What Happened To Lucy Letby?

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Where is Lucy Letby now?

Inside prison where baby killing nurse Lucy Letby expected to spend rest of her life Nurse Lucy Letby, the most prolific child serial killer in modern British history, will die in prison after being sentenced to a whole-life order. Judge Mr Justice Goss handed the baby murderer the rare sentence, which is life imprisonment with no possibility of release, at Manchester Crown Court on Monday.

  1. It comes after the serial killer nurse cemented herself as one of Britain’s worst criminals on Friday when she was and attempting to kill six others.
  2. Following a nine-month trial and over three weeks of deliberations, a jury found her, after she embarked on a campaign of horror at the Countess of Chester Hospital between June 2015 and June 2016.

Lucy Letby was jailed for life, and given a whole life order The jury found her not guilty on two counts of attempted murder and could not reach verdicts on a further six of the same charge. During that period, she, overfed them with milk and fatally injected some with air while working as a nurse in the neonatal unit.

For such horrific crimes, Letby could only receive a mandatory life sentence. She was remanded in custody over the weekend and sentenced to a whole-life order on Monday, which means she will spend the rest of her life behind bars. While it has not been confirmed, Letby could be placed in HMP Low Newton, a maximum security prison that is home to many of the deadliest female killers in recent history.

Letby is likely to be held at maximum security prison HMP Low Newton HMP Low Newton has housed infamous killers The jail, which was opened in 1965, has housed, as well as. Dubbed ‘‘The Devil’s Daughter”, Carr murdered an 18-year-old woman after picking her out at random when she was just 12 years old. Access unlimited streaming of movies and TV shows with Amazon Prime Video Sign up now for a 30-day free trial Access unlimited streaming of movies and TV shows with Amazon Prime Video Sign up now for a 30-day free trial She was eventually moved from HMP Low Newton in 2019, after another vicious killer, Joanna Dennehy, allegedly threatened to kill her. Rosemary West, pictured with husband Fred, was a former inmate of HMP Low Newton Dennehy remains at the prison, where she is serving a sentence for the murder of three men in a two-week killing spree.

She dumped their bodies in ditches outside Peterborough. Located in the village of Brasside near Durham, the prison accepts female inmates from across the north of England and holds a number of lifers and juvenile prisoners. HMP Low Newton, which was opened in 1965, has housed Baby P’s mother Tracey Connelly An Independent Monitoring Board report, published in 2021, found that lessons and workshops had been axed due to problems with a leaking roof, while an entire block was due for demolition after failing health and safety checks.

Not all aspects of prison life were negative, however, with inmates given the chance to have DVD nights and buy clothes from a fashion store. Staff were reported to be “friendly”. Even the food was reported to be “nutritious, well cooked and of good variety”, with inmates offered a selection of hot meals and packed lunches.

  • Violence occasionally breaks out among prisoners and staff, while the board expressed concern that around 40 per cent of inmates suffered mental health problems.
  • HMP Low Newton is also home to the “Primrose Project”, which is designed to treat women with “dangerous and severe personality disorders”, and is the only prison in the UK with such a unit.
  • The service has 12 places for female offenders who are at a high risk of harm in England and Wales but can only accommodate one restricted-status woman at a time.

Joanna Dennehy remains at the prison, where she is serving a sentence for the murder of three men in a two-week killing spree

  1. Entry criteria include a current offence of violence against the person, presenting a high risk of committing another serious offence, and likelihood of having a severe form of personality disorder.
  2. Among the treatment options are sessions with a psychiatrist, art therapy, and acupuncture.
  3. The Primrose Service won a World Health Organisation (WHO) award in 2009 for high quality of service provided to female prisoners.

: Inside prison where baby killing nurse Lucy Letby expected to spend rest of her life

What has happened to nurse Lucy Letby?

‘I am evil,’ wrote British nurse found guilty of murdering seven babies in her care A has been found guilty of murdering seven babies and attempting to kill six others at the hospital where she worked, making her the country’s worst baby serial killer in recent times.

  1. Lucy Letby, 33, harmed babies in her care by injecting air into their blood and stomachs, overfeeding them with milk, physically assaulting them and poisoning them with insulin, Manchester Crown Court in northern England heard.
  2. In one case, Letby murdered a baby boy, identified as Child E, by administering air into his bloodstream, the UK’s PA Media news agency reported.

The next day, she attempted to kill his twin brother, Child F, by poisoning him with insulin.

  • A court order protects the identity of the children involved in the allegations against Letby, including those who died and survived under her care.
  • Police found a trove of handwritten notes while searching Letby’s house during their investigation, including one that read: “I am evil I did this.”
  • She secretly attacked 13 babies on the neonatal ward at the Countess of Chester hospital between 2015 and 2016, Britain’s Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) said in a statement.
  • Her intention was to kill the babies while duping her colleagues into believing there was a natural cause of death, prosecutors argued.
  • Pascale Jones of the CPS called Letby’s actions a “complete betrayal of the trust placed in her.”
  • “Lucy Letby sought to deceive her colleagues and pass off the harm she caused as nothing more than a worsening of each baby’s existing vulnerability,” she said.

“In her hands, innocuous substances like air, milk, fluids – or medication like insulin – would become lethal. She perverted her learning and weaponised her craft to inflict harm, grief and death.”

  1. Victims’ families said they “may never truly know why this happened.”
  2. “To lose a baby is a heartbreaking experience that no parent should ever have to go through,” a joint statement said.
  3. “But to lose a baby or to have a baby harmed in these particular circumstances is unimaginable,” the statement added.

In 2018 and 2019, Letby was arrested twice by police in connection with their investigation, PA said. She was arrested again in November 2020. Authorities found notes Letby had written during searches of her address. “I don’t deserve to live. I killed them on purpose because I’m not good enough to care for them,” she wrote in one memo, adding in another, “I am a horrible evil person” and in capital letters “I am evil I did this.”

  • The mother of Child E and Child F said she “completely” trusted Letby’s advice, while giving evidence to the court, according to PA Media.
  • However, she said she “knew there was something wrong” when her baby, Child E, started screaming in the intensive care unit one night.
  • It emerged that before Letby murdered Child E, he started bleeding when she tried to assault him.

“It was a sound that should not come from a tiny baby,” the mother told the court. “I can’t explain what the sound was. It was horrendous. More of a scream than a cry.” There was no post-mortem examination following Child E’s death. The mother said she thought he had passed away from natural causes.

  1. Her twin son, Child F, later survived an attempt by Letby to kill him by insulin poisoning.
  2. Doctors at the hospital began to notice a steep rise in the number of babies who were dying or unexpectedly collapsing, the court heard.
  3. But concerns raised by consultants over the increased mortality rate of patients under Letby’s care were initially dismissed by the hospital’s management, PA Media said.

In September 2016, Letby filed a grievance against her employers after she was relocated from the hospital’s neonatal ward. She was put back on clerical duties after two male triplets died and a baby boy collapsed on three days in a row in June 2016. Later that year, she was notified of the allegations against her by the Royal College of Nursing union, but the complaint was later resolved in her favor.

  • The UK government has ordered an independent inquiry into the murders, including “how concerns raised by clinicians were dealt with.”
  • The inquiry will probe into the “circumstances surrounding the deaths and incidents,” the government said in a statement on Friday.
  • It will also evaluate what actions were taken by regulators and Britain’s National Health Service in response to concerns regarding Letby.
  • Health Secretary Steve Barclay pledged the voices of parents of the victims “are heard” throughout the inquiry, acknowledging there are many questions to be answered.
  • “Justice has been served and the nurse who should have been caring for our babies has been found guilty of harming them,” the victims’ families said in a joint statement on Friday.
  • “But this justice will not take away from the extreme hurt, anger and distress that we have all had to experience,” the statement added.
  • “We are heartbroken, devastated, angry and feel numb.”
  • Letby will be sentenced at Manchester Crown Court on August 21.
  • CNN’s Niamh Kennedy and Sarah Dean contributed reporting.

: ‘I am evil,’ wrote British nurse found guilty of murdering seven babies in her care

What did Lucy Letby actually do?

Lucy Letby
Letby following her arrest in 2018
Born 4 January 1990 (age 33) Hereford, Herefordshire, England
Occupation Neonatal nurse
Conviction(s) Murder (7 counts), attempted murder (7 counts)
Criminal penalty 14 life sentences ( whole life order )
Details
Span of crimes 2015–2016
Country United Kingdom
Killed 7
Injured 6
Date apprehended 3 July 2018
Imprisoned at HM Prison Low Newton

Lucy Letby (born 4 January 1990) is a British serial killer and former neonatal nurse who murdered seven infants and attempted to murder six others at the Countess of Chester Hospital between 2015 and 2016. Letby was the focus of much suspicion as the outbreak of unexpected collapses and infant deaths commenced shortly after she was qualified to work with children in the hospital’s intensive care unit and was consistently on duty when each incident took place.

As soon as Letby was removed from duties in June 2016, the suspicious incidents stopped. Letby was charged in November 2020 with eight counts of murder and ten counts of attempted murder, During her trial, which lasted from October 2022 to August 2023, it was revealed that Letby’s methods included injecting the infants with air or insulin, overfeeding them or physically assaulting them.

She also stole over 250 confidential documents relating to the children’s care to keep as mementoes of her crimes and falsified patient records to avert suspicion. A number of parents and staff members had also walked in during, or just after, Letby’s attacks on victims.

On 21 August 2023, Letby was sentenced to life imprisonment with a whole life order, Letby is the most prolific serial killer of children in modern British history; the Cheshire Constabulary now suspects that she may have claimed more victims, including at Liverpool Women’s Hospital, where two babies died while she was training there.

Management at the Countess of Chester Hospital were criticised for ignoring warnings about Letby that could have prevented some of the killings. The British government has since announced that an independent statutory inquiry would be held into the circumstances surrounding the murders.

Why was Lucy Letby suspended?

Lucy Letby has been found guilty of murdering seven babies and attempting to murder six other infants. – Lucy Letby’s former Director of Nursing has been suspended following her conviction last week. Last week, Ms Letby was found guilty of murdering seven babies and attempting to murder six other infants while working on the Countess of Chester Hospital’s neonatal unit between June 2015 and June 2016.

  1. Letby deliberately injected babies with air, force-fed others milk and poisoned two of the infants with insulin.
  2. During the trial, the jury was told that concerns were raised on several occasions about Ms Letby.
  3. The former director of nursing and quality Alison Kelly and other senior managers at the Countess of Chester Hospital have been accused of failing to prevent some of the later deaths by acting on concerns about Ms Letby when they were raised.

Yesterday Mr Justice Goss imposed a whole-life order for each offence Ms Letby committed, meaning she will spend the rest of her life in prison.

Is Lucy Letby innocent?

Candlelight vigil is held for serial child killer Lucy Letby’s victims: Almost 100 worshippers gather at poignant service for innocent babies that depraved nurse murdered –

Worshippers gather at service for innocent babies murdered by Lucy Letby

Published: 11:31 BST, 11 September 2023 | Updated: 16:57 BST, 11 September 2023 Seven candles – one for each of the babies murdered by Lucy Letby – and an eighth for her yet unknown victims were lit in a poignant service at Chester Cathedral last night.

  1. Almost 100 people attended the Service of Lament, Prayer and Hope, led by Dean Tim Stratford.
  2. Staff from the Countess of Chester Hospital, where the infants died, including consultants Dr John Gibbs and Dr Ravi Jayaram, who gave evidence against Letby during the ten-month trial, were among the congregation.

Chester Labour MP Samantha Dixon also attended. Several worshippers fought back tears or dabbed their eyes as the candles were lit while the cathedral choir sang. The Right Reverend Mark Tanner, the Bishop of Chester, gave the address and members of the congregation were invited to light candles at the end of the service.

Seven candles – one for each of the babies murdered by Lucy Letby – and an eighth for her yet unknown victims were lit in a poignant service at Chester Cathedral last night Lucy Letby, 33, was last month sentenced to a whole-life term for murdering seven babies and trying to murder six more Seven candles – one for each of the babies murdered by Lucy Letby (pictured being arrested) – and an eighth for her yet unknown victims were lit in a poignant service at Chester Cathedral last night Pictured: Countess of Chester Hospital where Letby murdered six babies Letby, 33, was convicted of murdering seven babies and attempting to murder six more at the hospital’s neonatal unit during a year-long killing spree last month.

The convictions made her the most prolific child serial killer in British history. She was sentenced to a whole life tariff, meaning she will never be freed. Following the 40-minute service, the Bishop said: ‘It is really important we gather at a time when people are despairing, when they don’t know where to turn, when there is anger, confusion and grief because the church exists to hold those kind of things, to introduce some kind of hope.

  1. ‘It was really hard but it’s right that it is really hard, we are mourning the loss of babies, but it was also really good to be together.
  2. The moment of lighting candles in the middle of the service I could barely look up, it was just beautifully poignant.’ A chilling photograph of killer nurse Lucy Letby comforting a newborn at the Countess of Chester Hospital Lucy Letby is pictured holding an infant at Countess of Chester Hospital in 2012 The Very Reverend Dr Stratford said members of the community had asked him to make the cathedral available as a space to pray following the trial and verdicts.

‘I found it very painful, the stories behind each of these children’s deaths are immensely painful,’ he said. ‘Living in Chester, this has happened in this community. I’ve asked myself in conversation with others how could this happen here? This has happened in the hospital that serves us, a place we know as a place of care.’ Dr Gibbs, who has since retired, said it was ‘hard to make sense’ of what had happened.

Does Lucy Letby have family?

Who are Lucy Letby’s family? – Lucy Letby is the only child of John and Susan Letby, who raised their daughter in Hereford. Her parents attended every day of her 10 month trial at Manchester Crown Court. John, 77 is a furniture boss, while Susan, 63 is an accounts clerk. John and Suan Letby attended every day of their daughter’s trial (Picture: Getty) The former nurse lived alone in the three bedroom semi with two rescue cats, Tigger and Smudge. Pictures shown to the jury show that Letby had a childlike room, filled with stuffed animals and fairy lights.

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In her kitchen were ‘Happy Birthday Mummy’ notes from the cats, written by Letby’s own mother. Mr and Mrs Letby were upset when their daughter did not return home after University, something which Letby said made her feel ‘guilty’. Messaging a friend who mentioned emigrating to New Zealand, Letby said: ‘I couldn’t leave my parents.

‘They would be completely devastated. Find it hard enough being away from me now and it’s only 100 miles. ‘I came here to uni and didn’t go back. They hate it and I feel guilty for staying here sometimes but it’s what I want. To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video ‘My parents worry massively about everything and anything, hate that I live alone etc.

‘I feel bad because I know it’s really hard for them especially as I’m an only child, and they mean well, just a little suffocating at times and constantly feel guilty.’ When Letby was first arrested on July, 4, 2018, her father watched her being taken away by police. During her trial, Letby said that after the arrest, her father, who had been staying the night after taking her home from a family holiday in Torquay, made her bed for her.

When Letby was arrested again in June 2019 and November 2020, her mother pleaded with police to take her instead, claiming ‘I did it.’ During the killer’s long trial, her parents even relocated from Hereford to Manchester. The couple made loving glances to their daughter while she was in the dock and even criticised journalists for their coverage of the trial.

Did Lucy Letby confess?

Nobody but Lucy Letby knows what drove her to kill and attack premature babies in her care. Police found nothing in her background or upbringing, or any event that may have triggered her killing spree which began in June 2015. Evidence that she became animated and excited after the babies’ deaths, enjoyed the drama of the emergencies when infants collapsed and was quick to tell her colleagues in texts when something unusual and tragic had happened on her shift, pointed to her revelling in the attention, they said.

Letby was psychologically assessed and deemed fit to stand trial, but this desire to be at the centre of a crisis could be a symptom of the mental disorder Munchausen’s syndrome, one leading criminologist told the Mail. However, in the absence of a clear motive, Detective Superintendent Paul Hughes, who led the investigation for Cheshire Police, said he believed Letby’s ‘confession’ note provided the only explanation for why she became Britain’s most prolific child killer in modern times.

‘She clearly loves the attention, I think she loved the attention of a trial as well,’ DS Hughes said. ‘But if we are looking for why she’s done this, then to re-use her own words, “she is evil and she did this”. Without her telling us why, if we’re looking for why, then she wrote it down in that note.’ The green Post-it note was discovered in her diary when police searched her home after she was arrested in July 2018.

It was headed: ‘NOT GOOD ENOUGH.’ Lucy Letby wrote in her diary: ‘I killed them on purpose because I’m not good enough for them and I am a horrible evil person. I don’t deserve Mum and Dad. World is better off without me.’ Undated handout photo issued by the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) of a note found in the house of Lucy Letby As well as writing, ‘I AM EVIL, I DID THIS’ in capital letters, Letby also scrawled: ‘There are no words.

I am an awful person – I pay every day for that. I can’t breathe. I can’t focus. Kill myself right now. Overwhelming fear/panic. I’ll never have children or marry. I’ll never know what it’s like to have a family. NO HOPE. ‘I haven’t done anything wrong. Police investigation forget slander.

  1. Discrimination.
  2. Victimisation.
  3. All getting too much everything taking over my life.
  4. Hate myself so much for what this has,
  5. I feel very alone and scared.
  6. What does the future hold.
  7. How can I get through it.
  8. How will things ever be like they used. HATE. PANIC. FEAR. LOST.
  9. I don’t deserve to live.
  10. I DID THIS. WHY ME.

I killed them on purpose because I’m not good enough for them and I am a horrible evil person. I don’t deserve Mum and Dad. World is better off without me.’ Letby claimed the note was not a confession and that she wrote it after being moved off the unit, in July 2016, because she was struggling with being blamed for something she hadn’t done.

But the prosecution urged the jury to read it ‘literally’ and Mr Hughes said it was his view that Letby deliberately left the note for police to find. He said that, by May 2017, she was aware police were investigating and, although she had a shredder at her home address in Chester, she did not destroy the note, nor did she get rid of other incriminating papers, nursing handover sheets and medical documents, which were found stashed under her bed.

‘In my view, she wrote it down and left it for us to find,’ Mr Hughes said. ‘She knew the police were investigating, she knew that she’d been moved and therefore was not a criminal suspect, but a community suspect. ‘She knew her colleagues had been spoken to by the police.

How did they find out about Lucy Letby?

By Megan Harwood-Baynes, news reporter, and Tom Parmenter, national correspondent – A TRAUMATIC WEEK When nurse Lucy Letby returned from a trip to Ibiza, she texted a colleague to say she would be “back in with a bang”. Within 72 hours of that message, two triplet siblings were dead.

It was June 2016 and the ward was busy – the triplets had just been born – and it was Letby’s first shift back from holiday. She texted a colleague enquiring about how the new arrivals were doing and discussing her return to work. Letby, pictured before her arrest Letby, pictured before her arrest She later told her trial that message was merely referencing what would be a “busy shift”.

But the prosecution claimed she was “out of control” and “playing God” with her patients – the text giving a sinister insight into her frame of mind. That traumatic week was the end of a killing spree by the nurse who worked on the Countess of Chester Hospital’s neonatal unit.

  1. Letby was charged with killing seven babies and attempting to murder 10 more infants between June 2015 and June 2016.
  2. She was accused of injecting air into babies’ bloodstreams, overdosing them with insulin, removing breathing apparatus or sabotaging their care in other ways.
  3. A bag containing medical paperwork related to her victims was found in Letby’s home A bag containing medical paperwork related to her victims was found in Letby’s home But it wouldn’t be until 2018 – two years later – that she would finally be arrested.

The parents of twin boys who survived describe Letby as an “evil person” and blame hospital bosses for missed chances to get her off the unit. “If they’d acted upon the initial suspicions, then they definitely could have stopped any more babies being attacked,” says their father.

Does Lucy Letby have Munchausen?

Raising serial killer Lucy Letby – inside ‘suffocating’ and ‘close knit’ family Monster will die behind in after being hit with a for killing seven while working as a nurse at an, We take a closer look at the upbringing which led her to become a, The 33-year-old was born in Hereford – which is between Wales and Birmingham – on January 4, 1990. What Happened To Lucy Letby Lucy Letby refused to face the parents of her victims in court. (Image: Getty) She got her first part-time job when she was as a teenager, working in a branch of WH Smith, and became the first member of the family to graduate. She secured a Bachelor of Science degree in Child Nursing from the University of Chester in 2011, and her parents were so delighted with the feat that they took out an advertisement in the local paper.

  • And while they were said to be unhappy about her moving away from Hereford to start her new job, they helped Letby buy her first home – a £179,000 three-bedroom semi.
  • The property was just a mile from the Countess of Chester Hospital, where she lived alone with her two rescue cats, Tigger and Smudge.
  • But her dad, now 77, and mum, 63, “hated it” when their only child did not return home after graduating from university, something she admitted made her feel “constantly guilty”.

What Happened To Lucy Letby Lucy Letby will spend the rest of her life behind bars (Image: SWNS) The close bond the trio shares can be seen in Letby’s correspondence with friends, telling them her parents found it “hard” being away from her and “worry massively”. Speaking to a friend who was emigrating to New Zealand, Letby said: “I couldn’t leave my parents.

She told another: “My parents worry massively about everything and anything, hate that I live alone etc. I feel bad because I know it’s really hard for them especially as I’m an only child, and they mean well, just a little suffocating at times and constantly feel guilty.” It could be that this feeling of “suffocation” led to Letby seeking attention elsewhere when she was 100 miles away from her parents. What Happened To Lucy Letby Countess of Chester Hospital in Chester, where Lucy Letby attacked and killed babies in her care (Image: SWNS) After killing her first victim, Baby A, in June 2015, a fellow nurse texted her: “I hope you are OK, you were brilliant.” Letby replied: “It was the hardest thing I’ve ever had to do.

  1. Just a big shock for us all.
  2. Hard coming in tonight and seeing the parents.” Lecturer in criminology at Loughborough University Dominic Wilmott said he believes some of the nurse’s texts suggest she wanted to ‘garner sympathy’ after the babies’ deaths.
  3. He said last week that she may have been motivated by a ‘pathological desire for attention and sympathy’.

The prosecution argued throughout the trial that Letby also wanted to gain the sympathy of a doctor she had become “infatuated” with. There are claims that she was animated after some of the murders, as if revelling in the drama she had created. It was believed Letby may have been suffering from Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy.

  • The condition can see carers intentionally harm children in order to gain attention for themselves.
  • Her parents appear to have been in complete denial of their daughter’s crimes throughout the trial.
  • They were quick to leap to her defence and she had leaned on them when she had a key meeting with hospital bosses in January 2017.

The parents went to the meeting alongside their daughter, six months after she was removed from her role. Two triplet boys had died at the neonatal unit where she worked. The meeting helped her secure a letter of apology from senior doctors who had raised concerns about Letby.

  • She was eventually arrested on July 4, 2018.
  • Dad John watched as she was led away from her house by police after he had stayed the night when driving her home after one of the family’s holidays to Torquay.
  • Close to tears, Letby told the courtroom during the trial how Mr Letby had made her bed following her arrest.

Stuffed toys and fairy lights adorned her room, which the jury saw from photographs shown in court, while there were notes in her kitchen from her cats. They read ‘Happy Birthday Mummy’, and had been sent by Susan, her mum. Her mum was such a devoted parent she pleaded with officers: “I did it. What Happened To Lucy Letby John and Susan Letby, parents of Lucy Letby, arriving at Manchester Crown Court for their daughters murder trial. (Image: PA.) They were seen making loving glances to their daughter as she sat in the dock. They were a constant presence, often seen smoking on the court steps during breaks and even going as far as criticising journalists for their coverage.

  1. They complained about the length of the trial as they had to extend their rent on the flat close to Manchester Crown Court.
  2. Their faith in their daughter remains unshakeable, even when the jury convicted her.
  3. Mrs Letby’s disbelief was laid bare in court when she collapsed sobbing into her husband’s arms, at one point shouting: “You can’t be serious.

This cannot be right.” In a final sign of solidarity with their daughter, they were not in court for sentencing. She was given a whole life order while cowerng in her cell. They did not hear the heart-wrenching words of parents who had lost their babies, nor did they listen to Mr Justice Goss declare that she will now spend the rest of her life behind bars.

  1. She will now spend the rest of her days in HMP Low Newton in Durham, which has also caged Baby P’s mum and Rose West among other villains.
  2. Her victims’ parents called her decision to stay in her cell and refuse to face justice and the families whose lives she had torn apart a ‘cowardly’ move.
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: Raising serial killer Lucy Letby – inside ‘suffocating’ and ‘close knit’ family

Who did Lucy Letby have a crush on?

Evil nurse Lucy Letby will die behind bars after she murdered innocent babies at the hospital where she worked. The killer was yesterday (Monday, August 22) handed a whole life order, which means she will never leave prison. The 33-year-old was convicted of killing seven babies and attempting to kill another six.

  • Despite her wicked ways, she is said to have lived a relatively normal life.
  • Friends even described her as ‘goofy’ and ‘kind’, while colleagues knew her as the ‘quiet geek’.
  • Childhood friend Dawn claimed the charges against Letby were the “most out of character that you could ever put against Lucy”.
  • READ MORE: Convicted drugs smuggler linked to demolition of The Crooked House Should The Crooked House be rebuilt? She told how Letby had dreamed of becoming a nurse after being grateful to medics who helped her survive her own difficult birth, MirrorOnline reports,

During the trial, it emerged Letby had a mystery boyfriend. It came as she defended herself against allegations that she had an affair with a married doctor on the ward. Manchester Crown Court heard of allegations that the killer murdered two premature triplets in less than 24 hours to get the attention of a medic – known only as Dr A. What Happened To Lucy Letby The moment Lucy Letby was arrested – she has now been sentenced to a whole-life term in prison (Image: PA) She is said to have had a ‘crush’ on him. Dr A – who cannot be named for legal reasons – shared supportive text messages with Letby following the deaths.

  • Prosecutors suggested their relationship went beyond that of colleagues.
  • The pair continued to meet even after Letby was removed from the ward.
  • They met outside work for coffee and restaurant dates, shopping trips, and a visit to the home where she lived alone.
  • He was described during the trial as her ‘boyfriend’ but Letby instead insisted: “I loved him as a friend.

I was not in love with him.” Jurors were told of messages exchanged while at work and home. Letby’s nursing colleagues also teased her about flirting with him. What Happened To Lucy Letby Lucy Letby giving evidence at Manchester Crown Court (Image: Elizabeth Cook/PA) In one text shown to the jury, Letby said she received a ‘strange message’ from the doctor. Her colleague said: “Did you? Saying what? Go Commando (laughing face emoji).” Letby replied with four laughing face emojis – but when quizzed during her trial, she denied knowing what ‘go commando’ meant.

  1. In another message, Letby protested: “I don’t flirt with him! Certainly, don’t fancy him ha ha just a nice guy.” A document shown to the court indicated Letby and Dr A had been to London together for a day.
  2. Messages between them showed a series of love heart emojis exchanged as they made plans to meet.

During questioning, Letby said she had a ‘boyfriend’. She said: ” was a married man, it’s not a relationship at all it’s a friendship”. She then went on to admit she had a boyfriend at this time. It was not made clear if this was the same person, while no previous partners were mentioned during the trial. What Happened To Lucy Letby Letby On her first day back at work following a holiday in Ibiza, she wrote ‘boo’ when she learned that he would not be there working with her. Later that day, Child O collapsed and Letby called for Dr A’s help. Prosecutor Mr Johnson asked her: “Did you want to get his attention? Is that the reason you sabotaged Child O?”.

She denied this. Child P collapsed the next day when Letby was on duty. Dr A responded to the emergency crash call. Mr Johnson asked her: “Did you enjoy being in these crisis situations with Dr A. Did it give you something to talk about and message about?” Letby said: “No, Dr A and I were friends.” Letby sought reassurance from Dr A when another medic raised concerns after a baby fell ill.

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Dr A messaged her saying: “No more doubt, it is not you, it is the babies.” He added: “You are one of a few nurses in the region (I’ve worked pretty much everywhere) that I would trust with my own children.” Police found a note in her home with the name of Dr A and the phrases: “My best friend.

Love, I loved you and I think you knew that. “I trusted you with everything.I wanted you to stand by me but you didn’t.” Letby was last week found guilty of seven counts of murder and six counts of attempted murder at the Countess of Chester Hospital between June 2015 and June 2016. She deliberately harmed the innocent babies by injecting air intravenously and administering air and/or milk into the stomach via nasogastric tubes.

She also added insulin as a poison to intravenous feeds, interferring with breathing tubes and inflicting trauma in some cases. Letby is now the fourth female in British history to have been given a whole life order. It is the most severe punishment.

Has Lucy Letby been sentenced?

Key points –

Lucy Letby will spend rest of life in jail as judge imposes whole-life order reserved for most heinous murderersFormer nurse was found guilty of murdering seven babies and attempting to murder six others at the Countess of Chester’s neonatal unit in 2015-16 ‘Sadistic’ Letby refusing to leave her cell for sentencing Scroll down to read powerful statements from the victims’ families Watch moment of Letby arrest – and what she said to police Sinister texts and ‘concerning patterns’: How police caught Letby Live reporting by Megan Harwood-Baynes and Katie Williams throughout the trial from Manchester Crown Court

Our live coverage of the Lucy Letby case ends here After more than 10 months of harrowing evidence and jury deliberations, Lucy Letby will go down as one of the UK’s most notorious child killers, never to be released from prison. The details of Letby’s “sadistic” murder and attempted murder campaign have been difficult for anyone to hear – but none more so than the victims’ families.

  • Sky News is among just a few media organisations to have covered the trial since it began in October to its culmination today.
  • As Letby begins her whole-life sentence in prison, we’re bringing our live coverage to an end.
  • Why can’t criminals like Letby be forced into court? Child killer Lucy Letby’s refusal to attend court for the conclusion of her trial has sparked outrage – and calls for changes in the law.

Our news reporter Lara Keay has produced this explainer on how and why Letby was able to skip court for the most pivotal part of this monumental trial. ‘Technology may be the answer’ to overcome difficult court attendance question Difficulties around forcing defendants to attend sentencing and victim statements could be solved through technology, according to a top lawyer.

Lucy Letby failed to show up to court today to hear victim impact statements and her own sentencing, leading many commentators to call for the enforcement of attendance for defendants. Kirsty Brimelow, chair of the Criminal Bar Association, said there would be concerns around enforcing such a rule – which could see defendants shout or make a scene during particularly sensitive moments, as well as pose a physical risk to officers bringing defendants to and from the dock.

Some suggestions included introducing a mandatory weblink to prison cells, which Ms Brimelow said could work. “I think technology probably is the answer, in that we’re in very different times to pre-COVID and it’s very common now to have live links to prisons,” she said.

A visual link could be dangerous if defendants choose to disrupt proceedings, but knowing offenders are listening to victim impact statements and sentencing could be beneficial, she added. Letby handed 14 whole-life sentences – joining three other notorious female criminals Lucy Letby has been handed 14 whole-life sentences for her crimes, which included the murder and attempted murder of 13 babies.

The judge imposed a whole-life order for each offence she committed, meaning she will spend the rest of her life in prison. As we outlined earlier, she becomes only the fourth woman to be given the sentence in the UK, joining Rose West, Joanna Christine Dennehy and deceased moors murderer Myra Hindley.

West was infamously convicted of 10 murders in 1995 alongside her husband Fred West, while Dennehy stabbed three men to death and dumped their bodies in ditches outside Peterborough in March 2013. Hindley, who murdered five children alongside partner Ian Brady, died behind bars in 2002. This makes Letby one of just three women alive currently serving whole-life orders, and the fourth to be given the sentence in British history.

Whole-life orders ‘reserved for people like Letby’ Whole-life orders are reserved exclusively for offenders like Lucy Letby, an ex-senior police officer has said. “It’s the only sentence that really would have been applicable in this case,” former senior investigating officer Simon Harding said.

“It’s a very sad day for many families, but they have justice in a way, some didn’t which we need to think of as well,” he added. “It is reserved for people like this, who stand out for their particular crimes. this is taking the lives of the most innocent and vulnerable members of our society and it is pleasing that she will never see the light of day again,” Mr Harding said.

How the police caught Lucy Letby When nurse Lucy Letby returned from a trip to Ibiza in June 2016, she texted a colleague to say she would be “back in with a bang”. Within 72 hours of that message, two triplet siblings were dead. But it would be two more years until Letby was finally arrested, and a further five before she was brought to justice for her evil crimes.

  • This is how the police caught Lucy Letby.
  • ‘Let’s get this law changed’: Starmer pledges to help government over Letby no-show Sir Keir Starmer has pledged to help the government overturn the law that allowed Lucy Letby to skip today’s impact statements and sentencing.
  • Speaking to reporters in the aftermath of the whole-life order sentencing, Sir Keir said Labour were not “thinking about party politics”.

“We’re thinking about the victims, making an absolutely open offer to the government, we’ll work with you, overcome the practical considerations, and let’s get this done, let’s get the law changed.” What makes a healthcare murderer tick? Lucy Letby has entered the history books today.

She’s the most prolific child murder in modern British history. She’s joins the ranks of Rose West and Myra Hindley in becoming of Britain’s most prolific female serial killers too. The disgraced nurse is now a medical monster, like GP Harold Shipmand and nurse Beverley Allitt. But what goes on inside the mind of a serial killer? Our reporter Gemma Peplow has been speaking to psychologists about what motivates such horrific crimes.

Letby whole-life order ‘reflects true scale of horrific crimes’, police say We’ve just heard from the police involved in bringing Lucy Letby to justice, with deputy senior investigating officer Detective Chief Inspector Nicola Evans sharing this statement: “Today, Lucy Letby has been handed a whole life order.

The sentence reflects the true scale and gravity of her horrific crimes and ensures that a calculated and dangerous individual is behind bars for a very long time. “Nothing will bring back the babies who died or take away the pain and suffering experienced by all of the families over the years but I hope that the significant sentence will bring some comfort at this dark time.

“The victim impact statements read out in court today on behalf of the parents are a chilling reminder of the pain and suffering that each family has had to endure over the years. “Hearing their own experiences in their own words has been truly heartbreaking.

Who is the nurse insulin killer?

Pennsylvania Nurse Charged With Murder After Allegedly Killing Patients With Insulin. Heather Pressdee, a 40-year-old nurse from Pennsylvania, was reportedly concerned the patients had a low quality of life and hoped ‘they would slip into a coma and just pass away.’

Has Alison Kelly been suspended?

The former director of nursing at the hospital trust where Lucy Letby murdered seven babies has been suspended from her current role. Alison Kelly was director of nursing and quality at the Countess of Chester Hospital during the years that Letby killed the babies and attempted to murder six others.

Letby used various ways to harm the babies including injecting air into the bloodstream, injecting air into the stomach, overfeeding with milk, physical assaults and poisoning with insulin. She was found guilty of the crimes last Friday and was this afternoon was given a whole life sentence, meaning she will never be released.

During the trial, Ms Kelly was one of the senior managers who was accused of failing to act when clinicians first raised concerns about Letby. It was revealed today that Ms Kelly, who is currently director for nursing for Rochdale Care Organisation, part of the Northern Care Alliance NHS Foundation Trust, has been suspended “in light of information” that emerged during the trial.

Nicky Clarke, chief people officer at Northern Care Alliance NHS Foundation Trust, said: “I can confirm Alison Kelly has been suspended. “We are unable to comment any further at this moment in time.” Formally established in 2021, the Northern Care Alliance NHS Foundation Trust brought together staff and services from Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust and the Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust It runs four hospitals across Greater Manchester, namely Salford Royal Hospital, Rochdale Infirmary, Fairfield General Hospital and the Royal Oldham Hospital.

Meanwhile, the government announced last week that it would be launching an independent inquiry into the circumstances behind Lucy Letby’s crimes, including the handling of concerns and governance. An NHS England spokesperson said: “We welcome the independent inquiry announced by the Department of Health and Social Care into the events at the Countess of Chester and will cooperate fully to help ensure all lessons are learned.

What mental illness did Letby have?

Was Lucy Letby battling mental health issues? – “It is difficult to know Lucy’s incentives, as she has not opened up her psyche to the world. However, we can look at some of the most high-profile healthcare professionals who committed their crimes, and compare and contrast.

  1. Beverley Allitt, also an English nurse, was convicted of murdering four infants, attempting to murder three others, and causing grievous bodily harm to a further six in Lincolnshire between February and April 1991.
  2. She had Munchausen’s by proxy.
  3. This contentious disorder leads the individual to intentionally fake or even artificially create illness.

The perpetrator gets some sort of perverse pleasure from feeding off the sympathy and attention that is afforded to the victim,” Sohom explained. Members of the media work near a large screen showing a picture of convicted hospital nurse Lucy Letby, ahead of her sentencing, outside the Manchester Crown Court, in Manchester, Britain, August 21, 2023 (REUTERS/Phil Noble)(REUTERS) “With Harold Shipman, an English doctor, considered to be one of the most prolific serial killers in modern history, with an estimated 250 victims, there seemed to be a ‘God complex’. Harold Shipman, an English doctor, is considered to be one of the most prolific serial killers (Wakefield Prison) Sohom said there may have been other motives, such as power and control or “a morbid fascination with the parents’ grieving process.” “It is also possible that she took some perverse pleasure in deceiving parents, i.e.

being the cause of their baby’s death yet also the person who comforts them. She may have also been jealous of the ideal family unit, perhaps as in her mind it was somehow obtainable. In her bitterness, she decided to simply annihilate what she couldn’t have,” he added. On being asked whether Lucy may have been battling mental health issues, Sohom said, “It has been established that Lucy suffered from some background anxiety and depression.

However, crucially, in my view, this did not affect her criminal culpability. It may have given her a negative outlook on life, but that still does not explain and certainly does not excuse what she did.”

Did Lucy Letby have friends?

She is going to jail for the rest of her life. And yet – Lucy’s best friends are standing by her. In an interview that takes ‘best friends forever’ to a whole new level, one of Lucy’s friends Dawn Howe told BBC’s Panorama on Friday that she and Lucy’s closest friends are firmly on her side.

Is there a documentary on Lucy Letby?

Lucy Letby: The Nurse Who Killed – Chilling documentary about the children’s nurse – the UK’s most prolific child killer of modern times. Her actions shook families and medics to their core. Who is Lucy Letby? Share this episode

Has Lucy Letby got siblings?

Does Lucy Letby Have Siblings – Born on January 4, 1990, in Hereford, England, Lucy Letby’s parents are identified as John Letby and Susan Letby. Records indicate that Lucy Letby is the sole offspring of her parents, though she was raised alongside her cousins, whose details remain undisclosed at this juncture.

  • Although numerous individuals are interested in uncovering Lucy Letby’s social media presence, it is noteworthy that the convicted neonatal nurse does not maintain any presence on social media platforms.
  • For further insights into her father and mother, refer to the subsequent section.
  • To access more information, simply swipe down.

Lucy Letby’s father, John Letby, has a profession as a businessman, specializing in furniture sales, while her mother, Susan Letby, formerly held a position as an accounts clerk. Presently, John Letby is 78 years old, and Susan Letby has reached the age of 63.

  1. Their relationship with their daughter remains strong and meaningful.
  2. According to available information, Lucy Letby, along with her parents, would make regular trips to Torquay, totaling three times a year.
  3. Emerging from a middle-class background, the convicted nurse’s family holds this attribute.
  4. Throughout the 10-month duration of the trial at Manchester Crown Court, Lucy Letby’s parents stood steadfastly by her side, offering their support.

For a more comprehensive understanding, delve further into her story. On August 18, the court rendered a verdict of guilt against her for the deaths of seven children. Subsequently, on August 21, 2023, Lucy Letby received a life sentence as determined by the court.

  1. Notably, Lucy Letby was not physically present in court during her sentencing.
  2. Her academic journey saw her graduating from the University of Chester in 2011.
  3. Following this, she became a part of the neonatal unit at the Countess of Chester Hospital.
  4. However, concerns about her behavior emerged in 2016, leading to her removal from her job position.

The year 2018 marked her initial arrest, abruptly ending her nursing career. Preceding her apprehension, Lucy Letby had transitioned to non-clinical roles. For continued updates and more comprehensive information, remain engaged with this website. : Does Lucy Letby Have Siblings- Meet Her Brother And Sister Wiki And Age

What illness has Lucy Letby got?

Munchausen Syndrome: Did killer nurse Lucy Letby have pathological condition? Lucy Letby’s motives are still unknown. (Reuters)

  • As the most prolific child serial killer in modern British history, has left victims’ families and the public with one major question – why did she do it?
  • The nurse maintained her innocence through her long-running trial but will now after being convicted while she worked on the neonatal unit at the Countess of Chester Hospital.
  • Sentencing her to a whole life order Mr Justice Goss said there was a “malevolence bordering on sadism” in her actions, and that she had “no remorse”.
  • Prosecutors never advanced a motive as they outlined the allegations against her to the jury and speaking after her trial, detectives said the reason for Letby’s killing spree may never be known.
  • Some experts have suggested that Letby may have been suffering from Munchausen syndrome by proxy – a disorder where a caregiver may harm someone in their care to get attention.
  • Watch: Who is Lucy Letby? The ‘average’ nurse who became Britain’s most notorious child killer
  • While parallels have been drawn between Letby and serial killers Myra Hindley and Rose West, more appropriate comparisons might be to historic cases of killer nurses, such as Beverley Allitt from the UK and Charles Cullen in the US, they suggested.
  • Allitt, 54, targeted 13 victims during a 59-day spree which saw her kill four babies and poison nine others at Grantham and Kesteven Hospital, Lincolnshire, in 1991.
  • Cullen, 63, murdered dozens, possibly hundreds, of patients during a 16-year career spanning several medical centres in the American state of New Jersey.
  • Criminology expert Dr Dominic Willmott said Letby, with her text messages showing she wanted to “garner sympathy” from colleagues after the children’s deaths.
  • Read more:

Police have said we may never know what Letby’s motives were. (Getty)

  1. The criminologist, a senior lecturer in criminology at Loughborough University who previously authored a paper on the Beverley Allitt case, said: “In our analysis of healthcare professionals who perpetrate violence against their patients, especially children, offending appeared to be motivated by a pathological desire for attention and sympathy emerging as a consequence of their involvement in the case.
  2. “There was a complex interaction between this and a history of personality disorder diagnoses and characteristics, and were often found to be highly sadistic and narcissistic as described by those who knew them.”
  3. appear to indicate Letby’s efforts to garner sympathy from her colleagues following the children’s deaths, along with other evidence that she had to be “repeatedly asked to focus on other patients around the time of the death of other babies and her passing on death notifications to family members seems to indicate her desire to be personally involved in the case, even when doing so was likely to raise suspicions about her involvement”.
  4. Watch: Zara Aleena’s aunt calls for reform as Lucy Letby refuses to appear for sentencing
  5. Dr Marc Feldman, Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Adjunct Professor of Psychology at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, and an international expert in ‘factitious disorders’ including Munchausen Syndrome and Munchausen by Proxy, said his latest book, Dying to be Ill (2018), has a long section on serial murder by Munchausen by proxy perpetrators – who are usually women.
  6. He told Yahoo News UK: “There have been well over 100 such perpetrators of healthcare professionals and paraprofessionals that have been reported around the world.
  7. “I would begin by pointing out that MBP is not a mental illness per se; it is a form of abuse in which the perpetrators (usually mothers) victimise one or more of their children.
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“Usually the goal is not to kill the child or even induce permanent physical damage. After all, doing so removes the person the mother has been manipulating to get the attention, sympathy, care, and concern that they may feel unable to get in any other way.

  • Read more:
  • He added: “The difference between these individual cases and serial murder cases in MBP is that, in the latter, if a child dies or suffers permanent injury, there is an unceasingly supply of new patients who can be abused and possibly killed by nurses or other healthcare professionals.”
  • Such people may crave excitement or praise from those who witness them under pressure, Dr Feldman added, or might get kudos for carrying on despite the ‘bad luck’ of being on duty when so many children happen to fall ill or die.

“These are general statements because obviously Lucy Letby is not shedding light on her particular motives,” he said. “In fact, she may be uncertain herself. “Certainly she knew what she was doing, and had the goal of severe harming or killing children, but these perpetrators often lack insight into the ‘why’ of their own behaviour.

  • In that sense, it can often be compulsive or even ‘addictive’.
  • James Treadwell, professor in criminology at Staffordshire University, said answering ‘how’ Letby had committed the crimes was more important than ‘why’, so it could be prevented from happening again.
  • It’s with the ‘how’ question you can prevent these things happening again.

We had Allitt and Harold Shipman in medical situations, if you don’t answer the ‘how’ question, tragic history, terrible history, bereaved families could happen again.”

Has Lucy Letby been sentenced?

Key points –

Lucy Letby will spend rest of life in jail as judge imposes whole-life order reserved for most heinous murderersFormer nurse was found guilty of murdering seven babies and attempting to murder six others at the Countess of Chester’s neonatal unit in 2015-16 ‘Sadistic’ Letby refusing to leave her cell for sentencing Scroll down to read powerful statements from the victims’ families Watch moment of Letby arrest – and what she said to police Sinister texts and ‘concerning patterns’: How police caught Letby Live reporting by Megan Harwood-Baynes and Katie Williams throughout the trial from Manchester Crown Court

Our live coverage of the Lucy Letby case ends here After more than 10 months of harrowing evidence and jury deliberations, Lucy Letby will go down as one of the UK’s most notorious child killers, never to be released from prison. The details of Letby’s “sadistic” murder and attempted murder campaign have been difficult for anyone to hear – but none more so than the victims’ families.

  1. Sky News is among just a few media organisations to have covered the trial since it began in October to its culmination today.
  2. As Letby begins her whole-life sentence in prison, we’re bringing our live coverage to an end.
  3. Why can’t criminals like Letby be forced into court? Child killer Lucy Letby’s refusal to attend court for the conclusion of her trial has sparked outrage – and calls for changes in the law.

Our news reporter Lara Keay has produced this explainer on how and why Letby was able to skip court for the most pivotal part of this monumental trial. ‘Technology may be the answer’ to overcome difficult court attendance question Difficulties around forcing defendants to attend sentencing and victim statements could be solved through technology, according to a top lawyer.

Lucy Letby failed to show up to court today to hear victim impact statements and her own sentencing, leading many commentators to call for the enforcement of attendance for defendants. Kirsty Brimelow, chair of the Criminal Bar Association, said there would be concerns around enforcing such a rule – which could see defendants shout or make a scene during particularly sensitive moments, as well as pose a physical risk to officers bringing defendants to and from the dock.

Some suggestions included introducing a mandatory weblink to prison cells, which Ms Brimelow said could work. “I think technology probably is the answer, in that we’re in very different times to pre-COVID and it’s very common now to have live links to prisons,” she said.

A visual link could be dangerous if defendants choose to disrupt proceedings, but knowing offenders are listening to victim impact statements and sentencing could be beneficial, she added. Letby handed 14 whole-life sentences – joining three other notorious female criminals Lucy Letby has been handed 14 whole-life sentences for her crimes, which included the murder and attempted murder of 13 babies.

The judge imposed a whole-life order for each offence she committed, meaning she will spend the rest of her life in prison. As we outlined earlier, she becomes only the fourth woman to be given the sentence in the UK, joining Rose West, Joanna Christine Dennehy and deceased moors murderer Myra Hindley.

West was infamously convicted of 10 murders in 1995 alongside her husband Fred West, while Dennehy stabbed three men to death and dumped their bodies in ditches outside Peterborough in March 2013. Hindley, who murdered five children alongside partner Ian Brady, died behind bars in 2002. This makes Letby one of just three women alive currently serving whole-life orders, and the fourth to be given the sentence in British history.

Whole-life orders ‘reserved for people like Letby’ Whole-life orders are reserved exclusively for offenders like Lucy Letby, an ex-senior police officer has said. “It’s the only sentence that really would have been applicable in this case,” former senior investigating officer Simon Harding said.

  1. It’s a very sad day for many families, but they have justice in a way, some didn’t which we need to think of as well,” he added.
  2. It is reserved for people like this, who stand out for their particular crimes.
  3. This is taking the lives of the most innocent and vulnerable members of our society and it is pleasing that she will never see the light of day again,” Mr Harding said.

How the police caught Lucy Letby When nurse Lucy Letby returned from a trip to Ibiza in June 2016, she texted a colleague to say she would be “back in with a bang”. Within 72 hours of that message, two triplet siblings were dead. But it would be two more years until Letby was finally arrested, and a further five before she was brought to justice for her evil crimes.

This is how the police caught Lucy Letby. ‘Let’s get this law changed’: Starmer pledges to help government over Letby no-show Sir Keir Starmer has pledged to help the government overturn the law that allowed Lucy Letby to skip today’s impact statements and sentencing. Speaking to reporters in the aftermath of the whole-life order sentencing, Sir Keir said Labour were not “thinking about party politics”.

“We’re thinking about the victims, making an absolutely open offer to the government, we’ll work with you, overcome the practical considerations, and let’s get this done, let’s get the law changed.” What makes a healthcare murderer tick? Lucy Letby has entered the history books today.

  1. She’s the most prolific child murder in modern British history.
  2. She’s joins the ranks of Rose West and Myra Hindley in becoming of Britain’s most prolific female serial killers too.
  3. The disgraced nurse is now a medical monster, like GP Harold Shipmand and nurse Beverley Allitt.
  4. But what goes on inside the mind of a serial killer? Our reporter Gemma Peplow has been speaking to psychologists about what motivates such horrific crimes.

Letby whole-life order ‘reflects true scale of horrific crimes’, police say We’ve just heard from the police involved in bringing Lucy Letby to justice, with deputy senior investigating officer Detective Chief Inspector Nicola Evans sharing this statement: “Today, Lucy Letby has been handed a whole life order.

  1. The sentence reflects the true scale and gravity of her horrific crimes and ensures that a calculated and dangerous individual is behind bars for a very long time.
  2. Nothing will bring back the babies who died or take away the pain and suffering experienced by all of the families over the years but I hope that the significant sentence will bring some comfort at this dark time.

“The victim impact statements read out in court today on behalf of the parents are a chilling reminder of the pain and suffering that each family has had to endure over the years. “Hearing their own experiences in their own words has been truly heartbreaking.

Who is the nurse insulin killer?

Pennsylvania Nurse Charged With Murder After Allegedly Killing Patients With Insulin. Heather Pressdee, a 40-year-old nurse from Pennsylvania, was reportedly concerned the patients had a low quality of life and hoped ‘they would slip into a coma and just pass away.’

Who is Nurse Letby?

U.K. Nurse Lucy Letby Handed Whole-Life Sentence for Killing Newborns Ms. Letby was convicted last week of murdering seven babies and trying to kill six others, making her the most prolific killer of children in modern British history. What Happened To Lucy Letby The Women and Children’s Building at the Countess of Chester Hospital in Chester, England. Lucy Letby was convicted of murdering seven babies and attempting to murder six more in the neonatal ward. Credit. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images By Lucy Letby, a nurse who became the most prolific in modern British history, was sentenced on Monday to life in prison without parole, the culmination of a yearslong case that has horrified the country and raised questions over the management culture that allowed her to evade detection for so long.

Judge James Goss handed Ms. Letby a “whole life order,” meaning she will spend the rest of her life in prison, a sentence reserved for the country’s worst offenses. She is only the fourth woman to have ever received the sentence. Judge Goss told the courtroom that Ms. Letby, who was convicted last week of killing seven newborns and trying to kill six others, “acted completely contrary to the normal human instincts of nurturing and caring for babies” and that her actions caused a majority of her victims to suffer “acute pain.” “There was premeditation, calculation and cunning in your actions,” the judge said, later describing “a deep malevolence bordering on sadism” in Ms.

Letby’s crimes. The murders and attempted killings took place between June 2015 and June 2016, when Ms. Letby was a nurse in the neonatal ward of the Countess of Chester Hospital in northwestern England, tasked with caring for premature and vulnerable babies.

  1. She refused to appear during her sentencing on Monday, but the court heard heart-wrenching testimony from the parents of babies who were killed.
  2. A November 2020 police photograph of Lucy Letby. Credit.
  3. Cheshire Constabulary The mother of a baby boy killed by Ms.
  4. Letby addressed the absent former nurse in court on Monday, saying, “There is no sentence that will ever compare to the excruciating agony that we have suffered as a consequence of your actions,” according to the BBC.

The mother described how she had a memory box of mementos of her son and had treasured the prints of his hand and foot. But she now felt conflicted over these, she said, because Ms. Letby had made the prints when her son was born. A father of triplets, two of whom Ms.

Letby was convicted of killing, said in a prerecorded video statement that “everyday life was difficult, just getting up and living was a struggle,” after the death of his children. “Lucy Letby has destroyed our lives,” he said, adding, “even after the trial has ended, it will continue to haunt us and will always have an impact on our lives.” The lawyer for the prosecution, Philip Astbury, read out a statement from the parents of twins who were attacked in June 2015.

One survived while the other died, and Ms. Letby was convicted of their murder and attempted murder, respectively. After the death of the child, a family member was always present with their surviving daughter, the parents said — but Ms. Letby had been waiting for the relatives to leave so she could “attack.” “You thought it was your right to play God with our children’s lives,” the statement said.

  • You thought you could enter our lives and turn it upside down, but you will never win.
  • We hope you live a very long life and spend every day suffering for what you’ve done.” While some of the parents delivered their statements through lawyers, others spoke directly to the courtroom, through tears.
  • One mother of two victims said that Ms.

Letby’s absence from court showed the “disrespect” she had for the court and the families. “We have attended court day in and day out, yet she decides she has had enough, and stays in her cell, just one final act of wickedness from a coward,” the mother said.

The identities of the babies in the case and their families were protected throughout the trial. Prime Minister Rishi Sunak, speaking on Monday morning, said that he had been shocked by the harrowing details of the case. “I think it is cowardly that people that commit such horrendous crimes do not face their victims and hear firsthand the impact that their crimes have had on them and their families and loved ones,” he said, adding that the government was looking at changing the law to ensure convicted criminals attended their sentencings.

Over the course of the 10-month trial in Manchester Crown Court, which began in October, jurors heard that Ms. Letby had harmed babies by overfeeding them with milk, injecting them with air and insulin and inflicting “impact-type” trauma. Ms. Letby, 33, maintained her innocence throughout the trial, where she faced 22 counts related to the killing and harming of babies.

  • In addition to the murder convictions, Ms.
  • Letby was found guilty of seven counts of attempted murder related to six newborns, meaning she tried to kill one of them twice, prosecutors said.
  • The jury did not reach verdicts on six counts of attempted murder and Ms.
  • Letby was found not guilty on two counts of attempted murder.

Medical records, text and social media messages, staffing schedules, handwritten notes and diaries were used to help convict Ms. Letby, prosecutors said. The government has ordered an independent inquiry into how Ms. Letby managed to remain undetected for years after the British news media that hospital managers had ignored repeated warnings about her conduct.

A BBC investigation revealed that doctors working alongside Ms. Letby first raised concerns about her possible role in 2015 but felt their alarm was dismissed by managers who were overly concerned with protecting the hospital’s reputation. Even after she was removed from the neonatal ward in 2016, she continued to work at the hospital in a clerical role until 2018.

The Cheshire police are still investigating whether other babies who had contact with Ms. Letby have experienced unexpected health issues, and the authorities are asking anyone with additional information to contact them. The attacks in the current case only relate to deaths within one year.

  1. Ms. Letby worked in the neonatal unit from 2011 to 2016.
  2. Aly Soto contributed reporting.
  3. Is an international correspondent for The Times, based in London, covering the United Kingdom and Ireland.
  4. Since early 2022, she has also covered the war in Ukraine.
  5. She joined The Times in 2016.
  6. A version of this article appears in print on, Section A, Page 9 of the New York edition with the headline: Nurse Who Murdered 7 Newborns in Britain Is Given Life Sentence,

| | : U.K. Nurse Lucy Letby Handed Whole-Life Sentence for Killing Newborns