call. I did not go to the museum with my friends as I was sick.

Here are a few examples, with main clauses in bold, to show you how they can be used in sentences.

Usha is a teacher. Suresh has been running all around as it is his son’s wedding. Though we had no interest in watching a movie, we went along with our friends to the theatre. Nobody knows anything about the new neighbour, so we decided to go talk to them. After a short break, the New Directions will be performing. In today’s event, the final dance by the Loyola Dance Crew will be the highlight of the entire event. My brother is not keeping well, so my father is taking him to the doctor. I am sure my team will win as they have been practising for months. Even after hours of explanation, the students were not able to understand the mathematical theorems. She does not think she can make it here in time; however, she told me she will come.

Identify the main clause in the following sentences: 1. ‘The Jungle Book’, written by Rudyard Kipling, is one of the most enjoyed story collections.2. The little girl was crying because she lost her favourite doll.3. Carry a shawl or a sweater with you, so you can use it in case you feel cold.4.

If you think it will rain, it is better to carry an umbrella.5. The boy, who helped me unload my luggage, lives in the next street.6. I love listening to songs, but that does not mean I like all songs.7. I am on the right track.8. Thomas lives in the city.9. I will help you find a taxi or I will come drop you at the bus stand.10.

Soumia didn’t go to college yesterday, for she was unwell. Now, check if you have identified the main clauses accurately from the answers given below.1. ‘The Jungle Book’, written by Rudyard Kipling, is one of the most enjoyed story collections.2. The little girl was crying because she lost her favourite doll.3.

  • I am feeling a bit under the weather today, so I don’t think I’ll be going out.4.
  • If you think it will rain, it is better to carry an umbrella.5.
  • The boy, who helped me unload my luggage, lives in the next street.6.
  • I love listening to songs, but that does not mean I like all songs.7.
  • I am on the right track.8.

Thomas lives in the city.9. I will help you find a taxi or I will come drop you at the bus stand.10. Soumia didn’t go to college yesterday, for she was unwell. A main clause is a group of words that make up the major part of a sentence. The main clause has the ability to convey meaning and make complete sense even if taken separately from the sentence, and so, it is also referred to as the independent clause.

A subject and a verb are required to form a main clause. According to the Oxford Learner’s Dictionary, a main clause is defined as “a group of words that includes a subject and a verb and can form a sentence.” A main clause, according to the Cambridge Dictionary, is defined as “a clause in a sentence that would form a complete sentence by itself.” The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines a main clause as “a clause that could be used by itself as a simple sentence but that is part of a larger sentence”, and according to the Collins Dictionary, a main clause is defined as “a clause that can stand alone as a complete sentence.” The main difference between a main clause and a subordinate clause is that a main clause can stand by itself and make sense if separated from the rest of the sentence; whereas, a subordinate clause cannot stand alone.

Here are a few examples to show you how you can use a main clause in a sentence.

Though we had no interest in watching a movie, we went along with our friends to the theatre. Nobody knows anything about the new neighbour, so we decided to go talk to them. After a short break, the New Directions will be performing. In today’s event, the final dance by the Loyola Dance Crew will be the highlight of the entire event. Even after hours of explanation, the students were not able to understand the mathematical theorems.

: Main Clause – Meaning, Definition, Usage and Examples

How can you identify a main clause?

How do you find the main clause in a sentence? – To find the main clause in a sentence, look for a subject and a verb. Once you’ve identified these, see if the clause would make sense as a stand-alone sentence. If this is the case then you’ve probably found the main clause. If not, keep looking! We’ll use an example below to illustrate the point. Look at the following sentence:

I walked past the park where I used to play.

This example is called a complex sentence, as it features a main clause (I walked past the park) and a subordinate clause (where I used to play). In the main clause, ‘I’ is the subject and ‘walked’ is the verb. It contains both ingredients of a main clause and makes sense on its own. The two clauses are joined by ‘where’, a connective,

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What is the main clause in a simple sentence?

A sentence must contain a main clause, which is typically made up of a subject and a verb, and it may also contain an object or a complement. A main clause may also be linked to another clause by a conjunction. Sentences can be classified according to their structure.

What is a main clause and a sub clause?

A complex sentence consists of one or more clauses which could be a combination of two or more main clauses, or a combination of main and subordinate clauses. A main clause is a clause that makes sense on its own and can also exist in a sentence on its own.

Is a main clause always a sentence?

A main clause can stand alone as a sentence – Every sentence has at least one main clause. The main clause is also known as:

a principal clause an independent clause.

The main clause has at least one complete (finite) verb and can stand alone as a sentence.

How do you write a main clause in a sentence?

Examples and Observations – In sentence structure, the simple subject is the “who, what, or where” that comprises the main focus of the sentence. The predicate is the part of the sentence (the verb) that shows the action. For example, in the sentence, “The angry bear howled ominously,” the word “bear” is the simple subject and the predicate is “howled” so the main clause of the sentence would be, “The bear howled.” In “The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics,” P.H.

Matthews defined a main clause as ” clause which bears no relation, or no relation other than coordination, to any other or larger clause.” Unlike a dependent or subordinate clause, a main clause can stand alone as a sentence, while two or more main clauses can be joined with a coordinating conjunction (such as and) to create a compound sentence,

In the following examples, notice the main clause does not necessarily include modifying words. “While Fern was in school, Wilbur was shut up inside his yard.” —From Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White. Main clause:

Wilbur was shut up

Since “Fern was in school” is modified by the word “while” which is a subordinate conjunction, “While Fern was in school” is a subordinate clause, rather than a main clause. “Dinner always took a long time, because Antonapoulos loved food and he was very slow.” —From “The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter,” by Carson McCullers Main clause:

Dinner took a long time

Since it’s modified by the word “because,” another subordinate conjunction, “because Antonapoulos loved food and he was very slow” is a subordinate clause. “I learned to type when I was 12 years old. When I finished the class my father bought me a Royal portable typewriter.” —From “The Writing Life,” by Ellen Gilchrist Main clauses:

I learned to typemy father bought a typewriter

Since “when I was 12 years old” and “When I finished the class” are modified by “when,” yet another subordinate conjunction, they are both subordinate clauses. “My father bought a typewriter” is the main thought in the second sentence so it’s the main clause.

he can do thathe has to borrow money

Since these two clauses are joined by the conjunction “and,” they are both main clauses.

What is independent vs main clauses?

An independent clause is also known as a main clause. An in- dependent clause is a group of words that contains both a sub- ject and a predicate and can stand alone as a complete sen- tence.

How many main clauses are there?

There are four basic types of main clause : declaratives (statements), interrogatives (questions), imperatives (orders/instructions) and exclamatives (used for exclamations). In the examples below, x is any other element in the clause (e.g. object, predicative complement): Declarative clauses most commonly function as statements.

affirmative negative
I saw them last week, I didn’t see them last week,
Some courses begin in January, Some courses don’t begin until March,

Sometimes we use declaratives as questions or requests: A: Those are the only tickets left? (question) A: You could pass me the spoon, That would be helpful, (request) Interrogative clauses most commonly function as questions. The usual word order is ( wh -word) + auxiliary/modal verb (aux/m) + subject + verb + x: What are you doing? Does she play tennis well? Can I come with you? Interrogative clauses can be affirmative or negative.

affirmative negative
Are there any blue ones? Aren’t there any blue ones?
Why did he tell me? Why didn’t he tell me?

Imperative clauses most commonly function as commands, instructions or orders. The usual word order is verb + x. We do not usually include the subject in an imperative clause. We use the base form of the verb: Come on. Hurry up! Leave me alone! Let’s go.

affirmative negative
Go! Don’t go!
Leave the door open. Don’t leave the door open.
Be happy. Don’t be sad.

We use do not in more formal contexts: Do not make coffee with boiling water. We can use the short form don’t as an imperative answer, or as a reaction to something: A: Shall I open the window? B: No, don’t, I’m freezing, (No, don’t open the window.) Sometimes we use you (subject pronoun) with an imperative clause to make a command stronger or to strengthen a contrast.

  • It can sometimes sound impolite: Don’t you ever read my letters again.
  • You wash, I’ll dry.
  • In informal speaking, we can use an indefinite subject (e.g.
  • Someone, somebody, no one, nobody, everyone, everybody ) with an imperative: No one move.
  • Everyone stay still.
  • We often use an imperative to make an offer or invitation: Have some more cake.

There’s plenty there. We sometimes use do for emphasis in an imperative clause, especially if we want to be very polite: Do sit down, please. Spoken English: In speaking we usually use let’s for first person plural imperatives ( us ) to make a suggestion.

In more formal situations we use let us : Let’s go and eat. Now, let us all get some sleep. (more formal) For third person imperatives ( him, her, it, them ) we form an imperative clause with let : A: Mr Thomas is here to see you. Shall I send him in? B: Let him wait. I’m busy, Exclamative clauses usually have one of the following word orders: What + noun + subject + verb How + adjective or adverb + subject + verb Auxiliary or modal verb + subject + verb (i.e.

interrogative word order) We use exclamative clauses most commonly to express surprise or shock. In writing we use an exclamation mark: What a lovely sister you are! How beautiful that house was! Wasn’t she great! Didn’t he sing well!

What is the difference between a sentence and a main clause?

Main Difference – Clause vs Sentence – Both clause and sentence are made up of a group of words that contain a subject and a predicate. The main difference between clause and sentence is that a sentence always conveys an independent meaning whereas a clause does not always convey an independent meaning.

How do I find a clause in a sentence?

How to Identify a Phrase or a Clause. The quickest way to identify whether a group of words is a phrase or a clause is to look for both a subject and a verb. If you can find both, then it’s a clause. If you can only find one or the other, then it’s a phrase.

What words make a clause?

A clause is a group of words that contains both a subject and a predicate. Charlie runs. There’s a subject; there’s a predicate. It’s a clause.

What are the three main types of clauses?

What is a Clause in English ? – For starters, what is a clause in English? A clause is an important feature of written English. Put simply, it’s a group of words that includes a subject and a verb. Clauses are what make up a sentence, and there are different kinds including main clauses, coordinate clause and subordinate clauses,

Clauses are also one of the building blocks of written English, which means it’s important for children to understand what they are. To help us answer the question of ‘what is a clause in English?’, let’s look at an example: The fast, red squirrel darted up a tree. The subject of this clause is the squirrel, and the verb is ‘darted’.

This can also be called a simple sentence,

What is a short example of a clause?

Example Sentences – The sentence “When it rained they went inside” consists of two clauses : “when it rained” and “they went inside.” a clause in a will Recent Examples on the Web Since Prescott has a no-trade clause and the club is prevented from hanging the franchise tag around his neck, the only way to lower that figure to a manageable number is to reach an extension. — David Moore, Dallas News, 27 Aug.2023 This could involve including clauses in debt contracts that would automatically trigger a deferral of debt repayments if a country experienced a natural disaster such as a flood, drought, or earthquake. — Foreign Affairs, 22 Aug.2023 In Fanatics’ version of events, Panini’s at-will employees left voluntarily to escape a declining company and were met with lawsuits and pressure campaigns by their former employer for their trouble, even though there were no noncompete clauses in their Panini contracts. — Matt Ford, The New Republic, 22 Aug.2023 Riders are a set of clauses that artists often add to their contracts, which relate to specific requirements around issues such as accommodation, nudity or travel. — Manori Ravindran, Variety, 21 Aug.2023 In the uncommon construction of Biden’s deal, however, the immunity clause was part of the diversion agreement, and the plea deal and diversion agreement referenced one another. — Perry Stein, Devlin Barrett and Matt Viser, Anchorage Daily News, 17 Aug.2023 Citing government sources, Reuters and the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung reported that a clause pledging for Germany to spend at least 2% of its gross domestic product annually on defense was quietly removed from Finance Minister Christian Lindner’s draft of a new budget financing law. — Danielle Wallace, Fox News, 17 Aug.2023 The outcome was expected after the high court in a 4-3 decision said the ban on an extensive list of high-power semi-automatic weapons and high-capacity magazines does not violate the state constitution’s equal protection clause, — Dan Petrella, Chicago Tribune, 16 Aug.2023 Montana is one of a handful of states with a clause that guarantees citizens a clean and healthy environment included in its constitution. — Sarah Kuta, Smithsonian Magazine, 15 Aug.2023 See More These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word ‘clause.’ Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

How do you identify a main clause and a subordinate?

A subordinate clause is a clause that cannot stand alone as a complete sentence; it merely complements a sentence’s main clause, thereby adding to the whole unit of meaning. Because a subordinate clause is dependent upon a main clause to be meaningful, it is also referred to as a dependent clause.

Here’s a tip: Want to make sure your writing shines? Grammarly can check your spelling and save you from grammar and punctuation mistakes. It even proofreads your text, so your work is extra polished wherever you write. Whether you use the term subordinate or dependent to describe the clause, this clause’s function is clear: It provides informational support to the main event of the sentence.

This main clause will be independent: it can stand on its own as a complete sentence. This sentence is an independent clause, It has a subject and a verb, and on its own, it presents a complete unit of meaning: All of us are able to go out and have ice cream.

Hooray!) But perhaps this isn’t all we need to convey. If I can find my wallet adds substantially to the meaning of the sentence. It is too soon to celebrate about our ice cream outing because there is a task at hand. We have to first find that wallet. On its own, if I can find my wallet is a subordinate clause; it is not a full unit of meaning.

If it was written separately as a sentence, the result would be a sentence fragment—your English teacher’s pet peeve. What will happen if I can find my wallet? If a clause in your sentence leaves us hanging like this when set apart on its own, it is a subordinate clause.

What is an example of a main clause and dependent clause?

The Difference Between Dependent and Independent Clauses Some clauses have an indie feel to them. Grammar teachers will sometimes talk about dependent clauses and independent clauses. What’s the difference between them? On what is a clause dependent or not dependent? What Is A Main Clause And what about the clauses that are still on their parents’ family plans? First, let’s start with the word, A clause is a part of a sentence that contains a subject and some kind of predicate. The sentence “After the rain stopped, we went out on our bikes” contains two clauses: “the rain stopped” and “we went out on our bikes.” The subjects rain and we are given something to do, thereby completing the idea.

  • By definition, a does not form a simple sentence by itself.
  • Also called a subordinate clause, it is connected to the main clause of a sentence by a sentence conjunction such as that or when,
  • Take this example: I went out on the bike that Mary gave me for my birthday.
  • The main clause of the sentence is “I went out on the bike”—a complete idea that can stand on its own as a complete sentence.

The words that follow (“that Mary gave me for my birthday”) are a dependent clause, acting subordinate to the main clause. They contain a complete idea in their own right, including a subject and corresponding verb (“Mary gave”), but the existence of the that indicates that the clause cannot stand on its own as a sentence.

  • It depends on the main clause, because the main clause contains the object (“bike”) that the verb in the dependent clause (“gave”) targets.
  • An, in contrast, can stand alone as a complete simple sentence even though it is usually functioning as part of a larger sentence.
  • For a sentence to be complete, all it needs is a subject and a verb: “She sighed.” No part of the sentence depends on some element expressed outside the sentence.

In many cases, in fact, the only thing that distinguishes an independent clause from a dependent clause is the presence of a subordinating conjunction. Consider what the addition of a subordinating conjunction does to these examples:

  • Independent: We arrived early to the party.
  • Dependent: when we arrived early to the party
  • Full sentence: The host was surprised when we arrived early to the party.
  1. Independent: The store doesn’t open until 10:00 AM.
  2. Dependent: since the store doesn’t open until 10:00 AM
  3. Full sentence: Since the store doesn’t open until 10:00 AM, we have time to get some breakfast first.
  • Independent: The forecast calls for rain.
  • Dependent: although the forecast calls for rain
  • Full sentence: Although the forecast calls for rain, we are going ahead with our plans for the hike.

The dependent clauses in these examples make no sense on their own as complete thoughts, because the subordinating conjunctions that are attached to them ( when, since, although ) depend on information outside of the clause. (They do, however, all seem like pretty normal text messages.) : The Difference Between Dependent and Independent Clauses

What is an example of a main clause and an independent clause?

The Difference Between Dependent and Independent Clauses Some clauses have an indie feel to them. Grammar teachers will sometimes talk about dependent clauses and independent clauses. What’s the difference between them? On what is a clause dependent or not dependent? What Is A Main Clause And what about the clauses that are still on their parents’ family plans? First, let’s start with the word, A clause is a part of a sentence that contains a subject and some kind of predicate. The sentence “After the rain stopped, we went out on our bikes” contains two clauses: “the rain stopped” and “we went out on our bikes.” The subjects rain and we are given something to do, thereby completing the idea.

  1. By definition, a does not form a simple sentence by itself.
  2. Also called a subordinate clause, it is connected to the main clause of a sentence by a sentence conjunction such as that or when,
  3. Take this example: I went out on the bike that Mary gave me for my birthday.
  4. The main clause of the sentence is “I went out on the bike”—a complete idea that can stand on its own as a complete sentence.

The words that follow (“that Mary gave me for my birthday”) are a dependent clause, acting subordinate to the main clause. They contain a complete idea in their own right, including a subject and corresponding verb (“Mary gave”), but the existence of the that indicates that the clause cannot stand on its own as a sentence.

It depends on the main clause, because the main clause contains the object (“bike”) that the verb in the dependent clause (“gave”) targets. An, in contrast, can stand alone as a complete simple sentence even though it is usually functioning as part of a larger sentence. For a sentence to be complete, all it needs is a subject and a verb: “She sighed.” No part of the sentence depends on some element expressed outside the sentence.

In many cases, in fact, the only thing that distinguishes an independent clause from a dependent clause is the presence of a subordinating conjunction. Consider what the addition of a subordinating conjunction does to these examples:

  • Independent: We arrived early to the party.
  • Dependent: when we arrived early to the party
  • Full sentence: The host was surprised when we arrived early to the party.
  1. Independent: The store doesn’t open until 10:00 AM.
  2. Dependent: since the store doesn’t open until 10:00 AM
  3. Full sentence: Since the store doesn’t open until 10:00 AM, we have time to get some breakfast first.
  • Independent: The forecast calls for rain.
  • Dependent: although the forecast calls for rain
  • Full sentence: Although the forecast calls for rain, we are going ahead with our plans for the hike.

The dependent clauses in these examples make no sense on their own as complete thoughts, because the subordinating conjunctions that are attached to them ( when, since, although ) depend on information outside of the clause. (They do, however, all seem like pretty normal text messages.) : The Difference Between Dependent and Independent Clauses

What are main or independent clauses examples?

Summary for Independent Clauses – Independent clauses are made by combining at least one subject and predicate. They express complete thoughts. Independent clauses connect to other independent clauses in three ways:

  1. Through the use of a semicolon
  2. With a comma+coordinating conjunction
  3. With a semicolon+subordinating conjunction+a comma

Be sure to check out our grammar course for more Independent Clause practice. You can also access over 3,400 high-quality questions that address nearly every grammatical concept.

What is a sentence with 3 main clauses?

Dependent Clauses – There are two key elements of a dependent clause:

It has a subject and verb It expresses an incomplete thought

So unlike an independent clause, this type of clause will not make sense on it’s own even though it has a subject and verb. To make sense, it must be joined with an independent clause. That is why dependent clauses are also called subordinating clauses – they are subordinate to (under the control of) the main clause, as they cannot exist without it.

  • Even though John likes golf.
  • He played cricket at the weekend ****** Even though John likes golf, he played cricket at the weekend Dependent Clause + Independent Clause ‘ Even though John likes golf ‘ does not make sense on its own, but it does once we add the main clause to it.
  • Rather than coordinating conjunctions, the relationship between these types of clauses is expressed through subordinating conjunctions, such as while, although, even though, as soon as, since, despite, which, who, that, etc,

When we join these two types of clauses, we get a complex sentence, Here are some examples of complex sentences, with the dependent clause in green: