What Were The Grandmother’S Views About Western Education?

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What Were The Grandmother
What were the grandmothers views about What were the grandmothers views about Western education Posted by Isha Agarwal 2 years, 4 months ago The grandmother didn’t like the English school in the city. It was totally different from the village school that was attached to the temple.

She was sad and disturbed. They didn’t teach anything about God and the scriptures at the new school. Nor was she interested in science. She hated music lessons given in the new school. The grandmother didn’t approve of the teaching methods at the English schools due to many reasons. She didn’t like the fact that they only taught about science and nothing on God, the scriptures and spirituality.

She absolutely disapproved of music being taught for she didn’t considered music as something for the gentlefolk but to be the sole monopoly of beggars and harlots. Western education did not please the grandmother at all. : What were the grandmothers views about
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What were the grandmothers views about Western education?

Grandmother associated western education with prostitutes and irrelevance. she didn’t liked western education at all. she believed that this education is of no use. The western education of science and technology made grandmother far from the narrator.
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What did the grandmother think about the education at the English school?

The grandmother didn’t like the English school in the city. It was totally different from the village school that was attached to the temple. She was sad and disturbed. They didn’t teach anything about God and the scriptures at the new school.
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What was the grandmother attitude towards the modern education?

She was very disturbed by the fact that music was being taught in English school. To her music had lewd associations. It was the monopoly of harlots and beggars and not meant for gentlefolk. She said nothing but her silence meant disapproval.
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Why did the grandmother dislike the education of English school?

Grandmother did not believe in things being taught at English schools. She felt unhappy learning that the author was not taught about God and scriptures at his new school.
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What was grandmother’s reaction towards education in the English school class 11th?

She did not believe in the things they taught at the English school. She hated. Western Science and learning. She was pained to know that there was no teaching of God and the scriptures there.
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What was the grandmother’s attitude towards the city education and music lesson at school?

Dear Student, Please find below the solution to the asked query: She did not believe in the things they taught at the English school and was distressed that there was no teaching about God and the scriptures. She was very disturbed by the fact that music was being taught in English school.

To her music had lewd associations. It was the monopoly of harlots and beggars and not meant for gentlefolk. She said nothing but her silence meant disapproval. Hope this information will clear your doubts about the topic. If you have any more doubts just ask here on the forum and our experts will try to help you out as soon as possible.

Regards
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What were the ideas of the grandmother about the city education?

Answer: She thought that education in the city wasn’t not proper because they were not teaching anything about god and they were teaching music which was not good according to grandmother.
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How the grandmother was interested in the education of the author?

Answer. Answer: The author’s grandmother accompanied him to the village school and then went to the temple adjoining it. While the author studied the alphabet at school, the grandmother prayed in the temple and read the scriptures.
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What were the grandmother’s views about teaching music in school?

Answer:- The grandmother was disheartened to hear that the school taught music lessons to the students. She considered music to be a downgraded activity which belonged to beggars and not to the gentlefolk. Besides this, she was disturbed to hear that there was no religious teaching rendered in the school.
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Why could the grandmother not pursue her education in class 6?

Read the extracts and answer the questions that follow. Ques 1. “I was surprised, for I had never seen her cry even in the most difficult situations.” (a) Who is ‘Her’ referred to here? Ans: ‘Her’ refers to the narrator’s grandmother. (b) Which quality of ‘her’ was revealed to the narrator at this moment? Ans: This reveals her helplessness because in the absence of the narrator she was unable to read the next episode of ‘Kashi Yatre’.

  1. C) What was the reason which made ‘her’ cry? Ans: She cried because being uneducated she was unable to read the next episode of ‘Kashi Yatre’ in the absence of her granddaughter. Ques 2.
  2. We would eat and play endlessly, savouring the freedom.” (a) ‘We’ here refers to whom? Ans: We here refers to the narrator and her cousins.

(b) Which occasion is being talked about here? Ans: A wedding ceremony in the neighbouring village of the narrator is being talked about here. (c) What led to ‘savouring freedom’ ? Ans: The narrator and her cousins enjoyed the freedom they experienced in the wedding ceremony in their neighbouring village.

  1. Ques 3. “She bent down and touched my feet.
  2. I was surprised and taken aback.” (a) Who bent down to touch narrator’s feet? Ans: Her grandmother bent down to touch narrator’s feet.
  3. B) What was the ‘feeling within’ when ‘she’ touched the girl’s feet? Ans: It was the feeling of respect for a teacher who had taught her to read Kannada alphabet.

(c) What had the speaker done ? Ans: The speaker had taught her grandmother to read Kannada alphabets so that she was able to read ‘Kashi Yatre’. SHORT ANSWER QUESTIONS Ques 1. Why could the grandmother not be educated? Give reasons. Ans: When the grandmother was young, education for girls was not considered as essential, so she was never sent to the school.

Moreover, she got married at a very young age and had a busy life. Later, when she had grandchildren, she just felt happy cooking and feeding them. So, her education was never thought of by anyone. Ques 2. For what did the grandmother set Dussehra festival as a deadline? Ans: In the absence of her granddaughter, the grandmother had felt too dependent and helpless as she could not read the next episode of ‘Kashi Yatre’.

Due to this miserable feeling, she decided to learn the Kannada alphabet for which she kept Dussehra as the deadline, by then she should be able to read ‘Kashi Yatre’ on her own. Ques 3. Explain the statement, “I knew then that my student had passed with flying colours” in the context of the lesson.

Ans: When the granddaughter gave the novel to her grandmother, she opened it and read immediately the title ‘Kash Yatre’ by Triveni and the publisher’s name. The author knew then that her student had passed with flying colours, i.e., she had been successful at learning the Kannada alphabet. Ques 4. The grandmother remained steadfast in her decision despite her granddaughter’s mockery? Why? Ans: In spite of her granddaughter’s mockery, the grandmother remained steadfast in her decision to study because she believed that if one is determined for a good cause, one can overcome any obstacle irrespective of the age.

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She was determined to learn the alphabet, no matter how much hard work she would have to do for it. Ques 5. Describe the grandmother’s desperation when she was not able to read ‘Kashi Yatre’. Ans: When the grandmother was not able to read ‘Kashi Yatre’, she felt a vacuum in her life.

She was a tough lady and had never cried even in the most difficult situations, but she cried at the helplessness of not being able to read. This desperation led her to decide upon learning the alphabet, even though she was sixty-two-years old. Ques 6. But I know it was not possible. If only I was educated enough.

Describe the circumstances that made the grandmother realize the importance of education. Ans: When grandmother was young, education for girls was not considered as essential, so she never went to school. Once her granddaughter presented her ‘Kashi Yatre’ which had been published as a serial in a magazine.

  1. She identified herself with the protagonist.
  2. Her granddaughter used to read the story to her.
  3. Once her granddaughter was away.
  4. She was unable to read ‘Kashi Yatre’, she felt a vacuum in her life.
  5. Then she realized the importance of education. Ques 7.
  6. What major Hindu belief did Triveni revolve her story around? Ans: The story revolves around a belief, prevailing among most of the Hindus, that going to Kashi and worshipping Lord Vishweshawara is the ultimate ‘Nirvana’.

‘Kashi Yatre’ is a story of an old lady’s struggle who had a strong desire to go to Kashi but could not do so because she spent the money she had saved for the purpose of helping a poor girl getting married.
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Why was the grandmother distressed by the education?

The author’s grandmother was unhappy after knowing that the things taught to him at school were related to western science and learning. Secondly, she did not believe such things that were taught at his new school. She was disturbed that there was no teaching about God and scriptures.
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Why did grandmother hate modern teaching and music?

Explanation: The grandmother did not like the teachings in English School as they focused more on the western form of education. They never taught about God and scriptures. She didn’t appreciate the music to be taught in the schools.
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What type of education did grandmother like to be given to children?

What was grandmother’s concept of proper education of children?

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Posted by Daksh Aggarwal 1 year, 7 months ago CBSE > Class 11 > English Core

2 answers

Angel Audichya 1 year, 7 months ago In the grandmother’s opinion, the proper education for a child meant learning the scriptures and being taught about god.2 Thank You Kirti Deshwal 1 year, 7 months ago The narrators grandmother was a very religious kind of a person and was a very simple kind of a lady,She opinion,the proper education for a child meant learning of scriptures and being taught about God.1 Thank You ANSWER
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What was grandmother’s reaction when the author was going abroad Class 11?

Solution : The narrator had expected his grandmother to be very sad on his going abroad however, it was not so. She was not at all sentimental at his leaving the house.
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What was the grandmother reaction towards?

The Portrait of a Lady Short Questions and Answers (2 Marks) – Question 1. Why was it hard for the author to believe that his grandmother was once young and pretty? Answer: The author had always seen his grandmother as a very old woman. For the past twenty years he had seen her as an old lady with white hair and countless lines running across her face.

Because his first impression about his grandmother was one of being aged, it was hard for the author to believe that his grandmother was once young and pretty. Question 2. How does the author describe his grandfather? Answer: The portrait of Khushwant Singh’s grandfather was hung above the mantelpiece.

He wore a big turban and loose-fitting clothes. His long white beard covered the major part of his chest. He looked a hundred years old. To the author, he did not look the sort of person who would have a wife or children; he looked as if he could only have lots and lots of grandchildren.

Question 3. What stories of the grandmother did the author treat as ‘Fables of the Prophets’? Why? Answer: The author treated his grandmother’s stories about her childhood and the games she used to play to be as old as the ‘Fables of the Prophets’. He had always seen his grandmother as an old, wrinkled, stooped woman and could not imagine her as a young child.

Thus, he considered her stories about her childhood to be a fantasy and a myth. Question 4. Describe the author’s grandmother. Was she young and pretty once? Answer: The author’s grandmother was short, fat and slightly bent in stature. Her silvery white hair was scattered over her wrinkled face.

Hushwant Singh remembers her hobbling around the house in spotless white clothes with one hand resting on her waist to balance her stoop and the other busy in counting her beads. It was difficult for the author to believe that once she too was young and pretty as he had always known her as an old woman.

She had been the same for the last twenty years. To the author, she was beautiful but not young and pretty. Question 5. Elucidate the phrase ‘not pretty but beautiful’ with reference to the chapter. Answer: To the author, the grandmother was not pretty but beautiful.

  1. She was beautiful in a peaceful way.
  2. He remembered her counting the beads of her rosary untiringly.
  3. Her silver locks lay scattered untidily over her pale, puckered face and her lips constantly moved in an inaudible prayer.
  4. She was like the winter landscape in the mountains, serene and content.
  5. Question 6.

Why could the grandmother not walk straight? How did she move around the house? Answer: The grandmother was short, fat and her body was bent due to her age. She was forced to put a hand to her waist to support the stoop so that she could not walk straight.

  • So she hobbled around the house while she was moving around, just like a lame person.
  • Question 7.
  • Grandmother appeared like the ‘winter landscape in the mountains’. Discuss.
  • Answer: The author brings out the inner beauty of the grandmother by comparing her to the winter landscape in the mountains.
  • This comparison shows her calmness and serenity.

Moreover, like the winter, the grandmother too was going through the last stage of her life. Just as the mountains are covered with snow and appear white, the old lady was altogether white with her white clothes, white hair and pale skin. Through the comparison, the author brings out the serenity and peacefulness of the grandmother.

  1. Question 8.
  2. What kind of bond did the author and the grandmother share in the village? Answer: In the village, the grandmother woke him up every morning and got him ready for school.
  3. She would bathe and dress him.
  4. She gave him breakfast, got him his slate and inkpot and then accompanied him to school.
  5. While he studied at school, grandmother used to read the scriptures in the temple.

When the school was over, they would walk back home together and feed the village dogs on the way. Thus, they shared a very strong bond in the village. Question 9. What was the daily routine of the grandmother in the village? Answer: The grandmother would wake up the narrator in the morning, bathe him and dress him for school before giving him breakfast.

Then she would get his writing implements (slate with chalk, reed pen and an inkpot) ready and give them to him. Then she would accompany him to school. While he was in the school, she used to read the scriptures in the temple next door to the school. Then she would accompany the narrator back home and spend the rest of the day with him.

Question 10. Was the grandmother educated? How can you tell? Answer: The grandmother was definitely educated. We can tell this by the fact that when the narrator was studying in the village school, the grandmother used to read the scriptures in the temple while the narrator attended his classes.

  1. As she could read the scriptures, possibly understanding them also, we can say that she was educated.
  2. Question 11.
  3. The author and his grandmother were intimate friends.
  4. How? Answer: The author and his grandmother were very close to each other.
  5. His parents had left him with her in the village.
  6. So, they spent most of their time together.
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She used to wake him up early in the morning. She got him ready for school. She even accompanied him to the school. While returning from the school they enjoyed feeding the dogs. Hence, they were perhaps very intimate friends. Question 12. “That was the turning point in our friendship.” What was the turning point? Answer: The author used to live with his grandmother in the village, where they were always together.

  1. The turning point in their friendship came when the author’s parents called them to the city.
  2. They shared the same room in the city but the grandmother could no longer accompany him to school or help him in his studies.
  3. Gradually they saw less of each other.
  4. Question 13.
  5. What was the grandmother’s reaction towards education in the English school? Answer: The author’s grandmother was unhappy as she could no longer help the narrator in his lessons.

She didn’t know English words or about Western Science. She was hurt to know that there was no teaching of God and scriptures in the English school. She didn’t believe in the things that were taught at the English school. Question 14. Bring out the contrast between the school education in the village and in the city.

Answer: The education in the village school was vastly different from the education in the city school. In the village, the school was next to the temple and the priest himself was the teacher. He taught them the alphabet and the morning prayer. But in the city school, there was no teaching of God or the scriptures.

English and science along with music were taught in the city school. Question 15. Why was the grandmother disturbed when she came to know that music lessons were being given in school? Answer: The grandmother thought that music was associated with indecent professions like prostitution.

She thought that it should not be taught to decent and gentle persons like her grandson. That is why she was disturbed when she came to know that the narrator was being taught music in the English school in the city. Question 16. Which moment of the day used to be the happiest for the grandmother in the city? Answer: After the author and the grandmother moved to the city, she felt lonely.

Her grandson became engrossed in his studies and she could no longer help him. She spent most of her time spinning the wheel. She only rested for a while in the afternoon when she fed the sparrows. This used to be the happiest moment of the day for her.

  • The birds came and perched on her legs and shoulders and some even sat on her head.
  • She smiled but never shooed them away.
  • Question 17.
  • Describe how the grandmother spent some time with the sparrows every day in the city house.
  • How did she feel at that time? Answer: The grandmother usually fed the sparrows in the afternoon by sitting in the verandah and breaking the bread into small pieces before throwing it to them.

Hundreds of sparrows gathered there, chirping noisily. Some even perched on her legs, shoulders and head. She felt very happy at this time. It was the happiest time of the day for her. Question 18. “i was sure my grandmother would be upset.” What was the author sure about? Was he right? Answer: When the author decided to go to abroad for further studies, he was sure that his grandmother would be upset.

But she was not even sentimental. She went to bid him goodbye at the railway station. However, she didn’t talk or show any emotion. She was lost in prayer and her hands kept counting her beads. Question 19. How can you say that the grandmother was a kind-hearted woman? Answer: When she lived in the village, the grandmother used to feed the street dogs with stale chapattis.

When she moved to the city, as there were no dogs in the streets, she started feeding sparrows in the house courtyard. She used to break the bread into little crumbs and throw the crumbs to them. The sparrows perched on her legs, shoulders and even sat on her head but she never shooed them away.

  1. All these actions show that the grandmother was a kind-hearted woman, particularly for animals.
  2. Question 20.
  3. What was the last sign of physical contact between the author and his grandmother? Why did the author think so? Answer: When the author was going abroad for five years for higher studies, the grandmother went to leave him off at the railway station.

He could tell that she was still reciting prayers. The grandmother then kissed his forehead lovingly. That kiss seemed to the author as the last sign of physical contact between them. He perhaps tnought that the grandmother, being old, might not survive for five years.

Question 21. The grandmother’s farewell and reception of her grandson were very touching. Comment. Answer: When the author went abroad, the grandmother came to- the station to see him off. She was not sentimental and was silently praying and counting her beads. She kissed the forehead of her grandson as a goodbye gesture.

When he returned after five years, she expressed her joy by collecting the women of the neighbourhood and singing for hours about the homecoming of warriors. For the first time, she missed her prayers. Question 22. How did the grandmother celebrate the homecoming of her grandson? Answer: After five years, the author was coming home.

The grandmother went to the railway station to receive him. She hugged him and he could hear her reciting prayers. After reaching home, she gathered the women of the neighbourhood. She got an old drum and started singing songs about the homecoming of warriors. That was the first time since the author had known her that she did not pray.

Question 23. What could have been the cause of grandmother’s falling ill? Answer: When the author came back from abroad after five years, grandmother collected the women from the neighbourhood. She kept singing and thumping a drum for several hours. This overstrained her body and this could have been the cause of her falling ill.

  • Question 24.
  • Why did the grandmother stop talking before her death? Answer: The old lady fell ill.
  • She had a mild fever.
  • The doctor told her that she would be all right soon.
  • But the grandmother declared that her end was near.
  • She did not pray that evening.
  • She was not going to waste any more time talking to them.

That is why she stopped talking before her death. Question 25. “We protested but she ignored our protests.” Who protested and why? Answer: The day after the author arrived from abroad, his grandmother was taken ill. She had celebrated his homecoming and perhaps overstrained herself.

The doctor said that it was a mild fever and would go away. But she said that her last hour had come. The author and his family protested about her thinking like this. But she ignored their protests. Thus, she stopped talking to anybody in order to pray and counting the beads of her rosary. Question 26. The grandmother has been portrayed as a very religious lady.

What details in the story create this impression? Answer: The grandmother was a very religious lady. Her lips always moved in inaudible prayer. Her one hand was always busy counting the beads of her rosary. She also read scriptures at the village temple.

  1. When she knew her end was near, she lay peacefully in bed praying and counting her beads till death.
  2. Question 27.
  3. How did the grandmother die? Answer: The grandmother realised that she was going to die soon.
  4. So she continued praying with her fingers busy in counting the beads of her rosary.
  5. She did not talk to anyone.
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After some time, her lips stopped moving. The rosary fell down from her fingers. Thus, she died a peaceful death. Question 28. What role did the grandmother play in shaping the grandson’s personality? Answer: The grandmother played a key role in her grandson’s life from his childhood.

She is the one who took care of him from sunrise to sunset. She indirectly taught him how a person should live a religious life with God, scriptures and values as guides. That is why the grandson was more attached to his grandmother. Question 29. How did the sparrows pay their homage to the dead grandmother? Answer: The grandmother had died.

Thousands of sparrows came and sat in the courtyard next to the grandmother’s body. They were totally silent. Even when the narrator’s mother threw some crumbs of bread to them, they did not eat them. When the grandmother’s body was carried off to be cremated, they flew away silently.
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Why would grandmother accompany the author to his school class 11 English?

The grandmother accompanied author to school so that she could read scriptures in the temple while the author attended the school.
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What good are grandmothers from an evolutionary perspective?

Killer whales, Japanese aphids and Homo sapiens — they’re among the few organisms whose females live on long past the age of reproduction. Since the name of the evolutionary game is survival and reproduction, the phenomenon begs explanation — why live longer than you can reproduce? In the 1960s, researchers came up with the “grandmother hypothesis” to explain the human side of things. Two studies published Thursday in Current Biology take another look at this hypothesis and add new insights into the role grandmothers play. The first hard evidence for the grandmother hypothesis was gathered by Kristen Hawkes, an anthropologist at the University of Utah who was studying the Hadza people, a group of hunter-gatherers in northern Tanzania.

  1. Hawkes was struck by “how productive these old ladies were” at foraging for food, and she later documented how their help allowed mothers to have more children.
  2. If our long post-reproductive lives evolved because of grandmothers, we should be able to find fingerprints of the benefits of grandmothering in many cultures.

But the circumstances of modern life differ drastically from those we faced at the beginning of our evolutionary story. The studies in Current Biology turned to the detailed records of two preindustrial populations, one in what is now Quebec and the other in Finland.

The researchers mined these rich databases to quantify the reproductive boost that grandmothers provide and to help us better understand the limits of their help. In 1608, French Catholic priests in what is present-day Quebec began recording every birth, death and marriage in their parish. As settlers continued to arrive, multiply and fill the St.

Lawrence Valley, parish records ballooned. “We had the data set of the first French settlers coming off the first boat,” says Patrick Bergeron, an evolutionary biologist at Bishop’s University, who co-authored the study. The population was mostly French and mostly farmers and was fairly mobile.

That homogeneity helped the researchers isolate the effect of grandmothers and see if it mattered how close, geographically, a daughter was to her mother. Hawkes explains that this approach adds nuance to previous studies of the grandmother hypothesis, which didn’t directly measure proximity. “After all, if you’re in Quebec but your grandma’s in Cleveland, she may not be much help,” she says.

Sacha Engelhardt, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Bern who conducted research for this study at Université de Sherbrooke, looked for groups of sisters in which some left home and others stayed put. If being close to grandma helps, the homebodies should have had more kids than their adventurous sisters.

It turned out that staying close to grandma paid off in family size. Women who lived 200 miles from mom had, on average, 1.75 fewer children than their sisters who lived in the same parish as their mother. “Women in those days had a lot of kids, on average almost eight,” says Engelhardt. But times were tough, and about half of a woman’s offspring died before age 15.

Such harsh conditions led to a range of reproductive success; the number of grandkids per grandmother in this database ranged from one to 195. Being geographically close to grandma curbed child mortality too and allowed mothers to start having kids at a younger age.

  • Altogether, these results are what you’d expect if the grandmother hypothesis is true.
  • These results are really interesting,” says Hawkes.
  • They took a much more fine-grained approach, and it gives us a clearer picture of the effect of grandmothers.” But if grandmas are so beneficial, why don’t they live even longer — long enough to help their great-grandchildren grow up and have kids of their own? To answer that question, you need to consider not only how much help a grandmother can give but also how the opportunity for a grandmother to help changes over time.

If a grandmother’s abilities deteriorate with age or if there just aren’t as many grandkids around to help, the evolutionary benefits of living longer might disappear. The second study, conducted by Simon Chapman, a Ph.D. student at the University of Turku in Finland, looked at a database of preindustrial Finns to answer this question.

  1. From 1731 to 1895, all births, deaths and marriages were recorded by the state.
  2. Finns moved around much less than the French settlers of the previous study, so most grandchildren lived close to their grandparents.
  3. In Finland too, the presence of a grandmother boosted a daughter’s total number of offspring.

But closer inspection revealed some caveats. The study shows that the opportunity for grandmas to help was not constant over the years. On average, a woman became a grandmother in her 40s, and the number of grandkids she cared for steadily rose, peaking in her early 60s and then diminishing into her mid-70s.

  • Having a grandmother age 50 to 75 increased a toddler’s chance of surviving from age 2 to 5 by 30 percent.
  • But the researchers found that the benefits of having a grandmother petered out after she passed age 75.
  • In fact, the presence of an older paternal grandmother reduced a newborn’s probability of surviving to age 2 by 37 percent.

Why? Too many mouths to feed, according to Chapman. “At this time, paternal grandmothers often lived in the same home as their son and may have required extra care,” he says. That may have shifted resources away from younger grandchildren. Chapman says that together, these results help explain why selection has extended human lives past our reproductive prime, but only up to a point.

  1. Grandma can help when her grandchildren are growing up and she is likely in her 50s, 60s and early 70s.
  2. As both these studies demonstrate, grandmas can make a big difference in these years, and that reproductive boost helps push human life past the normal finish line of old age.
  3. But as grandkids grow older, grandma’s help doesn’t have the same impact, and the evolutionary value of living much longer decreases.

Chapman found that grandmothers’ mortality rates shoot up just when this dip in opportunity for helping arrives. Rosalyn LaPier is intrigued by the results of these new studies. She examines the benefits of grandmothers on a societal and cultural level.

Currently a professor at the University of Montana who studies how indigenous cultures transmit knowledge, LaPier grew up on the Blackfeet reservation in Montana and spent countless afternoons with her grandmother learning about the land and plants that sustain their culture. For most of human history, this kind of knowledge was transmitted orally.

“In North American indigenous communities, you see the transmission of agricultural knowledge across generations,” she says. “In many cases from grandmother to grandchild.”
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What is the grandmother’s impression of the misfit?

What is the grandmother’s impression of The Misfit? He is a good man even though comes from a bad family.
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What did the grandmother think of music as a part of school education?

She hated music. She considered it fit only for harlots and beggars. It was not meant for gentle folks.
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What is the Western education?

An education system that characterize by the process of assimilation and learning of the customs and practices of western culture.
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