How Physical Education Is Beneficial For Health?

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How Physical Education Is Beneficial For Health
Physical Activity Facts The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, 2nd edition recommend that children and adolescents ages 6 to 17 years do 60 minutes or more of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity daily.2 Regular physical activity can help children and adolescents improve cardiorespiratory fitness, build strong bones and muscles, control weight, reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression, and reduce the risk of developing health conditions such as: 1

  • Heart disease.
  • Cancer.
  • Type 2 diabetes.
  • High blood pressure.
  • Osteoporosis.
  • Obesity.

Physical inactivity can

  • Lead to energy imbalance (e.g., expend less energy through physical activity than consumed through diet) and can increase the risk of becoming overweight or obese.14
  • Increase the risk of factors for cardiovascular disease, including hyperlipidemia (e.g., high cholesterol and triglyceride levels), high blood pressure, obesity, and insulin resistance and glucose intolerance.1,5,6
  • Increase the risk for developing type 2 diabetes.1,7
  • Increase the risk for developing breast, colon, endometrial, and lung cancers.1
  • Lead to low bone density, which in turn, leads to osteoporosis.1
  • Less than one-quarter (24%) of children 6 to 17 years of age participate in 60 minutes of physical activity every day.8
  • In 2017, only 26.1% of high school students participate in at least 60 minutes per day of physical activity on all 7 days of the previous week.9
  • In 2017, 51.1% of high school students participated in muscle strengthening exercises (e.g., push-ups, sit-ups, weight lifting) on 3 or more days during the previous week.9
  • In 2017, 51.7% of high school students attended physical education classes in an average week, and only 29.9% of high school students attended physical education classes daily.9
  • Aerobic: Most of the 60 minutes or more per day should be either moderate- or vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity and should include vigorous-intensity physical activity on at least 3 days a week.
  • Muscle-strengthening: As part of their 60 minutes or more of daily physical activity, children and adolescents should include muscle-strengthening physical activity on at least 3 days a week.
  • Bone-strengthening: As part of their 60 minutes or more of daily physical activity, children and adolescents should include bone-strengthening physical activity on at least 3 days a week.

These guidelines state that children and adolescents be provided opportunities and encouragement to participate in physical activities that are appropriate for their age, that are enjoyable, and that offer variety.3 The national recommendation for schools is to have a comprehensive approach for addressing physical education and physical activity in schools.10–12 This approach is called Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs.13

  • Students who are physically active tend to have better grades, school attendance, cognitive performance (e.g., memory), and classroom behaviors (e.g., on-task behavior).14, 15
  • Higher physical activity and physical fitness levels are associated with improved cognitive performance (e.g., concentration, memory) among students.14, 15
  1. Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee.2018 Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee Scientific Report. Washington, DC: US Dept of Health and Human Services; 2018.
  2. US Department of Health and Human Services. Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, 2nd edition. Washington, DC: US Department of Health and Human Services; 2018.
  3. National Physical Activity Plan Alliance. The 2018 United States Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth. Washington, DC: National Physical Activity Plan Alliance, 2018.
  4. Loprinzi PD, Lee I, Andersen RE, Crespo CJ, Smit E. Association of concurrent healthy eating and regular physical activity with cardiovascular disease risk factors in US youth. American Journal of Health Promotion.2015; 30(1):2–8.
  5. Cuenca-Garcia M; Ortega FB; Ruiz JR; et al. Combined influence of healthy diet and active lifestyle on cardiovascular disease risk factors in adolescents. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports.2014;24(3):553–562.
  6. Kriska A; Delahanty L; Edelstein S; et al. Sedentary behavior and physical activity in youth with recent onset of type 2 diabetes. Pediatrics.2013;131(3): e850–e856.
  7. The Child & Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative (CAHMI).2016 National Survey of Childrens Health. Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health;2016.
  8. Merlo CL, Jones SE, Michael SL, et al. Dietary and Physical Activity Behaviors Among High School Students — Youth Risk Behavior Survey, United States, 2019. MMWR Suppl 2020;69(Suppl-1):64–76.
  9. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. School Health Guidelines to Promote Healthy Eating and Physical Activity. MMWR.2011;60(No. RR-5).
  10. US Department of Health and Human Services. Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Midcourse Report: Strategies to Increase Physical Activity Among Youth. Washington, DC: US Department of Health and Human Services: 2012.
  11. Institute of Medicine. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press; 2013.
  12. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A Guide for Developing Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Department of Health and Human Services; 2013.
  13. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Association Between School-Based Physical Activity, Including Physical Education, and Academic Performance. Atlanta, GA; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Department of Health and Human Services; 2010.
  14. Michael SL, Merlo C, Basch C, et al. Critical connections: health and academics. Journal of School Health.2015;85(11):740–758.
  • : Physical Activity Facts
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    How is physical health beneficial?

    Regular physical activity is one of the most important things you can do for your health. Being physically active can improve your brain health, help manage weight, reduce the risk of disease, strengthen bones and muscles, and improve your ability to do everyday activities.
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    What is physical education and its benefits?

    The number of non-educational activities that children do in India has increased over the last few years. With rising incomes, the proliferation of places selling junk food, and the easy availability of non-academic activities, children are spending less time keeping themselves healthy. Physical education helps in developing students’ competence and confidence. It helps them to take part in a wide range of physical activities that are crucial to their lives— both in and out of school. A high-quality program about physical education in India enables all students to enjoy and succeed in many kinds of physical activities.
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    What is importance of health and physical education in school life?

    22 June 2022 Sub Heading if available Physical education is equally important as your child’s scholastic education. If your child is not physically fit and strong, they will not be able to perform in school, concentrate and retain all the information.

    • The benefits of physical education are plenty and they are especially beneficial for young students living in the digital age.
    • Due to the 2 year long pandemic, children were restricted within the four walls of their home.
    • Going to school there, sleeping there, studying there and spending leisure time there.

    There was little to no physical activity in these times. Plus, a growing dependence on tablets, online video games and streaming platforms makes it all the more difficult for kids to get off their couches and beds and play outside. This was exacerbated with all the closed parks and public spaces in the last 2 years.

    1. The rising rates of obesity, heart problems and related health problems especially in the urban areas is not particularly news to anyone.
    2. An increasingly tough life with elongated work and school hours, tuitions, homework and more can get your kids naturally exhausted with no energy left for physical activity leading them to spend their free time with their eyes glued to the computer or phone.
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    However this vicious cycle of being sedentary needs to stop as children at an young age can truly benefit from physical education. Physical education in schools can nurture a positive attitude towards staying active as children spend a lot of time in schools.

    Physical education not only helps keep the body fit, but it also allows children to have better mental health, inculcates a competitive spirit and more: we put the spotlight on reasons that make physical education so important and necessary. Brain Development – Kids in their growing age are going through a lot of bodily changes.

    Whether it is their brain or their body, children can truly reap the benefits of physical education as being fit can help accelerate neuron activity kick starting their brain development and helping them reach their milestones at any age! Prevention of Diseases – Keeping physically active, being in the normal weight range and lowering body fat can help your children prevent some of the diseases that are widespread now.

    • Maintaining good physical fitness can help your child avoid heart disease and diabetes later on.
    • Physical Education in India especially in Podar International School is making students aware of this during classes! Mental Health – Physical Education in India can also help bring forward the conversation around mental health.

    The benefits of physical education are not limited to physical health but also helps maintain positive mental health in children especially adolescents. Regular physical activity can help generate more dopamine in your brain, your body’s natural ‘feel-good’ chemical that keeps your child’s mood elevated.

    • Team-work – Playing a sport, especially a team sport can help your child socialise and learn the importance of teamwork.
    • In nuclear families and small size environments, children often miss out on the benefits of living in a community and working towards a common cause which fosters the feelings of team-work and unity.

    The benefits of physical education also helps your child socially by helping them become team players and more generous and kind to their fellow teammates. Better Self-Esteem – The benefits of physical education have a direct impact on our self-view as it improves our self-esteem and self-confidence.

    When children start playing a sport or start learning a new physical activity they are upskilling themselves, making them more adept and skillful at establishing a higher and more positive outlook about themselves. When they get a ball through the net or make that neat goal, they are proud of themselves, which leads to high self-confidence.

    Podar International School has state-of-the-art infrastructure and facilities for your child to enjoy sports while at school, along with an esteemed faculty of educators who will surely nurture a love for sports and physical activity! To know more about their admission process, click here!
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    How much physical activity is needed for improved health benefits?

    Move More; Sit Less Physical activity is anything that gets your body moving. Each week adults need 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity and 2 days of muscle strengthening activity, according to the current, We know 150 minutes of physical activity each week sounds like a lot, but you don’t have to do it all at once.

    It could be 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week. You can spread your activity out during the week and break it up into smaller chunks of time. See, Physical activity supports physical and mental health. The make it one of the most important things you can do for your health. Adults should move more and sit less throughout the day.

    Some physical activity is better than none. Adults who sit less and do any amount of moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity gain some health benefits. Adults should follow the exercises as specified in the following options. Check out this for a quick snapshot of the recommended amount of weekly activity for adults.

    • Moderate-intensity aerobic activity
    • (such as brisk walking) for 150 minutes every week (for example, 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week)
    • AND

    Muscle-strengthening activities on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms).

    1. Vigorous-intensity aerobic activity
    2. (such as jogging or running) for 75 minutes (1 hour and 15 minutes) every week
    3. AND

    Muscle-strengthening activities on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms).

    • An equivalent mix of moderate- and vigorous-intensity aerobic activity
    • on 2 or more days a week
    • AND

    Muscle-strengthening activities on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms). If you go beyond 150 minutes a week of moderate-intensity activity, or 75 minutes a week of vigorous-intensity activity or an equivalent combination, you’ll gain even more health benefits.

    1. Aerobic activity or “cardio” gets you breathing harder and your heart beating faster.
    2. From pushing a lawn mower, to taking a dance class, to walking or biking to the store – these types of activities and more count.
    3. As long as you’re doing aerobic physical activities at a moderate- or vigorous-intensity, they count toward meeting the aerobic guideline.

    Intensity is how hard your body is working during a physical activity. Moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity means you’re working hard enough to raise your heart rate and break a sweat. One way to tell if it’s a moderate-intensity aerobic activity is that you’ll be able to talk, but not sing the words to your favorite song.

    • Walking fast
    • Doing water aerobics
    • Riding a bike on level ground or with few hills
    • Playing doubles tennis
    • Pushing a lawn mower

    Vigorous-intensity aerobic activity means you’re breathing hard and fast, and your has gone up quite a bit. You may use the Talk Test to gauge the intensity of your aerobic physical activity. If you’re being active at a vigorous level, you won’t be able to say more than a few words without pausing for a breath. Here are some examples of activities that require vigorous effort:

    • Jogging or running
    • Swimming laps
    • Riding a bike fast or on hills
    • Playing singles tennis
    • Playing basketball

    If you are doing moderate-intensity physical activity, such as walking or hiking, you can talk, but not sing during the activity. Build Up Over Time If you want to do more vigorous-level activities, slowly replace those that take moderate effort like brisk walking with more vigorous activities like jogging.

    Learn more about with physical activity to improve health. You can do moderate- or vigorous-intensity aerobic activity, or a mix of the two, each week. A rule of thumb is that 1 minute of vigorous-intensity activity is about the same as 2 minutes of moderate-intensity activity. Some people like to do vigorous activity because it gives them about the same health benefits in half the time.

    If you haven’t been very active lately, however, increase your physical activity level slowly. If you have a history of a chronic disease, consider telling your doctor you are planning to increase your physical activity, including moving to more vigorous activity.

    • You need to feel comfortable doing moderate-intensity activities before you move on to more vigorous ones.
    • Learn more about additional that are right for you.
    • Want more tips on how you can add a variety of activities to your life?,
    • Physical activities to strengthen your muscles are recommended at least 2 days a week.
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    Activities should work all the major muscle groups of your body—legs, hips, back, chest, abdomen, shoulders, and arms. Muscle-strengthening activities should be done in addition to your aerobic activity. To gain health benefits, you need to do muscle-strengthening activities to the point where it’s hard for you to do another repetition without help.

    1. A repetition is one complete movement of an activity, like lifting a weight or doing a sit-up.
    2. Try to do 8-12 repetitions per activity, which counts as 1 set,
    3. Try to do at least 1 set of muscle-strengthening activities.
    4. To gain even more benefits, do 2 or 3 sets.
    5. You can do activities that strengthen your muscles on the same or different days that you do aerobic activity—whatever works best for you.

    There are many ways you can strengthen your muscles, whether it’s at home or the gym. You may want to try the following:

    • Lifting weights
    • Working with resistance bands
    • Doing exercises that use your body weight for resistance (e.g., push-ups, sit-ups)
    • Heavy gardening (e.g., digging, shoveling)
    • Some forms of yoga
  • : Move More; Sit Less
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    How can physical activity help to improve your social health?

    May 26, 2017 Increased confidence, peer acceptance, leadership skills, and empathy; these are just four of the social benefits children receive from sports and physical activity. These four benefits can have a significant effect on a child’s health, happiness, and future. How Physical Education Is Beneficial For Health Physical activity delivers social health benefits for adults as well. Improved self-confidence and self-sufficiency can be achieved from participation in physical activity at any age. As adults grow older, physical activity can also provide opportunities for social interaction and can decrease feelings of loneliness or exclusion,

    Adults and children alike can reap additional social benefits from physical activity through the impact it has on the community as a whole. By providing opportunities for increased social integration through community walking/bike paths and sports leagues, participating in physical activity can increase the feeling of connection between community members.

    The evidence is clear, the positive effects of physical activity go beyond the physical health of the participant to influence their social health throughout their lifetime. These benefits are amplified throughout the community at large through socialization and integration.
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    Why is physical health care important?

    Physical activity

    Physical activity has significant health benefits for hearts, bodies and minds Physical activity contributes to preventing and managing noncommunicable diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer and diabetes Physical activity reduces symptoms of depression and anxiety Physical activity enhances thinking, learning, and judgment skills Physical activity ensures healthy growth and development in young people Physical activity improves overall well-being Globally, 1 in 4 adults do not meet the global recommended levels of physical activity People who are insufficiently active have a 20% to 30% increased risk of death compared to people who are sufficiently active More than 80% of the world’s adolescent population is insufficiently physically active

    WHO defines physical activity as any bodily movement produced by skeletal muscles that requires energy expenditure. Physical activity refers to all movement including during leisure time, for transport to get to and from places, or as part of a person’s work.

    Both moderate- and vigorous-intensity physical activity improve health. Popular ways to be active include walking, cycling, wheeling, sports, active recreation and play, and can be done at any level of skill and for enjoyment by everybody. Regular physical activity is proven to help prevent and manage noncommunicable diseases such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes and several cancers.

    It also helps prevent hypertension, maintain healthy body weight and can improve mental health, quality of life and well-being. WHO guidelines and recommendations provide details for different age groups and specific population groups on how much physical activity is needed for good health.

    be physically active several times a day in a variety of ways, particularly through interactive floor-based play; more is better. For those not yet mobile, this includes at least 30 minutes in prone position (tummy time) spread throughout the day while awake; not be restrained for more than 1 hour at a time (e.g., prams/strollers, high chairs, or strapped on a caregiver’s back);

    Screen time is not recommended.

    When sedentary, engaging in reading and storytelling with a caregiver is encouraged; and have 14-17h (0-3 months of age) or 12-16h (4-11 months of age) of good quality sleep, including naps.

    In a 24-hour day, children 1-2 years of age should:

    spend at least 180 minutes in a variety of types of physical activities at any intensity, including moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity, spread throughout the day; more is better; not be restrained for more than 1 hour at a time (e.g., prams/strollers, high chairs, or strapped on a caregiver’s back) or sit for extended periods of time.

    For 1 year olds, sedentary screen time (such as watching TV or videos, playing computer games) is not recommended. For those aged 2 years, sedentary screen time should be no more than 1 hour; less is better.

    When sedentary, engaging in reading and storytelling with a caregiver is encouraged; and have 11-14h of good quality sleep, including naps, with regular sleep and wake-up times.

    In a 24-hour day, children 3-4 years of age should:

    spend at least 180 minutes in a variety of types of physical activities at any intensity, of which at least 60 minutes is moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity, spread throughout the day; more is better; not be restrained for more than 1 hour at a time (e.g., prams/strollers) or sit for extended periods of time.

    Sedentary screen time should be no more than 1 hour; less is better.

    When sedentary, engaging in reading and storytelling with a caregiver is); encourage; and have 10-13h of good quality sleep, which may include a nap, with regular sleep and wake-up times.

    Children and adolescents aged 5-17 years

    should do at least an average of 60 minutes per day of moderate-to-vigorous intensity, mostly aerobic, physical activity, across the week. should incorporate vigorous-intensity aerobic activities, as well as those that strengthen muscle and bone, at least 3 days a week. should limit the amount of time spent being sedentary, particularly the amount of recreational screen time.

    should do at least 150–300 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity; or at least 75–150 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity; or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity activity throughout the week should also do muscle-strengthening activities at moderate or greater intensity that involve all major muscle groups on 2 or more days a week, as these provide additional health benefits. may increase moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity to more than 300 minutes; or do more than 150 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity; or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity activity throughout the week for additional health benefits. should limit the amount of time spent being sedentary. Replacing sedentary time with physical activity of any intensity (including light intensity) provides health benefits, and to help reduce the detrimental effects of high levels of sedentary behaviour on health, all adults and older adults should aim to do more than the recommended levels of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity

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    Adults aged 65 years and above

    Same as for adults; and as part of their weekly physical activity, older adults should do varied multicomponent physical activity that emphasizes functional balance and strength training at moderate or greater intensity, on 3 or more days a week, to enhance functional capacity and to prevent falls.

    Pregnant and postpartum women All pregnant and postpartum women without contraindication should:

    do at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity throughout the week incorporate a variety of aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities should limit the amount of time spent being sedentary. Replacing sedentary time with physical activity of any intensity (including light intensity) provides health benefits.

    People living with chronic conditions (hypertension, type 2 diabetes, HIV and cancer survivors)

    should do at least 150–300 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity; or at least 75–150 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity; or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity activity throughout the week should also do muscle-strengthening activities at moderate or greater intensity that involve all major muscle groups on 2 or more days a week, as these provide additional health benefits. as part of their weekly physical activity, older adults should do varied multicomponent physical activity that emphasizes functional balance and strength training at moderate or greater intensity, on 3 or more days a week, to enhance functional capacity and to prevent falls. may increase moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity to more than 300 minutes; or do more than 150 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity; or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity activity throughout the week for additional health benefits. should limit the amount of time spent being sedentary. Replacing sedentary time with physical activity of any intensity (including light intensity) provides health benefits, and to help reduce the detrimental effects of high levels of sedentary behaviour on health, all adults and older adults should aim to do more than the recommended levels of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity.

    Children and adolescents living with disability:

    should do at least an average of 60 minutes per day of moderate-to-vigorous intensity, mostly aerobic, physical activity, across the week. should incorporate vigorous-intensity aerobic activities, as well as those that strengthen muscle and bone, at least 3 days a week. should limit the amount of time spent being sedentary, particularly the amount of recreational screen time.

    Adults living with disability:

    should do at least 150–300 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity; or at least 75–150 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity; or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity activity throughout the week should also do muscle-strengthening activities at moderate or greater intensity that involve all major muscle groups on 2 or more days a week, as these provide additional health benefits. As part of their weekly physical activity, older adults should do varied multicomponent physical activity that emphasizes functional balance and strength training at moderate or greater intensity, on 3 or more days a week, to enhance functional capacity and to prevent falls. may increase moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity to more than 300 minutes; or do more than 150 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity; or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity activity throughout the week for additional health benefits. should limit the amount of time spent being sedentary. Replacing sedentary time with physical activity of any intensity (including light intensity) provides health benefits, and to help reduce the detrimental effects of high levels of sedentary behaviour on health, all adults and older adults should aim to do more than the recommended levels of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity. It is possible to avoid sedentary behaviour and be physically active while sitting or lying.E.g. Upper body led activities, inclusive and/or wheelchair-specific sport and activities.

    Regular physical activity, such as walking, cycling, wheeling, doing sports or active recreation, provides significant benefits for health. Some physical activity is better than doing none. By becoming more active throughout the day in relatively simple ways, people can easily achieve the recommended activity levels.

    improve muscular and cardiorespiratory fitness; improve bone and functional health; reduce the risk of hypertension, coronary heart disease, stroke, diabetes, various types of cancer (including breast cancer and colon cancer), and depression; reduce the risk of falls as well as hip or vertebral fractures; and help maintain a healthy body weight.

    In children and adolescents, physical activity improves:

    physical fitness (cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness) cardiometabolic health (blood pressure, dyslipidaemia, glucose, and insulin resistance) bone health cognitive outcomes (academic performance, executive function) mental health (reduced symptoms of depression) reduced adiposity

    In adults and older adults, higher levels of physical activity improves:

    risk of all-cause mortality risk of cardiovascular disease mortality incident hypertension incident site-specific cancers (bladder, breast, colon, endometrial, oesophageal adenocarcinoma, gastric and renal cancers) incident type-2 diabetes prevents of falls mental health (reduced symptoms of anxiety and depression) cognitive health sleep measures of adiposity may also improve

    For pregnant and post-partum women Physical activity confers the following maternal and fetal health benefits: a decreased risk of:

    pre-eclampsia, gestational hypertension, gestational diabetes (for example 30% reduction in risk) excessive gestational weight gain, delivery complications postpartum depression newborn complications, and physical activity has no adverse effects on birthweight or increased risk of stillbirth.

    Health risks of sedentary behaviour Lives are becoming increasingly sedentary, through the use of motorized transport and the increased use of screens for work, education and recreation. Evidence shows higher amounts of sedentary behaviour are associated with the following poor health outcomes: In children and adolescents:

    increased adiposity (weight gain) poorer cardiometabolic health, fitness, behavioural conduct/pro-social behaviour reduced sleep duration

    all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease mortality and cancer mortality incidence of cardiovascular disease, cancer and type-2 diabetes.

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    Why is physical care important?

    WHY IS SELF-CARE IMPORTANT? – Taking care of ourselves is assuming that we are in charge of our well-being, an act of self-knowledge and, We don’t need the outside to take care of us.

    It is a way of indicating around us that we value and that we take care of ourselves, and that therefore, that is transmitted and contagious. It improves our physical condition, our quality of life, and prevents physical and mental illnesses. It helps us to know each other and have more resources that provide us with well-being.

    Improves the relationship with oneself and with the people around us. Because taking care of ourselves allows us to be happy, to love ourselves and to love more of what is around us. Self-care brings optimism to see life in a more vital way, since by dedicating time and care we improve our spirits, it makes us have a better attitude and positive thoughts.
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