Which Development In The Student Through Physical Education?

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Which Development In The Student Through Physical Education
Physical education is a course taught in several schools with the aim of bringing fitness and being healthy to be able to perform everywhere and enjoy our day-to-day lives. Physical education plays an essential part in the lives of students that go to schools and colleges especially.

  1. It is very important that schools and colleges motivate their students to keep a balance between their physical activities and their school work.
  2. Physical education plays an important role in living a healthy lifestyle is not only a student’s life but also in people of all age groups.
  3. It is most crucial for children who go to school as it is their growing stage, and they undergo a lot of stress during school.

Many researchers have already proved how important physical activities are for school going students, which is also why many schools have recently started teaching them the importance of physical education and encouraging their students to take part in various physical activities.

Scientifically all these physical activities are proved as important as doing the regular school work. Physical Education plays a key role in developing students’ confidence and competence level to participate in several physical activities that become a major part of students’ lives, in and out of school.

If there is a high-quality physical education curriculum, it will enable every student to enjoy physical activities. It helps them in developing a wide range of skills. It also helps students a lot in other ways, like developing personally as well as socially.
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What can be developed through physical education?

Physical education provides cognitive content and instruction designed to develop motor skills, knowledge, and behaviors for physical activity and physical fitness. Supporting schools to establish physical education daily can provide students with the ability and confidence to be physically active for a lifetime.
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What is development physical education?

Know – Our bodies go through amazing transformations when it comes to physical growth and development. Think about the vast physical changes that occur between a newborn baby and a young adult. Recall the different skills you or the children you know were able to do at different ages.

Physical activity is very important for our overall development and growth. We use our bodies to explore our environment and learn about the world. Through the movement and coordination of the different parts of our bodies we are better able to access our environment; sitting up, rolling, crawling, walking, running, jumping, and manipulating different materials or objects are examples of ways we are able to further knowledge and exploration in our surroundings.

Development of these skills keeps our bodies healthy, fit, and safe. Physical development refers to the growth and refinement of motor skills, or in other words, children’s abilities to use and control their own bodies. These advancements are evident in gross- and fine-motor skills, and they are essential to children’s overall health and wellness.

  • Gross- motor skills involve the use of large muscles in the legs or arms, as well as general strength and stamina.
  • Gross-motor skills include jumping, throwing, climbing, running, skipping, and kicking.
  • Fine- motor skills involve the use of small muscles in the arms, hands, and fingers.
  • They are supported by advancements in perception, or the ways in which children use their senses to experience the world around them.

Children use their fine-motor skills when they string beads, scribble, cut paper, and draw. Fine-motor skills also enable children to perform a variety of self-help tasks, such as using utensils and dressing themselves. There is a great deal of variation in the development of fine-motor skills (Trawick-Smith, 2014).

Preschool children’s motor abilities develop as a result of physical development. As their bodies mature, children progressively strengthen their muscles and are able to better control their bodies. Skill mastery and development, however, are also the result of brain growth and development. For example, consider a preschooler kicking a ball back-and-forth with a peer or caregiver.

This child must have acquired control over muscles and their movement in order to be able to kick the ball. The child also depends upon vision to determine the location, the direction in which to kick the ball, and on hearing for instructions from a peer or caregiver.
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What is the most important development of the physical education?

Why Is Physical Education So Important? – OWIS Singapore It is no secret that appropriate physical activity is necessary to a student’s overall well-being. The benefits of physical education in schools are far-reaching, including both increased student physical health and better academic performance. OWIS students practising football drills In recent years, many schools have cut back on their physical education programmes, placing greater emphasis on academics as they strive to prepare students for college and the workforce. Yet research shows that adults who had regular PE classes in school are more than twice as likely to be physically active as their non-PE counterparts.

In fact, children who have regular Physical Education lessons at school will be likely to experience the following benefits: Physical and Mental Health Well-versed in child development, PE teachers ensure that the curriculum consists of age-appropriate activities that support growing minds and bodies.

They will adapt lessons to make them appropriate for their groups and ensure that they do not overwhelm children with skills or requirements that may be too advanced. At the same time, they know when students are ready to be pushed. PE improves motor skills and increases muscle strength and bone density, which in turn makes students more likely to engage in healthy activity outside of school.

Furthermore it educates children on the positive benefits of exercise and allows them to understand how good it can make them feel. Participating in PE puts children on track to make regular exercise a habit- one that can combat obesity and reduce the likelihood of developing chronic conditions such as heart disease and diabetes.

It also helps to maintain their brain and mental health. By making exercise ‘normal’ from an early age this becomes ingrained in them throughout their lives. Physical education motivates children to expand their skills, as grasping the fundamentals of one sport makes it easier to master the rules of another.

  1. Since students spend a considerable amount of time in school, it is an ideal setting to empower them to take responsibility for their health.
  2. Often a secondary benefit of physical education is that children become more aware of what they are putting in their bodies.
  3. They realise the importance of a healthy, balanced diet and that sugary snacks are not the best way to gain energy for their sport.

They will often want to find out more about their bodies and this again teaches them to care for themselves and others. Studies also suggest that students who are less active are more likely to experience sleep disorders. Regular exercise reduces stress and anxiety, contributing to healthy sleep patterns, which in turn lead to better mental health, immune system functioning, and overall well-being.

  • ‍ Social Skills Physical education that begins in demonstrates the value of cooperation, while being part of a team gives them a sense of identity.
  • When PE teachers model prosocial behaviours, children gain skills that pave the way for healthy interactions and relationships throughout life.
  • This teaches them essential communication skills and social skills.

It helps them become team players, work alongside a diverse range of team mates and be able to support others. Learning the fundamentals of popular sports also provides a constructive way for students to fit in with their peers, especially as they approach adolescence.

Being able to understand a range of sports or hobbies allows them to be part of something bigger than their classroom. They may find a real passion for a particular sport, start attending sporting fixtures and they may even go on to have a career within the sporting industry. Having the opportunities to ignite this type of passion whilst developing a range of skills is hugely important.

Self-Esteem and Character Development Playing team sports in a structured setting reinforces leadership and good sportsmanship. Playing various roles on a team and gaining new skills encourage students to respect themselves and their peers. It also teaches them to be understanding to others and support them through their difficulties.

Gestures such as a hand shake, a pat on the back or a high-five from a team-mate helps to build confidence and camaraderie, and earning praise from coaches or other players also helps to improve self-esteem. This then leads to increasing children’s confidence to trust their abilities and to progress their skills within their sport.

It is important for children to understand that self-esteem should not rely on winning or losing, but in the taking part and learning from every opportunity. Children who receive constructive criticism well are shown to be better at making changes to improve themselves, whether it be at school, in work or in sport. OWIS Sports Day 2019 As they hone their abilities through individual and team sports, children learn self-discipline and goal-setting. They learn that there will always be winners and losers but that it is important to accept this and to get back up when needed, or in turn to encourage those around us to carry on.

  • Discipline is essential for sport and this can be both mental and physical.
  • In sport, children need to follow rules and take orders from their coaches.
  • Sometimes they must accept decisions that they may not agree with.
  • This teaches them an important life skill that will help them throughout their life and careers.
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According to the International Platform on Sport and Development, “Sport has been used as a practical tool to engage young people in their communities through volunteering, resulting in higher levels of leadership, community engagement and altruism among young people.” Better Academic Performance The many benefits of PE carry over from the playing field or gymnasium into the classroom, leading to better academic performance.

  1. Research reveals that children who take part in physical education are better able to regulate their behaviour and stay focused in class.
  2. Often sport gives children the opportunity to take their minds off their academic studies.
  3. It offers the chance for them to relax, release pent up emotions and to spend time having fun with their friends.

At OWIS, PE is a critical component of a well-rounded curriculum. To learn more, visit our page. : Why Is Physical Education So Important? – OWIS Singapore
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How physical education develops the learners through cognitive development?

Research shows that children who engage in more physical activity have larger brain involvement in areas associated with memory and cognitive control. They also show increased concentration and attention span, both of which are foundational to improving the ability to learn other subjects.
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What is the role of physical education in development?

Benefits of physical education classes – There are many benefits to incorporating physical education in your child’s daily life. Here are some of them: 1. Helps achieve academic excellence The quality of your child’s health greatly affects their ability to focus, learn, understand, memorize and repeat.

“Sitting on rickety benches for long hours during exams requires physical strength and mental stamina,” says Dr Haridas, who holds a masters degree in Physical Education from YMCA. “It is common to see children developing poor posture in classrooms resulting in chronic back pain and loss of concentration” he adds.2.

Boosts brain power Being physically active not only keeps the body fit but also makes the brain active. According to a research ‘Effects of Physical Activity on Children’s Executive Function: Contributions of Experimental Research on Aerobic Exercise’ published in the Developmental Review (2010) the author John R Best suggests that physical activity, like aerobics, helps in better cognitive development.

  • The study states: Recent experimental research indicates that both acute and chronic aerobic exercise promotes children’s executive function.
  • Executive function refers to the cognitive processes necessary for goal-directed cognition and behavior, which develop across childhood and adolescence.
  • So, these children perform well in academics compared to their less physically active peers in class.3.

Develops motor skills Playing games help children develop their motor skills and achieve better movement coordination and balance. Physical education is one class that truly helps your child get stronger, more coordinated, and focused by building cognitive and motor skills.

The skills learned during running, stretching, catching, hitting, and throwing are building blocks for the all-around development of the child.4. Relieves stress Exercise or indulging in any physical activity is a great stress reliever. High school students often go through a lot of stress because of academic pressure, peer pressure, homework, tuition, projects, etc.

Without physical activity, it becomes difficult for them to relieve their stress and then they start losing their focus. Being involved in sports and recreational activities also helps build confidence and a sense of competence. As per a study titled, ‘Physical activity and stress resilience: Considering those at-risk for developing mental health problems’ by Nicole J Hegberg and Erin B Tone published in 2014, individuals with high trait anxiety, which may be a risk factor for developing clinically significant mental health problems, may preferentially show psychological, as well as physiological, benefit from physical activity.5.

  1. Improves immunity Having a sedentary lifestyle is not unique to adults.
  2. Children are spending more and more time behind screens today.
  3. But, children who get adequate movement and exercise are generally happier and immune to common diseases.
  4. They don’t easily fall sick or suffer from depression or anxiety.

It is a great way to ensure and sustain a healthy lifestyle.7. Helps build character Being involved in sports helps cultivate qualities like fairness, self-discipline, courage, persistence, and respect. It also helps children develop social and communication skills, which enables them to become good team players.

The early influence of sports supports character development and helps children become responsible adults.8. Promotes good eating habits Good nutrition is the building block of a child’s health and well-being. Physical education classes are an excellent time for the children to understand the connection between the food they eat and how it affects their bodies.

It also helps them make educated decisions regarding their health in the long run.
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How does physical education help students develop skills?

Develops teamwork, leadership, and interpersonal skills – Physical education explicitly teaches the necessary knowledge and skills for working with and relating to others, and provides the learning opportunities to develop these skills. It enables the development of leadership and teamwork skills and encourages students to transfer knowledge to other learning areas.
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What are the types of development?

Physical, intellectual, social, emotional, and moral.
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What is social development in physical education?

Social development is a balanced set of social skills and learned adaptive behaviors that enables an individual to interact well with other people, react positively and avoid behavior that has negative consequences.
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What are the types of physical development?

What is physical development, and why is it important? – Physical development predominantly relies on two things: growth and development. These two areas go hand in hand towards a child’s physical development, although there are of course a number of smaller additional factors.

Growth – how children physically change in size, height and weight Development – how children learn to control their bodies and physical actions

A child’s development will be impacted by their growth, including their size and muscular strength. As a result, physical development tends to follow a sequence, but the age each child hits these milestones may vary. Physical development is also divided into two main areas: fine motor skills and gross motor skills.
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What is the most important development of physical fitness to you and explain why?

Improve your health – There are numerous health advantages to physical fitness. Regular exercise and physical activity promotes strong muscles and bones. It improves respiratory, cardiovascular health, and overall health. Staying active can also help you maintain a healthy weight, reduce your risk for type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and reduce your risk for some cancers.

  1. In other words, staying active is a crucial part of maintaining good health and wellness.
  2. Here are the CDC physical activity guidelines for,,, and,
  3. Encourage your family to be more active, and challenge yourself to meet daily or weekly physical activity goals.
  4. Play outdoor sports with the whole family, schedule time each day to go to the gym, or pick up healthy, active hobbies like hiking or cycling.

National Physical Fitness and Sports Month is a great time to get more active, but don’t stop at the end of the month. Make exercise and physical activity a permanent part of your daily routine! : The Importance of Physical Fitness
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What is physical development in child development?

Infant and Toddler Physical Growth and Development – Physical development refers to the advancements and refinements of motor skills, or, in other words, children’s abilities to use and control their bodies. Physical development is one of the many domains of infant and toddler development.

It relates to the growth and skill of development in the body, including the brain, muscles, and senses. For example, babies learn about the world as they develop their physical senses of sight, touch, smell, sound, and taste. In fact, babies can even hear before they are born. Very early on newborns are interested in looking at faces, bright colors, and contrasting patterns.

Within several days after birth an infant can recognize its mother’s smell and the sound of her voice. From birth, infants are aware of the world around them. Their ability to grow, develop, and learn occurs quickly as they explore the world through their senses and use motor skills.

  1. Gross-motor skills and fine-motor skills develop during infancy and toddlerhood.
  2. Gross-motor skills involve the mastery of large muscle movements, as well as the building of strength in muscle groups like the arms, legs, and core.
  3. Examples of such skills for infants and toddlers include reaching, rolling, crawling, walking, and climbing.

Fine-motor skills involve smaller, more precise movements, particularly movements of the hands and fingers, such as grasping, pointing, and clapping. As their bodies grow, infants and toddlers progressively strengthen their muscles and improve their control and coordination.

Each newly-developed motor skill results from skills learned earlier and contributes to the development of future skills. Newborn infants do not have the strength to hold up their heads. However, as they learn and develop muscle control, they become better able to support their heads, and can move them side to side as they explore and observe their environment.

Skill mastery and development are also the result of brain growth and development. Consider an infant who is starting to walk while holding on to couches and furniture. This child must have acquired strength in the large muscles and adequate control over their body movement.

  • At the same time, the child also relies on vision to determine where to walk and what to hold onto.
  • As infants and toddlers grow, their bodies and minds become more capable of simple and increasingly complex movements and experiences.
  • Parents, teachers, and caregivers must stimulate toddlers and infants to encourage the development of gross- and fine-motor skills.

For example, you may stimulate physical development by encouraging an infant to walk back and forth alongside a couch. Eventually, the child will become accustomed to the balance and muscle movements that are required to walk and be able to do it on their own.

Infants and toddlers depend on their caregivers to meet their needs for safety and security. When infants and toddlers receive consistent, responsive care and attention from nurturing adults, they’re able to establish a sense of trust in the world. This sense of trust and safety in the world is essential to promote growth in all areas of development; including physical development.

When infants and toddlers feel safe and secure, they are better able to use their brains, muscles, and senses to explore the world around them. Below you will find the typical progression of motor skills across the development from infant to toddler for gross- and fine-motor skills, respectively.
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What is cognitive skills in physical education?

Physical Education Learning Activity Types, This taxonomy of learning activity types in physical education is intended to illustrate and suggest tasks that can comprise a curriculum-based lesson, project, or unit that addresses cognitive, psychomotor, and affective learning objectives.

The activity types are rooted in the National Association for Sports and Physical Educations (NASPE, 2004) standards that assist students in building the knowledge, skills, and confidence to achieve, enjoy, and maintain a physically active and healthy lifestyle. The description of each individual activity type includes a list of possible technologies that may be used to support it,

Tools such as exergames, pedometers, and heart rate monitors can provide creative ways to engage in physical activity and its monitoring (NASPE, 2009). The taxonomy incorporates physical fitness and motor skills development activities. Consequently, the two major categories in the taxonomy are physical fitness and motor skill development,

  • Physical fitness is sub-divided into those learning activities that help students build cognitive understanding ( knowledge development and application ) and psychomotor development ( practice and application ).
  • The motor skill development section is also subdivided into cognitive and psychomotor categories.

In all, we have identified 56 distinct learning activity types within these subdivisions of physical education. Teachers should consider planning each lesson, project, or unit to include more than one activity from each of the cognitive and psychomotor tables that follow.

  • In each of the following activity types, affective learning outcomes are linked to explicit cognitive and psychomotor goals.
  • Whether affective learning is a component or the central focus of instruction, specific instructional strategies may be employed to ensure its inclusion.
  • A combination of activity types such as learning game-playing strategies while playing the game and cooperating as a team member, for example, represent important aspects of both affective and cognitive learning in physical education.

In a physical fitness unit, students could self-assess their physical fitness levels, then create fitness programs using that information. The physical education activity types are presented in the tables that follow, along with possible technologies that may be used to support each type of learning activity.

  • Physical Fitness Physical fitness is a physical state of well being that helps people to perform daily activities with vigor, reduces the risk of health problems related to lack of exercise, and provides a fitness base for participation in a variety of physical activities,
  • The activity types below reflect two areas of physical fitness: health-related physical fitness (HRPF) and skill-related physical fitness (SRPF) (Miller, 2005).

Combining and sequencing the activities below can help students to understand, acquire, practice, and use physical fitness, Educational technologies can assist students linking specific physical fitness knowledge and concepts to real-world situations, and to measure, interpret, and prescribe appropriate fitness activities,

Cognitive, The purpose of physical fitness-related cognitive activities is to build knowledge about the effects of exercise on health, to engage in practices that develop and maintain physical fitness, and to value physical activity for health, enjoyment, challenge, self-expression, and/or social interaction.

Knowledge develop ment.

Activity Type Brief Description Possible Technologies
Read text Students extract information from textbooks, laboratory activities, etc.; both print-based and digital formats Web site, electronic book, online databases
Take notes Students record information from lecture, live or recorded games, videos, presentations, group work Word processor, mobile device, tablet, wiki
View images Students examine still images/objects; print-based or digital format Document camera, digital camera, Web site
View a presentation/demonstration Students gain information from teachers, guest speakers, and peers; moving images/objects (video, animations); synchronous/asynchronous; in-person or multimedia Presentation software, video, Web-based virtual demonstration
Explore/examine concepts and/or principles Students gather information/conduct research using print-based and digital sources Web search engines, content-specific interactive tool
Ask questions Students develop questions related to course material/concepts Word processor, wiki
Answer questions Students respond to teacher, peer, written, or digitally posed questions Word processor, quiz software, discussion board, wiki, student response system
Discuss Students engage in dialogue with one or more peers; synchronous/asynchronous Discussion forum, email, text message, videoconferencing
Take a quiz/test Students respond to questions on a test or quiz Word processor, quiz software, Web site, student response system
Create a representation Students develop a representation of a physical fitness concept or process (in text, images, presentation, concept map, etc.). Drawing software, concept mapping software, presentation software, video camera

Knowledge application.

Activity Type Brief Description Possible Technologies
Learn a procedure Students learn how to use equipment safely and appropriately Video demonstration, Web site, text file
Practice a procedure Students practice using equipment and software, measuring and collecting data Realtime data collection tool, content-specific software
Select a health-related physical fitness test Students learn the correct form(s) for and choose relevant test(s) to measure a physical fitness component (e.g., muscular strength, agility, coordination) e -book, Web site, virtual demonstration
Generate/collect data (pre- and post-) Used in: Physical Activity Tracker (elementary) Students generate data (e.g. heart rate, number of sit-ups, etc.) by performing and administering HRPF tests Realtime data collection tools, content-specific assessment software
Analyze data Used in: Physical Activity Tracker (elementary) Students compare and contrast data collected against criteria and/or previous analyses Spreadsheet, mobile device
Set goals Based upon previous data analysis, students identify appropriate physical fitness goals Word processor, content-specific assessment software
Maintain a physical activity log Students record a log of activities, perceptions, reflections on feelings; both in school and outside school Concept mapping software, word processor, spreadsheet
Create a fitness plan Students design and modify individualized fitness plans to address specific goals (e.g., to improve flexibility, endurance) Concept mapping software, word processor, spreadsheet
Observe and evaluate self and/or peers Students observe their own or a peers performance and analyze the performance against predetermined criteria (form and/or product) Digital camera, digital video camera, content-specific assessment software, realtime data collection tool
Provide feedback & recommendations Students use information from fitness assessments to improve selected physical fitness components Word processor, videoconferencing, audiorecorder, discussion forum
Demonstrate/teach a physical fitness concept or principle Students share their understanding of a physical fitness concept or principle Digital camera, digital video camera, presentation software, realtime data collection tool

Psychomotor. Psychomotor learning activity types help learners to practice and apply health and skill-related physical exercises to develop and maintain a healthy lifestyle. The sequence of these activities—in that they appear following the knowledge-related activities described above—demonstrates how students can engage in activities to understand, acquire, practice, and perform appropriate exercises in to improve physical fitness.

Activity Type Brief Description Possible Technologies
Do an exercise/calisthenics Students select and perform an appropriate exercise to improve a specific component of physical fitness Exergames
Practice an exercise Students continue to do a previously-learned exercise to develop and improve a specific component of physical fitness Exergames
Practice various types of physical conditioning Students practice a variety of physical activities to develop a component of physical fitness Exergames
Evaluate and revise physical performance Students review, consider, and make changes to an exercise performance based upon feedback from teachers and/or peers Exergames, digital video camera

table>

Activity Type Brief Description Possible Technologies Demonstrate/teach a physical fitness concept or principle Students communicate their understanding of a fitness concept or principle Digital camera, digital video camera, presentation software, realtime data collection tool Create an exercise or exercise routine Students create a series of movements to address a particular fitness concept and perform them Digital camera, digital video camera, presentation software, Web site, Web authoring software Maintain a personal fitness program Students incorporate fitness-related components in a conditioning program Exergames

Motor Skill Development Motor skill development activity types reflect three stages of motor skill acquisition: cognitive (understanding), stage associative (practice), and stage autonomous (automatic) learning (Fitts & Posner, 1967). Combining and sequencing the activities below can help students to understand, acquire, practice, and perform motor skills automatically,

Activity Type Brief Description Possible Technologies
Read text Students extract information from paper-based and digital resources Web site, electronic book, online database
Take notes Students record information from lecture, live or recorded game, video, presentation, group work Word processor, mobile device, tablet, wiki
View images Students examine still images/objects; print-based or digital format Document camera, digital camera, Web site
View a demonstration Students gain information from teachers, guest speakers, and peers; moving images/objects (videos, animations); synchronous/asynchronous; in-person or multimedia Presentation software, video, Web-based virtual demonstrations
Explore/examine concepts, rules, and/or strategies Students gather information/conduct research using print-based and digital sources Web search engines, content-specific interactive tools
Ask questions Students develop questions related to course material/concepts Word processor, wiki
Answer questions Students respond to teacher, peer, written, or digitally posed questions Word processor, quiz software, student response system, discussion board, wiki
Discuss Students engage in dialogue with one or more peers; synchronous/asynchronous Discussion board, email, text message, videoconferencing
Take a quiz/test Students respond to questions on a test or quiz Word processor, quiz software, Web site, student response system
Create a representation Students develop a representation of a movement concept or skill (in text, images, presentation, concept map, etc.). Drawing software, concept mapping software, presentation software, digital video camera
Create a game Combine rules, strategies, and motor skills to form a new way to play a game Drawing software, concept mapping software, word processor, digital video camera
Plan for collaboration in a game situation Students develop a strategy or game plan to address specific goals Concept mapping software, word processor, spreadsheet

Knowledge application.

Activity Type Brief Description Possible Technologies
Do movement analysis Students assess movement patterns and/techniques to improve performance Movement analysis software
Generate/collect data Students generate data by performing motor skill Realtime data collection tool, content-specific assessment software
Analyze data Students compare and contrast data collected against criteria and/or previous analyses (e.g. proper techniques) Spreadsheet, mobile device, movement analysis software
Observe and evaluate self and/or peers Students observe and analyze their own or a peers performance. Digital camera, digital video camera, content-specific assessment software, realtime data collection tool
Provide feedback & recommendations Students communicate the results of performance analysis and provide recommendations to improve motor skills. Word processor, videoconferencing, audiorecorder, discussion forum
Set goals Students determine appropriate motor goals based upon observations and/or movement analysis. Word processor, content-specific assessment software
Plan a training program Students design a training program for skill development and/or improvement based upon self/peer evaluation Digital camera, digital video camera, presentation software, Web site, Web authoring software

Psychomotor. Psychomotor learning activity types focus on practicing and applying motor skills that lead to the automatic performance of those skills. The sequence of these activities—in that they appear following the knowledge-related activities described above—demonstrates how students can engage in activities to understand, acquire, practice, and perform appropriate exercises to improve motor skill performance.

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Activity Type Brief Description Possible Technologies
Imitate/execute the mechanics of a motor skill Students imitates specific skill mechanics over and over to address a particular motor skill (e.g. stance, follow-through, etc.) Digital video camera, Web site, Exergames
Refine the performance of each part of the motor skill The students practice parts of a motor skill separately. (e.g. a spike in volleyball can be broken down into run up, stepping, jumping and striking). Digital video camera, movement analysis software, Exergames
Combine parts of a motor skill in a sequence Students practice the whole motor skill (e.g. a spike in volleyball) Exergames
Adjust the sequence the motor skill Students make corrections to the performance of a motor skill in response to feedback Digital video camera, movement analysis software

Automatic performance.

Activity Type Brief Description Possible Technologies
Perform a motor skill automatically Students practice of one or more motor skills without thinking Exergames
Participate in a game Students select and apply specific sports tasks (e.g. motor skills), rules, and/or strategies in an individual or team-based game-play situation Exergames
Collaborate and strategize in a game Students work as a team to apply relevant knowledge and skills during a controlled game-play situation Exergames
Modify & adapt performance Students revise, consider, and make changes to a performance based upon feedback from teachers and/or peers Exergames, digital video camera
Demonstrate/teach the mechanics of a skill Students share their understanding of a game concept or principle Digital camera, digital video camera, presentation software, realtime data collection tool

References Fitts, P.M., & Posner, M.I. ( 1967). Human performance. Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole. Miller, D.K. (2010). Measurement by the physical educator: Why and how (6th ed.). Boston, MA: McGraw Hill. National Association for Sport and Physical Education. (2009), Appropriate use of instructional technology in physical education, Reston, VA: Author. National Association for Sport and Physical Education. (2004). Moving into the future: National standards for physical education (2nd ed.). Reston, VA: Author.

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What is the importance of physical activities to you as a student?

Searching for your content. GRAND RAPIDS, Mich., Nov.2, 2021 /PRNewswire/ – The benefits of physical activity for school-aged children are proven. Healthy school environments help students achieve their academic potential and support the development of life-long healthy habits.

Better focus in school. When the brain activates following exercise, it can better concentrate and helps improve memory and information retention. This helps students to perform better and learn more information during lessons. Improves school attendance, Students who participate in regular physical activity are less likely to get sick and be absent. The immune system gets stronger and ready to fight illnesses better. Better academic performance. Studies show that students who are physically active get better grades. These students also perform better on standardized tests and have higher graduation rates. Builds a strong, healthy body. Students that develop a routine for physical activity when they are younger lower their risk of obesity, heart disease, high blood pressure, and other life-altering diseases and conditions. This helps them build a healthier and stronger body for a longer life. Improves sleep quality. Students that participate in physical activity get better sleep and achieve a deeper sleep that helps their body to recover from exercise. Better sleep increases their ability to focus or concentrate their energy levels, and better manage stress. Reduces risk of anxiety and depression. Activity helps release endorphins, feel-good hormones, that help reduce stress therefore relieving feelings of anxiety and depression. Develops better social and problem-solving skills. Participating in activities that include working with others on a team or a group help students develop positive social and problem-solving skills. Students learn to cooperate with others, encourage teammates, and achieve a goal. Build self-confidence. Finding a skill, activity, or sport a student can find success at helps build self-confidence which helps students try new skills, learn new information, and take risks. More energy. A body in motion, stays in motion. When a student participates in regular physical activity, they will have more energy and be alert throughout their day. This helps them engage in their learning and enjoy class. It’s fun. It’s important for all students to just have fun! Finding an activity a student enjoys and finds pleasure in will help increase the likelihood of them participating in physical activity for their lifetime.

Be a partner with your child’s teacher and school in getting them physically active! About Vista Charter Academy: Vista Charter Academy, managed by National Heritage Academies, is a free, public charter school serving students in kindergarten through eighth grade. For information, visit vistacharteracademy.org, SOURCE Vista Charter Academy
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What are 5 benefits of physical education?

Physical Activity Facts The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, 2nd edition recommend that children and adolescents ages 6 to 17 years do 60 minutes or more of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity daily.2 Regular physical activity can help children and adolescents improve cardiorespiratory fitness, build strong bones and muscles, control weight, reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression, and reduce the risk of developing health conditions such as: 1

  • Heart disease.
  • Cancer.
  • Type 2 diabetes.
  • High blood pressure.
  • Osteoporosis.
  • Obesity.

Physical inactivity can

  • Lead to energy imbalance (e.g., expend less energy through physical activity than consumed through diet) and can increase the risk of becoming overweight or obese.14
  • Increase the risk of factors for cardiovascular disease, including hyperlipidemia (e.g., high cholesterol and triglyceride levels), high blood pressure, obesity, and insulin resistance and glucose intolerance.1,5,6
  • Increase the risk for developing type 2 diabetes.1,7
  • Increase the risk for developing breast, colon, endometrial, and lung cancers.1
  • Lead to low bone density, which in turn, leads to osteoporosis.1
  • Less than one-quarter (24%) of children 6 to 17 years of age participate in 60 minutes of physical activity every day.8
  • In 2017, only 26.1% of high school students participate in at least 60 minutes per day of physical activity on all 7 days of the previous week.9
  • In 2017, 51.1% of high school students participated in muscle strengthening exercises (e.g., push-ups, sit-ups, weight lifting) on 3 or more days during the previous week.9
  • In 2017, 51.7% of high school students attended physical education classes in an average week, and only 29.9% of high school students attended physical education classes daily.9
  • Aerobic: Most of the 60 minutes or more per day should be either moderate- or vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity and should include vigorous-intensity physical activity on at least 3 days a week.
  • Muscle-strengthening: As part of their 60 minutes or more of daily physical activity, children and adolescents should include muscle-strengthening physical activity on at least 3 days a week.
  • Bone-strengthening: As part of their 60 minutes or more of daily physical activity, children and adolescents should include bone-strengthening physical activity on at least 3 days a week.

These guidelines state that children and adolescents be provided opportunities and encouragement to participate in physical activities that are appropriate for their age, that are enjoyable, and that offer variety.3 The national recommendation for schools is to have a comprehensive approach for addressing physical education and physical activity in schools.10–12 This approach is called Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs.13

  • Students who are physically active tend to have better grades, school attendance, cognitive performance (e.g., memory), and classroom behaviors (e.g., on-task behavior).14, 15
  • Higher physical activity and physical fitness levels are associated with improved cognitive performance (e.g., concentration, memory) among students.14, 15
  1. Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee.2018 Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee Scientific Report. Washington, DC: US Dept of Health and Human Services; 2018.
  2. US Department of Health and Human Services. Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, 2nd edition. Washington, DC: US Department of Health and Human Services; 2018.
  3. National Physical Activity Plan Alliance. The 2018 United States Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth. Washington, DC: National Physical Activity Plan Alliance, 2018.
  4. Loprinzi PD, Lee I, Andersen RE, Crespo CJ, Smit E. Association of concurrent healthy eating and regular physical activity with cardiovascular disease risk factors in US youth. American Journal of Health Promotion.2015; 30(1):2–8.
  5. Cuenca-Garcia M; Ortega FB; Ruiz JR; et al. Combined influence of healthy diet and active lifestyle on cardiovascular disease risk factors in adolescents. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports.2014;24(3):553–562.
  6. Kriska A; Delahanty L; Edelstein S; et al. Sedentary behavior and physical activity in youth with recent onset of type 2 diabetes. Pediatrics.2013;131(3): e850–e856.
  7. The Child & Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative (CAHMI).2016 National Survey of Childrens Health. Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health;2016.
  8. Merlo CL, Jones SE, Michael SL, et al. Dietary and Physical Activity Behaviors Among High School Students — Youth Risk Behavior Survey, United States, 2019. MMWR Suppl 2020;69(Suppl-1):64–76.
  9. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. School Health Guidelines to Promote Healthy Eating and Physical Activity. MMWR.2011;60(No. RR-5).
  10. US Department of Health and Human Services. Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Midcourse Report: Strategies to Increase Physical Activity Among Youth. Washington, DC: US Department of Health and Human Services: 2012.
  11. Institute of Medicine. Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press; 2013.
  12. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A Guide for Developing Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Department of Health and Human Services; 2013.
  13. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Association Between School-Based Physical Activity, Including Physical Education, and Academic Performance. Atlanta, GA; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Department of Health and Human Services; 2010.
  14. Michael SL, Merlo C, Basch C, et al. Critical connections: health and academics. Journal of School Health.2015;85(11):740–758.
  • : Physical Activity Facts
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    What we developed in physical activities?

    Specifically, physical activity reduces the risk for heart disease, diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, high blood pressure, obesity, and metabolic syndrome ; improves various other aspects of health and fitness, including aerobic capacity, muscle and bone strength, flexibility, insulin sensitivity, and lipid profiles; and
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    What are 4 types of development in PE?

    Physical, social, emotional and cognitive development.
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    What are the five aspect of life that will develop through physical education?

    There are five main aspects of personal health: physical, emotional, social, spiritual, and intellectual. In order to be considered “well,” it is imperative for none of these areas to be neglected. Roger Williams University Health and Wellness Educators (HAWES) want to inform you of ways to maximize your personal wellness.
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