How Many Education Policy In India?

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How Many Education Policy In India
India has a total of 4 education policies to date. The first policy was formulated in 1968 and the second in 1986.
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How many national policy of education are there in India?

National Education Policy 2020 – What is New Education Policy 2020? The Union Cabinet approved the National Education Policy (NEP) in July 2020. This policy will usher in sweeping changes to the education policy of the country, including a renaming of the Ministry of Human Resource Development as the Education Ministry.

  1. This article on education in India is aligned with the and is relevant for prelims and mains examination.
  2. Education and topics related to education in India are relevant for the and are often seen in the news and hence are important for the UPSC Mains.
  3. Aspirants can find notes for UPSC Mains General Studies topics from the links given at the end of the article.

Candidates must read about that has been launched as a part of New Education Policy 2020, in June 2021. The Union Cabinet has approved the new National Education Policy 2020 with an aim to introduce several changes in the Indian education system – from the school to the college level.

  • Its aims at making “India a global knowledge superpower”.
  • The Cabinet has also approved the renaming of the Ministry of Human Resource Development to the Ministry of Education.
  • The New Education Policy cleared by the Cabinet is only the third major revamp of the framework of education in India since independence.
  • The two earlier education policies were brought in 1968 and 1986.
  • Aspirants should read about New Education Policy along with other education-related topics to holistically cover this article. Such similar articles are linked below:
  • In this article, you will get the following facts about the new National Education Policy 2020 for the UPSC exam:
  • National Education Policy 2020 UPSC Notes:-

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What are the education policies in India?

References –

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  31. ^ Kumar, Manoj (29 July 2020). “India opens door for foreign universities under new education policy”, Reuters, Retrieved 31 July 2020,
  32. ^ Lane, Jason (1 July 2013). “India’s New Rules for Foreign Universities Are a ‘Missed Opportunity’ “, The Chronicle of Higher Education,
  33. ^ “UGC allows top universities to set up campuses abroad”, University World News, Retrieved 23 January 2022,
  34. ^ “Time has come for India to emerge as knowledge hub, become ‘vishwa guru’ again: Vice President”, The Hindu, PTI.5 September 2021. ISSN 0971-751X, Retrieved 24 January 2022, } : CS1 maint: others ( link )
  35. ^ Lane, Jason; Schueller. “Can international branch campuses aid national identity?”, University World News, Retrieved 24 January 2022,
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  38. ^ Baral, Maitree, ed. (30 July 2020). “NEP 2020: New Education Policy Moots Formation Of Technology Forum”, NDTV, Retrieved 31 July 2020,
  39. ^ “NITI Aayog ties up with BYJU’S to provide study material to schools”, The Indian Express,17 September 2021, Retrieved 6 March 2022,
  40. ^ Upadhyay, Deepak (29 July 2020). “New school education policy approved: Grading system, more choice of subjects”, Livemint, Retrieved 31 July 2020,
  41. ^ “To Improve Gross Enrolment Ratio, New Education Policy Proposes Academic Bank of Credit; Multiple Entry, Exit Points”, News18,29 July 2020, Retrieved 30 July 2020,
  42. ^ Jayan, T.V. (5 July 2020). “National Research Foundation to boost research, innovation”, @businessline, Retrieved 30 July 2020,
  43. ^ Shukla, Amandeep (1 October 2019). “HRD begins process for creation of National Research Foundation”, Hindustan Times, Retrieved 30 July 2020,
  44. ^ Shukla, Amandeep (30 July 2020). “Govt unveils sweeping changes for education”, Hindustan Times, Retrieved 31 July 2020,
  45. ^ Pandit, Ambika (30 July 2020). “Gender Inclusion Fund, Spl Edu Zones in policy”, The Times of India, Retrieved 31 July 2020,
  46. ^ “No language imposition in new education policy, says drafting panel chief”, India Today, New Delhi,30 July 2020, Retrieved 30 July 2020,
  47. ^ “UGC ask varsities to create awareness about new education policy among students, teachers”, Hindustan Times,6 August 2020, Retrieved 6 August 2020,
  48. ^ “PM Narendra Modi speech live on NEP: Policy to shift focus from ‘what to think’ to ‘how to think’ “, India Today,7 August 2020, Retrieved 9 August 2020,
  49. ^ Chanda, Papri (30 July 2020). “IIT Directors laud the New Education Policy, call it an Important Milestone and a ‘Morrill Moment’ for India”, Times Now, Retrieved 30 July 2020,
  50. ^ “JNU, Jamia V-Cs: National Education Policy move groundbreaking, positive”, The Indian Express,30 July 2020, Retrieved 30 July 2020,
  51. ^ Jump up to: a b “National Education Policy evokes mixed reactions among academicians”, Outlook India, PTI.29 July 2020, Retrieved 30 July 2020, } : CS1 maint: others ( link )
  52. ^ Naidu, M. Venkaiah (8 August 2020). “The New Education Policy 2020 is set to be a landmark in India’s history of education”, Times of India Blog, Retrieved 9 August 2020,
  53. ^ Chaturvedi, Amit (30 July 2020). ” ‘Much to welcome in National Education Policy but.’: Shashi Tharoor highlights some challenges”, Hindustan Times, New Delhi, Retrieved 30 July 2020,
  54. ^ Jain, Sangeet (6 August 2020). “The National Education Policy 2020: A policy for the times”, ORF, Retrieved 9 August 2020,
  55. ^ Sarfaraz, Kainat (29 July 2020). “Mixed response to new education policy, Sisodia welcomes move to rename MHRD as ministry of education”, Hindustan Times, Retrieved 31 July 2020,
  56. ^ “NEP will transform millions of lives, says Modi; CPM terms it unilateral drive to destroy education”, Firstpost,30 July 2020, Retrieved 9 August 2020,
  57. ^ Roy, Kumkum (31 July 2020). “National Education Policy needs close scrutiny for what it says, what it doesn’t”, The Indian Express,
  58. ^ “NEP 2020 “undermines” Tamil, halt its implementation: Stalin”, The Times of India, PTI.9 August 2020, Retrieved 9 August 2020,
  59. ^ “Aishe Ghosh calls internships ‘child labour’, Twitter mocks ‘freeloader communists’ “, Free Press Journal, Retrieved 9 August 2020,
  60. ^ Shukla, Ashish (30 July 2020). “Netizens irked with Modi government’s 3-language formula in NEP 2020”, International Business Times, India, Retrieved 9 August 2020,
  61. ^ Stalin, J Sam Daniel (1 June 2019). Dutta Roy, Divyanshu (ed.). “#StopHindiImposition Protest Erupts Against Centre’s Draft Education Plan”, NDTV, Retrieved 30 July 2020,
  62. ^ Stalin, J Sam Daniel (3 June 2019). Srinivasan, Chandrashekar (ed.). “Tamil-Speaking Ministers Join Firefight As Anti-Hindi Uproar Flares”, NDTV, Retrieved 30 July 2020,
  63. ^ Das, Prajanma (29 July 2019). “Six reasons why SFI thinks the New Education Policy will destroy Indian education as we know it”, The New Indian Express, Retrieved 24 April 2020,
  64. ^ Prasad, Madhu (19 July 2019). “NEP 2019: The devil in the detail”, Frontline, Retrieved 31 July 2020,
  65. ^ “Dr. D P Sharma On The Challenges In Indian Education Systems”, Eduvoice | The Voice of Education Industry,25 May 2020, Retrieved 29 September 2020,
  66. ^ “Aatm Nirbhar Bharat Abhiyan : स्कूल—कॉलेज से शुरू होना चाहिए आत्मनिर्भरता का जज्बा”, Patrika News (in Hindi), Retrieved 29 September 2020,
  67. ^ D’Souza, Roshan (12 May 2022). “The Coming Disruption in Higher Education in India”, The India Forum,
  68. ^ “Karnataka becomes first state to issue order implementing National Education Policy”, The New Indian Express, Retrieved 15 September 2021,
  69. ^ “NEP to be implemented in phases by 2022, says UP CM Yogi Adityanath”, India Today,20 November 2020, Retrieved 15 September 2021,
  70. ^ Phaniharan, V.R.C. (8 August 2020). “Telangana ready to implement National Education Policy 2020”, www.thehansindia.com, Retrieved 15 September 2021,
  71. ^ “NEP 2020: Maharashtra CM directs to appoint experts’ committee for implementation of new education policy”, Hindustan Times,21 August 2020, Retrieved 15 September 2021,
  72. ^ Staff Reporter (8 September 2021). “NEP 2020 will be implemented in letter and spirit: Jagan”, The Hindu, ISSN 0971-751X, Retrieved 15 September 2021,
  73. ^ “NEP 2020 will be implemented in phased manner, says Rajasthan Governor Kalraj Mishra”, Hindustan Times,7 October 2020, Retrieved 19 September 2021,
  74. ^ Indian Today Web Desk (21 August 2021), “NEP will be implemented in Assam from April 1, 2022”, Indian Today, retrieved 30 October 2021
  75. ^ “UGC Allows Students To Pursue 2 Degree Courses Simultaneously”, NDTV.com, Retrieved 5 May 2022,
  76. ^ “Dharmendra Pradhan launches National Curriculum Framework for 3-8 years children”, The New Indian Express, Retrieved 23 October 2022,
  77. ^ “Centre releases draft policy: How the credit system will work in schools”, The Indian Express,22 October 2022, Retrieved 23 October 2022,
  78. ^ “NEP will be implemented in Goa from 2023”, Educart,
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National Education Policy 2022
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Is NPE and NEP same?

National Education Policy (NEP 2020) Highlights – Introduction After long wait, the National Education Policy (NEP 2020) was released by the Prime Minister of India in July 2020. For the same purpose, another committee headed by T.S. R Subramanian was constituted by the Ministry of HRD/Education but the same couldn’t find takers in the Government because of controversies between the then Human Resource Minister and the Chairman of the Committee.

  • The Highlights of NEP 2020 was released by the Press Information Bureau (PIB), Mumbai (29 JUL 2020) details of which is presented below: The new policy aims to pave way for transformational reforms in school and higher education systems in the country.
  • This policy will replace the 34 your old National Policy on Education (NPE),1986.

More about NPE 2020: Holistic Approach to School Education in India, National Education policy (NPE) Tables 50% Increase in Higher Education Enrolment by 2035 Arun C Mehta Fifty Percent Increase in Higher Education Enrolment by 2035 Possible Introduction After long wait, the National Education Policy (NEP 2020) was released by the Prime Minister of India in July 2020.

  1. For the same purpose, another committee headed by T.S.
  2. R Subramanian was constituted by the Ministry of HRD/Education but the same couldn’t find takers in the Government because of controversies between the then Human Resource Minister and the Chairman of the Committee.
  3. The Highlights of NEP 2020 was released by the Press Information Bureau (PIB), Mumbai (29 JUL 2020) details of which is presented below: The new policy aims to pave way for transformational reforms in school and higher education systems in the country.

This policy will replace the 34 your old National Policy on Education (NPE),1986. More about NPE 2020: Holistic Approach to School Education in India, National Education policy (NPE)

New Policy aims for universalization of education from pre-school to secondary level with 100 % Gross Enrolment Ratio (GER) in school education by 2030. NEP 2020 will bring 2 crore out of school children back into the main stream through open schooling system. The current 10+2 system to be replaced by a new 5+3+3+4 curricular structure corresponding to ages 3-8, 8-11, 11-14, and 14-18 years respectively. This will bring the hitherto uncovered age group of 3-6 years under school curriculum, which has been recognized globally as the crucial stage for development of mental faculties of a child. The new system will have 12 years of schooling with three years of Anganwadi/ pre schooling. Emphasis on Foundational Literacy and Numeracy, no rigid separation between academic streams, extracurricular, vocational streams in schools ; Vocational Education to start from Class 6 with Internships Teaching up to at least Grade 5 to be in mother tongue/ regional language. No language will be imposed on any student. Assessment reforms with 360 degree Holistic Progress Card, tracking Student Progress for achieving Learning Outcomes A new and comprehensive National Curriculum Framework for Teacher Education, NCFTE 2021, will be formulated by the NCTE in consultation with NCERT. By 2030, the minimum degree qualification for teaching will be a 4-year integrated B.Ed. degree,

Higher Education

Gross Enrolment Ratio in higher education to be raised to 50 % by 2035 ; 3.5 crore seats to be added in higher education. The policy envisages broad based, multi-disciplinary, holistic Under Graduate education with flexible curricula, creative combinations of subjects, integration of vocational education and multiple entry and exit points with appropriate certification. UG education can be of 3 or 4 years with multiple exit options and appropriate certification within this period. Academic Bank of Credits to be established to facilitate Transfer of Credits Multidisciplinary Education and Research Universities (MERUs), at par with IITs, IIMs, to be set up as models of best multidisciplinary education of global standards in the country. The National Research Foundation will be created as an apex body for fostering a strong research culture and building research capacity across higher education. Higher Education Commission of India (HECI) will be set up as a single overarching umbrella body the for entire higher education, excluding medical and legal education. HECI to have four independent verticals – National Higher Education Regulatory Council (NHERC) for regulation, General Education Council (GEC ) for standard setting, Higher Education Grants Council (HEGC) for funding, and National Accreditation Council( NAC) for accreditation. Public and private higher education institutions will be governed by the same set of norms for regulation, accreditation and academic standards. Affiliation of colleges is to be phased out in 15 years and a stage-wise mechanism is to be established for granting graded autonomy to colleges. Over a period of time, it is envisaged that every college would develop into either an Autonomous degree-granting College, or a constituent college of a university.

Others

An autonomous body, the National Educational Technology Forum (NETF), will be created to provide a platform for the free exchange of ideas on the use of technology to enhance learning, assessment, planning, administration. NEP 2020 emphasizes setting up of Gender Inclusion Fund, Special Education Zones for disadvantaged regions and groups New Policy promotes Multilingualism in both schools and higher education. National Institute for Pali, Persian and Prakrit, Indian Institute of Translation and Interpretation to be set up The Centre and the States will work together to increase the public investment in Education sector to reach 6% of GDP at the earliest.

Unprecedented Consultations

NEP 2020 has been formulated after an unprecedented process of consultation that involved nearly over 2 lakh suggestions from 2.5 lakhs Gram Panchayats, 6600 Blocks, 6000 ULBs, 676 Districts. The MHRD initiated an unprecedented collaborative, inclusive, and highly participatory consultation process from January 2015. In May 2016, ‘Committee for Evolution of the New Education Policy’ under the Chairmanship of Late Shri T.S.R. Subramanian, Former Cabinet Secretary, submitted its report. Based on this, the Ministry prepared ‘Some Inputs for the Draft National Education Policy, 2016′. In June 2017 a ‘Committee for the Draft National Education Policy’ was constituted under the Chairmanship of eminent scientist Dr.K. Kasturirangan, which submitted the Draft National Education Policy, 2019 to the Hon’ble Human Resource Development Minister on 31 st May, 2019. The Draft National Education Policy 2019 was uploaded on MHRD’s website and at ‘MyGov Innovate’ portal eliciting views/suggestions/comments of stakeholders, including public. New Education Structure based on NPE 2020 National Policy on Education 2016: T.S. R Subramanian Committee for the Evolution of New Education Policy (English) National Policy on Education 2016: T.S. R Subramanian Committee for the Evolution of New Education Policy (Hindi)

Meaning of Universalisation in the Light of the National Policy on Education 2020 by Prof. Arun C Mehta, Formally Professor & Head of the EMIS Department, NIEPA, New Delhi (India) The National Educational Policy (2020) adopted a number of suggestions for school education which, if adopted has got far reaching implications one of which is restructuring the composition of school education.

At present in India Primary education level consists of Grade I to V (corresponding age-group 6+ to 10+ years), Upper Primary level consists of Grades VI to VIII (age-group 11+ to 13+ years), Secondary (Grades IX & X/14+ to 15+ years) and Higher Secondary Level of education (XI & XII/16+ to 17+ years).

Universalisation in India means universal access (school facilities to all), universal participation (all relevant age group children enrolled), universal retention (meaning all those who enter in to the system retain and transit from one level of education to another) and universal quality of education (satisfying criteria of minimum levels of learning).

Instead of present levels, the NPE (2020) proposed (i) Foundational Stage of School Education (3 years of Pre-primary education including Grades 1 and 2 with corresponding age-group 3 to 8 years) (ii) Preparatory phase consisting of 3 years i.e. Grades 3, 4 and 5 (iii) Middle School Education of 3 years (Grades 6, 7 and 8) and (iv) Secondary Education phase of 4 years consisting Grades 9, 10, 11 and 12.

The corresponding clientele age-groups of these phases would be: Phase I (3+ to 7+ years), Phase II (8+ to 10+years), Phase III (11+ to 13+ years) and Phase IV (14+ to 17+ years). New phases, if adopted, would change the meaning of universal primary education.

A new set of indicators would be required to be developed and adopted. At present universalisation in India at an educational level is viewed through a set of indicators such as, Gross and Net Enrolment Ratio, Age-specific & Adjusted Net Enrolment Ratio, Grade-to-Grade drop out, promotion and repetition rate, average annual dropout rate, retention & transition rates and a set of quality of education related indicators to view learners ability to read and write.

In case if the proposed structure is adopted, meaning of the most of the indicators and its implication for planning universalisation will change. Instead of present 6+ to 18+ years age group, the new system would have 3+ to 18+ as its clientele; thus meaning school education would have 17 years instead of present 14 years.

  • New indicators for Foundation and Preparatory Phase would need to be developed on the line of existing set of indicators.
  • However, there would not be any implication for third phase i.e.
  • Middle School education which consists of Grades 6, 7 and 8 which is similar to the existing Upper Primary level of Education and Phase 4th which is combination of the existing Secondary and Higher Secondary levels of education.

For Universal foundational Stage, one would be required to compute Gross, Net and other enrolment based indicators for the corresponding 3 to 8 years clientele population. To attain universalisation at this phase of education means enrolling all children of age-group 3 to 8 years in the corresponding classes i.e.

  1. Pre-primary to Grade 1 and 2 will be the sufficient condition but that itself will not serve the purpose unless all those who enter into the system through first year of 3 years of Pre-primary education retain in the system, move from one grade to another and finally reach and complete Grade 2.
  2. To achieve goal of universalisation, the basic condition would be to enroll all children of age 3 for which entry rate would be required to be computed.

A 100 percent entry rate (net) will be required to achieve the goal of universal foundation. Grade-to-grade dropout, promotion and repetition, if any will be required to compute between each of 5 years of foundation stage. In addition, transition rate from Foundational stage to Preparatory phase, Preparatory to Middle school education phase and from Middle school education phase to Secondary education phase as well as retention rate at all these phases will be required to be computed.

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Retention rate presents information about the retaining capacity of the system which is unless brought to 100; the dream of universalisation may not be cherished. Similarly, enrolment ratios at Preparatory phase consisting Grades 3, 4 & 5 with the corresponding clientele age group 8+to 10+ years would be required to be worked out.

Universalisation at this phase mean all children of age group 8 to 10 years are enrolled in corresponding grades i.e. Grades 3, 4 & 5 but that would depends upon how many phase one graduates (those who successfully reach Grade 2) system will be producing and transit to the first grade i.e.

  1. Grade 3 of next phase i.e.
  2. Phase 2, Preparatory phase.
  3. It may also be of interest to know that to compute enrolment based indicators enrolment in absolute form and relevant age-specific child population is required.
  4. Though enrolment in the latest year is available from the U-DISE but the age-specific population is available only from the Census of India which is latest available for 2011.

Until 2001 Census, the Office of the Registrar General of India used to provide projected population annually but the same based up to the 2011 Census population was never provided in the absence of which enrolment ratio at different levels of education may be termed as indicative (GER at Primary 95.12 percent & Upper Primary level, 90.73 percent) as the child population used in computing GER & NER is estimated based on the projected population based on up to the 2001 Census.

  • All through 2012 to current year, enrolment ratios at all levels of education are based on provisional set of child population.
  • Once the actual child population is available, the enrolment ratio may dramatically change.
  • At disaggregated levels such as, district and block levels, official population projections are rarely available in the absence of which it is not an easy task to compute enrolment based indicators at these levels.

School Education Department of the MHRD must approach the Office of the Registrar General of India to ensure timely availability of 2021 Census child population both at the all-India and State and district levels and in subsequent years in the absence of which it is not possible to reliably compute enrolment ratio indicators which has got serious implications for planning universalisation.

The policy document also envisage increasing GER at Higher Education level from present 25 percent to 50 percent by 2035 meaning doubling enrolment during the period 2017 to 2035 which may not be realized unless the efficiently of school education system is improved to significant effect as enrolment in higher education level is not only a function of 18 to 22 population but would largely depends upon number of higher secondary graduates the system will be producing.

Needless to mention that of the total 123.8 million enrolment in Primary classes, about 6 percent children dropped out form the system before completion of Primary level thus influencing enrolment in subsequent levels of education i.e. upper primary and secondary and higher secondary levels of education all which will eventually affect number of secondary graduates that would be available for higher education.

In view of this, the National Policy 2020 emphasized the need to achieve access and participation in free and compulsory quality school education for all children in the age group of 3 to 18 years by 2030 for which it envisaged all out of school, never enrolled and dropped out children back to school as early as possible and to further prevent all them from dropping out.

To achieve this, the policy suggested (i) sufficient infrastructure at all levels from pre-primary school through Grade 12; and (ii) to achieve universal participation in schools by carefully tracking students to ensure that they are enrolled in and attending schools.

The Policy (2019) also advocates that the Free and Compulsory aspects of Right to Education (RTE) Act must be enforced and extended through Grade 12 to all children up to the age of 18 is termed welcome and timely suggestion but the moot question one may ask is whether RTE Act enacted in 2009 has been truly implemented in its spirits?.

U-DISE data suggest that only 12 percent of the 1.5 million schools imparting school education in the Country have all the 10 facilities as was envisaged in the Right to Free and Compulsory Education 2009 Act majority of schools without such facilities are the Government run schools.

  • In addition, though declined but still a good number of unrecognized schools are functioning across the country which is evident from the U-DISE data.
  • As per the RTE Act, all un-enrolled, never enrolled and dropped out children are to be identified by the local authorities annually and train them (3 months to 2 years) to make them to sit in the age appropriate grade in view of which in the recent years there are no target date/year to achieve the goal of Universal Primary/School education.

The Student Database Management in-sync with U-DISE launched in 2016-17 could have helped, as proposed in the policy, in moving towards developing a Child-Tracking System but unfortunately for unknown reasons, the same despite successfully collecting individual student records of more than 210 million students discontinued abruptly in the following years.

Once the modifications as suggested in the NPE 2020 is adopted, Officers those who are engaged in data analysis and district plans will be required to understand meaning of universalisation in the changed scenario for which adequate modifications will be required in the planning strategies, if any under the Government of India’s flagship programme i.e.

Samagra Shiksha!! NEP 2020 National Focus Groups to Create Curriculum for Different Phases
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What is first education policy?

1968 – Based on the report and recommendations of the Kothari Commission (1964–1966), the government headed by Prime Minister Indira Gandhi announced the first National Policy on Education in 1968, which called for a “radical restructuring” and proposed equal educational opportunities in order to achieve national integration and greater cultural and economic development.

The policy called for fulfilling compulsory education for all children up to the age of 14, as stipulated by the and specialized training and qualification of teachers. The policy called for a focus on the learning of regional languages, outlining the “” to be implemented in secondary education – the instruction of the, the official language of the state where the school was based, and,

Language education was seen as essential to reduce the gulf between the and the masses. Although the decision to adopt Hindi as the national language had proven controversial, the policy called for the use and learning of Hindi to be encouraged uniformly to promote a common language for all Indians.
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How many policies are there in education?

India has a total of 4 education policies to date. The first policy was formulated in 1968 and the second in 1986.
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What is the latest education policy?

Schooling starts at the age of 3 years now – The New Education Policy extends compulsory schooling from the age bracket of 6-14 years to 3-18 years. The NEP includes three years of previously unrecognized pre-schooling for children aged 3-6 years in the school curriculum.
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Who introduced NEP 2022 in India?

On Thursday, the Union Minister of State Science and Technology Dr Jitendra Singh said that the National Education Policy, NEP 2020 seeks to de-link degrees from education and livelihood opportunities. clarifying his remarks, Singh said that linking degrees with education has taken a heavy toll on India’s education system and society as well and one of the fallouts has been an increasing number of educated unemployed.

  • While addressing students and youth at the Krishna Mahavidyalaya at Thakurdwar in Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh, Singh said that NEP 2020 also supports the Start-Up ecosystem, and promises to open new career and entrepreneurship opportunities for students and youth in India.
  • READ | Pope Francis admits priests, nuns have ‘vice of porn’, warns ‘devil enters from there and weakens soul’ When was NEP 2020 introduced? What are its benefits? For the unversed, NEP 2022 was introduced by Prime Minister Narendra Modi to reorient India’s education policy as per global benchmarks.

Many, including Singh, have described it as the biggest path-breaking reform in India since independence, calling it not only progressive and visionary but also in keeping with the emerging needs and requirements of 21st-century India. How does NEP 2020 help students? NEP 2020 gives due priority to the students’ inherent talent, knowledge, skill, and aptitude, rather than focusing only on degrees, Singh said.

The Minister said NEP-2020 is having provisions for multiple entry/exit options thus providing academic flexibility to the students. He said this will have a positive impact on the students related to the availing of different career opportunities at different times, depending upon their intrinsic learning and inherent aptitude.

READ | Russian President Vladimir Putin denies having any intentions of using nuclear weapons in Ukraine How Uttar Pradesh is turning into a start-up hub? Singh also urged the students and the youth to explore livelihood opportunities in the booming start-up sector in the country.

  • He informed the gathering that only in August this year, the Uttar Pradesh government injected Rs 4,000 crore into the state’s start-up corpus for employment generation and economic activity.
  • The fresh infusion of capital has been made to constitute the maiden ‘UP Innovation Fund’ that will be mandated to provide seed capital to start-ups, the minister said.

Singh noted with satisfaction that the Uttar Pradesh government plans to have at least one incubator in every district by 2023. As of now, there are 47 incubators in 20 districts, the statement said. Singh told the youth of Moradabad that Uttar Pradesh is catching up fast in the start-up race and there are more than 6,500 start-ups already registered in the state.

READ | US: 3 Indian students in their 20s killed in road accident in western Massachusetts Singh said Noida has turned out to be the most preferred destination for start-ups followed by Ghaziabad, Agra, Lucknow, and Gorakhpur in the Purvanchal region, and now is the time for the innovative minds of the western UP to take a lead in the start-up movement.

He said the green and farm-rich belt of the western region can be a fertile ground for agri-tech and dairy start-ups. The minister promised all support from the Ministry of Science and Technology to support the start-up ecosystem.
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What are two types of NEP?

NEP stands for New Economic Policy. This set of policies can broadly be classified into two groups: the stabilization measures and the structural reform measures.
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Is NEP for CBSE?

Summary Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) is getting ready for a transition to the 5+3+3+4 pedagogical system The NEP 2020 suggested a new pedagogical framework that separates education for children into four stages According to the New Education Policy (NEP) 2020’s recommendations, the Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) is getting ready for a transition to the 5+3+3+4 pedagogical system.

The board will soon issue a directive requesting that all Indian schools associated with the CBSE board make preparations for a switch from the present 10+2 system to the suggested 5+3+3+4 one. Nidhi Chhibber, the chairperson of the CBSE, said the board will implement the change in the next academic year.

She added that CBSE will start the creation of a school registry, teacher registry, and student registry in order to track the growth of these resources throughout the various stages of schooling. The board “will be issuing directions for the adoption of the new 5+3+3+4 system of education for all the schools instead of 10+2 as envisaged in NEP” she said.

  1. The official of CBSE stated that the NEP’s distinguishing characteristic is the participation of children from three to six in formal education.
  2. She also emphasised how many CBSE schools are already involved in the teaching of younger children through their preparatory and pre-nursery programmes.
  3. The board will make an effort to officially include this in the CBSE system architecture.
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The NEP 2020 suggested a new pedagogical framework that separates education for children into four stages. The first stage is the five-year foundational stage. Preparatory and middle stages will follow, each lasting three years. Four years will elapse during the secondary stage.
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What is the full form of NEP * 1?

What is the Full Form of NEP NEP stands for National Education Policy. The 2020 National Education Policy aims for India’s future educational system. It is described in the National Education Policy of India 2020 (NEP 2020), which the Indian Union Cabinet adopted on July 29, 2020. How Many Education Policy In India The administration quickly stressed that no one would be forced to study any particular language and that they would not replace English with any regional language as the teaching language. The NEP’s language policy is a general guideline and advisory that the states, organizations, and schools must determine how to implement it. India’s Concurrent List includes the subject of education.
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When was the new education policy?

What Is New Education Policy? Here’s is a brief understanding The old education policy has recently been changed by the minister of human resource management. This change has been done under the chairmanship of ISRO Chief Doctor K Kasturirangan for better education.

  1. The national education policy was approved on 29 July 2020 by the union cabinet of India.
  2. It replaced the existing educational policy of India which was made in 1986.
  3. This policy brings a big positive change in the education of India.
  4. It is a framework for elementary education till higher education which includes vocational training in both urban and rural areas.

The main aim of launching the National Education Policy 2022 is to remodel India’s education policy. Under this new national education policy, nobody is forced to take any particular language. Now the students can choose the language according to their interests.

  • The National Education Policy will universalize education from preschool to Secondary School.
  • Previously the pattern of 10 + 2 was followed which has now changed to 5 + 3 + 3 + 4.
  • New Education Policy is also going to take place by bringing changes in Higher Education across India.
  • Various discussions have been done for bringing some modifications to the Higher Education Sector.

Active participation of each relevant official is required for bringing change in the education sector. This change is going to take place after considering various revisions, comments and suggestions of the stakeholders. Inclusion Of NCC Course With the revamp and formulation of the New Education Policy, the Union Government or Central Government is going to include the NCC course as an optional subject in all relevant universities.

Major Outcomes of NEP · Mother tongue or regional language will be used as a medium of instruction for teaching the students.· Counseling will be given to the parents for the early childhood care.· Qualitative education will be provided to the students.· With the adoption of modern technology, education will reach to a higher one.· After studying analytical based subjects, students will be able to think critically and logically after participating in the discussion session organized by the school authorities.· Children with special needs will be given same facilities as the normal student’s access.· Promotion will be based on the merit-based test.· Qualitative opportunities in the field of higher education will be provided to the individuals.· After the set up of Digital Library, students will be able to access digital form of books online.

: What Is New Education Policy? Here’s is a brief understanding
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What are the five National Policy on Education?

National Education Policy (NEP) – It has been a practice to have Commissions and Committees established on education even by the British well before the independence details of which is presented below. The earliest Charles Wood Despatch was commissioned in 1854 and the last, The Sargent Plan was commissioned just before the independence in the year 1944.

Name of Committees/ Commissions Year
Charles Wood Despatch 1854
Hunter Commission 1882
Raleigh Commission 1902
Sadler Commission 1917
Hartog Commission 1929
Sargent Plan 1944

Since the independence in 1947, the Government of India sponsored a variety of programmes concerning education in both the rural and urban areas and commissioned a number of commissions and committees over a period of time details of which is presented below:

University Education Commission (1948–1949) Secondary Education Commission (1952–1953) University Grants Commission and Kothari Commission (1964–66)

Based on the recommendations of these Commissions, a number of new establishments, such as Indian Institutes of Education (IITs), National Council of Educational Research and Training (NCERT) and host of other institutions were established. Based on the Kothari Commission, the then Prime Minister of India, announced the first National Policy on Education in the year 1968 which had emphasis on restructuring.

Prime Minister Policy Year
Indira Gandhi First 1968
Rajiv Gandhi Second 1986
Narendra Modi Third 2020

In addition to Commissions and Committees, a number of centrally sponsored schemes were also launched by the federal governments from time to time which are listed below:

Restructuring and Reorganization of Teacher Education (1987). Operation Blackboard (1987–98) aimed to improve teachers and physical resources in primary schools. Minimum Levels of Learning (1991) specifying achievement at various stages and revision of textbooks District Primary Education Programme (DPEP) (1993) with emphasis on decentralized planning and management and school effectiveness. National Programme for Nutritional Support to Primary Education (1995): Noon Meal Scheme with a provision to provide a cooked meal every day for all children in Classes 1–5 of all government, government-aided and local body schools. The movement to Educate for All (2000) aimed to achieve universal primary education by 2010 through micro-planning and school-mapping exercises, bridging gender and social gaps through Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan (SSA) Programme. Fundamental Right (2001) involved the provision of free and compulsory education, declared to be a basic right for children aged between 6 and 14 years which subsequently enactment of Right to Education in 2009.

National Policy on Education 2020 (66 Pages), Ministry of Education National Policy on Education 2020 (55 Pages), Ministry of Education Highlights of National Education Policy 2020 New Education Structure based on NPE 2020 NEP 2020: Creating SEDGs & SEZs, National Workshop Education Commission_& Committees by EVANGELINE Sheela_Bell_ Education Commissions & Committes since Independence (Taleemi Board) National Policy on Education 2016: T.S. R Subramanian Committee for the Evolution of New Education Policy (English) National Policy on Education 2016: T.S. R Subramanian Committee for the Evolution of New Education Policy (Hindi) National Policy on Education (1986 and 1992) Programme of Action (1992) Education and National Development : Report of The Education Commission, 1964-66 (Vol.1) Education and National Development : Report of The Education Commission, 1964-66 (Vol.2) 1949 Report of the University Education Commission 1953 Secondary_Education Commission_Report EVANGELINE 1990 Acharya Ramamurti Report 1992 NPE 1986 as Modified in 1992 1996 Delors Commission Report 2015 Eurydice Assuring Quality in Education 2015 Understanding and Facilitating the Development of Intellect Parliamentary Standing Committee Report on Compulsory Elementary Education Constitution Ninety-Third Amendment) Bill, 2001 Right to Education Guidelines of Kasturba Gandhi Bal Vidhalaya Scheme NPEGL Reconstituted CABE Committee National Evaluation of Kasturba Gandhi Bal Vidhalaya Scheme (KBGV) Mid-day Meal: Noon-Meal Scheme Education And National Development : Report of The Education Commission, 1964-66 (Vol.1) Education And National Development : Report of The Education Commission, 1964-66 (Vol.2) Elementary Education in 12th Plan: 2012 to 2017, MHRD 1949 Report of the University Education Commission 1953 Secondary_Education Commission_Report 1990 Acharya Ramamurti Report 1992 NPE 1986 as Modified in 1992 1996 Delors Commission Report Yashpal Committee Report to Advise Renovation & Rejuvenation of Higher Education in India 2015 Eurydice Assuring Quality in Education 2015 Understanding and Facilitating the Development of Intellect 11th Five Year Plan: Elementary Education & SSA 12th fFve Year Plan: Elementary Education, Sub-group Report NPEGL Aligning SSA Norms with the RTE Act, 2009 Mid-day Meal: Noon-Meal Scheme Scheme of Incentive to Girls for Secondary Education in India Education in the Union Budget 2022-23: A Note by Arun C Mehta S chool Complexes/Clusters: NEP 2020

The recently adopted National Policy of Education in 2020 has the following features (downloaded from the internet):

Schooling to begin from the age of 3 years A Single Overarching Body of Higher Education Mother tongue to be instated as medium of instruction Separation between subject streams to be blurred The Return of the FYUP Programme and No More Dropouts

Meaning of Universalisation in the Light of the National Policy on Education 2020

National Policy on Education 2020 (66 Pages), Ministry of Education National Policy on Education 2020 (55 Pages), Ministry of Education Highlights of National (New) Education Policy (NEP 2020) New Education Structure based on NPE 2020 Education Commission_& Committees by EVANGELINE Sheela_Bell_ Education Commissions & Committes since Independence (Taleemi Board) National Policy on Education 2016: T.S. R Subramanian Committee for the Evolution of New Education Policy (English) National Policy on Education 2016: T.S. R Subramanian Committee for the Evolution of New Education Policy (Hindi) National Policy on Education (1986 and 1992) Programme of Action (1992) Education and National Development : Report of The Education Commission, 1964-66 (Vol.1) Education and National Development : Report of The Education Commission, 1964-66 (Vol.2) 1949 Report of the University Education Commission 1953 Secondary_Education Commission_Report EVANGELINE 1990 Acharya Ramamurti Report 1992 NPE 1986 as Modified in 1992 1996 Delors Commission Report 2015 Eurydice Assuring Quality in Education 2015 Understanding and Facilitating the Development of Intellect Parliamentary Standing Committee Report on Compulsory Elementary Education Constitution Ninety-Third Amendment) Bill, 2001 Right to Education Guidelines of Kasturba Gandhi Bal Vidhalaya Scheme NPEGL Reconstituted CABE Committee National Evaluation of Kasturba Gandhi Bal Vidhalaya Scheme (KBGV) Mid-day Meal: Noon-Meal Scheme Education And National Development : Report of The Education Commission, 1964-66 (Vol.1) Education And National Development : Report of The Education Commission, 1964-66 (Vol.2) Elementary Education in 12th Plan: 2012 to 2017, MHRD 1949 Report of the University Education Commission 1953 Secondary_Education Commission_Report 1990 Acharya Ramamurti Report 1992 NPE 1986 as Modified in 1992 1996 Delors Commission Report Yashpal Committee Report to Advise Renovation & Rejuvenation of Higher Education in India 2015 Eurydice Assuring Quality in Education 2015 Understanding and Facilitating the Development of Intellect 11th Five Year Plan: Elementary Education & SSA 12th fFve Year Plan: Elementary Education, Sub-group Report NPEGL Aligning SSA Norms with the RTE Act, 2009 Mid-day Meal: Noon-Meal Scheme Scheme of Incentive to Girls for Secondary Education in India Evolution of National Policy on Education by Satpathy and Biswas Left-Wing Affacted Districts in India, 2011 School Nutrition (Kitchen) Garden Guidelines (SNG) ussued by Mnistry of Education 2019 National Education Policy 1968 & after

Nation al Curriculum Framework

National Curriculum Framework 2005, NCERT (English) National Curriculum Framework 2005, NCERT (Hindi) Meaning of Universalisation in the Light of the National Policy on Education 2020

Copy Right: GOVERNMENT OF INDIA, New Delhi & Others Sources. Please refer the original source of information and provide reference of the material used.
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What are the three education policies in India?

Kothari) (1964-66), National Policy on Education (1968), Draft National Policy on Education (1979) National Policy on Education (1986) and National Policy on Education (1992), Concluding remarks.
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