Who Started The Education Institution Shantiniketan?

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Who Started The Education Institution Shantiniketan
Justification of Outstanding Universal Value – Founded by Rabindranath Tagore in 1901 and located about a hundred and fifty eight kilometers northwest of Kolkata in Bengal’s rural hinterland, Santiniketan represents the distillation of Rabindranath Tagore’s life, philosophy and greatest works through his lifetime and the continuing legacy of his unique model of education and internationalism through a living institution and architectural ensemble.

And while many of Tagore’s greatest art and literary works bear a unique association with Santiniketan, it can be argued that his model of an Indian education through the revival of the tapoban tradition and humanist ideology finds its greatest reflection in Santiniketan, thus making it Tagore’s greatest work.

In his last letter to Mahatma Gandhi, Tagore wrote ‘Visva Bharati is like a vessel carrying the cargo of my life’s best treasure and I hope it may claim special care from my countrymen for its preservation’. The school at Santiniketan was a sapling which grew into the widely branching tree that was Visva Bharati.

Today, Santiniketan and Visva Bharati exemplify the continuation of Tagore’s works, both as a living educational and cultural centre as well as through the generations of outstanding alumni who excelled in the worlds of painting, literature, music, sculpture, cinema, economics and politics. The architectural and landscape setting of Santiniketan embody Tagore’s vision of an eclectic architectural expression that was a blending of diverse cultural traditions in a landscape setting that formed the backdrop for a literal translation of ‘Santiniketan’ as an abode of peace.

Humanism & Cultural interchange (Criterion ii) Author Nirad C. Chaudhuri described Tagore as, “Historically, the greatest product of the interaction in India in the nineteenth century between European and Hindu life and civilization. In one sense he may be regarded as the victim of the interchange, and in another as its prophet.

His own life was caught in the conflict which the interchange brought about, and his writings stand for its achievement.” At the threshold of the 20th century in Bengal reeling under British rule and sectarian divisions, Tagore envisioned a place of learning unfettered by religious and regional barriers.

From its very inception, Tagore modelled Santiniketan on principles of humanism, internationalism and a sustainable environment and the curriculum was developed to promote the free interchange of human values and cultures. Thus, over a hundred years ago, Santiniketan began in a majority Hindu region with 3 out of 5 teachers being Christian, encouraged women to join as both students and teachers, and promoted a unique blend of art and cultural interchange in its classrooms that were held in the open air, free from the confines of spatial or ideological boundaries.

In developing his holistic educational paradigm, Rabindranath sought through various means to break down existing barriers and to foster interconnectivity between provincial and regional groups: between English-medium educated elites and the common people; between urban and rural economic groups.and to reduce the gender gap.

Tagore’s vision finds architectural expression in Santiniketan where the buildings of China Bhavan and Hindi Bhavan were specifically built to house institutes that explored linguistic linkages between eastern countries, as well as the eclectic architectural expression of structures such as Sinha Sadan, Udayan and Patho Bhavan that merged various cultural vocabularies to create a unique architectural synthesis.

In only the second year of its existence, Santiniketan had its first foreign student in Hori San from Japan. To cultivate this interchange in the students of Santiniketan, Tagore actively solicited the presence of visitors from all over the world, in addition to devising syllabi that promoted the understanding of different cultures: Vedic, Puranic, Buddhist, Jain, Zoroastrian, and Sikh traditions; the ‘precious and permanent contribution’ of Islamic culture to Indian art and architecture; writings of ‘our medieval saints’; special studies of China, Japan, and Tibet; as well as Western culture, for ‘only then shall we able to assimilate this last contribution to our common stock’.

Noting its ‘celebration of variety’, Nobel laureate and long time resident of Santiniketan, Amartya Sen speaks of ‘the ease with which discussions in the school could move from Indian traditional literature to contemporary as well as classical western thought and to China, Japan and elsewhere’.

Tagore’s poem encapsulates this vision of internationalism through his words, “He mor chitta, punya tirthe jagore dhire ei bharater maha-manaber sagoro-tire.” ‘On the sacred shores of the ocean of humanity of this India, Awaken, my heart!’ The architectural and landscape setting of Santiniketan embody Tagore’s vision of an eclectic architectural expression that was a blending of diverse cultural traditions in a landscape setting that formed the backdrop for a literal translation of ‘Santiniketan’ as an abode of peace.

The Tapoban & Gurukul traditions: Education & Rural Reconstruction (Criterion iii) On 22nd December 1901, Rabindranath Tagore established his school at Santiniketan with five students (including his eldest son) and an equal number of teachers. He originally named it Brahmacharya Ashram in the tradition of ancient forest hermitages.

  1. Santiniketan is in many ways a pioneering step in the field of education and rural reconstruction.
  2. Located in the heart of nature amongst Hindu, Muslim, and Santali villages which were in ‘serious decline’ despite a rich cultural heritage, the school, from almost its beginning aimed to combine education with a sense of obligation towards the larger civic community.

The ‘voice of the vedic tongue’, Tagore said, outlined the nature of Santiniketan, envisioned as the ideal form of the traditional Indian hermitages which had at one time flourished in the forests of ancient India, great seats of learning from which the Upanishads had evolved, exploring a universal and humanistic life of the mind.

Although Tagore was highly critical of Macaulay’s system due to which, unlike the West, education, particularly higher education, was cut off and insulated from the living social corpus of India. Santiniketan revives and gives form to Tagore’s interpretation of the ancient Indian concept of tapoban. Tagore revived the ancient Indian model of Tapoban, or penance in a forest, interpreting it though an educational model aimed at ‘cultivation of feeling’ (bodher tapasya/sadhana) as opposed to education of the senses and intellect.

This aspect of education involves the realization of the individual self in relation to the universe and the essential kinship of all existence. Santiniketan combines the traditions of the gurukul mode of residential schooling with its tangible manifestation in open air classrooms arranged under the canopies of trees.

In keeping with the gurukul tradition of students learning from their guru (teacher) in a residential ashram in the bosom of nature, Sriniketan is a distinct step in the field of rural reconstruction. In 1907, Tagore sought to expand the school’s relationship with its neighbouring villages of the Santhal tribal community.

The school, from its conception, aimed to combine education with a sense of obligation towards the larger community. Sriniketan is the earliest experiment in rural reconstruction in India that Tagore began and was later followed by Mahatma Gandhi in his ashrams at Wardha and Sewagram.

  1. Leonard Elmhirst came from England to be part of Sriniketan and his experiences in Santiniketan inspired him to establish at Darlington Hall in Devonshire.
  2. If Tagore had done nothing else, what he did at Santiniketan and Sriniketan would be sufficient to rank him as one of India’s greatest nation – builders.

Instead of celebrating religious festivals, the students of Santiniketan celebrate nature through its seasons. Thus Poush Mela (winter), Vasantotsav (spring), Varsha Mangal (rains) and Maghotsav, continuing the close connect between man and nature established in the founding principles of Santiniketan.

  • With the outbreak of unprecedented communal violence in the wake of Bengal’s partition, Tagore revived the folk festival of Raksha Bandhan, reinterpreting it in 1909 as a tie between Hindus and Muslims.
  • Santiniketan, or the ‘abode of peace’ cannot be confined to the strict definition of an academic university.

Vishwabharti is an educational institution, but one with a difference, where classes are taught in the open air, where nature and its seasons are celebrated instead of religious festivals, where the graduation ceremony is marked by the gifting of a chhatim leaf and where humanism and the larger concepts of internationalism are rooted in Tagore’s philosophy that ‘the whole world can find a nest”.

(Criterion iii) Ideas of Outstanding Universal Value: Internationalism: (Criterion vi) Santiniketan is among the pioneering institutions in modern history that offered a living example of internationalism, before even the United Nations established its guiding principle enshrined in Article 1, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on December 10, 1948.

Long before the League of Nations and the United Nations, Tagore was an internationalist who critiqued the narrowly defined concepts of nationalism and patriotism. He wanted all human beings to be treated equally regardless of the country or nation to which they belonged.

He also did not want barriers between people even within the same nation-the barriers of caste, race, and religion. Santiniketan is a pioneering experiment in internationalism. At a time when India was grappling with the problems of colonialism and seeking its freedom from British authority, Tagore’s vision surpassed national and cultural boundaries to establish a larger international vision, that of universal humanism.

Through bringing diverse individuals together in a hospitable setting, he sought to promote understanding between different linguistic groups, different races and global cultures and diverse religions. The motto that Tagore chose for Visva Bharati, Yatra Visvam Bhavatyekanidam, ‘where the whole world can find a nest’, reflected his aspiration for the institution.

Tagore himself alluded to the global character of Santiniketan with an invitation to the world, while concluding his acceptance speech for the Nobel Prize in Stockholm, in the ‘name of the unity of men’, in the ‘name of love’, and ‘in the name of God’, to ‘join hands with us and not to leave this institution to us’, to ‘make it living and representative of the undivided humanity of the world’.

Mainly due to his efforts, Santiketan was visited by international scholars and artists such as Sylvain Levi, Moritz Winternitz, Sten Konow, Fernand Benoit, Arthur Geddes, Andree Karpeles, Mary Eeghen, Stella Kramisch, James Cousins, T’an Yun-Shan, Yonejiro Noguchi, Guiseppe Tucci, Carlo Formichi, Arnold Bake, Igor Bogdanov, Mark Collins, and Vincenc Lesny.

Ideas of Outstanding Universal Value: Influence on the Modern Indian Nation – Inclusiveness & Non Alignment (Criterion vi) The vision of Tagore’s Santiniketan was that of inclusiveness and it influenced the vision of Gandhi and Nehru (and later Indira Gandhi who was a student at Santiniketan) in the formulation of an inclusive Indian nation.

His inclusive nationalism and non-parochial interpretation of India’s history became a powerful agent of ideas for the freedom movement that Gandhi and Nehru led between the two world wars.8 Nehru’s famous foreign policy of ‘non-alignment’ sought to avoid taking sides in the Cold War.

  • This was very much in line with Tagore’s philosophy and understanding of history.
  • Ideas of Outstanding Universal Value: Environmentalism, Women’s Emancipation (Criterion vi) Tagore had always championed the cause of women emancipation, most of his literary works etched unforgettable female characters.

At the beginning of the 20th century, Santiniketan pioneered a coeducational model in India which was a major break from accepted social norms. Associated Personalities (Criterion vi) Highly gifted men and women from the different parts of India came to Santiniketan for an innovative education or to teach there.

  • Noteworthy among them were Mrinalini Sarabhai, Gopala Reddy, Nandalal Bose, Leonard Elmherst, Arthur Geddes, Bal Gangadhar Menon and KV Muthuswamy.
  • Indira Gandhi, Prime Minister of India, Oscar Award winning director Satyajit Ray, Nobel Laureate Amartya Sen and iconic artists such as, Ram Kinker Baij and Jogen Chaudhuri, Kanika Bandhopadhyay, Udai Sankar, have been alumni of Santiniketan.

Visva Bharati became therefore an important facilitator of inter relationship of cultures within the sub continent as well. Not only was it enriched by being the site of the artistic creations of some of the best known artists of modern India, its art school was arguably the best in the country.

  • Mahatma Gandhi called Santiniketan his second home and established on the principles of its rural reconstruction model, his ashrams at Wardha and Sewagram.
  • Association with Rabindranath Tagore’s work and ideas (Criterion vi) The sheer volume and diversity of Rabindranath Tagore’s work is outstanding.

In Bengali, there are twenty-eight large volumes consisting of poetry, dramas, operas, short stories, novels, essays and diaries; and a similar number of volumes of letters, still being edited and published. His songs separately published, number nearly two and a half thousand, his paintings and drawings over two thousand.

  1. A large fraction of all this is still read performed and studied in Bengal.
  2. The Nobel Prize awarded to Rabindranath Tagore in 1913 for his work Gitanjali published in Bengali 1910, was an acknowledgement of his literary genius and also of his thoughts, making him the first Indian to be acknowledged by the West at this scale.

‘Jana Gana Mana’ ‘composed by Tagore, was selected as free India’s national anthem after it gained independence in 1947, but was composed by Tagore in late 1911. This stirring song is today India’s national anthem, a beacon of light guiding a billion Indians.

Mahatma Gandhi referred to Tagore as Gurudev (teacher) and wrote, “I regard the Poet as a sentinel warning us against the approach of enemies called Bigotry, Lethargy, Intolerance, Ignorance, Inertia and other members of that brood.” Among individuals who made these forces creative in shaping the destiny of India, two stand out as pre-eminent, Gandhi and Tagore.

The contribution of Gandhi is unmatched; he made Indian history as no one else did. That of Tagore was less obvious, but subtler and deeper, for it released and fed the hidden fountains of creative activity in fields which the politician is power. Among modern writers he has the uncommon distinction that while the sophisticated Bengali intellectuals delight in his verse and prose and learned professors write volumes on them, the simple unlettered folk in the congested lanes of Calcutta or in the remote villages of Bengal sing his songs with rapture.

Santiniketan is, most of all, distinguished by Tagore’s life long association with it. It was the crystallization of his vision and the place where Tagore himself wrote many of his great works of literature, poured his creative genius into paintings and sketches and was informed of his being awarded the Nobel prize.

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Even the different houses in which Tagore lived in Santiniketan, which were constructed from local material and which are mainly specimens of rural architecture, were in most cases designed by him. In his last letter to Mahatma Gandhi Tagore said that ‘Visva Bharati is like a vessel carrying the cargo of my life’s best treasure and I hope it may claim special care from my countrymen for its preservation’.
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Who started Class 8 Shantiniketan?

History – In 1863, Rabindranath Tagore took on permanent lease 20 acres (81,000 m 2 ) of land, with two chhatim ( Alstonia scholaris ) trees, at a yearly payment of Rs.5, from Bhuban Mohan Sinha, the talukdar of Raipur,Birbhum. He built a guest house there and named it Shantiniketan (the abode of peace).

  1. Gradually, the whole area came to be known as Shantiniketan.
  2. Binoy Ghosh says that Bolpur was a small place in the middle of the 19th century.
  3. It grew as Shantiniketan grew.
  4. A certain portion of Bolpur was a part of the zamindari of the Sinha family of Raipur.
  5. Bhuban Mohan Sinha had developed a small village in the Bolpur area and named it Bhubandanga.

It was just opposite Shantiniketan of those days. Bhubandanga was the den of a gang of notorious dacoits, who had no compunction in killing people. It led to a situation of conflict and confrontation, but the leader of the gang, ultimately, surrendered to Debendranath, and they started helping him in developing the area.

  • There was a chhatim tree under which Debendranath used to meditate.
  • Inspired by The Crystal Palace built originally in Hyde Park, London, to house the Great Exhibition of 1851 and later relocated, Debendranath constructed a 60-foot × 30-foot hall for Brahmo prayers.
  • The roof was tiled and the floor had white marble, but the rest of the structure was made of glass.

From its earliest days, it was a great attraction for people from all around. Rabindranath Tagore first visited Shantiniketan in 27 January, 1878 when he was 17 years old. In 1888, Debendranath dedicated the entire property for the establishment of a Brahmavidyalaya through a trust deed.

  1. In 1901, Rabindranath started a Brahmacharyaashrama and it came to be known as Patha Bhavana from 1925.
  2. In 1913, Rabindranath Tagore won the Nobel Prize in Literature,
  3. It was a new feather in the cap of the Tagore family which was the leading family contributing to the enrichment of life and society in Bengal in many fields of activity over a long period of time.

The environment at Jorasanko Thakur Bari, one of the bases of the Tagore family in Kolkata, was filled with literature, music, painting, and theatre. Founded in 1921 by Rabindranath Tagore, Visva Bharati was declared to be a central university and an institute of national importance, in 1951.
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Who was the founder of Shantiniketan Class 9?

Shantiniketan began as a meditation centre called Shantiniketan Ashram. It was founded by Debendranath Tagore, the father of Rabindranath Tagore and son of Dwarkanath Tagore.
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Who named the school Shantiniketan Class 8?

A Day in the ashram queations – C 1 Answer the following questions.1) Who named the School ‘Shantiniketan’? Ans: Gurudeva Rabindranath Tagore named the School Shantiniketan.2) When does the day in Shantiniketan begin? Ans: The day begins long before the sunrise.3) What is termed by Gurudeva as, ‘the darling of our hearts’? Ans: Shantinikethan is termed as darling of our hearts by Gurudev.4) Which phrase is used in paragraph to mean ‘both the old the young people’? Ans: The Phrase used is “old and young alike” 5) The boys in Shantinlketan get up early in the morning.
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What is Shantiniketan Class 8?

Shantiniketan is a small town near bolpur in the district of West Bengal, India, approximately 160km North of kolkata(formerly Calcutta). It was established by maharshi davendranath tagore and later expanded by his son rabindranath tagore whose vision became what is now a university town,visva Bharti University.
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Why is Shantiniketan famous?

Shantiniketan Shantiniketan, a veritable abode of peace and tranquility, is famous for the world renowned Viswa Bharati University founded by Rabindranath Tagore in 1921. The university has a unique setting for imparting education, with classes held in the open.

  1. It focusses on the common fellowship of the meeting of East and West, to strengthen world peace through the establishment of free communication of ideas.
  2. It follows a culture where study and research of religion, literature, history, science and art of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Islam, Sikh, Christian and other civilisations are pursued.

Situated in lush green surroundings, you can spend time exploring the university talking with the students and teachers, by taking a prior appointment. Located in the Birbhum district of West Bengal, Santiniketan is also a repository of exotic sculptures, frescoes, murals, and paintings by Rabindranath Tagore, Nandlal Bose, Ramkinkar, BinodeBehari Mukherjee, and other internationally acclaimed artists. : Shantiniketan
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What was the first name of Shantiniketan?

Justification of Outstanding Universal Value – Founded by Rabindranath Tagore in 1901 and located about a hundred and fifty eight kilometers northwest of Kolkata in Bengal’s rural hinterland, Santiniketan represents the distillation of Rabindranath Tagore’s life, philosophy and greatest works through his lifetime and the continuing legacy of his unique model of education and internationalism through a living institution and architectural ensemble.

And while many of Tagore’s greatest art and literary works bear a unique association with Santiniketan, it can be argued that his model of an Indian education through the revival of the tapoban tradition and humanist ideology finds its greatest reflection in Santiniketan, thus making it Tagore’s greatest work.

In his last letter to Mahatma Gandhi, Tagore wrote ‘Visva Bharati is like a vessel carrying the cargo of my life’s best treasure and I hope it may claim special care from my countrymen for its preservation’. The school at Santiniketan was a sapling which grew into the widely branching tree that was Visva Bharati.

  • Today, Santiniketan and Visva Bharati exemplify the continuation of Tagore’s works, both as a living educational and cultural centre as well as through the generations of outstanding alumni who excelled in the worlds of painting, literature, music, sculpture, cinema, economics and politics.
  • The architectural and landscape setting of Santiniketan embody Tagore’s vision of an eclectic architectural expression that was a blending of diverse cultural traditions in a landscape setting that formed the backdrop for a literal translation of ‘Santiniketan’ as an abode of peace.

Humanism & Cultural interchange (Criterion ii) Author Nirad C. Chaudhuri described Tagore as, “Historically, the greatest product of the interaction in India in the nineteenth century between European and Hindu life and civilization. In one sense he may be regarded as the victim of the interchange, and in another as its prophet.

His own life was caught in the conflict which the interchange brought about, and his writings stand for its achievement.” At the threshold of the 20th century in Bengal reeling under British rule and sectarian divisions, Tagore envisioned a place of learning unfettered by religious and regional barriers.

From its very inception, Tagore modelled Santiniketan on principles of humanism, internationalism and a sustainable environment and the curriculum was developed to promote the free interchange of human values and cultures. Thus, over a hundred years ago, Santiniketan began in a majority Hindu region with 3 out of 5 teachers being Christian, encouraged women to join as both students and teachers, and promoted a unique blend of art and cultural interchange in its classrooms that were held in the open air, free from the confines of spatial or ideological boundaries.

In developing his holistic educational paradigm, Rabindranath sought through various means to break down existing barriers and to foster interconnectivity between provincial and regional groups: between English-medium educated elites and the common people; between urban and rural economic groups.and to reduce the gender gap.

Tagore’s vision finds architectural expression in Santiniketan where the buildings of China Bhavan and Hindi Bhavan were specifically built to house institutes that explored linguistic linkages between eastern countries, as well as the eclectic architectural expression of structures such as Sinha Sadan, Udayan and Patho Bhavan that merged various cultural vocabularies to create a unique architectural synthesis.

In only the second year of its existence, Santiniketan had its first foreign student in Hori San from Japan. To cultivate this interchange in the students of Santiniketan, Tagore actively solicited the presence of visitors from all over the world, in addition to devising syllabi that promoted the understanding of different cultures: Vedic, Puranic, Buddhist, Jain, Zoroastrian, and Sikh traditions; the ‘precious and permanent contribution’ of Islamic culture to Indian art and architecture; writings of ‘our medieval saints’; special studies of China, Japan, and Tibet; as well as Western culture, for ‘only then shall we able to assimilate this last contribution to our common stock’.

Noting its ‘celebration of variety’, Nobel laureate and long time resident of Santiniketan, Amartya Sen speaks of ‘the ease with which discussions in the school could move from Indian traditional literature to contemporary as well as classical western thought and to China, Japan and elsewhere’.

Tagore’s poem encapsulates this vision of internationalism through his words, “He mor chitta, punya tirthe jagore dhire ei bharater maha-manaber sagoro-tire.” ‘On the sacred shores of the ocean of humanity of this India, Awaken, my heart!’ The architectural and landscape setting of Santiniketan embody Tagore’s vision of an eclectic architectural expression that was a blending of diverse cultural traditions in a landscape setting that formed the backdrop for a literal translation of ‘Santiniketan’ as an abode of peace.

The Tapoban & Gurukul traditions: Education & Rural Reconstruction (Criterion iii) On 22nd December 1901, Rabindranath Tagore established his school at Santiniketan with five students (including his eldest son) and an equal number of teachers. He originally named it Brahmacharya Ashram in the tradition of ancient forest hermitages.

  • Santiniketan is in many ways a pioneering step in the field of education and rural reconstruction.
  • Located in the heart of nature amongst Hindu, Muslim, and Santali villages which were in ‘serious decline’ despite a rich cultural heritage, the school, from almost its beginning aimed to combine education with a sense of obligation towards the larger civic community.

The ‘voice of the vedic tongue’, Tagore said, outlined the nature of Santiniketan, envisioned as the ideal form of the traditional Indian hermitages which had at one time flourished in the forests of ancient India, great seats of learning from which the Upanishads had evolved, exploring a universal and humanistic life of the mind.

  • Although Tagore was highly critical of Macaulay’s system due to which, unlike the West, education, particularly higher education, was cut off and insulated from the living social corpus of India.
  • Santiniketan revives and gives form to Tagore’s interpretation of the ancient Indian concept of tapoban.
  • Tagore revived the ancient Indian model of Tapoban, or penance in a forest, interpreting it though an educational model aimed at ‘cultivation of feeling’ (bodher tapasya/sadhana) as opposed to education of the senses and intellect.

This aspect of education involves the realization of the individual self in relation to the universe and the essential kinship of all existence. Santiniketan combines the traditions of the gurukul mode of residential schooling with its tangible manifestation in open air classrooms arranged under the canopies of trees.

In keeping with the gurukul tradition of students learning from their guru (teacher) in a residential ashram in the bosom of nature, Sriniketan is a distinct step in the field of rural reconstruction. In 1907, Tagore sought to expand the school’s relationship with its neighbouring villages of the Santhal tribal community.

The school, from its conception, aimed to combine education with a sense of obligation towards the larger community. Sriniketan is the earliest experiment in rural reconstruction in India that Tagore began and was later followed by Mahatma Gandhi in his ashrams at Wardha and Sewagram.

  1. Leonard Elmhirst came from England to be part of Sriniketan and his experiences in Santiniketan inspired him to establish at Darlington Hall in Devonshire.
  2. If Tagore had done nothing else, what he did at Santiniketan and Sriniketan would be sufficient to rank him as one of India’s greatest nation – builders.

Instead of celebrating religious festivals, the students of Santiniketan celebrate nature through its seasons. Thus Poush Mela (winter), Vasantotsav (spring), Varsha Mangal (rains) and Maghotsav, continuing the close connect between man and nature established in the founding principles of Santiniketan.

  1. With the outbreak of unprecedented communal violence in the wake of Bengal’s partition, Tagore revived the folk festival of Raksha Bandhan, reinterpreting it in 1909 as a tie between Hindus and Muslims.
  2. Santiniketan, or the ‘abode of peace’ cannot be confined to the strict definition of an academic university.

Vishwabharti is an educational institution, but one with a difference, where classes are taught in the open air, where nature and its seasons are celebrated instead of religious festivals, where the graduation ceremony is marked by the gifting of a chhatim leaf and where humanism and the larger concepts of internationalism are rooted in Tagore’s philosophy that ‘the whole world can find a nest”.

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(Criterion iii) Ideas of Outstanding Universal Value: Internationalism: (Criterion vi) Santiniketan is among the pioneering institutions in modern history that offered a living example of internationalism, before even the United Nations established its guiding principle enshrined in Article 1, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on December 10, 1948.

Long before the League of Nations and the United Nations, Tagore was an internationalist who critiqued the narrowly defined concepts of nationalism and patriotism. He wanted all human beings to be treated equally regardless of the country or nation to which they belonged.

  1. He also did not want barriers between people even within the same nation-the barriers of caste, race, and religion.
  2. Santiniketan is a pioneering experiment in internationalism.
  3. At a time when India was grappling with the problems of colonialism and seeking its freedom from British authority, Tagore’s vision surpassed national and cultural boundaries to establish a larger international vision, that of universal humanism.

Through bringing diverse individuals together in a hospitable setting, he sought to promote understanding between different linguistic groups, different races and global cultures and diverse religions. The motto that Tagore chose for Visva Bharati, Yatra Visvam Bhavatyekanidam, ‘where the whole world can find a nest’, reflected his aspiration for the institution.

Tagore himself alluded to the global character of Santiniketan with an invitation to the world, while concluding his acceptance speech for the Nobel Prize in Stockholm, in the ‘name of the unity of men’, in the ‘name of love’, and ‘in the name of God’, to ‘join hands with us and not to leave this institution to us’, to ‘make it living and representative of the undivided humanity of the world’.

Mainly due to his efforts, Santiketan was visited by international scholars and artists such as Sylvain Levi, Moritz Winternitz, Sten Konow, Fernand Benoit, Arthur Geddes, Andree Karpeles, Mary Eeghen, Stella Kramisch, James Cousins, T’an Yun-Shan, Yonejiro Noguchi, Guiseppe Tucci, Carlo Formichi, Arnold Bake, Igor Bogdanov, Mark Collins, and Vincenc Lesny.

Ideas of Outstanding Universal Value: Influence on the Modern Indian Nation – Inclusiveness & Non Alignment (Criterion vi) The vision of Tagore’s Santiniketan was that of inclusiveness and it influenced the vision of Gandhi and Nehru (and later Indira Gandhi who was a student at Santiniketan) in the formulation of an inclusive Indian nation.

His inclusive nationalism and non-parochial interpretation of India’s history became a powerful agent of ideas for the freedom movement that Gandhi and Nehru led between the two world wars.8 Nehru’s famous foreign policy of ‘non-alignment’ sought to avoid taking sides in the Cold War.

This was very much in line with Tagore’s philosophy and understanding of history. Ideas of Outstanding Universal Value: Environmentalism, Women’s Emancipation (Criterion vi) Tagore had always championed the cause of women emancipation, most of his literary works etched unforgettable female characters.

At the beginning of the 20th century, Santiniketan pioneered a coeducational model in India which was a major break from accepted social norms. Associated Personalities (Criterion vi) Highly gifted men and women from the different parts of India came to Santiniketan for an innovative education or to teach there.

Noteworthy among them were Mrinalini Sarabhai, Gopala Reddy, Nandalal Bose, Leonard Elmherst, Arthur Geddes, Bal Gangadhar Menon and KV Muthuswamy. Indira Gandhi, Prime Minister of India, Oscar Award winning director Satyajit Ray, Nobel Laureate Amartya Sen and iconic artists such as, Ram Kinker Baij and Jogen Chaudhuri, Kanika Bandhopadhyay, Udai Sankar, have been alumni of Santiniketan.

Visva Bharati became therefore an important facilitator of inter relationship of cultures within the sub continent as well. Not only was it enriched by being the site of the artistic creations of some of the best known artists of modern India, its art school was arguably the best in the country.

  1. Mahatma Gandhi called Santiniketan his second home and established on the principles of its rural reconstruction model, his ashrams at Wardha and Sewagram.
  2. Association with Rabindranath Tagore’s work and ideas (Criterion vi) The sheer volume and diversity of Rabindranath Tagore’s work is outstanding.

In Bengali, there are twenty-eight large volumes consisting of poetry, dramas, operas, short stories, novels, essays and diaries; and a similar number of volumes of letters, still being edited and published. His songs separately published, number nearly two and a half thousand, his paintings and drawings over two thousand.

A large fraction of all this is still read performed and studied in Bengal. The Nobel Prize awarded to Rabindranath Tagore in 1913 for his work Gitanjali published in Bengali 1910, was an acknowledgement of his literary genius and also of his thoughts, making him the first Indian to be acknowledged by the West at this scale.

‘Jana Gana Mana’ ‘composed by Tagore, was selected as free India’s national anthem after it gained independence in 1947, but was composed by Tagore in late 1911. This stirring song is today India’s national anthem, a beacon of light guiding a billion Indians.

Mahatma Gandhi referred to Tagore as Gurudev (teacher) and wrote, “I regard the Poet as a sentinel warning us against the approach of enemies called Bigotry, Lethargy, Intolerance, Ignorance, Inertia and other members of that brood.” Among individuals who made these forces creative in shaping the destiny of India, two stand out as pre-eminent, Gandhi and Tagore.

The contribution of Gandhi is unmatched; he made Indian history as no one else did. That of Tagore was less obvious, but subtler and deeper, for it released and fed the hidden fountains of creative activity in fields which the politician is power. Among modern writers he has the uncommon distinction that while the sophisticated Bengali intellectuals delight in his verse and prose and learned professors write volumes on them, the simple unlettered folk in the congested lanes of Calcutta or in the remote villages of Bengal sing his songs with rapture.

  • Santiniketan is, most of all, distinguished by Tagore’s life long association with it.
  • It was the crystallization of his vision and the place where Tagore himself wrote many of his great works of literature, poured his creative genius into paintings and sketches and was informed of his being awarded the Nobel prize.

Even the different houses in which Tagore lived in Santiniketan, which were constructed from local material and which are mainly specimens of rural architecture, were in most cases designed by him. In his last letter to Mahatma Gandhi Tagore said that ‘Visva Bharati is like a vessel carrying the cargo of my life’s best treasure and I hope it may claim special care from my countrymen for its preservation’.
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What was unique about Shantiniketan Class 8?

Ashram style. Here, Tagore wanted to blend best of both Western and Indian education systems. Hence, in Shantiniketan, students learnt in close harmony of nature.
View complete answer

Why did Shantiniketan started?

Santiniketan began as an axram in 1863. maharshi debendranath tagore founded it on twenty bighas of land purchased from Bhubanmohan Sinha, landlord of Raipur. The ashram, located near Bolpur in the Birbhum district of West Bengal, was intended as a retreat for householders, where they could spend their time in prayer, away from their worldly preoccupations. Santiniketan Ashram, Birbhum, West Bengal In 1901 rabindranath tagore founded a school for children in the Santiniketan ashram. Just prior to that he had spent ten years at Shilaidaha on the Padma managing his family estates. In the process he came to know the life of the rural people and it made him want to do something constructive for society.

Choosing the fields of education and rural reconstruction he made a beginning at Shilaidaha and then moved to Santiniketan. At Santiniketan, Rabindranath wanted to establish an ideal school. He was unhappy with the schools he was sent to in his boyhood; he thought English schools were cut off from Indian life, society and culture.

In choosing Santiniketan he had three distinct goals: to make the children grow up in an ideal physical environment, close to Nature, an education to balance the city and the village in a changing India and to impart knowledge capable of accepting a larger world.

  • The Santiniketan School was started during the swadeshi movement ; it grew into Vishvabharati at the end of the First World War.
  • The Santiniketan School founded in the Santiniketan ashram, and the Vishvabharati make up the totality of Rabindranath’s educational ventures.
  • They were not separate and disconnected institutions although the Santiniketan ashram was founded in 1863, the school in 1901, and Vishvabharati in 1921.

Rabindranath had conceived this totality even before Vishvabharati was formally started. He wrote to his son Rathindranath in 1916, ‘The Santiniketan school must be made the thread linking India with the world. We must establish there a centre for humanistic research concerned with all the world’s peoples 85The task of my last years is to free the world from the coils of national chauvinism’.

He wanted to free India from its spirit of isolation. He wrote, ‘We must build up a relationship with the world, to serve and to be served, to give and to receive. India has been cut off from the world’s scholarship, treated only to trifles in the name of education and relegated to a perennial primary school.

We now want freedom from this spiritual and intellectual humiliation’. The new idea was one of co-ordination and co-operation among the cultures of the world. A true centre of Indian culture would foster the creative and the universal, first in India’s many cultures, and then in those of the world at large.

  1. It was this idea that gave birth to Vishvabharati.
  2. The curriculum consisted of collecting the treasures of the Vedic, Puranic, Buddhist, Jaina and Islamic minds.
  3. It was hoped that this knowledge would lead India to find her identity in her diversity.
  4. Rabindranath wrote, ‘We must understand ourselves in this extended and interlinked way or else the education we will receive will be like that of a beggar.

No nation can be rich on begging’. The concept of Vishvabharati also included the idea of total activity. Thus at Santiniketan economists, agriculturists, social workers, doctors, midwives, healthcare workers, and specialists in various fields of rural industry and education, experimented and worked with the villagers on different aspects of rural problems.

  • Research and application of research made up the Santiniketan method.
  • A scout movement Brati Balaka Sanggathana was also organised to initiate the village youth in self-reliance.
  • It was hoped that mobilising the children would draw in the elders.
  • The objective was to awaken in the minds of the village elders, torn by disputes among themselves, the absolute need for co-operation.

All in all the Santiniketan school was designed to be more than a school, a society in itself where teacher and pupil, householder and visitor, Bengali and non-Bengali, Indian and non-Indian would all live and learn together. It was also Rabindranath’s hope to free the Indian mind of its slavishness through a new education.

He thought that would reveal the fundamental aim of life beyond the mere needs of livelihood. He wanted the children to appreciate the meaning of co-operation and friendship from the very beginning of their education. In 1919, Rabindranath enunciated his Vishvabharati plan and accepted ‘yatra vishvam bhavatyekanidam’ (where the world would become a single nest) as its motto.

In 1921 Vishvabharati was formally established. Rabindranath was its Chancellor (acharya) till his death, abanindranath tagore and Sarojini Naidu were his successors. Many eminent European scholars contributed to the development of Vishvabharati at its initial stage.

Notable among them were Sylvan Levy, Sten Konow, Tucci, Collins, Vogdanov, Andre Karpeles, Stella Kramreisch. Leonard Elmhirst contributed to the development of Rural Welfare activities. Prabhat Kumar Mukhopadhyaya joined Vishvabharati as its Librarian. In 1936 a department for mass education (Lokashiksa) was added and in 1938 the Shilpasadan (Art Institute).

Different organs of Vishvabharati are Pathabhavan (School), Shiksabhavan (College), Vidyabhavan (Post-graduate and Research), Kalabhavan (Arts), Sangitbhavan (Music), Pallisanggathan (Rural Organisation), Granthan (Publication) etc. In 1937 the Chinbhavan (Sino-Indian Studies) was added in collaboration with Professor Tan Yun-san.

  1. Hindibhavan and Rabindrabhavan were added in 1939 and 1942 respectively; the latter, a centre for Rabindra studies, holds the collection of manuscripts, paintings, letters and books of Rabindranath Tagore.
  2. Rabindranath died in 1941.
  3. Ten years later Vishvabharati became a Central University of the Government of India, fully funded by the Government.

Besides the size of the institution, which has grown many times over since its beginnings in 1901, there have been fundamental changes in two spheres. In Rabindranath Santiniketan and Sriniketan no degrees were given. Today, Vishvabharati gives degrees at every level at par with the other universities in the country.

The other change has been in the sphere of finances. Rabindranath started the school with only five boys on his own limited resources. His wife Mrinalini Devi sold her jewellery to meet the expenses of the Santiniketan School at its inception. Rabindranath sold his bungalow in Puri. He depended mainly on the eighteen hundred rupees that came annually from the father’s Santiniketan Trust.

Later he gave his entire Nobel Prize money to the school. In 1922 he gave the copyright for his works in Bangla to Vishvabharati. Help also came from the early teachers who took very little salary from the school. WW Pearson and CF Andrews of England gave their all to the school.

  • Dorothy Elmhirst Straight of the USA and Leonard Elmhirst of England endowed a large sum of money from their Dartington Hall Trust for Sriniketan’s development.
  • There were generous donations to Santiniketan from the princely families of Tripura, Baroda, Jaipur, Pithapuram, Kathiawar, Porebander, Limdi, Awagarh, Hyderabad and from Sir Ratan Tata.

Present day Santiniketan and Sriniketan are successors to Rabindranath’s Santiniketan and Sriniketan. In Santiniketan the school reminds use somewhat of life as it was. Open-air classes, seasonal festivals, prayer services in the mondir (temple), its music, give glimpses into the past life of the ashram.
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Who is the Principal of Shantiniketan school?

Vidhya rajeshkannan – Principal – Shantiniketan Trust School | LinkedIn.
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Who was the first principal of Shantiniketan?

College overview – The college has an art gallery, Nandan, exhibiting sculptures, frescoes and murals. In the 1960s, the Birlas and Goenkas families had built two girls hostels named after them. Kala Bhavana has 17,000 original art works by eminent Indian and Far-Eastern masters, and is now seeking outside support for preserving and displaying these.

  • Nandalal Bose became the first principal in 1923 and was followed by artists including Benode Behari Mukherjee, Ramkinkar Baij, K.G.
  • Subramanyan, Dinkar Kaushik, R.
  • Siva Kumar, Somnath Hore and Jogen Chowdhury,
  • Amongst others who distinguished themselves in the art arena of Santiniketan were Gouri Bhanja, Jamuna Sen, Sankho Chaudhuri and Sanat Kar.
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The school offers a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree and a Master of Fine Arts degree, as well as certificate degrees in painting, sculpture, mural painting, printmaking, design (textiles/ceramics) and art history.
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What is Shantiniketan?

Shantiniketan (Sanskrit: ‘ The Abode of Peace ‘) began as Shantiniketan Ashram, a meditation centre founded and endowed in 1863 by Maharishi Debendranath, the father of the world-famous Bengali poet Rabindranath Tagore.
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What was the name of the school institution opened by Tagore Class 8?

Rabindranath Tagore started the Vishwabharati School at in the year, No worries! We‘ve got your back. Try BYJU‘S free classes today! Right on! Give the BNAT exam to get a 100% scholarship for BYJUS courses No worries! We‘ve got your back. Try BYJU‘S free classes today! Right on! Give the BNAT exam to get a 100% scholarship for BYJUS courses Open in App Suggest Corrections 3 : Rabindranath Tagore started the Vishwabharati School at in the year,
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What is the name of the school in Shantiniketan?

Rabindranath Tagore’s School at Shantiniketan.
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Is Shantiniketan a CBSE?

Shantiniketan International School, Ramakrishnapuram, Secunderabad: Admission, Fee, Facilities, Affiliation Shantiniketan International School is alternatively also known as SNIS, The school was established in 2017, Shantiniketan International School is a Co-ed school affiliated to Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE), International Baccalaureate (IB) & Cambridge Assessment International Education (CAIE).

Facilities Drinking Water Toilet facilities Classroom Sports Transport Security/CCTV Labs Library IT Infrastructure Kindergarten Indoor Games Dance Rooms Music Rooms Health and Medical Check up

Activities and Events Drama Debate And Discussion Declamation Contest Recitation Competition Sports Day Christmas Carnival Parenting Seminars Educational Tours Extra-Curricular Activities Drawing Competition Hobby Classes Fancy Dress Story-Telling Sessions School Exhibition Art & Craft Workshops Festival Celebrations Seminars Yoga Activity Creative Writing Orientation Programs

CBSE Time Table 2023 – Central Board of Secondary Educati. CBSE Class 10 Date Sheet 2023 – Know the CBSE Board class.10th Results 2023 – Check CBSE, ICSE, NIOS, HBSE, UP Boar. CBSE Class 10 Preparation Tips 2022 – Know more about how. CBSE 10th Result 2023 Date & Time – Central Board of Seco.
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How does Shantiniketan prepare boys for life class 8?

how does Shantiniketan prepare the boys for life The? education? here? is the living education. Boys are taught according to their tastes and preferences. They enjoy learning and become exports in the subject of their liking. That is how Shantiniketan prepares boys for life.? : how does Shantiniketan prepare the boys for life
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What is the motto of Shantiniketan?

Visva-Bharati

Motto Yatra Visvam Bhavatyekanidam ( Sanskrit )
Motto in English Where the world makes a home in a single nest
Type Public
Established 23 December 1921 ; 100 years ago
Founder Rabindranath Tagore
Accreditation NAAC
Academic affiliations
  • UGC
  • ICAR
  • AIU
  • ACU
Chancellor Prime Minister of India
Vice-Chancellor Bidyut Chakrabarty
Academic staff 473 ( 2022 )
Students 7,967 ( 2022 )
Undergraduates 3,591 ( 2022 )
Postgraduates 2,929 ( 2022 )
Doctoral students 1,447 ( 2022 )
Location Shantiniketan, West Bengal, India 23°40′44″N 87°40′25″E  /  23.67889°N 87.67361°E Coordinates : 23°40′44″N 87°40′25″E  /  23.67889°N 87.67361°E
Campus Rural 1,128.895 acres (456.848 ha)
Website visvabharati,ac,in

Visva-Bharati ( Bengali: ) is a public central university and an Institution of National Importance located in Shantiniketan, West Bengal, India. It was founded by Rabindranath Tagore who called it Visva-Bharati, which means the communion of the world with India.
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What are the two features of Shantiniketan?

Aims of Tagore Shantiniketan School: –

Homely Atmosphere- To provide to the students a homely atmosphere in the school. Spiritual Atmosphere- To provide an atmosphere in the school which is pervaded by spiritual greatness as found in the ancient Hindu Ashrams of the Gurus. Ancient Indian Culture- To acquaint the students with ancient Indian culture and traditions. Simple Living- To emphasize the principle of simple living and high thinking. Maximum Freedom- To provide maximum freedom of activity to children and healthy community life. Contact with nature- To allow the students to come in contact with nature and get education from it.

With all these basic purposes, Shantiniketan functions like an Ashram with all the simplicity, tranquillity and calm atmosphere. It represents a community where people live in collaboration and strive commonly for the pursuit of excellence.
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What happens in Shantiniketan?

Poush Mela – One of the most celebrated events of the year, the Poush mela is held every year in late December to mark the harvest season. The Mela sees local artisans and tourists from all over the country coming together in this spirit of celebration. Folk dances, music, food and culture are in rampant display during these days. Santiniketan leather bags, earthen wares, paintings etc. are sold in this fair.
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Who studied at Shantiniketan?

Judges –

Name Class year Notability Ref.
Sudhi Ranjan Das who studied at Patha Bhavana, Santiniketan, and became Chief Justice of India.

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Why did Shantiniketan started?

Santiniketan began as an axram in 1863. maharshi debendranath tagore founded it on twenty bighas of land purchased from Bhubanmohan Sinha, landlord of Raipur. The ashram, located near Bolpur in the Birbhum district of West Bengal, was intended as a retreat for householders, where they could spend their time in prayer, away from their worldly preoccupations. Santiniketan Ashram, Birbhum, West Bengal In 1901 rabindranath tagore founded a school for children in the Santiniketan ashram. Just prior to that he had spent ten years at Shilaidaha on the Padma managing his family estates. In the process he came to know the life of the rural people and it made him want to do something constructive for society.

  • Choosing the fields of education and rural reconstruction he made a beginning at Shilaidaha and then moved to Santiniketan.
  • At Santiniketan, Rabindranath wanted to establish an ideal school.
  • He was unhappy with the schools he was sent to in his boyhood; he thought English schools were cut off from Indian life, society and culture.

In choosing Santiniketan he had three distinct goals: to make the children grow up in an ideal physical environment, close to Nature, an education to balance the city and the village in a changing India and to impart knowledge capable of accepting a larger world.

The Santiniketan School was started during the swadeshi movement ; it grew into Vishvabharati at the end of the First World War. The Santiniketan School founded in the Santiniketan ashram, and the Vishvabharati make up the totality of Rabindranath’s educational ventures. They were not separate and disconnected institutions although the Santiniketan ashram was founded in 1863, the school in 1901, and Vishvabharati in 1921.

Rabindranath had conceived this totality even before Vishvabharati was formally started. He wrote to his son Rathindranath in 1916, ‘The Santiniketan school must be made the thread linking India with the world. We must establish there a centre for humanistic research concerned with all the world’s peoples 85The task of my last years is to free the world from the coils of national chauvinism’.

He wanted to free India from its spirit of isolation. He wrote, ‘We must build up a relationship with the world, to serve and to be served, to give and to receive. India has been cut off from the world’s scholarship, treated only to trifles in the name of education and relegated to a perennial primary school.

We now want freedom from this spiritual and intellectual humiliation’. The new idea was one of co-ordination and co-operation among the cultures of the world. A true centre of Indian culture would foster the creative and the universal, first in India’s many cultures, and then in those of the world at large.

It was this idea that gave birth to Vishvabharati. The curriculum consisted of collecting the treasures of the Vedic, Puranic, Buddhist, Jaina and Islamic minds. It was hoped that this knowledge would lead India to find her identity in her diversity. Rabindranath wrote, ‘We must understand ourselves in this extended and interlinked way or else the education we will receive will be like that of a beggar.

No nation can be rich on begging’. The concept of Vishvabharati also included the idea of total activity. Thus at Santiniketan economists, agriculturists, social workers, doctors, midwives, healthcare workers, and specialists in various fields of rural industry and education, experimented and worked with the villagers on different aspects of rural problems.

Research and application of research made up the Santiniketan method. A scout movement Brati Balaka Sanggathana was also organised to initiate the village youth in self-reliance. It was hoped that mobilising the children would draw in the elders. The objective was to awaken in the minds of the village elders, torn by disputes among themselves, the absolute need for co-operation.

All in all the Santiniketan school was designed to be more than a school, a society in itself where teacher and pupil, householder and visitor, Bengali and non-Bengali, Indian and non-Indian would all live and learn together. It was also Rabindranath’s hope to free the Indian mind of its slavishness through a new education.

  1. He thought that would reveal the fundamental aim of life beyond the mere needs of livelihood.
  2. He wanted the children to appreciate the meaning of co-operation and friendship from the very beginning of their education.
  3. In 1919, Rabindranath enunciated his Vishvabharati plan and accepted ‘yatra vishvam bhavatyekanidam’ (where the world would become a single nest) as its motto.

In 1921 Vishvabharati was formally established. Rabindranath was its Chancellor (acharya) till his death, abanindranath tagore and Sarojini Naidu were his successors. Many eminent European scholars contributed to the development of Vishvabharati at its initial stage.

Notable among them were Sylvan Levy, Sten Konow, Tucci, Collins, Vogdanov, Andre Karpeles, Stella Kramreisch. Leonard Elmhirst contributed to the development of Rural Welfare activities. Prabhat Kumar Mukhopadhyaya joined Vishvabharati as its Librarian. In 1936 a department for mass education (Lokashiksa) was added and in 1938 the Shilpasadan (Art Institute).

Different organs of Vishvabharati are Pathabhavan (School), Shiksabhavan (College), Vidyabhavan (Post-graduate and Research), Kalabhavan (Arts), Sangitbhavan (Music), Pallisanggathan (Rural Organisation), Granthan (Publication) etc. In 1937 the Chinbhavan (Sino-Indian Studies) was added in collaboration with Professor Tan Yun-san.

Hindibhavan and Rabindrabhavan were added in 1939 and 1942 respectively; the latter, a centre for Rabindra studies, holds the collection of manuscripts, paintings, letters and books of Rabindranath Tagore. Rabindranath died in 1941. Ten years later Vishvabharati became a Central University of the Government of India, fully funded by the Government.

Besides the size of the institution, which has grown many times over since its beginnings in 1901, there have been fundamental changes in two spheres. In Rabindranath Santiniketan and Sriniketan no degrees were given. Today, Vishvabharati gives degrees at every level at par with the other universities in the country.

The other change has been in the sphere of finances. Rabindranath started the school with only five boys on his own limited resources. His wife Mrinalini Devi sold her jewellery to meet the expenses of the Santiniketan School at its inception. Rabindranath sold his bungalow in Puri. He depended mainly on the eighteen hundred rupees that came annually from the father’s Santiniketan Trust.

Later he gave his entire Nobel Prize money to the school. In 1922 he gave the copyright for his works in Bangla to Vishvabharati. Help also came from the early teachers who took very little salary from the school. WW Pearson and CF Andrews of England gave their all to the school.

  • Dorothy Elmhirst Straight of the USA and Leonard Elmhirst of England endowed a large sum of money from their Dartington Hall Trust for Sriniketan’s development.
  • There were generous donations to Santiniketan from the princely families of Tripura, Baroda, Jaipur, Pithapuram, Kathiawar, Porebander, Limdi, Awagarh, Hyderabad and from Sir Ratan Tata.

Present day Santiniketan and Sriniketan are successors to Rabindranath’s Santiniketan and Sriniketan. In Santiniketan the school reminds use somewhat of life as it was. Open-air classes, seasonal festivals, prayer services in the mondir (temple), its music, give glimpses into the past life of the ashram.
View complete answer

When did Shantiniketan set up and whom 8?

Shantiniketan was set up by Rabindranath Tagore in 1901.
View complete answer

Who was the first principal of Shantiniketan?

College overview – The college has an art gallery, Nandan, exhibiting sculptures, frescoes and murals. In the 1960s, the Birlas and Goenkas families had built two girls hostels named after them. Kala Bhavana has 17,000 original art works by eminent Indian and Far-Eastern masters, and is now seeking outside support for preserving and displaying these.

  1. Nandalal Bose became the first principal in 1923 and was followed by artists including Benode Behari Mukherjee, Ramkinkar Baij, K.G.
  2. Subramanyan, Dinkar Kaushik, R.
  3. Siva Kumar, Somnath Hore and Jogen Chowdhury,
  4. Amongst others who distinguished themselves in the art arena of Santiniketan were Gouri Bhanja, Jamuna Sen, Sankho Chaudhuri and Sanat Kar.

The school offers a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree and a Master of Fine Arts degree, as well as certificate degrees in painting, sculpture, mural painting, printmaking, design (textiles/ceramics) and art history.
View complete answer

Why did Tagore set up Shantiniketan Class 8?

Answer. Explanation: Rabindranath Tagore established Shantiniketan because he thought that the education should be provided in the nature so the students could understand the topic better. Tagore’s vision was to establish an educational institution where humans exists in perfect harmony with nature.
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