How Do You Feel Overall About Online Education?

0 Comments

How Do You Feel Overall About Online Education
Larry Ferlazzo is an English and social studies teacher at Luther Burbank High School in Sacramento, Calif. (This is the final post in a multipart series. You can see Part One here, Part Two here, and Part Three here,) Here is the new question-of-the-week: What has your online learning experience been as a student? What did you like about it? What didn’t you like about it? How does it compare with your experience as a student in a physical classroom? In the future, if you could choose, would you want to do more online learning? If so, why? If not, why not? In Part One, five students from the high school where I teach in Sacramento, Calif., shared their reflections.

In Part Two, contributions come from students in Austin Green’s 1st grade class in Utah and others connected with the Kansas State School for the Blind. In Part Three, contributors came from my class; Ryan Jakacki’s class in Plymouth, Minn.; and Anne Magnin’s class in France. Today, several students from my classes “wrap things up” in the final post of this series.

“The temptations are REAL!” Lee Xiong is a junior at Luther Burbank High School: School has been tough. Transferring to all online learning has been the biggest challenge this year for me. As a student, I’d say I’ve usually kept up with all my work for all my classes.

  1. The biggest change I’ve seen in myself is becoming less focused with my school work.
  2. Being in a physical classroom is tremendously different from learning online.
  3. In a classroom, most of your focus is there, unlike virtually, the temptations are REAL! Yes, self-discipline is good to learn, but when having all this thrown at you, you can’t blame the student for not wanting to work.

at least that’s my opinion. This online learning has affected me personally because during this time, I found myself turning in assignments weeks late. It wasn’t because I was having trouble, it was because I had no motivation and energy to do them. This isn’t the norm for me.

  1. Without a routine schedule, I felt lost.
  2. That makes me sound like a robot, but I think it’s because it’s been that way since we were so small, change this big is affecting me to the max.
  3. This has taught me that online learning will not be for me in the future! Maybe for one or two classes, but overall I plan for my school life to be set in a physical classroom for the most part.

Although this has been a challenging time for school and out in the real world, remembering to stand tall will get us through this together. “Learning at school is best for me” Evelynn Vang is a junior at Luther Burbank High School: The online learning experience as a student for me has been fine. I sometimes find myself not interested in doing my assignments and I feel like I’m lazy. I still do the assignments, but I sometimes end up turning in my assignments late.

It’s like I’ll do the assignments whenever I feel like doing it. I can say that there is a reason for this, and that is where I am doing my school work. My home is not a learning environment like at school, where there are teachers, other students, learning tools, desks/tables, chairs, a library, lots of space, and those who you can get support from.

At home is like a sleeping or resting environment. In a classroom, I can focus more on my assignments/work and get engaged in the subject. Whenever I’m in a classroom, I feel prepared to learn and get my brain pumped; at home, I feel like it’s very hard to be prepared because I’m always getting distracted.

  1. Whenever I need help, my teachers or classmates are there for me.
  2. When I have a question at home, I have to wait for a response.
  3. I do have to say that whenever I’m at school, I always feel nervous in class.
  4. Now that I’m at home learning, I don’t feel nervous.
  5. From my online learning experience right now, I would not choose more online learning in the future because in a school, a classroom is a learning environment.

Also, I feel like it’s easier to communicate with my classmates/groups for projects, teachers, counselors, and principal. Learning at a school is best for me. “I have many responsibilities at home” Diana Lopez is a junior at Luther Burbank High School: As a student, my online learning experience hasn’t been great. This new learning system has its perks, such as more time to do assignments in the comfort of your home, not having to wake up so early to go to school, and ensuring the safety of the staff as well as the students.

Despite these benefits, there are downsides of this method of learning. For example, I have many responsibilities at home, such as taking care of my younger siblings, cooking meals, cleaning up after them, etc. I also find it harder to have any motivation when I’m doing school assignments. When I’m surrounded by all these other temptations like my phone or other electronics, I lose any will to do work.

The environment at home is different from the workspace students have at school. A classroom provides a quiet academic place to do work while a household can be loud and cause students to lose concentration or not even work at all. Additionally, I find that simply reading the instructions for an assignment or lesson isn’t as engaging as when it’s explained by a teacher. “Online learning has been difficult” Isabella Sandoval is a junior at Luther Burbank High School: Online learning has been difficult. I feel pressured to try and hurry to finish and turn in all of my assignments on time. Most of my assignments are due at the same time, and a lot of them are time- consuming.

Though, for the most part it’s difficult to adapt to since I’ve had my education in person with my teachers and classmates, I like how I can do the assignments on my own time. I could divide the day and time I complete my work, I can sleep in a little longer, and overall just be comfortable while in my own home.

I feel that online learning is nothing compared to physical learning. With physical learning, I can talk to my teachers one on one and visually see and interact with everything. Whereas online, when I have a question, I either have to email or text my teachers, and sometimes they don’t see my message and/or take forever to respond. “My online experience has been interesting” Brenda Hernandez is a junior at Luther Burbank High School: As a student, my online experience has been interesting. What I like about this experience is that I have more time to talk to my family and call or text some friends.

I get to do school work from home and I have time for self-care. I like that I kind of get to choose which classes I should work on first and which I could wait to do after. What I don’t like about it is that I am on a screen all day. I like electronics, but school has kept me from staring at a screen for hours.

I also don’t like that I have more distractions at home. I live in a small apartment with five other people and four dogs. This experience is different from being in a physical classroom because I socialize less now. In school, I get to hear the opinions and ideas of my friends and classmates.

  1. Some of my teachers would tell us to talk to the people around us about the lesson.
  2. Now, not everyone’s online at the same time.
  3. I have anxiety, which prevents me from texting some friends and some of my classmates.
  4. And if I did, they’d take a while to respond.
  5. Same with communicating with teachers.
  6. In the future, if I could choose, I’d like to do a bit of online learning and the rest in an actual classroom.

Although it depends on the class. I have noticed that some of the classes I’ve been able to complete at home since there isn’t anyone asking questions or reading the directions to stall me from beginning my work. In other classes, it has been more difficult since I’m more of a visual learner for that subject, and my teachers keep me on task. “My online learning experience hasn’t been the best but not worst experience” Laitak Briand is a junior at Luther Burbank High School: Being an engaging student during quarantine has been difficult. There have been a lot things that happened during the first weeks since school was canceled.

  1. Stores began to close down, parks being shut down, and people told to stay in the house 24-7 unless they needed their necessities.
  2. What I liked about it, though, is that I have more time to do things that I said I wanted to do if I only had time.
  3. Now I have time to do things like spend time with family and resting.

What I don’t like about online learning is that I have to still do homework even though we are in a pandemic and can’t leave the house. The experience from doing online learning and going to school physically are vastly different. With online classes, if you need help you have to ask your parents or google.

But when you go to school, there is a teacher that can help you. Also, my friends I can’t physically see them when I’m at home, but if I went to school, I could. In the future, if I had to choose to continue online learning or not, I’d choose not because I like to be somewhere I can ask someone near me for help and see if I did something right or wrong.

In conclusion, my online learning experience hasn’t been the best but not worst experience I have ever had. “There is nothing that I liked about it besides how supportive the teachers have been” Na Lee Her is a junior at Luther Burbank High School: My experience with online learning is very stressful and hard. I felt this way because of how hard it is for me to understand the assignments and having to not be able to check with your teacher face to face if you are doing it correctly or not.

It doesn’t make me confident because I want to make sure that I am actually doing the assignment correctly in order to deserve the credit for it. Not only that, but having time to do the assignments is another problem. At home, there are many things to take care of, and it makes it hard for me to be able to do my assignments.

This makes me turn in the assignment late or not turn it in at all. Last but not least, it is the lack of motivation that makes online learning hard. Not being able to be face to face with friends and teachers gives me no motivation and makes me unhappy about this.

I am unable to get ideas from them, and it makes me lose hope because I don’t know what I will do to be able to complete the assignment and meet its requirement. It just makes me very worried and anxious to know that I may have done things wrong or to not know what to do. During this time of online learning, there is nothing that I liked about it besides how supportive the teachers have been.

If I were to choose online learning or learning face to face, I would rather choose learning face to face. I choose this because it is much easier and I get my questions answered right away. Not only that, but I can also get suggestions/ideas from my peers as well. Thanks to Lee, Evelynn, Diana, Isabella, Brenda, Laitak, and Na Lee for their contributions! Please feel free to leave a comment with your reactions to the topic or directly to anything that has been said in this post. Consider contributing a question to be answered in a future post.

You can send one to me at [email protected], When you send it in, let me know if I can use your real name if it’s selected or if you’d prefer remaining anonymous and have a pseudonym in mind. You can also contact me on Twitter at @Larryferlazzo, Education Week has published a collection of posts from this blog, along with new material, in an e-book form.

It’s titled Classroom Management Q&As: Expert Strategies for Teaching, If you missed any of the highlights from the first eight years of this blog, you can see a categorized list below. The list doesn’t include ones from this current year, but you can find those by clicking on the “answers” category found in the sidebar.

This Year’s Most Popular Q&A Posts Race & Gender Challenges Classroom-Management Advice Best Ways to Begin the School Year Best Ways to End the School Year Implementing the Common Core Student Motivation & Social-Emotional Learning Teaching Social Studies Cooperative & Collaborative Learning Using Tech in the Classroom Parent Engagement in Schools Teaching English-Language Learners Reading Instruction Writing Instruction Education Policy Issues Assessment Differentiating Instruction Math Instruction Science Instruction Advice for New Teachers Author Interviews Entering the Teaching Profession The Inclusive Classroom Learning & the Brain Administrator Leadership Teacher Leadership Relationships in Schools Professional Development Instructional Strategies Best of Classroom Q&A Professional Collaboration Classroom Organization Mistakes in Education Project-Based Learning I am also creating a Twitter list including all contributors to this column,

You might be interested:  Who Started English Education In India?

The opinions expressed in Classroom Q&A With Larry Ferlazzo are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.
View complete answer

How do you feel about online education?

The vast majority of higher education students who have experienced hardships during the COVID-19 pandemic say they have been supported well academically and personally by their online instructors, according to a new study performed by Sykes Enterprises.

  • In the report, ” Student Perceptions of Online Learning in Higher Education During COVID-19 “, 95% of respondents said they felt professors were addressing their personal needs while allowing for understanding in completing course work.
  • Nearly the same percentage of the 1,500 students polled felt their instructors pivoted well to a switch to remote models.

The responses from students were largely positive overall – 85% said their online courses felt like a “classroom community”, 84% said remote learning environments can be effective and 70% said they would consider taking more virtual classes in the future.

Still, there were some barriers holding them back from fully endorsing them. “Our student respondents told us that while they feel quite personally supported by their online instructors, there’s also ample opportunity to improve their virtual learning experience,” said Steve Davis, Higher Education Business Development Executive at Sykes.

“Nearly half of students say they want more support both on how to better virtually collaborate with their classmates (45%) as well as how to deal with tech issues during class (44%).” And although instructors seemed to do well in delivering their lessons online, students said they would like more interaction.

  • Some 61% were able to engage in virtual office hours last fall.
  • The technology they are using There were several more positives for colleges and universities that made the pivot to online, in a hybrid or fully remote model.
  • Only 4% of the students surveyed felt professors did not adapt well to the switch.

When they weren’t connecting for classes or in one-on-one sessions, students said more than 80% of them provided access to their videos so they could review lectures. Students also were pleased with the level of support for online tools they used in the fall, as 70% rated their schools with 4 stars out of 5 or better.

The rippling effects from COVID-19 have dramatically transformed higher education systems for good—and with students indicating that virtual learning can offer an effective learning environment, now is the time to further invest in elevating the virtual student learning experience,” Davis said. That experience included a variety of different apps and platforms that students used to engage during the fall.

The most popular were Google Classroom (72.1%), Blackboard (46.7%), Canvas (36.7%) and Schoology (16.3%). The feature they utilized most, not surprisingly, was texts/chats with classmates (31%). Interactive whiteboards also ranked very high (29%), as did breakout rooms (18.3%) and live polls (14%).

Did you switch colleges? When asked if they had changed institutions because of a pivot to online learning, 20% of students said they had. That is a high number compared with other data released by other reporting agencies like the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center but still worth noting given the tumult the pandemic has caused in different regions. Best part of remote switch? The most positive outcome was not the direct communication with instructors or the contributions they were making during class or the learning environment itself. It was the fact that they felt like they had a better chance of not getting coronavirus (71%). Online vs. in-person, which is better? Student responses were mixed. Only 2.5% felt remote instruction was completely ineffective. But only 16% felt it was more effective. Most answers ranged toward the middle: 38% felt it was somewhat more effective, while 43% either thought there was no difference or that it was somewhat less effective. What kind of feedback do you prefer? When operating in a virtual model, students said don’t call them. Only 25% prefer hearing a progress report from them. More than 40% would like either comments typed and sent to them or get updates through a video call.

Chris Burt Chris is a reporter and associate editor for University Business and District Administration magazines, covering the entirety of higher education and K-12 schools. Prior to coming to LRP, Chris had a distinguished career as a multifaceted editor, designer and reporter for some of the top newspapers and media outlets in the country, including the Palm Beach Post, Sun-Sentinel, Albany Times-Union and The Boston Globe.
View complete answer

How do you feel overall about distance education Why?

What do you think about distance education? Is a teaching method you feel comfortable learning from or teaching with? We believe that Distance Education is a useful tool and resource when time and location cannot be worked out between teacher and student.

It allows for quick and thorough communication, and because of the advancements and features to programs, it provides a fresh option to teaching and learning. As students having had Distance Education, we feel there are both advantages and disadvantages to the experience. Since an actual class setting was not possible for us, it was incredible to have the chance to take a class and learn from our desks at home.

We felt in control of our communication with the teacher and our schedules while completing the work. Giving advice to future Distance Education goers, we say to choose a face-to-face, actual classroom environment course if you can, but if not, Distance Education allows for an effective, advanced, and communicative education.

In regards to teaching Distance Education, we feel we have yet to learn more about in-classroom methods before advancing or dedicating ourselves to online education. On the other hand, we have learned how to use online tools for communication and teaching, and after some practice, would feel confident in such practices that we could integrate and use with a class.

We feel a teacher should have a few years of physical presence and interaction with their students to learn methods of teaching and ways of dealing with students before becoming teachers who dedicate themselves to Distance Education. : What do you think about distance education? Is a teaching method you feel comfortable learning from or teaching with?
View complete answer

How do students feel about online learning engagement?

Students reported decreases in live lecture engagement and attendance, with 72 percent reporting that low engagement during lectures hurt their online learning experience.
View complete answer

What are your views on online education answer?

With online learning, both the teacher and the student can choose their own speed for learning, and there’s also the extra flexibility of creating a schedule that works for everyone.
View complete answer

How do students feel about online learning in the Philippines?

Online learning challenges the Filipino students face – On the part of the students, online learning has been a struggle. A study conducted by Barrot, Llenares, and del Rosario (2021) revealed that college students are faced with challenges that impact their overall learning experiences.

Among these, their most significant challenges are related to the learning environment at home, including difficulties setting up the learning area, sticking with a study schedule, and steering clear of distractions. Technological knowledge and competency are not much of a challenge for these college students who participated in the study.

The financial ramifications of doing ongoing online classes are areas where the participants felt most challenged. In the Philippines, not every household has access to postpaid Internet—the majority relies on data. Buying Internet load requires shelling out a hundred pesos for 1 to 2 gigabytes of data, which proved inadequate most of the time.

  • Participant S66 mentioned, “not all the time I have money to load” (Barrot, Llenares, & del Rosario, 2021).
  • In a separate account, online learning consumed at least Php500 ($10) to the monthly budget, which is a struggle for families with irregular income (Beltran, 2021).
  • A blog published by Reedley International School (2020) outlines the challenges that younger students face.

Apart from at-home distractions and technical difficulties, students have a general lack of engagement. The pressure lies on both the parents and students when enthusiasm dwindles. This is more so for very young children whose attention span is shorter than adults.
View complete answer

What makes you feel comfortable in an online classroom?

In this “Student Perspectives” blog post, Sophie Whittemore ’20 shares tips on how and why instructors can make Zoom classrooms more comfortable for all students; particularly those with social anxiety, body dysmorphia/dysphoria, and/or trauma. – Video conferencing might attempt to recreate the feeling of sharing a space together, but it doesn’t quite succeed.

  • It might even add to the feeling of unease and discomfort for users, especially those affected by some form of social anxiety, body dysmorphia/dysphoria, and/or trauma.
  • Here are some reasons that Zoom can be uncomfortable for students, and concepts that instructors can incorporate to make their remote courses more welcoming for all; Awkward Silences When Mics Are on Mute To combat Zoom microphones picking up potentially distracting noises from each individual’s environment, most participants end up placing themselves on mute.

Though helpful in getting clearer sound, this immediately places students in a more vulnerable and exposed position if they wish to ask a question. In a live classroom, students might feel more comfortable if they raise their hands to ask questions or interrupt a too-fast lecture.

However, having to un-mute themselves and watch for visual cues that a speaker has finished their sentence is both confusing and anxiety-producing to do. (Especially when there’s a lag or Wi-Fi fails). This leaves students reluctant to ask questions because it places them in a too-visible spotlight for the rest of the class, their image and audio taking up the majority of their peers’ screens if cameras are required to be on at all times.

Even the most confident student might balk at that level of vulnerability, of talking into a void or vacuum. Despite video-conferencing’s promise to bring us closer together, staring at a respectfully muted screen of pixelated faces can only make us feel more alone.

When Virtual Reality Falls Short of Actual Reality Being off-campus immediately brings up the full reality of living outside an environment specifically tailored to learning. Life gets in the way, and recreating an academic environment just isn’t possible for everyone. Not everyone has access to a perfectly empty and quiet room with strong Wi-Fi.

This can potentially be uncomfortable for students when it reveals aspects of their personal life that they’d rather not share with their classmates and instructors. From the pressures of family responsibility to time-sensitive errands, employment, time zone differences, and accessibility issues for those with mental/physical disabilities, a virtual reality simply falls short from what actual reality offers in education.

Zoom Fatigue The big question. what causes Zoom fatigue? Video-conferencing simply feels “unnatural” in that we cannot pick up micro-communication cues we’d find in a real-world conversation. (Or alter said cues for neurodivergent individuals). These nonverbal cues can range anywhere from body language to natural pauses that happen when we aren’t staring at a screen.

But on Zoom, we feel forced to fill the silence. There’s also a sense that one needs to perform or exaggerate their voice/ actions in order to compensate for the deficit of nonverbal cues that real life has to offer. This sense of being “on” or having that extra layer of performance can be draining if one feels they must do so to appear attentive.

While you might be able to look away for a brief moment to read a text message or just take a moment to breathe in real life, that’s not possible in Zoom. At least, it’s not entirely possible without repercussions. Over a Zoom call, looking away from the screen for j ust a few seconds already places you in the uncomfortable position of looking distracted or inattentive to others in the call.

If meetings are back-to-back or stretched out for the course of an entire day, then that extra expense of energy for “performing” can feel absolutely exhausting. WAYS TO CREATE A MORE COMFORTABLE CLASSROOM ONLINE On Camera Usage Allow individuals to turn off their camera.

Having to leave one’s Zoom camera on for the duration of a class can be extremely fatiguing, anxiety-producing, and uncomfortable. Instructors should allow people in their classes to turn off their cameras whenever their courses allow for it. At the very least, allow students to turn off their cameras for breaks and emergencies.

It’s understandable that for smaller, presentation-based or performance-based courses, turning one’s camera off for the entirety of a course isn’t plausible. But for those lectures which don’t absolutely mandate cameras being on at all times, allow students to turn cameras off when they feel it is necessary.

You might be interested:  What Is The Impact Of Education In Your Life?

Trust that the student who leaves their camera off is doing so for legitimate reasons. A myriad of motives might include: a disability, family emergencies, health problems, time-sensitive errands, bathroom breaks, body dysmorphia/dysphoria, anxiety, trauma, and others. Staring at one’s face projected in a tiny Zoom screen only exacerbates mental health issues like dysphoria/dysmorphia for the trans community and those suffering with an eating disorder.

It worsens anxiety, prompting the anxious person to stare at their image more than the actual class, and it might broadcast a living situation that the student would rather keep private. Not everyone has access to a safe space for learning, and students should not be shamed for turning a camera off to keep these two situations/realities private.

If cameras are absolutely necessary (like in a performance/presentation of some sort), have a plain set background screen for everyone in the class. This can be an image related to the class (e.g. a planetary model, an art exhibit), a generic classroom environment, or just a solid color. This would help students who feel uncomfortable broadcasting their living environments by creating a more neutral setting where everyone’s background is shared.

It also allows for a feeling of togetherness and sharing a space. Alternative Methods of Engagement Aside from a Zoom camera, there are plenty of ways to check that a person is engaged with learning. Run activities that require some form of non-verbal feedback like a Zoom poll every so often during a lecture or use a Zoom Breakout room for small group review sessions.

There’s also Zoom react buttons like thumbs up/thumbs down. An educator can use this as a quick response to their lectures by asking if the students would like the lecture to be faster/slower, or if they understand a new concept. Make avid use of the chat function. Instead of having to “raise their hand” virtually and risk being talked over or ignored in a larger virtual course, allow them to use the chat function throughout class.

Let the students ask questions virtually. Give them an ample window of opportunity to respond: a few minutes to form a question, type it, and submit. And, finally, if a student doesn’t seem to be engaging with any of these features, reach out to them individually through email.

  • Again, always err on the side of understanding instead of accusation, and practice empathy.
  • Peer Groups One of the simplest ways to transform what feels like a too-large, impersonal virtual lecture into a more comfortable environment is to break the class up into smaller groups.
  • Students tend to feel more comfortable talking to peers or a TA.

It allows for a more personal touch than a traditional virtual lecture. There’s also the added perk of increased flexibility. When it comes to scheduling discussions with small groups, time slots can cater to the needs of 3-5 students as opposed to 20+.

  • Take Breaks Ensure that your classroom allows breaks.
  • Education requires trust on both the ends of the instructor and the student so that both might receive the fullest benefit of learning as possible.
  • Emphasize that breaks are not just allowed, but that they are encouraged,
  • Screen breaks are healthy in avoiding screen headaches/migraines; they also allow students time to tend to other needs: family responsibilities, caring for themselves/others, financial demands, and other vulnerable circumstances.

Trust that a student is taking a break for what they deem a necessary situation even if you don’t understand their exact experience, especially if said person has a visible/invisible disability. This requires mutual understanding instead of ridicule or punishment, especially during a pandemic.

If a student seems to be unable to attend class, reach out to them outside of class. Never call them out in front of their peers or enact some form of punishment without attempting to speak to them first. Practice empathy and kindness, and always remember to lead with erring on the side of understanding when communicating offline.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, if students seem apprehensive of taking breaks, then schedule a short break every class that allows students to stretch, use the bathroom, etc. Build that intermission into your class schedule, especially if your class takes place over a longer stretch of time.

No exploiting Zoom features to enact methods of hate or intolerance. (E.g. no abuse of private messages in the chat feature to purposefully target any one person, no changing backgrounds to offensive images, etc.) Respect names/pronouns/experiences. An agreement to build a virtual classroom in a community. Emphasize togetherness and equal importance to everyone’s words.

These rules, amongst others, are important to reiterate both on and off-syllabus. Thing to Keep in Mind Ultimately, each virtual classroom environment is different and has needs tailored to their specific subject matter. Even if you think your classroom is performing fine, it’s always good to ask how one can do better.

  1. Each term’s class will bring in new students with new needs and learning styles to be met.
  2. Students know what is/isn’t working in a class, so remember to always be present, ask, and check in! SOURCES: Blum, Susan D.
  3. A Professor Explores Why Zoom Classes Deplete Her Energy.” A Professor Explores Why Zoom Classes Deplete Her Energy (Opinion), Inside Higher Ed, 22 Apr.2020, www.insidehighered.com/advice/2020/04/22/professor-explores-why-zoom-classes-deplete-her-energy-opinion.

Degges-White, Suzanne. Dealing With Zoom Anxiety.13 Apr.2020, www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/lifetime-connections/202004/dealing-zoom-anxiety. Jiang, Manyu. “The Reason Zoom Calls Drain Your Energy.” BBC Worklife, BBC, 22 Apr.2020, www.bbc.com/worklife/article/20200421-why-zoom-video-chats-are-so-exhausting.

  • Nicandro, Vincent, et al.
  • Please, Let Students Turn Their Videos off in Class.” The Stanford Daily, 1 June 2020, www.stanforddaily.com/2020/06/01/please-let-students-turn-their-videos-off-in-class/.
  • Pickrell, John.
  • ‘Zoom Fatigue’ Is Real, and It’s Causing a New Kind of Anxiety amid Coronavirus Isolation, Nature Index, 22 May 2020, www.natureindex.com/news-blog/zoom-fatigue-stress-anxiety-video-conferencing-researchers-coronavirus-pandemic-covid.

Schmidt, Megan. “A Psychologist Explains How to Cope With Video Chat When You’Re Socially Anxious.” Discover Magazine, 15 May 2020. Schoemig, Skylar. “‘Asked to Stretch and Grow’: UC Berkeley Faculty Struggles, Learns to Teach Online.” The Daily Californian, 4 Apr.2020, www.dailycal.org/2020/04/03/asked-to-stretch-and-grow-uc-berkeley-faculty-struggles-learns-to-teach-online/.

  • Team, Zoom.
  • Managing Breakout Rooms.” Zoom Help Center, 2020, support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/206476313-Managing-Breakout-Rooms.
  • Wiederhold, Brenda K.
  • Connecting Through Technology During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic: Avoiding ‘Zoom Fatigue.'” Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, vol.23, no.7, 2020, pp.437–438., doi:10.1089/cyber.2020.29188.bkw.

Zoom. Why Aren’t You Zooming? The Fear And How To Cope With It.25 June 2020, blog.zoom.us/arent-zooming-yet-fear-cope/.
View complete answer

What is your realization as a student about distance learning?

Distance learning is a process in which the source of knowledge and the learner are physically distance. Nowadays students are delighted with this way of learning, and gladly accept the idea to learn from electronic materials. Among other things, the success also depends on how this technology is applied.
View complete answer

What is your experience in distance learning?

My Experience about Distance Learning Distance learning is something which is very much of a new concept to me. I have never done distance learning in my undergraduate life. So, when I came to Dalarna University and enrolled in term 1 of Autumn semester, both of the courses I registered happened to be distance courses.

  1. Dalarna University has a learning portal where teachers can upload all the necessary teaching materials.
  2. Those materials are covered with audio, video lectures and hand written notes as well as PDFs.
  3. Teachers expect students to take their own responsibilities and carefully read the materials to pass the course.

I have taken Object Oriented Programming and Database Management course for the term 1. In the programming course, there are three modules and each of the modules covered by different lecturers. They uploaded several reading materials in the “LEARN” portal of Dalarna University website. How Do You Feel Overall About Online Education My course page in LEARN portal In database management course there are several lecture videos and mandatory reading sections. Students are asked to watch those videos and practice the problem by hand so that they can be comfortable with problem. There are total 5 modules and after completing each module, students have to submit a lab assignment as well as at the end of the course students are asked to appear a written examination held on Dalarna University.

  1. Students can easily get good score if they spend adequate amount of time in their study and practice the problem that have been mentioned in the lecture videos and assignment.
  2. I love distance learning course because it gives me freedom to spend my time in my own way.
  3. I love to study in the early morning to afternoon and I don’t have to worry about class time and other things, it helps me to spend more time with my course material.

In addition to that, if anyone facing any problem they can easily throw questions in the forum under “LEARN” platform and discuss about it with peers. Professor are also available for meeting whenever students are facing any problem. It’s better if you take prior appointment from your professor.

Though distance learning works for me, but for some students they find it too difficult to cope up with this learning method. They feel comfortable with face to face interaction. I have communicated few of my class peers and according to them, it would have been better if they could learn all those things in the actual classroom.

Now, it depends on the students what course they want to take and how they want to take it. I have always believed that, it’s learning which helps you to grow up as a human being also it helps us to improve yourself from today to tomorrow. So for me it actually is a blessing to learn those new topics in a mode of distance learning where I can spend my time and my curiosity of learning the way I want to.
View complete answer

Do students like online learning?

– According to researchers, 65 percent of students preferred in-person instruction, compared to 18 percent who prefer a hybrid model and 9 percent who reported they’d rather learn remotely. However, the survey found significant differences between ethnic groups.

The survey findings found that there were differences in the preferences and success rates for teens between online versus in-person learning based on race, socioeconomics, and whether the home had one or more parent involved,” said Dr. Stephanie G. Thompson, LCSW, Lightfully Behavioral Health, Director of Clinical Operations.

Only a little more than half of the surveyed Black teenagers said they wanted a return to in-person school after the pandemic ends, while 70 percent of white teens reported wanting a return to in-person classes.
View complete answer

What are the impacts of online learning on students like you?

Impact Of Online Learning On Children – Online learning for children improves student accessibility. Students must be organized, self-motivated, and have a high level of time management to participate in an online program. Online learning methods can be an effective alternative educational medium for mature and self-disciplined pupils but are unsuitable for learning environments that depend on the learner.

  • The main benefit of asynchronous, online learning is that it allows students to fully participate in high-quality learning situations, where distance learning makes it difficult or impossible to learn on the ground.
  • It is essential for teachers to keep their online lessons clear, engaging, and interactive so that students can concentrate on the lessons.

Students’ commitment to time is often misinterpreted as meaning that online courses require less time and effort than traditional courses. Online students can participate in internal class discussions and complete assignments, essays, and projects. This shows the effects of not being able to interact with other students and teachers in an online school, which can result in serious negative effects.

You might be interested:  Which Period Is Called The Golden Period Of Physical Education?

Online learning can lead to students not developing the necessary communicative skills. In addition, students must have high-speed internet access at home, which can lead to complications if it is not available. The challenges of online learning can impact children to a great extent; loss of motivation, self-discipline, and the need to study are some of the biggest problems children face.

Impacts include the lack of efficiency of technology, the difficulty for pupils to understand the concepts taught, and online learning causes social isolation and results in pupils not developing the necessary communication skills. Factors that determine how well a pupil’s education performs in online learning include individual learning styles, learning environments, and the level of parental involvement.
View complete answer

How do students and teachers feel about online learning?

Teachers feel assessment of children in online classes is impossible, reveals study Even as online teaching has become a necessity due to the raging COVID-19 pandemic, a survey by the prestigious Azim Premji University has found that a huge majority of teachers found it difficult to maintain an emotional contact with their students while 90% felt it was not easy to carry out meaning assessments from behind screens.

  1. According to the survey, over 80% teachers expressed the impossibility of maintaining emotional connect with children during such classes, thus eliminating the very basis of education.
  2. More than 90% teachers felt that no meaningful assessment of children’s learning was possible during online classes.

Parents have echoed this sentiment with almost 70% being of the opinion that online classes are not effective for the learning of their children,” the survey has claimed. The varsity released its Field Study on ‘Myths of Online Education’ in Bangalore on Monday.

Also Read: The study found an overwhelming majority of the teachers and parents stating that the online mode is inadequate and ineffective for education.The varsity study also indicated that many parents were willing to send their children to schools with necessary health safeguards.

“Online education is ineffective because of the basic character of education, and not merely because of lack of access to the net and online resources, especially for school-age children. Education requires physical presence, attention, thought and emotions, all to be sewn towards learning goals, step-by step, often back-and-forth, and differently for each student.

This requires intense verbal and non-verbal interactions amongst teachers and students, which is possible only in actual classes.’ said Anurag Behar, Vice Chancellor, Azim Premji University. Rahul Mukhopadhyay and Aanchal Chomal, from the research team that conducted the study, noted that “the study revealed the ineffectiveness of remote learning solutions in providing meaningful learning opportunities, exclusion of majority of children due to poor access, and the professional frustration of teachers.” The study also revealed the difficulty faced by numerous students due to lack of access to devices like smartphones.

“Over 60% children cannot access online education opportunities; reasons for this include non-availability of or inadequate number of smartphones for dedicated use or sharing, and difficulty in using the apps for online learning. The issue of access is further exacerbated for children with disabilities; 90% teachers with children with disabilities in their regular classes found them unable to participate in online classes,” the varsity said.

The report advocated the need to reopen schools in a phased manner with appropriate precautions for the health and well-being of both children and teachers. In the interim period, teachers could be encouraged to facilitate community-based solutions for direct interactions with children with all necessary precautions, it said.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE ON : Teachers feel assessment of children in online classes is impossible, reveals study
View complete answer

What is your opinion of online learning essay?

Teaching Platform Used for Online Classes – Online classes are a part of today’s life, and one of the main components of online classes is the platform required for online classes. There are many platforms available for online classes, and all are used for delivering an online lectures to students.

Let’s see some of the most popular teaching platforms for live classes.1. Microsoft Teams MS Teams is one of the most popular online teaching platforms available in the market. This teaching platform is used in many teaching sectors like Coaching Institutes, schools, and colleges for delivering online classes to students.

Features like downloading recorded lectures, recording live lectures, automatic attendance downloading features, scheduling meetings, and many more features are available in MS Teams.2. Udemy This is the most popular online education network, with over 2 million users globally and more than 13,000 courses.

  • It enables teachers to create comprehensive lessons that include video lectures, PowerPoint presentations, screencast videos, documents, audio files, text, and mashup videos.
  • The platform is free for teachers to build their courses, which they may then provide for free or a fee.
  • Udemy takes a cut of any fees that are applied.

This platform seems quite professional and has a lot to offer.3. RCampus RCampus is one of several online learning platforms that may be used to upload various forms of instructional content, including videos, links, and photographs, design courses, assign homework, maintain grades, and host class discussions.
View complete answer

What can you describe about online class?

What is an An online class is a course conducted over the Internet. They are generally conducted through a learning management system, in which students can view their course syllabus and academic progress, as well as communicate with fellow students and their course instructor.
View complete answer

What is your opinion about online teaching and offline teaching?

Offline Learning: – Offline education is the traditional counterpart of online education and the original mode of learning that allows students to engage with their peers and teachers in a face-to-face setting on a regular basis. Even if online education is anticipated to be the future of education, it will never be able to replace the whole nature of traditional education.

Technical issues have little impact on offline education, and it provides a wonderful opportunity for students to build and stick to a fixed schedule. Offline classes encourage students to collaborate on projects with other students and help them learn new skills. Students become more introverted as a result of online education since they only communicate with other students through online chatting rather than face-to-face interaction.

Additionally, offline education allows teachers to observe their students’ responses and behaviour and respond as needed. As a result, no matter how advanced online education becomes, offline education will continue to play an important role in students’ growth. How Do You Feel Overall About Online Education
View complete answer

Are students comfortable with online learning?

Overall satisfaction among students was 41.3% compared to 74.3% for faculty. The highest areas of satisfaction for students were communication and flexibility, whereas 92.9% of faculty were satisfied with students’ enthusiasm for online learning.
View complete answer

Are students struggling with online learning?

3. Students don’t always know where to get help in online environments – Because interaction is difficult online and many students struggle with self-regulated learning, help-seeking can be a problem. This issue manifests in two ways: students don’t recognise when they need help, and they either don’t know where to get help or feel uncomfortable about accessing virtual help.
View complete answer

What is the positive impact of online class in your life?

A well-thought-out online learning strategy can benefit everyone. At first glance, that might seem like hyperbole. However, in reality, online learning is just that effective. While you might assume that online learning serves the learner primarily, the benefits of online learning are far more wide-reaching.

Digital learning can improve the performance of individuals, businesses, and society by promoting vital, future-ready skills, such as communication, collaboration, technology, and education. Making online learning accessible for everyone from preschool students to post-graduate learners is in all of our best interests.

Not only is digital learning creating a smarter, more productive civilization, but also one that is well-informed about new technologies and able to stay on top of emerging trends, Online learning in the corporate world also has a substantial impact on society. From motivation to collaboration, here are five ways that online learning has a positive impact on society.
View complete answer

How students and teachers feel about online learning?

Teachers feel assessment of children in online classes is impossible, reveals study Even as online teaching has become a necessity due to the raging COVID-19 pandemic, a survey by the prestigious Azim Premji University has found that a huge majority of teachers found it difficult to maintain an emotional contact with their students while 90% felt it was not easy to carry out meaning assessments from behind screens.

  • According to the survey, over 80% teachers expressed the impossibility of maintaining emotional connect with children during such classes, thus eliminating the very basis of education.
  • More than 90% teachers felt that no meaningful assessment of children’s learning was possible during online classes.

Parents have echoed this sentiment with almost 70% being of the opinion that online classes are not effective for the learning of their children,” the survey has claimed. The varsity released its Field Study on ‘Myths of Online Education’ in Bangalore on Monday.

Also Read: The study found an overwhelming majority of the teachers and parents stating that the online mode is inadequate and ineffective for education.The varsity study also indicated that many parents were willing to send their children to schools with necessary health safeguards.

“Online education is ineffective because of the basic character of education, and not merely because of lack of access to the net and online resources, especially for school-age children. Education requires physical presence, attention, thought and emotions, all to be sewn towards learning goals, step-by step, often back-and-forth, and differently for each student.

  • This requires intense verbal and non-verbal interactions amongst teachers and students, which is possible only in actual classes.’ said Anurag Behar, Vice Chancellor, Azim Premji University.
  • Rahul Mukhopadhyay and Aanchal Chomal, from the research team that conducted the study, noted that “the study revealed the ineffectiveness of remote learning solutions in providing meaningful learning opportunities, exclusion of majority of children due to poor access, and the professional frustration of teachers.” The study also revealed the difficulty faced by numerous students due to lack of access to devices like smartphones.

“Over 60% children cannot access online education opportunities; reasons for this include non-availability of or inadequate number of smartphones for dedicated use or sharing, and difficulty in using the apps for online learning. The issue of access is further exacerbated for children with disabilities; 90% teachers with children with disabilities in their regular classes found them unable to participate in online classes,” the varsity said.

  • The report advocated the need to reopen schools in a phased manner with appropriate precautions for the health and well-being of both children and teachers.
  • In the interim period, teachers could be encouraged to facilitate community-based solutions for direct interactions with children with all necessary precautions, it said.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE ON : Teachers feel assessment of children in online classes is impossible, reveals study
View complete answer

What is your opinion of online learning essay?

Teaching Platform Used for Online Classes – Online classes are a part of today’s life, and one of the main components of online classes is the platform required for online classes. There are many platforms available for online classes, and all are used for delivering an online lectures to students.

  • Let’s see some of the most popular teaching platforms for live classes.1.
  • Microsoft Teams MS Teams is one of the most popular online teaching platforms available in the market.
  • This teaching platform is used in many teaching sectors like Coaching Institutes, schools, and colleges for delivering online classes to students.

Features like downloading recorded lectures, recording live lectures, automatic attendance downloading features, scheduling meetings, and many more features are available in MS Teams.2. Udemy This is the most popular online education network, with over 2 million users globally and more than 13,000 courses.

  1. It enables teachers to create comprehensive lessons that include video lectures, PowerPoint presentations, screencast videos, documents, audio files, text, and mashup videos.
  2. The platform is free for teachers to build their courses, which they may then provide for free or a fee.
  3. Udemy takes a cut of any fees that are applied.

This platform seems quite professional and has a lot to offer.3. RCampus RCampus is one of several online learning platforms that may be used to upload various forms of instructional content, including videos, links, and photographs, design courses, assign homework, maintain grades, and host class discussions.
View complete answer