What Is School Library And Its Benefits In Society?

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What Is School Library And Its Benefits In Society
The purpose of the school library – School library media centers in the 21st century can, and should be, hubs for increased student achievement and positive focused school reform, —Kathleen D. Smith The school library exists to provide a range of learning opportunities for both large and small groups as well as individuals with a focus on intellectual content, information literacy, and the learner.

In addition to classroom visits with collaborating teachers, the school library also serves as a learning space for students to do independent work, use computers, access the internet, use equipment and research materials; to host special events such as author visits and book clubs; and for tutoring and testing.

School libraries function as a central location for all of the information available, and a school librarian functions as the literary map to the resources and materials found within the library. A school library functions as an opportunity for educators to work with librarians in support of a resource center for the students to be able to safely access the internet for both school work and interacting with each other.

In her article, “Tag! You’re It!”: Playing on the Digital Playground, De las Casas discusses how today’s youth is much more comfortable with technology than ever before, and believes that “We need to advocate for regulations and laws that support education of young people rather than simply limiting their access to the Web.” The school library media center program is a collaborative venture in which school library media specialists, teachers, and administrators work together to provide opportunities for the social, cultural, and educational growth of students.

Activities that are part of the school library media program can take place in the school library media center, the laboratory classroom, through the school, and via the school library’s online resources. In Australia school libraries have played a major role in the success of Reading Challenge programs initiated and funded by various State Governments.
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What is the purpose of libraries in the society?

Libraries provide the crucial role in promoting education, research, personality development, ethics and other important values. A society cannot flourish without proper education and the primary requirement of the education system is the knowledge available in the books.
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What are the benefits of a library?

10 Benefits of Having a Library Card September 16th, 2021 September is National Library Card Sign Up Month! The library was a second home to me when I was a kid—I was lucky enough to live within walking distance to the library in my hometown, and loved tearing through the stacks after school and finding new books to escape in and take home with me.

  • With a library card, I was able to explore my interests and dive deeper into the types of stories that resonated with me, as well as learn more about stories and people I might not have gotten to learn about otherwise.
  • The library in my town was fantastic—the librarians were incredibly helpful and friendly, and I spent many afternoons studying in the open spaces with my friends.

Now, I use the library app on my phone to read ebooks with the Brooklyn Public Library, and I love it! You already know you can borrow free books from the library, but what else can you do with a library card? Here are ten benefits of having a library card that you might not be aware of, and that might convince you to sign up for one if you haven’t already:

Free museum passes : Going to museums can be expensive! With programs like Culture Pass in New York City, you can gain access to museums you may have never been to before for free. Free ebook downloads : With the Libby app, Overdrive, or Simply E, you can borrow and download hundreds of thousands of ebooks for free at the drop of a hat. Free movie streaming : If you have a library card, you also have access to thousands of movies for free streaming. Read old newspapers and magazines for free : Many libraries offer access to old newspapers and magazines that you can look through physically or digitally for free. Learn a new language for free : Taking classes to learn a new language can be expensive. Many libraries across the country offer online learning programs for dozens of different languages. Learn new skills : Libraries often offer free classes/programs where you can learn a new skill, craft, or explore career development opportunities. Quiet study spaces : Libraries have spaces for you to study, work, or read in peace and quiet. Free Wifi : Libraries also offer free Wifi for you to study, work, or read. Software/database access for free : Many libraries offer access to databases and software like Adobe Creative Cloud or LexisNexis for people to use at their leisure or for professional purposes. Librarians : Lastly, librarians are such an important free resource. They can assist you in answering questions and giving recommendations, as well as provide support within your community.

: 10 Benefits of Having a Library Card
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What is the definition of a school library?

(skuːl ˈlaɪbrərɪ ) a library within a school where teachers and students have access to books and other resources. Collins English Dictionary.
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What is library and its purpose?

What Is School Library And Its Benefits In Society What is a “Library”? The word “library” seems to be used in so many different aspects now, from the brick-and-mortar public library to the digital library. Public libraries—and indeed, all libraries-are changing and dynamic places where librarians help people find the best source of information whether it’s a book, a web site, or database entry.

In The Librarian’s Book of Lists (Chicago: ALA, 2010), George Eberhart offers this definition: “A library is a collection of resources in a variety of formats that is (1) organized by information professionals or other experts who (2) provide convenient physical, digital, bibliographic, or intellectual access and (3) offer targeted services and programs (4) with the mission of educating, informing, or entertaining a variety of audiences (5) and the goal of stimulating individual learning and advancing society as a whole.” (p.1) This definition is in turn compiled from: (1) Heartsill Young, ed., The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science (ALA, 1983) (2) Robert S.

Martin, “Libraries and Learners in the Twenty-First Century,” Cora Paul Bomar Lecture, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, April 5, 2003. (3) Deanna B. Marcum, “Research Questions for the Digital Era Library,” Library Trends 51 (Spring 2003): 636-651.

Another general definition of library is from the Online Dictionary of Library and Information Science (ODLIS): “Library – from the Latin liber, meaning “book.” In Greek and the Romance languages, the corresponding term is bibliotheca. A collection or group of collections of books and/or other print or nonprint materials organized and maintained for use (reading, consultation, study, research, etc.).

Institutional libraries, organized to facilitate access by a specific clientele, are staffed by librarians and other personnel trained to provide services to meet user needs. By extension, the room, building, or facility that houses such a collection, usually but not necessarily built for that purpose.

Directory information on libraries is available alphabetically by country in World Guide to Libraries, a serial published by K.G. Saur. Two comprehensive worldwide online directories of library homepages are Libdex and Libweb. See also the UNESCO Libraries Portal. Abbreviated lib. See also: academic library, government library, monastic library, new library, proto-library, public library, special library, and subscription library.

ANSI/NISO Z39.7-2013-Information Services and Use: Metrics & Statistics for Libraries and Information Providers : Data Dictionary : an American National Standard identifies categories for basic library statistical data reported at the national level, and provides associated definitions of terms” (p.1), including the main types of libraries (public, academic, special, school, medical, etc.).
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Do libraries of all types serve a critical function in our society?

All types of libraries serve as critical public access points to e-government services and other government information. They provide a wide array of services including teaching individuals how to use the Internet to search for government information and forms.
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Why do libraries matter?

Why public libraries matter more than ever in the information age | Book Nook What Is School Library And Its Benefits In Society Occasionally, someone unfamiliar with King County Library System will say to me “Why do we need libraries when we have the Internet?” I actually love that question because there are so many compelling answers. Libraries, as repositories of knowledge, have been around for about 5,000 years, dating back to ancient Middle Eastern civilizations that began to preserve important records and texts.

The first public libraries appeared in Athens, Greece around 500 BC. It is true that libraries have a long history, but that hardly makes them outdated. On the contrary, public libraries are more relevant than ever in an Information Age in which the Internet and social media has made the quest for knowledge increasingly confusing and complex, and where barriers to access still exist.

Public libraries are places that are free and welcoming to people of all ages, abilities, ethnicities, religions, cultures and socioeconomic backgrounds. Public libraries level the playing field, providing equal access to information and creating equal opportunities to learn and grow.

And access is not limited to physical buildings. KCLS provides outreach services to senior centers, homeless shelters, detention facilities and other underserved populations that cannot get to a library. Libraries play a critical role in building community by providing spaces for people to gather and interact.

In 2018, KCLS welcomed 10 million visitors and nearly 700,000 program attendees. Children made new friends during story times, non-native speakers practiced English at Talk Time sessions, Teen Library Advisory Board members developed programs for fellow teens, adults discussed current events with authors and local experts and parents traded tips in caregiving classes.

KCLS also provided assistance to patrons with real-life challenges, including individuals applying for jobs, navigating Social Security and Medicare, managing debt, seeking health care or searching for housing. Through it all, libraries continue to offer books, music, movies, databases and other materials and resources to meet the demand of our patrons’ wide-ranging interests.

KCLS circulated 21.7 million items in 2018, including 4.9 million downloadable eBooks and audiobooks through Rakuten OverDrive — more than any other library in the United States. So if you are still thinking that libraries are no longer relevant, check out all there is to discover at your local library.
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What is the conclusion of library?

Conclusion. The library facilitates each student with access to essential resources and learning material for a smooth learning process.
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What is the purpose of visiting a library?

The simplest definition of a library: It’s a place that houses and lends books to its members. But in this age of digital information, e-books and the internet, is there still a reason to go to the library? The answer is an emphatic “yes.” More than just the place where books live, libraries are an integral part of any community.
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What is the purpose of class library?

In this article – Class libraries are the shared library concept for,NET. They enable you to componentize useful functionality into modules that can be used by multiple applications. They can also be used as a means of loading functionality that is not needed or not known at application startup.

Platform-specific class libraries have access to all the APIs in a given platform (for example,,NET Framework on Windows, Xamarin iOS), but can only be used by apps and libraries that target that platform. Portable class libraries have access to a subset of APIs, and can be used by apps and libraries that target multiple platforms.,NET Standard class libraries are a merger of the platform-specific and portable library concept into a single model that provides the best of both.

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What are the uses of class libraries?

How do class libraries simplify the job of the developer? – Class libraries greatly simplify the developer’s job by providing access to code that performs specific tasks without having to invest in the time and effort needed to write the code from scratch.

Many libraries are also available as open source projects, so they can be customized to meet a developer’s or organization’s specific requirements, which can be especially beneficial if using the library in multiple applications. Programming languages typically include core class libraries that developers can access within their applications.

Python, for example, comes with the Standard Library, which contains numerous built-in modules that are written in either C or Python and that provide access to a wide range of classes. Another example is the Java Class Library, which includes a large collection of classes organized into packages of similar functionality.

The packages are available at runtime to applications running in a Java virtual machine. Microsoft’s,NET Framework also offers an assortment of class libraries that are available as either base class libraries that provide core capabilities or as framework class libraries that deliver a more complete set of classes.

Check out this breakdown of object-oriented programming concepts, This was last updated in February 2023
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What are five functions of a library?

A library is a collection of materials, books or media that are accessible for use and not just for display purposes. A library provides physical (hard copies) or digital access (soft copies) materials, and may be a physical location or a virtual space, or both.

A library’s collection can include printed materials and other physical resources in many formats such as DVD, CD and cassette as well as access to information, music or other content held on bibliographic databases, A library, which may vary widely in size, may be organized for use and maintained by a public body such as a government; an institution such as a school or museum; a corporation; or a private individual.

In addition to providing materials, libraries also provide the services of librarians who are trained and experts at finding, selecting, circulating and organizing information and at interpreting information needs, navigating and analyzing very large amounts of information with a variety of resources.

  1. Library buildings often provide quiet areas for studying, as well as common areas for group study and collaboration, and may provide public facilities for access to their electronic resources; for instance: computers and access to the Internet,
  2. The library’s clientele and services offered vary depending on its type: users of a public library have different needs from those of a special library or academic library, for example.

Libraries may also be community hubs, where programs are delivered and people engage in lifelong learning. Modern libraries extend their services beyond the physical walls of a building by providing material accessible by electronic means, including from home via the Internet.
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What is another name for a school library?

What is another word for “school library”?

Noun Public library”The Group included social studies and history teachers, a school library media specialist and a teacher who works with academically talented middle schoolers.”Nearby Words

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What is another word for “school library”?
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What is library definition for students?

A library is a collection of resources that provide information and entertainment. A library has books, newspapers, magazines, films, audio recordings, and computer software. Workers called librarians keep the resources in order and show people how to find and use them.
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Why is modern library important?

Some of the characteristics of modern libraries are: Modern libraries have a social function in making knowledge publicly available. They play two pivotal roles, firstly, to serve as a local center of information and knowledge and secondly, to be a local gateway to national and global knowledge.
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What are four key functions of a library?

Over the course of those four thousand years, librarians built both great and small libraries with the intention of efficiently gathering, organising, preserving, and making available the pictorial records of society.
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Do libraries still have a place in your society?

Global Issues and IFLA’s Role – Globalisation has put pressure on governments to develop more cohesive and interrelated policies and regulatory environments worldwide. Increasingly, important policies that affect our local library services are being addressed, debated and enforced at the international level via bilateral and multilateral agreements.

A good example of this took place last September, when the UNESCO conference—”Memory of the World in the Digital Age: Digitization and Preservation”—took place in Vancouver, British Columbia. ifla participated in planning this conference, which featured public decision-makers, librarians, scholars and technology experts sharing their insights on digital preservation, records management, intellectual rights and much more.

The conference culminated with a declaration of recommendations—a significant accomplishment.4 This was an instance where lobbying by special interest groups and collective efforts around international advocacy for library issues were absolutely critical.

Another area in which IFLA has been very active in the past several years has involved copyright limitations and exceptions, most notably at the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO). The treaties adopted by WIPO define and guide the development of copyright laws in countries across the globe.

Many countries are in the process of updating their copyright laws and look to WIPO for an appropriate framework. IFLA has advocated strongly to gain support at WIPO and engage in discussions around the merits of copyright exceptions and limitations for libraries and archives.

In November 2011, I was invited to speak on behalf of the world’s libraries at the WIPO Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights meeting. Library delegations have since participated in subsequent meetings of the Standing Committee, and other multilateral discussions have taken place this year with IFLA support and representation.

Additional global issues affecting IFLA members include the challenges and opportunities facing libraries around e-book lending. In March 2013, The Economist interviewed several IFLA members about e-lending principles for the licensing and purchasing of e-books that all libraries can use in their respective jurisdictions. Global networks are rapidly shrinking the world. Image via iStock. As president of IFLA, I am truly fortunate to witness first-hand how libraries are positively and proactively responding to the changes around them. We must continue to develop our digital collections and safeguard the knowledge legacies of the past while ensuring accessibility for the future.

Librarians must harness new tools for information creation and discovery, and configure our services and spaces to meet our users’ evolving needs. Libraries will need to respond to and support new trends as they evolve, such as massive open online courses (MOOCS), which are already impacting education in Singapore, and elsewhere in the world.

We will need to continue to provide innovative spaces for people to meet, engage and access new technologies. And we will need to do all of this while we bring our services to our patrons, wherever they might spend their time—whether it is on social media, in their homes or in the library.

  • Libraries play an essential role in the life of communities and academic institutions, and in human development.
  • Libraries are not just cultural institutions; they contribute to the economic well-being of society.
  • Accordingly, the library community must continue to advocate on behalf of its users for openness and less restrictive policies and legislation regarding the access and use of content.

While the nature and shape of libraries continue to evolve and respond to the changing needs of users, what must endure are the underlying values that libraries bring to our societies—the values of equitable access to information, networking and the sharing of expertise and resources, and a trusted brand.

For its part, IFLA will continue to work strategically at the international level to ensure the library perspective is heard. The association aims to foster cross-disciplinary partnerships, influence decisionmakers and build the capacity of its members to advocate for themselves locally. Libraries and their associations at the local, national and international levels are interdependent; working together, our voices become stronger.

Our joint efforts are critical for ensuring that the library perspective is part of the public policy debate around the world. Change can be difficult. It challenges our traditional assumptions and practices. But change can also be very exciting, as it offers opportunities to redefine our roles in society and reinvent who we are and what we offer.

  • As my IFLA presidency comes to an end, I believe there is a very positive future for libraries as they adapt to the changes around them and become more resilient and integrated into their environments.
  • By being proactive and not remaining complacent, libraries can indeed be a force for change.
  • For those who are attending the conference in Singapore this August, I look forward to continuing this discussion.

The conference is a wonderful opportunity for more than 3,000 global members to hear from leading experts on topics that matter to you. There will be many stimulating conversations and ideas to explore with each other. On behalf of IFLA, I look forward to meeting you in Singapore.
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Are libraries just functions?

Libraries are functions that may be useful to many programmers so they are created as reusable code that can be shared. The standard libraries are designed to be very common functions that programmers typically need.
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Why do libraries matter?

Why public libraries matter more than ever in the information age | Book Nook What Is School Library And Its Benefits In Society Occasionally, someone unfamiliar with King County Library System will say to me “Why do we need libraries when we have the Internet?” I actually love that question because there are so many compelling answers. Libraries, as repositories of knowledge, have been around for about 5,000 years, dating back to ancient Middle Eastern civilizations that began to preserve important records and texts.

The first public libraries appeared in Athens, Greece around 500 BC. It is true that libraries have a long history, but that hardly makes them outdated. On the contrary, public libraries are more relevant than ever in an Information Age in which the Internet and social media has made the quest for knowledge increasingly confusing and complex, and where barriers to access still exist.

Public libraries are places that are free and welcoming to people of all ages, abilities, ethnicities, religions, cultures and socioeconomic backgrounds. Public libraries level the playing field, providing equal access to information and creating equal opportunities to learn and grow.

And access is not limited to physical buildings. KCLS provides outreach services to senior centers, homeless shelters, detention facilities and other underserved populations that cannot get to a library. Libraries play a critical role in building community by providing spaces for people to gather and interact.

In 2018, KCLS welcomed 10 million visitors and nearly 700,000 program attendees. Children made new friends during story times, non-native speakers practiced English at Talk Time sessions, Teen Library Advisory Board members developed programs for fellow teens, adults discussed current events with authors and local experts and parents traded tips in caregiving classes.

  • CLS also provided assistance to patrons with real-life challenges, including individuals applying for jobs, navigating Social Security and Medicare, managing debt, seeking health care or searching for housing.
  • Through it all, libraries continue to offer books, music, movies, databases and other materials and resources to meet the demand of our patrons’ wide-ranging interests.

KCLS circulated 21.7 million items in 2018, including 4.9 million downloadable eBooks and audiobooks through Rakuten OverDrive — more than any other library in the United States. So if you are still thinking that libraries are no longer relevant, check out all there is to discover at your local library.
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Why we don t need libraries anymore?

Beyond the Bullet Points: Libraries are Obsolete What Is School Library And Its Benefits In Society As promised, here is the argument and my own rebuttal from the Harvard event. Special thanks to Meg Backus, Jill Hurst-Wahl and all the great librarians who helped me put this together. I am putting this up in a sort of drafty form because I am interested in how the argument and counter-argument can be made better.

  • Libraries are Obsolete There are few of us who can know the exact moment their career ended.
  • However when a professor of library science argues libraries are obsolete against a Harvard law school professor and the head of the lead funding agency in the field I think that moment has arrived.
  • This was where I found myself April 18th when I took part in an Oxford-style debate as part of Harvard Library Strategic Conversations.

The idea was to mix humor with serious debate on the proposition that “Libraries are Obsolete.” I was asked to argue for the proposition. Now this is a rather odd position to be in since I have spent my career arguing exactly the opposite, but in the spirit of playing devil’s advocate, and the fact that I have tenure, I jumped in.

After all, if we don’t honestly debate the point, how can we truly be sure we are not headed towards obsolescence, In looking at most of the cases against libraries many are focused on one type of library. For example, some argue against public libraries because they do not feel it is a wise use of tax dollars.

Other arguments that fall apart in the face of evidence such as the editorial from the News Leader (Florida’s oldest weekly newspaper) where Mike Thompson opines: “While local taxpayers pick up the biggest tab for America’s libraries, most librarians are little more than unionized pawns for the social-activist bosses of the American Library Association (ALA)TodayALA controls 62,000 members and, through its czarist accreditation program of many libraries, largely dictates what books are available for the most impressionable members of U.S.

society, our children.” This might be a valid argument is ALA did in fact accredit libraries, or if ALA had any supervisory power in libraries’ workforces – and you know, if Mike wasn’t nuts. Other arguments have merit, but only from a given political view: libraries are a socialist attempt that interferes in the free market.

Tax dollars would be better spent in other ways – namely giving it back to the taxpayers. If libraries are so valuable they should charge for their services and operate like businesses. These arguments are difficult to counter, because you often have to refute a basic tenant of ideology that is not likely to yield to evidence.

So frankly in preparing for the debate I was both relieved that I couldn’t find an argument worthy of Harvard, and dismayed that I was about to stand up before a crowd and have to half-heartedly make these weak arguments. Until I came upon an argument that scared the hell out of me. A very compelling argument that spans library types and ideology.

Libraries are obsolete because they act as institutions of remediation. Libraries were either created to fill some deficit in existing institutions, or over the years have adopted the role of remedying some deficit in the community. While this deficit model of libraries made sense at one point, today many of these deficiencies either no longer exist, or libraries now divert precious resources we should use to solve the underlying problem and/or institutions.

  1. What scared me (and still does) is that the predominant message libraries use to justify their budgets (and continued existence) is as a sort of societal band-aid ministering only to what ails our communities.
  2. As with any argument about libraries in the abstract, the argument lacks nuance and parts are easy to refute, but I ask you to look to the core of the argument.

This deficit model thinking has big implications for library advocacy, and even the evolution of the institution. Community Deficiency: Access So how do libraries present themselves as remediating institutions, and why is that a problem? Take the idea of libraries as sharing institutions.

Many public and university libraries were created to pool and share information resources of a community (in the form of manuscripts, books, letters and so on). These libraries filled a need in the community to increase access to a commodity that was rare and expensive. The library, in this case, was a remediation for a larger problem of access.

Today this function is obsolete for two reasons. The first is obvious to anyone who has ever been on the web. There are plenty of sites that let you share resources. From sites like LibraryThing and Goodreads for books; to Flickr (and Instagram, and Facebook) for photos; to YouTube for video there are ample alternative, and arguably better ways to share ideas and resources.

The second reason this deficiency argument no longer works is that libraries that began as sharing institutions have become lending organizations. When Benjamin Franklin and his buddies put together their subscription library in Philadelphia in the 1700’s more members joining increased access and the resources available.

As more joined, they brought in more books, so there was more to go around. Today libraries don’t share, they lend from a finite collection owned by the library. As more people join the library (use their services), they add demand, but not more resources.

So when four people used the library, there were plenty of copies of Harry Potter to go around. Yet as hundreds of people use the library, demand increases, resources don’t, so Harry Potter becomes more scarce – access is actually decreased. One clear way to see the difference between library as lending versus sharing comes from a story Eli Neiburger told me.

Eli, Associate Director for IT and Production at the Ann Arbor District Library had a member of the library ask “if the catalog can keep track of books for lending at multiple locations (branches), can’t it also include books at my house? I’d be glad to share them as well.” This idea makes perfect sense in a sharing model, it makes no sense in a lending model.

  1. A deficit approach to collections is to say the community doesn’t have access to information, so we’ll fix the community by making stuff available.
  2. A sharing model says the community is full of information assets (books, letters, photos, ideas, expertise, stories, music) let’s build a platform to allow the community to easily share with each other.

Lending will lead libraries to obsolescence as demand increases, information resources costs escalate, and the library’s collections look more and more like everywhere else instead of like the community itself. Community Deficiency: Democracy When Carnegie wrote that “there is not such a cradle of democracy upon the earth as the Free Public Library” he was right.

Public and academic libraries had minimal fiction collections, and were one of the few places you could track the workings of government. The advent of the depository library program made up for a deficit in the public’s access to the workings of the federal government. However today with the advent of the web, the government is often by-passing the depository program and publishing this material directly to the public.

Before you say that we can’t we trust the government to be transparent I ask you how housing microfiche of government produced materials is equivalent to advocating for transparency? If anything it is a dodge of the true issues. If indeed public libraries are meant to bring to the masses information that can be used to promote and further democracy, why then do our fiche cabinets full of government documents sit unused as the holds for romance novels and spy fiction grow longer? Community Deficiency: Internet Access The focus libraries have on remediation continues in the area of Internet access.

The argument is made that libraries of all sorts provide Internet access to the disadvantaged and disconnected. To be sure this is a real problem that needs a solution. Yet rather than divert funding to rural libraries to provide Internet access, why not follow the model of rural electrification and take it to the home where it can be used? Imagine in the days of the Tennessee Valley Authority if they ran a power line to the library and told rural citizens that if they needed light at night or to listen to the radio they needed to go to the library.

The money we spend on libraries would be better spent buying the underprivileged a tablet and expanding eRate to include monthly allowances to buy quality information. Already states and universities are licensing databases for public useis there something so special about libraries that acquisition of resources can’t be done by existing procurement procedures at these institutions? Community Deficiency: Literacy This argument hinges on the belief that our public and school libraries are necessary to promote reading.

That might have made sense when universal public education wasn’t so universal. When the color of skin and gender were barriers to accessing education. Libraries were the people’s university. In essence we need libraries to provide remedial reading education to fix our communities. Today, while racial and gender discrimination are far from gone, the world has changed.

Women now constitute the majority population in our college and universities. In terms of race, rather than creating a separate system of education for minorities, affirmative action, minority scholarships, and other mechanisms are integrating minorities into the same high performing educational institutions as white males.

  • Separate, but equal was discarded long ago.
  • The answer to increasing literacy rates is to improve the performance, and lower the barriers of access to education.
  • The money and time spent on libraries would be better spent on our schools and teachers.
  • Instead of working around a test-driven K-12 schools in the nebulous world of informal education, we should focus our time and talents on getting a “No Child Left Behind” system that actually works.

Instead of believing that librarians that have little formal training in reading instruction (and math instruction, and science instruction) can somehow solve the education gap through a do-it-yourself-here-are-the-books model, we should be focusing on enabling teachers to teach.

Community Deficiency: Information Seeking What about the deficit in people’s ability to find information? We need libraries to make sense of the glut of information now coming at our students and citizens. It is no wonder our reference statistics drop. Who needs a librarian to use a search engines that can traverse billions of pages in milliseconds when we can now do it for ourselves.

Has Google become like a new Dialog, where we must have patrons line up to our gatekeeping search abilities? Rather than use librarians as band-aids to bad search tools, let’s fix the search tools. Community Deficiency: Embedded Librarians There was one thing that all the speakers agreed upon at the debate – even if libraries are obsolete, librarians aren’t.

Rather than dividing our time and effort on compensating for an inadequate educational system, or inequalities in the market place, we should free up our brilliant librarians to work within these organizations to make the institutions better. Why take amazing information professionals and saddle them with leaky roofs, security at the door, and maintaining physical artifacts in often duplicative collections just waiting to be digitized? We see this at the Cushing Academy, a boarding school in Massachusetts that made the press when they significantly downsized the physical collection of the library.

They did so at the same time they hired more librarians. Close the library and hire more librarians. Real Danger of the Deficit Model of Libraries If libraries continue to be remedial organizations, focused solely on the problems and deficits of our communities the communities themselves will find libraries obsolete.

How long will our communities tolerate being told how they are broken? How long will we be welcome if all we do is highlight what doesn’t work and add little value beyond filling in the gaps of other organizations? Rebutting the Easy Reactions Now, if you are anything like me you have been mustering your counter arguments as you have read this.

For example, there is a big assumption in here that all information will be digital. And you would be right. But we must be careful of the rebuttals to this argument as well. They often feed right into the deficit model argument. Fixing organizations is a great idea, but it’s not realistic So our big argument here would be that life sucks, get used to it (great replacement for the READ posters)? This is also very reminiscent of the arguments that not all information would be available digitally.

Then Google started scanning books by the literal truck full. The perception on what is available digitally and what in physical form has shifted in those we serve. More than that, you are still saying the reason for the library is to care take stuff not important enough to be digitized yet, or that we are a temporary organization until the technology catches up.

Supporting democracy is more than just government documents Being informed in a democracy is more than simply keeping up with the information and documents that government produce. It involves reading newspapers, treatises, even keeping up with pop culture.

This is truehave you seen the Internet lately? Where once libraries filled the gap of providing a rich and diverse corpus to enrich our communities’ thinking the Internet now represents a richer and more diverse corpus of thought. Fostering a love of reading Literacy is more than just reading you say.

Libraries foster a habit of reading and a love of reading. What exactly is it about four walls and stacks that does this better than say a living room? You can read anywhere, and with digital delivery to ebooks you could argue that people are better able to follow their passions with instant delivery.

  • But use of libraries is increasing This fact, if arguing a deficit model, only points out that there is need for remediation – not the form of the remediation.
  • For example, in the unprecedented economic downturn over the past years the number of soup kitchens and beds in shelters have probably also increased.

I think we can all agree that instead of building more soup kitchens and shelters, we should fix the economy. You callous careless bastard First, remember that I am playing devil’s advocate here (and give me another paragraph until I talk about how libraries aren’t obsolete).

  1. Second, assuming that wasn’t just an ad hominem attack, this is about the idea that a deficit model isn’t a bad one, because there will always be a role for a safety net.
  2. The deficit argument isn’t against the social safety net, but rather that we can fix the net through mechanisms other than libraries.

The Real Rebuttal The real retort to the deficit argument that libraries are obsolete is not to find new and bigger problems, but to focus on (or at the VERY least include) aspirational arguments for libraries. Now before I dive into this, let me say that most of these approaches are already in full effect, my point is to highlight them and support them.

Internet access: the library uses the Internet to push the passions and possibilities of our communities to the whole world. Yes folks can use the Internet connection to check mail and apply for jobs, but they can also use it to create businesses, and start global conversations. Literacy and Reading: the library allows you to explore the great thoughts and imaginations of the world throughout time, and add to that pool. Come to the library, get inspired, and add your great ideas. Democracy: did you know your government came with an owner’s manual? It’s at the library. Help shape the direction of your town, your state, your country – the library can help you learn how.

Like I said, these approaches are hardly unique to me. But there is one point of the deficit model that takes more than just sloganeering – the shift of libraries from places of sharing to lending organizations. To me, this is the real damning argument against libraries.

  1. If libraries continue to see themselves as focused on things that can be borrowed or consumed, and continue to build collections for the community not of the community, there is real danger.
  2. Libraries must become true platforms of the community.
  3. Want an example? I have been working with Polaris on a community portal to be added to their ILS.

With it librarians can add information about community organizations (locations, services, events) directly to the catalog. So now you can search for materials on first aid, and the Red Cross will show up beside the results. However, the system is built to allow community organizations to add and maintain their own information.

Very small organizations or even individual community members (if the library choses) can add their information and get a landing page on the net that they may not have had before. For organizations with their own web sites already, they embed library and community information in their own websites easily.

So now the Red Cross can embed books about first aid on their web site. This is taken one step further, because the same mechanism that allows this embedding can be used by other software and platforms. For example a doc student here in Syracuse is building an iPad app to mount on local busses.

  1. At any stop a passenger can find out what events and services are available community wide at within a given distance.
  2. This is library as community platform.
  3. The iPad app is not built or owned by the library.
  4. The information being presented is not owned by the library.
  5. Yet the library is indispensable in making this happen.

The library is a platform that helps the community do something new, innovative, and helpful. The most powerful arguments for libraries, aside from the brilliance of librarians, are around the theme of community platform for improvement and advancement.

The people’s university (when presented as a place of knowledge acquisition, not as a bandage to other educational institutions), the agora, the creation space, idea factory, all of these metaphors present a compelling and positive vision of the library that communities can take pride in. Now rather than being associated with the library out of charity, or desperate straights, they are part of an exciting and progressive organization.

Rather than trying to fix the community, or bring everyone up to some sort of norm, libraries are foundations for individual advancement. Let me be clear, I believe both in the necessity and importance of libraries and the social safety net. I know our communities face terrible problems, and our service mission is necessary.

  • However, if you lift someone out of hell and don’t tell them about heaven, how much hope have you given them? Libraries are not obsolete.
  • They serve a vital and important mission in today’s society, and in tomorrow’s society.
  • That mission that has driven libraries for the past 3,000 years is in service of a better tomorrow.

That mission is hope through knowledge and the empowerment of the individual. Libraries as band aids may be obsolete, but that is not why we need libraries. We need libraries so we can fix our education system, so we can fix our economy, so we can fix our democracies yes.

  1. But we need libraries even more to discover new knowledge not found in any textbook.
  2. We need libraries to create whole new opportunities for innovation.
  3. We need libraries to give our communities a voice and power in the working of government.
  4. Libraries will never be obsolete so long as our communities dream, and strive, and work to ensure a world of insurmountable opportunities.

: Beyond the Bullet Points: Libraries are Obsolete
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Why is modern library important?

Some of the characteristics of modern libraries are: Modern libraries have a social function in making knowledge publicly available. They play two pivotal roles, firstly, to serve as a local center of information and knowledge and secondly, to be a local gateway to national and global knowledge.
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Why are libraries important in research?

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia A research library is a library that contains an in-depth collection of material on one or several subjects. A research library will generally include an in-depth selection of materials on a particular topic or set of topics and contain primary sources as well as secondary sources,

  • Research libraries are established to meet research needs and, as such, are stocked with authentic materials with quality content.
  • Research libraries are typically attached to academic or research institutions that specialize in that topic and serve members of that institution.
  • Large university libraries are considered research libraries, and often contain many specialized branch research libraries.

The libraries provide research materials for students and staff of these organizations to use and can also publish and carry literature produced by these institutions and make them available to others. Research libraries could also be accessible to members of the public who wish to gain in-depth knowledge on that particular topic.

  • Research libraries face a unique challenge of making research materials accessible and available to patrons.
  • They also need to ensure there are no copyright-related issues with their materials, ensure that as many materials as possible are open access, and ensure all their materials are reliably sourced.

Some specialized research libraries could include those affiliated to governmental organizations which may hold documents of historical, legal or political import, or music libraries which will have books and journals on music, as well as films and recordings for musicians to access.

  1. Research libraries will generally have materials that are typically non-fiction and scholarly.
  2. These traditionally included books, periodicals, journals, newspapers, manuscripts and cassette tapes.
  3. With the advent of technology, this has evolved to include CDs, DVDs, Ebooks, audiobooks and online research catalogues.

Research library collections are focused on one or more subjects or fields of study and the material available on those topics are typically more extensive and in-depth than that found in public lending libraries. Institutions such as universities may have multiple research libraries on campus, each dedicated to different faculties or subjects.
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