Which Type Of Education Is More Theoretical?

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Which Type Of Education Is More Theoretical
Theoretical Education VS Practical Education | by Shashi Dream Foundation | Medium Theoretical v Practical Education Theoretical Education Theoretical education refers to getting education primarily from sources based on books ; etc. This type of education is mainly based on reading, memorizing and rote learning, It refers to the factual information pertaining to any subject or topic.

  • It has no practical or application aspects to it.
  • It refers to a process that is wholly based on learning,
  • The data which is to be learned can be facts, figures, etc.
  • Theoretical education helps in providing information about the experience of others as well.
  • Theoretical knowledge is the explanatory part of it.

It explains the logic or reason behind a particular event. Explanation of facts is an extremely significant part of theoretical education. Theoretical knowledge focuses on the reasoning aspect. It does not focus on the acquisition of knowledge by focusing on day to day activities.

It focuses on the in-depth study of a topic or subject. The learner is informed about the various facets of the subject which she or he is striving to learn. The main focus area under theoretical education is factual learning, The system of theoretical learning is the most traditional and conventional type of education.

This type of education has been followed for ages and it is even very widely prevalent in India. This branch of education is very important since it explains the various concepts and the logic behind each concept. In order, to be a qualified expert in any topic and/or to be a thorough academician theoretical education is very important. Comparing Theoretical and Practical Education Practical Education Practical Education on the other hand refers to, gaining knowledge not solely on the basis of reading or memorizing, but gaining it through practical application and uses. Under practical education, the information is acquired through the acts of doing, using, or enacting,

The information gained through this branch is more efficient as the learner while doing an activity internalizes the knowledge received by him/her. The knowledge acquired through such means is relatively easier to memorize and more resistant to forgetting. Such knowledge even if forgotten, can easily be remembered easily on the presentation of relevant cues.

Practical education is fast developing as a medium of education. There have been considerable developments and upgrades that have been made in this category owing to the increased awareness of both the educators and the learners about it. Practical Knowledge Practical education focuses on learning through personal experience, Theoretical education focuses more on the “learning” aspect. Practical education means we learn about a thing by implementing that action and it is during the implementation, that the information we have acquired is fixed in our brains.

Practical education leaves no doors closed and makes you acquainted with the topic in focus in such a way that you are a hundred percent well versed in it and very well able to face any grinding challenges that you may face. However, one thing that is essential and should be kept in mind is that there is no one type that is better than the other.

Both types have their pros and cons. What is needed is a perfect blend of both theoretical and practical education.

-By Iknoor Kohli (SDF Batch 11, Gargi College, New Delhi, India) Click on the following links to find more information regarding our work and career counseling session video.👇 Facebook: Instagram: hl=en LinkedIn: Twitter:

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Why is theoretical more experimental than learning?

Why practical knowledge is more important than theoretical knowledge? Can you imagine someone teaching you to swim or drive a vehicle, within four walls of a classroom? It is impossible!! You have to get into the water to learn swimming and you have to be out on the road to learn driving.

  1. Some subjects are skill based and practice oriented.
  2. Theoretical knowledge of skill- based subjects needs to be supported by practice.
  3. Subjects like teaching and engineering are skill based.
  4. In these subjects, practical knowledge is more important than theoretical knowledge.Practical work includes experiments in laboratories, study tours, projects, assignments etc.

the advantages of practical work are unmatched. Getting theoretical knowledge has no value until students can apply it for practical purposes.

When you do something with your own hands you remember better.Practical work promotes experiential learning.Practical work encourages self-learning.Practical work familiarizes students with tools and equipment that he will be required to use.Practice leads to perfection.One cannot become an expert overnight; greater the practice, greater the expertise.Practical work is a good change from the monotonous lecture method.Students are required to participate actively in practical activities.Involvement of students is more in practical work.Practical work complements theory.Practical assignments are often carried out in groups. Group work helps to inculcate social values and values like sharing, cooperation, team spirit, compassion etc.Practical work makes students independent and increases their confidence.

Students who complete engineering education often find that when they start working, they are at a loss in spite of getting very good marks in the examination. If the engineering colleges in pune integrates theory with practice, students are better prepared for jobs.

Practical knowledge in advance boosts their confidence. Hence, there are several benefits of practical work. At the same time it must be remembered that theoretical knowledge is also important. Practical work is application of theory. Theory creates a strong base for practical work. One must be able to achieve a balance between theory and practice for best results.

Theory and practice are two sides of the same coin. I would like to end with a funny anecdote. One Mr. X had a master’s degree in automobile engineering and worked on a high post in a reputed organization. One day, on his way to the office, his car stopped working and he got off to investigate the problem.

  1. With his high qualification and expertise in the area, he examined each part of the car carefully but couldn’t find any fault.
  2. After a while, a peasant who was passing asked him, “What’s the matter?” He answered, “Well, something is wrong with the car.” The peasant replied,” Did you check the tank? Perhaps there is no petrol.” The peasant was right.

This is what might happen when theoretical knowledge is not supported by practical knowledge. : Why practical knowledge is more important than theoretical knowledge?
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Which learning theory is best for teaching?

No two students are alike, and the way every person learns will vary. Our brains are all unique, and our experiences all contribute to the different ways we learn, Psychologists have spent countless hours performing tests to better understand how students learn.

Current and aspiring teachers need to be educated to be prepared for teaching students every day, and an important part of teacher education is understanding different ways of learning. There are many solidified learning theories that teachers can learn from as they prepare to help students in the classroom.

Teachers who understand learning theories can use different techniques in their classrooms to cater to different kinds of learning. This can help all students find success in learning. There are five main educational learning theories that educators can utilize to help them enhance their classrooms and make them better learning environments for all students.

  • Cognitive learning theory looks at the way people think.
  • Mental processes are an important part in understanding how we learn.
  • The cognitive theory understands that learners can be influenced by both internal and external elements.
  • Plato and Descartes are two of the first philosophers that focused on cognition and how we as human beings think.

Many other researchers looked deeper into the idea of how we think, spurring more research. Jean Piaget is a highly important figure in the field of cognitive psychology, and his work focuses on environments and internal structures and how they impact learning.

Cognitive theory has developed over time, breaking off into sub-theories that focus on unique elements of learning and understanding. At the most basic level, the cognitive theory suggests that internal thoughts and external forces are both an important part of the cognitive process. And as students understand how their thinking impacts their learning and behavior, they are able to have more control over it.

Cognitive learning theory impacts students because their understanding of their thought process can help them learn. Teachers can give students opportunities to ask questions, to fail, and think out loud. These strategies can help students understand how their thought process works, and utilize this knowledge to construct better learning opportunities.

  1. Behaviorism learning theory is the idea that how a student behaves is based on their interaction with their environment.
  2. It suggests that behaviors are influenced and learned from external forces rather than internal forces.
  3. Psychologists have been developing the idea of behaviorism since the 19th century.

Behavioral learning theory is the basis for psychology that can be observed and quantified. Positive reinforcement is a popular element of behaviorism—classical conditioning observed in Pavlov’s dog experiments suggests that behaviors are directly motivated by the reward that can be obtained.

  1. Teachers in a classroom can utilize positive reinforcement to help students better learn a concept.
  2. Students who receive positive reinforcement are more likely to retain information moving forward, a direct result of the behaviorism theory.
  3. Constructivism learning theory is based on the idea that students actually create their own learning based on their previous experiences.

Students take what they’re being taught and add it to their previous knowledge and experiences, creating a reality that’s unique to them. This learning theory focuses on learning as an active process, which is personal and individual for each student.

Teachers can utilize constructivism to help understand that each student will bring their own past to the classroom every day. Teachers in constructivist classrooms act as more of a guide to helping students create their own learning and understanding. They help them create their own process and reality based on their own past.

This is crucial to helping many kinds of students take their own experiences and include them in their learning. Humanism is very closely related to constructivism. Humanism directly focuses on the idea of self-actualization. Everyone functions under a hierarchy of needs.

  1. Self-actualization is at the top of the hierarchy of needs—it’s the brief moments where a person feels all of their needs are met and that they’re the best possible version of themselves.
  2. Everyone is striving for this, and learning environments can either move toward meeting needs or away from meeting needs.

Teachers can create classroom environments that help students get closer to their self-actualization. Educators can help fulfill students’ emotional and physical needs, giving them a safe and comfortable place to learn, plenty of food, and the support they need to succeed.

  • This kind of environment is the most conducive to helping students learn.
  • Connectivism is one of the newest educational learning theories.
  • It focuses on the idea that people learn and grow when they form connections.
  • This can be connections with each other or connections with their roles and obligations in their lives.

Hobbies, goals, and people can all be connections that influence learning. Teachers can utilize connectivism in their classrooms to help students make connections to things that excite them, helping them learn. Teachers can use digital media to make good, positive connections to learning.

They can help create connections and relationships with their students and with their peer groups to help students feel motivated about learning. While these five learning theories are the main educational learning theories for teachers who want to support their students’ learning, there are additional theories they may want to understand.

Some may work as good supplemental theories for teachers to bolster their educational support with a new approach. Transformative learning theory is a great approach for adult education and young adult learning. Also referred to as transformation learning, transformative learning theory focuses on the idea that learners can adjust their thinking based on new information.

  1. This learning theory was founded by Jack Mezirow, who discovered it after doing studies on adult women who went back to school.
  2. His initial research found that adults don’t apply their old understanding to new situations and that having a new perspective helped them gain a new understanding of things as they change.

Mezirow also believed that students had important teaching and learning opportunities connected to their past experiences and that critical reflection and review could lead to a transformation of their understanding. This approach works well for adult students, as children don’t have the same kind of transformation with their learning experiences—and with life experience.

Adult students could draw on childhood experiences and transforming those beliefs and understandings using critical reflection, leading them to an understanding of what they should believe and understand as adults. Overall, the theory states that our worldview is changed the more we learn, which helps us grasp new concepts and ideas.

By getting new information that helps evaluate past ideas, students are able to make a dramatic educational shift beyond standard learning. Teachers can employ this learning theory by encouraging their students to learn new perspectives while questioning their assumptions and open the floor for discourse to cement their new train of thought.

Using social learning theory can be a valuable tool for dealing with difficult students who like to disrupt the classroom and cause trouble. This theory focuses on the concept of children learning from observing others by acting on or not acting on what they see exhibited by their classmates. For example, they may see a classmate politely asking for a treat and getting one, or maybe they hear another classmate talking about something new they’ve learned, which teaches the student something new even if it’s not something they try themselves.

This learning theory was founded by Albert Bandura. He conducted an experiment called the Bobo doll experiment in the early ’60s, during which he studied children’s behavior after they watched an adult act aggressively with a doll-like toy. He noted how the children reacted when the adult got rewarded, punished, or suffered no consequences after they attacked the doll.

Attention, which calls upon different or unique lessons or activities to help children focus. Retention, focusing on how the student will internalize information and recall it later on. Reproduction, drawing on previously learned behavior and when it’s appropriate to use it. Motivation, which can extend from seeing other classmates being rewarded or punished for their actions.

By using social modeling based on these elements, teachers have a very powerful tool in their arsenal that can effectively guide their students to be more active in their learning, pay more attention, and channel their energy into their schooling. Experiential learning theory focuses on learning by doing.

  1. Using this theory, students are encouraged to learn through experiences that can help them retain information and recall facts.
  2. Experiential learning theory, or ELT, was identified by David Kolb in 1984.
  3. Though his influence came from other theorists such as John Dewey, Kurt Lewin, and Jean Piaget, Kolb was able to identify four stages of ELT.

The first two stages, concrete learning and reflective observation, focus on grasping an experience. The latter two, abstract conceptualization and active experimentation are about transforming an experience. To Kolb, effective learning is seen as the learner goes through the cycle of experiential learning theory.

Students can enter the cycle in any way and at any point. Some examples of this form of learning include taking students to the zoo to learn about animals instead of just reading about them or growing a garden to learn about photosynthesis instead of watching a video about it. By creating environments where students can learn and experience at the same time, teachers offer students the opportunity to immediately apply their knowledge and get real-world experiences.

This approach also encourages teamwork and is shown to improve motivation. Teachers can create specific strategies and techniques to apply these learning theories in their classrooms. Teachers need to first focus on getting a well-rounded education to learn about all kinds of techniques for teaching and classroom management.
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Which do you think is more important practical skills or theoretical education?

Theoretical versus Practical Learning The mind is not a vessel to be filled but a fire to be ignited. Education paves the way for a bright future and a good life. The sole purpose of education is to replace an empty mind with an open and an inquisitive mind.

  • Education is a must as it gives everyone an opportunity to learn skills and gain knowledge.
  • It is also the only key to nurture responsible human beings who can absorb good teachings and can impart it to many others but then there is a question as to what type of education should we follow.
  • We have theoretical on one side and practical on the other.

Which of these two is more important and valuable to a student. Theoretical means to learn everything through books. It helps the child to understand why one technique is successful over the other. Books teach us through the experience of others. It gives a deeper understanding of the concept and helps realize the reason behind it. Which Type Of Education Is More Theoretical Those who are theoretical are called book smart and those who learn practically are called street smart. These two are like two sides of a coin and both carry equal weightage. Therefore without the counterpart there is no value to the coin. At we ascertain that our children imbibe the goodness of both and ensure that they go hand in hand.

We put into practice what we teach, starting with meditation for the kids. This might sound impossible to many but it has been made possible with practice and we are experiencing the results which is amazing. Children have become much calmer, more energetic and pose a positive outlook throughout the day.

We have also incorporated exercise, dance, art and stories in their daily routine to fuel their physical and mental growth. When the children learn an alphabet or number, they are asked to use play dough to make animals or letters. They draw pictures with that letter which is saved better in their memory when compared to just writing the letter or number.

The teachers have explained that papers, tissues are all made by cutting down trees. To stress on this many paper based activities have been reduced and the activities are mostly based on reusable materials or things that are readily available at home. This being done, the children started growing their own saplings and started taking care of them.

They have also made bird feeders using orange peels and placed food and water for the birds. They have emphasized and realized that it is their responsibility to protect Mother Earth and contribute to care in their own small ways possible. When a shape is introduced, the children find out objects in the house or in the neighborhood that are of that shape. We often see that some people are good orators but this should be practiced from a very young age. To enhance these skills children are given opportunities to freely express their thoughts and talk about Ocean Day, and other such topics. Pre-writing skills are instilled before stress is given to writing.

  • These skills are the fundamental skills that children need to develop before they are able to write.
  • These skills contribute to the child’s ability to hold and use a pencil, and the ability to draw, write, copy, and colour.
  • There are many pencil strokes that letters, numbers and early drawings mostly comprise of.
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Philosophically, knowledge is intangible but the practical experience has made it tangible by applying those skills into practice. For example the uppercase letters were the first to be formed but when it came to writing it was difficult to write fast and occupied more space owing to which the lowercase came into practice as these letters were more rounded and easier to write.

  1. Thus when we put our theoretical knowledge to test in a practical way we come up with different solutions.
  2. Today everything has become digitized and kids can find all the necessary information on the internet.
  3. But it is through these inevitable practical fumbles that the children learn to deal with things and this in turn enhances their situational understanding in the future.

Both theoretical knowledge and practical skills are necessary to master a field. Theoretical learning is good, but not using that knowledge makes practical education vain. At this juncture GIIS has taken huge strides and always kept in pace with the advancements even during the most challenging times.

A. Arosh PeggyAssistant Teacher in KindergartenGIIS Abu Dhabi

: Theoretical versus Practical Learning
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What are the 7 learning theories in education?

Most influential theories of learning Learning is defined as a process that brings together personal and environmental experiences and influences for acquiring, enriching or modifying one’s knowledge, skills, values, attitudes, behaviour and world views.

Learning theories develop hypotheses that describe how this process takes place. The scientific study of learning started in earnest at the dawn of the 20th century. The major concepts and theories of learning include behaviourist theories, cognitive psychology, constructivism, social constructivism, experiential learning, multiple intelligence, and situated learning theory and community of practice.

Behaviourism The behaviourist perspectives of learning originated in the early 1900s, and became dominant in early 20th century. The basic idea of behaviourism is that learning consists of a change in behaviour due to the acquisition, reinforcement and application of associations between stimuli from the environment and observable responses of the individual.

  1. Behaviourists are interested in measurable changes in behaviour.
  2. Thorndike, one major behaviourist theorist, put forward that (1) a response to a stimulus is reinforced when followed by a positive rewarding effect, and (2) a response to a stimulus becomes stronger by exercise and repetition.
  3. This view of learning is akin to the “drill-and-practice” programmes.

Skinner, another influential behaviourist, proposed his variant of behaviourism called “operant conditioning”. In his view, rewarding the right parts of the more complex behaviour reinforces it, and encourages its recurrence. Therefore, reinforcers control the occurrence of the desired partial behaviours.

  1. Learning is understood as the step-by-step or successive approximation of the intended partial behaviours through the use of reward and punishment.
  2. The best known application of Skinner’s theory is “programmed instruction” whereby the right sequence of the partial behaviours to be learned is specified by elaborated task analysis.

Cognitive psychology Cognitive psychology was initiated in the late 1950s, and contributed to the move away from behaviourism. People are no longer viewed as collections of responses to external stimuli, as understood by behaviourists, but information processors.

Cognitive psychology paid attention to complex mental phenomena, ignored by behaviourists, and was influenced by the emergence of the computer as an information-processing device, which became analogous to the human mind. In cognitive psychology, learning is understood as the acquisition of knowledge: the learner is an information-processor who absorbs information, undertakes cognitive operations on it, and stocks it in memory.

Therefore, its preferred methods of instruction are lecturing and reading textbooks; and, at its most extreme, the learner is a passive recipient of knowledge by the teacher. Constructivism Constructivism emerged in the 1970s and 1980s, giving rise to the idea that learners are not passive recipients of information, but that they actively construct their knowledge in interaction with the environment and through the reorganization of their mental structures.

  1. Learners are therefore viewed as sense-makers, not simply recording given information but interpreting it.
  2. This view of learning led to the shift from the “knowledge-acquisition” to “knowledge-construction” metaphor.
  3. The growing evidence in support of the constructive nature of learning was also in line with and backed by the earlier work of influential theorists such as Jean Piaget and Jerome Bruner.

While there are different versions of constructivism, what is found in common is the learner-centred approach whereby the teacher becomes a cognitive guide of learner’s learning and not a knowledge transmitter. Social learning theory A well-known social learning theory has been developed by Albert Bandura, who works within both cognitive and behavioural frameworks that embrace attention, memory and motivation.

His theory of learning suggests that people learn within a social context, and that learning is facilitated through concepts such as modeling, observational learning and imitation. Bandura put forward “reciprocal determininsm” that holds the view that a person’s behavior, environment and personal qualities all reciprocally influence each others.

He argues that children learn from observing others as well as from “model” behaviour, which are processes involving attention, retention, reproduction and motivation. The importance of positive role modeling on learning is well documented. Socio-constructivism In the late 20th century, the constructivist view of learning was further changed by the rise of the perspective of “situated cognition and learning” that emphasized the significant role of context, particularly social interaction.

Criticism against the information-processing constructivist approach to cognition and learning became stronger as the pioneer work of Vygotsky as well as anthropological and ethnographic research by scholars like Rogoff and Lave came to the fore and gathered support. The essence of this criticism was that the information-processing constructivism saw cognition and learning as processes occurring within the mind in isolation from the surrounding and interaction with it.

Knowledge was considered as self-sufficient and independent of the contexts in which it finds itself. In the new view, cognition and learning are understood as interactions between the individual and a situation; knowledge is considered as situated and is a product of the activity, context and culture in which it is formed and utilized.

  • This gave way to a new metaphor for learning as “participation” and “social negotiation”.
  • Experiential learning Experiential learning theories build on social and constructivist theories of learning, but situate experience at the core of the learning process.
  • They aim to understand the manners in which experiences – whether first or second hand – motivate learners and promote their learning.

Therefore, learning is about meaningful experiences – in everyday life – that lead to a change in an individual’s knowledge and behaviours. Carl Rogers is an influential proponent of these theories, suggesting that experiential learning is “self-initiated learning” as people have a natural inclination to learn; and that they learn when they are fully involved in the learning process.

Rogers put forward the following insight: (1) “learning can only be facilitated: we cannot teach another person directly”, (2) “learners become more rigid under threat”, (3) “significant learning occurs in an environment where threat to the learner is reduced to a minimum”, (4) “learning is most likely to occur and to last when it is self-initiated” (Office of Learning and Teaching, 2005, p.9).

He supports a dynamic, continuous process of change where new learning results in and affects learning environments. This dynamic process of change is often considered in literatures on organizational learning. Multiple intelligences Challenging the assumption in many of the learning theories that learning is a universal human process that all individuals experience according to the same principles, Howard Gardner elaborated his theory of ‘multiple intelligences’ in 1983.

  1. His theory also challenges the understanding of intelligence as dominated by a single general ability.
  2. Gardner argues that every person’s level of intelligence actually consists of many distinct “intelligences”.
  3. These intelligences include: (1) logical-mathematical, (2) linguistic, (3) spatial, (4) musical, (5) bodily-kinesthetic, (6) interpersonal, and (7) intrapersonal.

Although his work is speculative, his theory is appreciated by teachers in broadening their conceptual framework beyond the traditional confines of skilling, curriculum and testing. The recognition of multiple intelligences, for Gardner, is a means to achieving educational goals rather than an educational goal in and of itself.

Situated learning theory and community of practice “Situated learning theory” and “community of practice” draw many of the ideas of the learning theories considered above. They are developed by Jean Lave and Etienne Wenger. Situated learning theory recognizes that there is no learning which is not situated, and emphasizes the relational and negotiated character of knowledge and learning as well as the engaged nature of learning activity for the individuals involved.

According to the theory, it is within communities that learning occurs most effectively. Interactions taking place within a community of practice – e.g. cooperation, problem solving, building trust, understanding and relations – have the potential to foster community social capital that enhances the community members’ wellbeing.

  • Thomas Sergiovanni reinforces the idea that learning is most effective when it takes place in communities.
  • He argues that academic and social outcomes will improve only when classrooms become learning communities, and teaching becomes learner-centered.
  • Communities of practice are of course not confined to schools but cover other settings such as workplace and organizations.21st century learning or skills Exploration of 21st century learning or skills has emerged from the concern about transforming the goals and daily practice of learning to meet the new demands of the 21st century, which is characterized as knowledge- and technologically driven.

The current discussion about 21st century skills leads classrooms and other learning environments to encourage the development of core subject knowledge as well as new media literacies, critical and systems thinking, interpersonal and self-directional skills.

  1. For example, the Partnership for 21st Century Skills (P21) defines the following as key: core subjects (e.g.
  2. English, math, geography, history, civics) and 21st century themes (global awareness, civic literacy, health literacy, environmental literacy, financial, business and entrepreneurial literacy); learning and innovation skills (creativity and innovation, critical thinking and problem solving, communication and collaboration); information, media and technology skills (e.g.

ICT literacy, media literacy); and life and career skills (flexibility and adaptability, initiative and self-direction, social and cross-cultural skills, productivity and accountability, leadership and responsibility). One main learning method that supports the learning of such skills and knowledge is group learning or thematic projects, which involves an inquiry-based collaborative work that addresses real-world issues and questions.
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What is theoretical education?

Theoretical Education VS Practical Education | by Shashi Dream Foundation | Medium Theoretical v Practical Education Theoretical Education Theoretical education refers to getting education primarily from sources based on books ; etc. This type of education is mainly based on reading, memorizing and rote learning, It refers to the factual information pertaining to any subject or topic.

It has no practical or application aspects to it. It refers to a process that is wholly based on learning, The data which is to be learned can be facts, figures, etc. Theoretical education helps in providing information about the experience of others as well. Theoretical knowledge is the explanatory part of it.

It explains the logic or reason behind a particular event. Explanation of facts is an extremely significant part of theoretical education. Theoretical knowledge focuses on the reasoning aspect. It does not focus on the acquisition of knowledge by focusing on day to day activities.

It focuses on the in-depth study of a topic or subject. The learner is informed about the various facets of the subject which she or he is striving to learn. The main focus area under theoretical education is factual learning, The system of theoretical learning is the most traditional and conventional type of education.

This type of education has been followed for ages and it is even very widely prevalent in India. This branch of education is very important since it explains the various concepts and the logic behind each concept. In order, to be a qualified expert in any topic and/or to be a thorough academician theoretical education is very important. Comparing Theoretical and Practical Education Practical Education Practical Education on the other hand refers to, gaining knowledge not solely on the basis of reading or memorizing, but gaining it through practical application and uses. Under practical education, the information is acquired through the acts of doing, using, or enacting,

The information gained through this branch is more efficient as the learner while doing an activity internalizes the knowledge received by him/her. The knowledge acquired through such means is relatively easier to memorize and more resistant to forgetting. Such knowledge even if forgotten, can easily be remembered easily on the presentation of relevant cues.

Practical education is fast developing as a medium of education. There have been considerable developments and upgrades that have been made in this category owing to the increased awareness of both the educators and the learners about it. Practical Knowledge Practical education focuses on learning through personal experience, Theoretical education focuses more on the “learning” aspect. Practical education means we learn about a thing by implementing that action and it is during the implementation, that the information we have acquired is fixed in our brains.

Practical education leaves no doors closed and makes you acquainted with the topic in focus in such a way that you are a hundred percent well versed in it and very well able to face any grinding challenges that you may face. However, one thing that is essential and should be kept in mind is that there is no one type that is better than the other.

Both types have their pros and cons. What is needed is a perfect blend of both theoretical and practical education.

-By Iknoor Kohli (SDF Batch 11, Gargi College, New Delhi, India) Click on the following links to find more information regarding our work and career counseling session video.👇 Facebook: Instagram: hl=en LinkedIn: Twitter:

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Which course has more practical than theory?

Home QnA Home i want a engineering course which has more practical than theory n has a good scope

Answers (5) Go for Mechanical branch. Right from your first year involve in practical activity like robotics, aeromodelling, automobile events like SAE, if your college has collegiate clubs and other technical clubs. You’ll surely learn many thing through this. Mechanical,electrical etc but you have to learn theory to do practical Comments (0) Question cannot be greater than 3000 characters 0 / 3000 Dear As per your query you may consider these fields for more practical approach Civil Aerospace Automobiles Mechanical Chemical All the best Comments (0) Question cannot be greater than 3000 characters 0 / 3000 In almost all of the colleges theory is more in proportion than practicals.but you can take civil or mechanical branch,practical are bit more their.develop your skills in practicals and do hard work.hope you got it! Comments (0) Question cannot be greater than 3000 characters 0 / 3000 Dear Pratmesh In engineering, you can find half-half practical and theory and in most of the colleges theory will be in higher ratio than practical.

  • If you can attend as many workshops you can, your practical knowledge will increase very high.
  • And my option for practical knowledge branch is I vote for Mechanical/Civil.
  • All the best.
  • Take wise decision.
  • Comments (0) Question cannot be greater than 3000 characters 0 / 3000 The question have been saved in answer later, you can access it from your profile anytime.

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What is the most effective learning style?

The Learning Styles and the Preferred Teaching—Learning Strategies of First Year Medical Students 1 Professor, Department of Anatomy, School of Medical Sciences & Research, Sharda University, Greater Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India. Find articles by 2 Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy, School of Medical Sciences & Research, Sharda University, Greater Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India.

1 Professor, Department of Anatomy, School of Medical Sciences & Research, Sharda University, Greater Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India.2 Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy, School of Medical Sciences & Research, Sharda University, Greater Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India.3 Professor, Department of Physiology, School of Medical Sciences & Research, Sharda University, Greater Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India.4 Professor & HOD, Department of Anatomy, Santosh Medical College, Santosh University, Ghaziabad, Uttar Pradesh, India.

NAME, ADRESS, E-MAIL ID OF THE CORESPONDING AUTHOR: Dr. Poonam Kharb, Professor Department of Anatomy, School of Medical Sciences & Research, Sharda University, Plot No.32-34, Knowledge Park III, Greater Noida, UP, 201306, India. Phone: 9810960544 E-mail: Received 2013 Feb 6; Revisions requested 2013 Feb 7; Accepted 2013 Apr 3. © 2013 Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research Introduction: The purpose of teaching is to facilitate learning and to encourage the learners to learn more effectively. The learning style is an individual’s consistent way of perceiving, processing and retaining new information. Educational researchers have shown an increasing interest in the learning styles, the related instructional methods and the andrgogical teaching techniques. This interest is spurred by a desire to help the students to become capable and successful learners. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the preferred learning styles of medical students as well as their preferences of specific teaching-learning methods. Method: A cross sectional study was conducted on 100 first semester medical students who were enrolled at SMS & R, Sharda University, India. The VARK questionnaire, version 7.1 was used to categorize the learning preferences/modes as visual (V), auditory (A), read and write (R) and kinaesthetic (K). The students were also asked to rank the various teaching methodologies viz. lectures, tutorials, demonstrations and practicals/dissections from the most preferred choice to the least preferred one. Results: The majority (61%) of the students had multimodal VARK preferences. Among them, 41%, 14% and 6% preferred the bimodal, trimodal and the quadrimodal ways of information presentation.39% of the respondents had one strong (unimodal) learning preference. The most common unimodal preference was kinaesthetic, followed by visual, auditory and read and write. The most preferred teaching methodology was practical/dissection (39%) and tutorial was the least preferred one (12%). Conclusion: One single approach to teaching does not work for every student or even for most of the students. The educators’ awareness of the various learning styles of the students and their efforts towards matching the teaching and learning styles may help in creating an effective learning environment for all the students. Keywords: Learning style, Instructional method, Teaching-learning strategies, Medical students Recent years have seen a change in the trends of medical education from pedagogy to andragogy i.e. from a teacher-centred learning to a student-centred learning. Therefore, it is not only desirable but also essential for educators to recognize that adults have different learning styles and that they should tailor instructions to the characteristic ways in which the adults prefer to learn, The term, ‘learning style’ describes an individual’s preferred method of gathering, processing, interpreting, organizing and analyzing information. The VARK model which was developed by Fleming and Mills provides the learners with a profile of their learning styles, based on the sensory modalities which are involved in taking in information. VARK is an acronym for the Visual (V), Auditory (A), Read/Write (R) and the Kinaesthetic (K) sensory modalities. The visual learners process the information best if they can see it. The auditory learners like to hear information. The read-write learners prefer to see the written words. The kinaesthetic learners like to acquire information through experience and practice. Various instructional methods which are used for teaching the first year medical students include lectures, dissections, practicals, tutorials, etc. The students’ preference for different teaching-learning methods had been attributed in the past to a number of reasons such as familiarity with the method, a positive outcome, etc. A less explored but perhaps a more significant factor could be the students’ learning styles. Having knowledge on the learners’ learning styles is a vastly underutilized approach towards an improvement in the classroom instructions. The learning style information can also benefit the students as it would help them in formulating the appropriate learning strategies for enhancing their learning. Most of the previous studies which have been done in the medical arena on the learning styles have been conducted in other countries and the results have shown variations, may be due to the use of different teaching methodologies at the premedical level,To the best of our knowledge, none of the studies have correlated the preferences of the instructional methods with the learning styles of the medical students. The aim of the present study was therefore, to gain an understanding of the learning style preferences of first semester medical students, to find out the most preferred instructional methods and to correlate these methods with the learning preferences of the students, which could be helpful in formulating teaching —learning strategies for improving the learning experience. This study was conducted on the first year medical students who were enrolled at the School of Medical Sciences and Research, Sharda University, Greater Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India. A total of 100 students voluntarily participated in the study (66 females and 34 males). Two separate questionnaires were used to determine the students’ most preferred teaching-learning methods and their learning style preferences. The first questionnaire was used to obtain the general demographic information i.e. names, ages and genders of the students, as well as to assess their preferences of the teaching-learning methodologies (Lectures, Practicals/Dissections, Tutorials, Self study) in the descending order of the preference. The second questionnaire, the latest version (7.1) of the VARK questionnaire, which was developed by Fleming, was used to determine the learning style preferences of the students. It consisted of 13 questions with four options each and the respondents could choose more than one option if they found them suitable. The VARK model was used in the present study because it a. addressed a part of the learning styles that was open to self-modification, b. it was accompanied by study strategies for each style, c. it could help in formulating teaching strategies and d. it was the most popular model due to its simplicity and reliability. The purpose of the study was explained to the students and the hard copies of the questionnaires were distributed to the students who volunteered to take the analysis. The completed questionnaires were collected after 15-20 minutes and they were evaluated by using previously validated scoring instructions which were available on the VARK website. Descriptive statistics was used to analyze the students’ preferences of the various VARK components, as well as their preferences for the various teaching-learning methods. The Students’ t-test was utilized to compare the VARK scores for the male and female students and Pearson’s Correlation Co-efficient was employed to analyze the correlation between the learning styles and the most preferred teaching- learning methods. According to the VARK model, the students’ learning styles are dependent on how they prefer to perceive/receive information. They may prefer a single mode (unimodal), two modes (bimodal), three modes (trimodal) or all four modes (quadrimodal) of the information presentation. In the present study, it was found that 61% students had multimodal learning style preferences and that only 39% students had unimodal preferences. Amongst the multimodal learning styles, the most preferred mode was bimodal, followed by trimodal and quadrimodal respectively, Of the 39% students who had unimodal learning styles, 26% preferred the kinaesthetic mode, 7% preferred the visual mode, 4% preferred the auditory mode and only 2% preferred the read-write mode. Therefore, the kinaesthetic mode was the most preferred mode and the read—write the least preferred mode of the information presentation. The learning style preferences of the female students were more varied, which included all the bimodal (VA, VK, VR, AK AR, KR) and the trimodal (VAK, VAR, AKR and VRK) learning styles, whereas in the male student population, the VR and AR bimodal combinations were not represented, shows the comparison of the preferences for the four VARK modalties of the female and male students. It was observed that a significantly higher number of female students preferred the auditory mode of the learning style as compared to the males; whereas a significantly higher number of male students preferred the kinaesthetic mode (p value <0.05). Comparison of VARK Scores of Male & Female Students

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VARK Mode Male/Female Students Mean ± SD p value
Visual Female 5.83±2.33 0.03*
Male 4.83±2.29
Auditory Female 5.23±1.61 0.13
Male 4.76±1.81
Read-Write Female 3.79±1.90 0.39
Male 3.66±2.31
Kinaesthetic Female 5.98±2.14 0.002*
Male 7.45±2.01

Various teaching-learning methods such as a. direct instruction methods (lectures and demonstrations), b. interactive instruction methods (tutorials), c. experimental learning methods (practicals and dissections) and d. independent study methods ( self study) are used to impart and acquire knowledge of the basic sciences during first year of the medical curriculum.

The most preferred teaching-learning method among all the students was practicals/dissections (39%), followed by lectures (32%), self study (18%) and tutorials (11%). Among the female students, the second most preferred teaching—learning methodology was lectures, whereas the male students preferred self study following practicals/dissections,

The correlation between the students’ learning styles and their preferences of the teaching-learning methods is shown in, The most preferred VARK mode was the kinaesthetic and the most preferred teaching—learning method was practical/dissection. A positive correlation (Pearson’s ccorrelation coefficient, r = 0.752) was observed between the preferences of the VARK modes and the teaching learning methods.

Preferred mode of teaching -learning method Practical/Dissection Lecture Tutorial Self Study
%age of students 39 32 11 18
VARK Mode K V A R
Mean score 13.43 10.66 9.99 7.45

The educational world is acknowledging the importance of understanding the students’ different learning style preferences and their role in attaining academic success, In the present study, therefore, we administered the VARK questionnaire to the first year medical students to determine their learning style preferences.

A majority of the students (61%) exhibited multimodal learning style preferences, which indicated that they preferred multiple modes of information presentation. The results of previous studies which were conducted on first year medical students from various other countries also reported similar results; however, the percentage of students with multimodal learning style preferences in these studies varied from 59-85%,This implies that most of the students learn effectively as long as the teaching methods include a blend of activities that stimulate the visual, aural, read-write and the kinaesthetic sensory modalities.

The increasing use of multimedia in teaching can provide opportunities for presenting multiple representations of the content (text, video, audio, images and interactive elements) to cater more effectively to the diverse learning styles of the students.

Neuroscience research has also revealed that significant increases in learning can be accomplished when the learning environments cater to their predominant learning styles, This is known as the “meshing hypothesis”, In the unimodal learning style category, we found that the most preferred mode was the kinaesthetic one, followed by the visual, auditory and the read-write ones.

Therefore, the active learning strategies such as role playing, simulations, use of models, debates, etc which are preferred by the kinaesthetic learners would be more beneficial to the students than the traditional lecture formats. Active learning strategies not only encourage the critical thinking (evaluation, analysis, and interpretation of the information) but they also improve the problem solving and the decision making skills.

A passive learning strategy format such as lectures mainly caters to the auditory learners. In the present study, the percentage of the auditory learners was much less as compared to those of the kinaesthetic and the visual learners. Our findings were comparable to the results of the study which was conducted by Baykan and Nacar on first year medical students from Turkey.

According to Lujan and DiCarlo, the most preferred learning style of the first year medical students was read/write among the students from Indiana, USA. However, Nuzhat et al., reported that the auditory mode was the most preferred learning style among the medical students from Saudi Arabia.

The variations in the learning preferences of the medical students from different countries could be explained on the basis of the differences in the teaching methodologies which are being used at the premedical level and the exposure to the hands on clinical experiences in the first year of the medical curriculum.

There is no single best teaching-learning strategy that can work for every student, no matter how good that approach is. Some previous studies have reported that certain teaching-learning methods, such as problem based learning, are favoured over the traditional methods i.e.

  1. Lectures,
  2. However, only little is known on whether the learning style of a student affects his/her preference for a specific teaching strategy/instructional method.
  3. The data from this study revealed that practicals/dissections were the most favoured teaching methodology of both male and female students.

This fact can be associated with the finding that the most preferred learning style of the student population of the present study was the kinaesthetic one. The kinaesthetic learners prefer the hands on approach to learning and therefore, the students with this learning style prefer to perceive information best through practical sessions.

  • Further, it was observed that the second most favoured teaching methodology of the female students was lectures, which could be explained by the fact that higher numbers of female students had a preference for auditory and visual modalities.
  • This indicated that the choice of the teaching methodologies was affected to a certain extent by the learning styles of the students.

Unmatched learning styles and teaching— learning methodologies may adversely affect the learning on the part of the students and therefore, tailoring instruction methods to the students’ learning style preferences is advocated, Providing training and opportunities to the medical educators to develop an understanding of the students’ learning style preferences can result in a greater comprehension and consideration of the unique learning needs of each student who is under their tutelage.

  • Correlating the students’ learning style preferences and instructional needs can assist the teachers in using appropriate teaching-learning instructional practices and it can also provide personalized interventions for enhancing the learning.
  • One of the limitations of the study was its relatively small sample size.

For this reason, these findings cannot be generalized to all the medical students. Secondly, like any other learning style inventory, VARK analyzes only one aspect of the learning style. In future, further studies need to be conducted to a. study the correlation between the performances and the learning styles of students, b.

  1. Find out whether the learning styles of the students change as they progress from the pre-clinical phase to the clinical phase of the curriculum.
  2. The knowledge on the learning styles has implications for both the medical teachers and the students.
  3. The students identify their learning preferences, which can help them in using the appropriate learning strategies and as a result, they are more likely to become lifelong self directed learners and to maximize their true potential.

The teachers become aware of the students’ learning styles and they can therefore incorporate teaching-learning strategies which are tailored to meet the students’ learning preferences. This would not only create an efficient learning environment, but it would also motivate the students to achieve academic success.

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Australian Journal of Basic and Applied Sciences.2011; 5 (9):122–27. Ding Y, Liu J, Ruan H, Zhang X. Learning Preferences to Physiology of Undergraduate Students in a Chinese Medical School. IJEME.2012; 2 (2):1–5. Choudhary R, Dullo P, Tandon R V. Gender differences in learning style preferences of first year Medical students.

Pak J Physiol.2011; 7 (2):42–45. Sankey MD, Birch D, Gardiner M W. The impact of multiple representations of content using multimedia on learning outcomes across learning styles and modal preferences. International Journal of Education and Development using Information and Communication.

Technology.2011; 7 (3):18–35. Pashler H, McDaniel M, Rohrer D, Bjork R. Learning Styles Concepts and Evidence. Psychological Science in the Public Interest.2008; 9 (3):105–19. Baykan Z, Nacar M. Learning styles of first year medical students attending Erciyes University in Kayscri,Turkey. Adv Physiol Educ.2007; 31 :158–60.

Lujan H, DiCarlo S. First-year medical students prefer multiple learning styles. Adv Physiol Educ.2006; 30 (1):13–16. Antepohl W, Herzig S. Problem-based learning versus lecture-based learning in a course of basic pharmacology: a controlled, randomized study.

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NASSP Bulletin.2005; 89 :67–89. : The Learning Styles and the Preferred Teaching—Learning Strategies of First Year Medical Students
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Which is the most effective form of teaching?

What Is the Best Method of Teaching? – There is no “best” method of teaching. However, many researchers today agree that including more student-centered learning approaches in the classroom can improve learning. Using only a teacher-centered approach leaves out many skills and learning opportunities for students.

Yet, there may still be space for teacher-centered learning for some specific topics and learning objectives. However, teacher-centered learning shouldn’t be the only strategy in your teacher toolbox. The bottom line is that each teacher needs to find a teaching style that fits his or her personality.

An effective teacher is a passionate teacher who is confident in what they’re doing! So, if any of the strategies on this list of teaching methods intrigues you, why not look into it a bit more? You might discover a new method that motivates your students and improves their learning and your teaching experience! Are you looking for a new tool in your teacher toolbox for teaching maths in a fun, engaging way that builds a deep understanding of the subject? Try Happy Numbers (it’s free to try!) and watch your students grow 1.5 grade levels in just one school year!
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What is the most effective learning method?

The Most Effective Learning Techniques – If you have only limited time to read this page, at least check out the following two points. For further details, click on the links to learn more. Based on decades of learning science research, the two most effective methods known to date are:

Spaced practice / distributed practice – learning that occurs over multiple sessions at different points in time (for example, revisiting a textbook chapter once every three days). This technique refers to when you should be preparing for course exams (that is, multiple sessions spread out over several weeks).

► Further information: Spaced Practice

Retrieval practice / practice testing – instead of simply restudying information, attempting to recall that information from memory (such as by taking a practice test). This technique refers to what you should be doing to prepare for course exams (that is, test yourself via practice tests or other recall-based techniques).

► Further information: Retrieval Practice Spaced practice involves when you should “study” and retrieval practice involves how you should “study”. When you use both (for instance, you can prepare for your exams using a spaced practice schedule and then use retrieval practice during each session), they make a powerful combination.

Additionally, if you perform retrieval practice across multiple days – and, each time, practice recalling information until you attain 100% accuracy (a method called successive relearning ) – then recent research shows that your ability to retain that information over long periods of time is maximized.6 Finally, besides spaced and retrieval practice, there are some additional learning techniques that you may wish to try.

These included interleaved practice, self-explanation, and others. ► Further information: Other Learning Techniques
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Which is best theoretical or practical?

Theoretical Knowledge Vs Practical Application User Rating: 4 / 5 Manish Ramnani “The task of the modern educator is not to cut down jungles, but to irrigate deserts.” -C.S. Lewis The knowledge you get is more important, than from where you get that knowledge. You can easily find examples of people who went or didn’t went to school but rather they went on to have a great success.

Theoretical knowledge and practical knowledge are like two sides of the coin, both are equally important. It is necessary to understand both the ends of the spectrum. It takes hours to acquire the art of practical techniques putting in the time to understand how these techniques fit into a larger context and how they work.

Theoretical knowledge means learning anything without adopting practical approach. It helps you understand why one technique is successful while the other fails. Theory teaches you the experience of others. Theoretical knowledge can give you a deeper understanding of a concept through seeing it in the context of understanding the why behind it.

  • Practical education is better because it makes you capable enough to know how things happen in the real world.
  • The best part of practical application is whatever we learn through the practical way that knowledge will remain with us for a longer period.
  • In practical application, we learn the facts in an interesting manner which are the best part of learning.

If you enjoy your study then you will never get bored or feel nervous of it. Today our education system needs a practical approach therefore, they put prominence on the experience of ‘hands on learning’. Practical knowledge can give the best exposure of learning.

  • The scope of practical knowledge is very wide, there are some things you can only learn through doing and experiencing.
  • For e.g.: An “on the job” experience which is also called Internship.) Practical knowledge can often lead to a deeper understanding of a concept through the act of personal experience.

Theoretical learning is what the knowledge is about and the practical application is how the knowledge learnt needs to be implemented in certain real life situations. The mode of practical application along with theory gives everyone a clear explanation about the facts.

  1. Theory teaches about the experiences of others while by practically experiencing the particular task you can build your own experiences.
  2. Philosophically, knowledge is intangible but the practical application made it tangible by applying those skills in practice.
  3. Having learnt the difference between theoretical knowledge and practical application.

Let’s take an example of VESIM and the exposure it provided not only theoretical knowledge but also practical application. Right from Sell-On activity we were spurred to take on a practical approach and it seemed to continue as and when our MBA journey was progressing then be it the Swachh Bharat Abhiyan, Tree Plantation drive, Literati Fest, Basic 18, Yuva for Seva and the summer internship to the annual function, the Navratri function by CGPT there were ample opportunities created for us to successfully learn the art of management through practical approach of knowledge.
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Why is practical learning better?

Practical learning – Another challenge can be helping students to learn from practical work. It’s important to make sure you have clear learning objectives for the piece of practical work you are about to carry out and to understand the role you will play in helping the students reach this objective.

Practical work can in fact facilitate learning in the classroom. Using a practical activity can help structure a lesson and improve engagement and knowledge retention: Many students learn more easily by actually “doing” activities. This is particularly relevant in practical science activities. When studying a particular topic, we often begin with a practical exercise in the laboratory with an open-ended exercise where students are encouraged to make their own hypotheses and then to test these and draw conclusions.

Joan H, science teacher, South Africa
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Why is practical learning more important?

Advantages Of Practical Learning “Knowledge is of no value unless you put it into practice.” – Anton Chekhov. Does hands-on learning have a significant influence on students? Yes! Practical learning helps students learn more effectively. It has been scientifically shown to help students remember information for an extended amount of time.

  • A student’s ability to grasp an idea is enhanced more by doing than by hearing about it.
  • Children must begin learning via hands-on activities as early as possible.
  • Students become successful experts as a result of this skill-based practical education.
  • You can get high marks in theory, but what use is it if you can’t apply it to real-world situations? Here are some advantages of practical learning and why it is crucial for school students: Discourages the Culture of Memorizing Few pupils are fortunate enough to read and retain information to learn.

Students who struggle with memory retention, or “memorizing,” should also be addressed. The strain and stress of memorizing whole chapters or a course curriculum may be enormous. Students might benefit from actual learning rather than simply memorizing facts in many circumstances.

They will be able to study more effectively and achieve better grades due to this. Creates a Love for Learning What do you think is more attractive? A lecture in a classroom or an excursion to a field/factory? It’s critical that kids like and enjoy learning. Students are under a lot of pressure in the classroom, and there is more than the necessary emphasis on tests and exams.

Grades and goals don’t matter when it comes to education. There has to be a setting where students may apply what they’ve learned in class. For example, students’ attention is piqued in a chemistry lesson when escorted to a lab where they may observe and demonstrate chemical reactions.

Includes training You can’t learn anything by reading the same material over and over. However, putting that knowledge into action through experiments or other activities needs a lot of experience. If you continue studying a language guidebook without speaking the language, you will make no progress. When you start speaking in that language, you’ll notice a difference.

As time goes on, you’ll see an improvement. Therefore, unless the theoretical knowledge is turned into practical tasks which are practiced and proven, sitting on the side with a book or simply learning is not beneficial in the long run. Generates a More Meaningful Impact It is possible to improve your comprehension of a subject through interactive education, such as practical learning.

  • Learning by doing rather than reading about it in a textbook or a research paper is imperative to develop the right knowledge that broadens your horizon.
  • A student’s ability to learn and comprehend is greatly enhanced when they engage in this type of learning, creating a larger impact on their mind and behavior.

Improves Knowledge Retention Our brains retain information when we study to memorize it in preparation for a test; this does not serve its intended goal because our brains forget it so quickly. You strive too hard to memorize a theory or an explanation word-for-word, yet you constantly miss crucial details or seem to forget the information after the exams.

  1. Nowledge gained via practical applications, such as experiments, real-world projects, or educational excursions, are those we carry with us for a long time.
  2. Allows pupils to put what they’ve learned in the classroom into practice.
  3. It is critical to the acquisition of new information and abilities.
  4. When students study in a hands-on environment, they have a better time remembering what they’ve learned and are more likely to stick with what they’ve learned longer.

This helps them in their career, it creates a safe and secure spot for them in their field of choice because they are used to the practicality of their knowledge as opposed to just theory. : Advantages Of Practical Learning
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Who is the best educational theorist?

The list includes Lev Vygotsky, Jean Piaget, B.F. Skinner, Jerome Bruner, Benjamin Bloom, and Howard Garnder.
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What are the 4 main theories?

Four Major Sociological Theories. The four main theoretical perspectives are symbolic interactionism theory, social conflict theory, structural-functional theory, and feminist theory.
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What are the 3 educational theories?

Although there are many different approaches to learning, there are three basic types of learning theory: behaviorist, cognitive constructivist, and social constructivist. This section provides a brief introduction to each type of learning theory. The theories are treated in four parts: a short historical introduction, a discussion of the view of knowledge presupposed by the theory, an account of how the theory treats learning and student motivation, and, finally, an overview of some of the instructional methods promoted by the theory is presented.

Behaviorism Cognitive Constructivism Social Constructivism
View of knowledge Knowledge is a repertoire of behavioral responses to environmental stimuli. Knowledge systems of cognitive structures are actively constructed by learners based on pre-existing cognitive structures. Knowledge is constructed within social contexts through interactions with a knowledge community.
View of learning Passive absorption of a predefined body of knowledge by the learner. Promoted by repetition and positive reinforcement. Active assimilation and accommodation of new information to existing cognitive structures. Discovery by learners is emphasized. Integration of students into a knowledge community. Collaborative assimilation and accommodation of new information.
View of motivation Extrinsic, involving positive and negative reinforcement. Intrinsic; learners set their own goals and motivate themselves to learn. Intrinsic and extrinsic. Learning goals and motives are determined both by learners and extrinsic rewards provided by the knowledge community.
Implications for teaching Correct behavioral responses are transmitted by the teacher and absorbed by the students. The teacher facilitates learning by providing an environment that promotes discovery and assimilation/accommodation. Collaborative learning is facilitated and guided by the teacher. Group work is encouraged.

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What you mean by theoretical?

: relating to or having the character of theory : abstract. : limited to theory or speculation : speculative. theoretical physics. : existing only in theory : hypothetical.
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What is an example of theoretical?

To theoretically define is to create a hypothetical construct. This method of operationalization is not to be confused with operationally defining. An example of a theoretical definition is that of ‘Heat’ in physics, which actually puts forth an entire theory of heat (involving accelerating molecules, etc.).
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What is an example of theoretical knowledge?

For example, if Annie came to know that the New England Patriots won Superbowl LIII by reading it in the paper, then her knowledge is theoretical by our definition. Yet saying that Annie’s knowledge that the New England Patriots won the Super- bowl is theoretical might come across as slightly odd.
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Is MBBS theoretical or practical?

MBBS requires both theoretical and practical knowledge of senior secondary level: Supreme Court of India To meet to the criteria of equivalence, all the subjects must have been studied, and practical examinations attempted at the 10+2 or equivalent level must have been conducted.

  1. To be eligible for admission, the candidate should produce clear and categorical material to show that they underwent the necessary years of study in all the stipulated subjects.
  2. This assertion was made by the honorable Supreme Court of India presided by J.L.
  3. NAGESWARA RAO and J.S.
  4. RAVINDRA BHAT in the case of KALOJI NARAYANA RAO UNIVERSITY OF HEALTH SCIENCES vs.

SRIKEERTI REDDI PINGLE & ORS. The Kaloji Narayana Rao University of Health Sciences appealed a decision of the Telangana High Court which allowed a writ petition preferred by the respondent. The respondent student had sought a direction declaring the action of the University in treating her as ineligible for admission to the MBBS Course as illegal.

  • The student had applied, pursuant to a notification issued by the University for Admission into the management quota for NRI candidates for the MBBS/BDS course.
  • The University published a list containing the respondent student’s name, clarifying that she had not furnished proof of study of Biological Science subject in the qualifying examination.

The respondent then secured a letter from the Consulate General of India in New York, stating that she had successfully completed the 12th grade from one Conrad High School, West Hartford, Connecticut and that it was equivalent to the 12-year Senior Secondary Board Examination Certificate of India.

The University issued a notification seeking web option for the second round of online counseling for admission to the MBBS/BDS seats in the management quota. The student approached the High Court and besides relying upon the certificate/letter issued by Conrad High School, she also relied upon a certificate issued by the Telangana State Board of Intermediate Education which declared the equivalence.

The student applied for an interim order and was permitted to participate in the counseling process conducted for the remaining seats without prejudice to the parties’ rights. Thereafter, the University filed an application for vacation of the interim order, made its position clear and spelt out why according to it, the respondent student was ineligible.

The Telangana High Court declared that the University acted arbitrarily in treating the student ineligible. The honorable court held, “The qualification should be equally applicable to the other sub-clauses too, and that there was no difficulty in reading the qualifying clause as lending colour to each of those items.

In the present case, Regulation 4(2)(f) explicitly refers to the subject matter requirement reiterated in all the eligibility conditions from (a) to (e); the substance of the eligibility requirement indeed, is that the candidate should have qualified an intermediate level examination or first year of a graduate course, and studied the subjects of Physics, Chemistry and Biology at this level, along with practical testing in these subject areas, and the English language.
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Is MBA theoretical or practical?

Full-time – This is the original program and was once the only way to obtain an MBA. The full-time program is in-person and most often a 2-year pursuit. During the first year, fundamentals and theories are taught and in the second year, students narrow their focus and choose from any number of specialties.
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What are theory based courses?

In theory-based applied learning, students study a principle or idea on which the practice of an activity is based, and then they apply it through in-class exercises and laboratory activities. In other words, learning by doing. This hands-on approach has always been the hallmark of the college, and the Polytechnic transformation has strengthened it even further.

Over 90 percent of Polytechnic courses now reflect this core approach. For example, mechanical engineering technology and construction management technology students might study the area moment of inertia to learn about how a beam’s cross-sectional shape affects its stiffness before they build a device or structure that will be subjected to heavy loads.

For course material that is less conducive to “hands-on” lab work, in-class case studies and role-playing are popular applied-learning techniques.
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Is theoretical more accurate than experimental?

That’s why predictions based on experimental probability are always less reliable than those based on theoretical probability. In general, the greater the number of outcomes you have, the closer a prediction based on probability is likely to be.
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Why is theoretical knowledge more important than practical knowledge?

Theoretical Knowledge Vs Practical Application User Rating: 4 / 5 Manish Ramnani “The task of the modern educator is not to cut down jungles, but to irrigate deserts.” -C.S. Lewis The knowledge you get is more important, than from where you get that knowledge. You can easily find examples of people who went or didn’t went to school but rather they went on to have a great success.

  1. Theoretical knowledge and practical knowledge are like two sides of the coin, both are equally important.
  2. It is necessary to understand both the ends of the spectrum.
  3. It takes hours to acquire the art of practical techniques putting in the time to understand how these techniques fit into a larger context and how they work.

Theoretical knowledge means learning anything without adopting practical approach. It helps you understand why one technique is successful while the other fails. Theory teaches you the experience of others. Theoretical knowledge can give you a deeper understanding of a concept through seeing it in the context of understanding the why behind it.

  1. Practical education is better because it makes you capable enough to know how things happen in the real world.
  2. The best part of practical application is whatever we learn through the practical way that knowledge will remain with us for a longer period.
  3. In practical application, we learn the facts in an interesting manner which are the best part of learning.

If you enjoy your study then you will never get bored or feel nervous of it. Today our education system needs a practical approach therefore, they put prominence on the experience of ‘hands on learning’. Practical knowledge can give the best exposure of learning.

  1. The scope of practical knowledge is very wide, there are some things you can only learn through doing and experiencing.
  2. For e.g.: An “on the job” experience which is also called Internship.) Practical knowledge can often lead to a deeper understanding of a concept through the act of personal experience.

Theoretical learning is what the knowledge is about and the practical application is how the knowledge learnt needs to be implemented in certain real life situations. The mode of practical application along with theory gives everyone a clear explanation about the facts.

  1. Theory teaches about the experiences of others while by practically experiencing the particular task you can build your own experiences.
  2. Philosophically, knowledge is intangible but the practical application made it tangible by applying those skills in practice.
  3. Having learnt the difference between theoretical knowledge and practical application.

Let’s take an example of VESIM and the exposure it provided not only theoretical knowledge but also practical application. Right from Sell-On activity we were spurred to take on a practical approach and it seemed to continue as and when our MBA journey was progressing then be it the Swachh Bharat Abhiyan, Tree Plantation drive, Literati Fest, Basic 18, Yuva for Seva and the summer internship to the annual function, the Navratri function by CGPT there were ample opportunities created for us to successfully learn the art of management through practical approach of knowledge.
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Why is theoretical yield more than actual?

The percentage yield shows how much product is obtained compared to the maximum possible mass. Molar gas volume can be used to make calculations about reactions between gases.

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The theoretical yield is the maximum possible mass of a product that can be made in a chemical reaction. It can be calculated from:

  • the balanced chemical equation
  • the mass and relative formula mass of the limiting reactant, and
  • the relative formula mass of the product

An actual yield is the mass of a product actually obtained from the reaction. It is usually less than the theoretical yield. The reasons for this include:

  • incomplete reactions, in which some of the reactants do not react to form the product
  • practical losses during the experiment, such as during pouring or filtering
  • side reactions (unwanted reactions that compete with the desired reaction)
  • reversible reactions
  • impurities in reactants

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Is theoretical probability better than experimental?

What is experimental probability? – In math, when we deal with probability, we may be asked for the experimental probability of an experiment. What this means is that they’re looking for the probability of something happening based off the results of an actual experiment.

This is the experimental probability definition. So for example, if you’re asked for the probability of getting heads after flipping a coin 10 times, the experimental probability will be the number of times you got heads after flipping a coin 10 times. Let’s say that you got 6 heads out of your 10 throws.

Then your experimental probability is 6/10, or 60%. What is theoretical probability For theoretical probability, it doesn’t require you to actually do the experiment and then look at the results. Instead, the theoretical probability is what you expect to happen in an experiment (the expected probability).

  • This is the theoretical probability definition.
  • In the case of the coin flips, since there’s 2 sides to a coin and there’s an equal chance that either side will land when you flip it, the theoretical probability should be 1 2 \frac or 50%.
  • Theoretical vs experimental Why is there a difference in theoretical and experimental probability? The relationship between the two is that you’ll find if you do the experiment enough times, the experimental probability will get closer and closer to the theoretical probability’s answer.

You can try this out yourself with a coin. You likely won’t get exactly 50% for both heads and tails from your first 10 throws, but as you throw a coin 50 times or even 100 times, you’ll see the experimental probability’s answer getting closer to 50%.

Practice problems We’ll now see how experimental and theoretical probability works with these questions. Question 1a: Two coins are flipped 20 times to determine the experimental probability of landing on heads versus tails. The results are in the chart below: What is the experimental probability of both coins landing on heads? Solution: We are looking for the experimental probability of both coins landing on heads.

Looking at the table in the question, we know that there were 4 out of 20 trials in which both coins landed on heads. So the experimental probability is 4 20 \frac, which equals to 1 5 \frac (20%) after simplifying the fraction Question 1b: Calculate the theoretical probability of both coins landing on heads.

  1. Solution: Now, we are looking for the theoretical probability.
  2. First, there are 4 possible outcomes (H,H), (H, T), (T,H), (T, T).1 out of the 4 possible outcomes has both coins land on heads.
  3. So, the theoretical probability is 1 4 \frac or 25% Question 1c: Compare the theoretical probability and experimental probability.

From the previous parts, we know that the experimental probability of both coins landing on head equals 20%, while in theory, there should be a 25% chance that both coins lands on head. Therefore, the theoretical probability is higher than the experimental probability.

Question 1d: What can we do to reduce the difference between the experimental probability and theoretical probability? We can simply continue the experimental by flipping the coin for many more times —say, 20,000 times. When more trials are performed, the difference between experimental probability and theoretical probability will diminish.

The experimental probability will gradually get closer to the value of the theoretical probability. In this case, the experimental probability will get closer to 25% as the coins is tossed over more times. If you’re looking for more experimental vs.theoretical probability examples, feel free to try out this question,
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