What Is Value Education In Environmental Studies?

0 Comments

What Is Value Education In Environmental Studies
Value education is expected to bring about a new sustainable way life. Education, both through formal and non-formal processes, must address understanding environmental, natural and cultural values, social justice, human heritage, equitable use of resources, managing common property resources and the causes of ecological degradation.

Environmental values: Every human being has a great variety of feelings for different aspects of his or her surroundings. True environmental values go beyond valuing a river for its water, a forest for its timber and NTFPs, or the sea for its fish. Environmental values are inherent in feelings that bring about sensitivity for preserving nature as a whole. This is a more spiritual, Eastern, traditional value. There are several writings and sayings in Indian thought that support the concept of the oneness of all creation, of respecting and valuing all the different components of nature. Value system has been altered with time and circumstances. With enormous numbers of people throwing away large quantities of non-degradable waste, it is damaging to the environment and value system must prevent all this through a strong environmental value education system. Pro-environmental actions must begin to move from the domain of individuals to that of a community. Environmental values must stress on the importance of preserving ancient structures. The characteristic architecture, sculpture, artworks and crafts of ancient cultures are invaluable environmental assets. Valuing nature: We must learn to value and respect diverse human cultures. We have a great responsibility to protect life in all its glorious forms and must therefore respect the wilderness with all its living creatures. On one hand, we need to protect natural ecosystems ; while on the other hand, we must protect the rights of local people. We must also attempt to restore degraded areas to their former natural ecological state. Valuing cultures: Every culture has a right to exist. Tribal people are frequently linked closely with nature and we have no right to disturb and disrupt their life. We need to appreciate that many ancient and tribal cultures have a wisdom and knowledge of their own environments that is based on a deep sense of respect for nature. Tribal have produced unique art forms, such as painting, sculpture and crafts, which are beautiful and can enrich living experiences for everyone. The world will be culturally impoverished if we lose this traditional knowledge. Human heritage: The earth itself is a heritage left to us by our ancestors. Heritage preservation is now a growing environmental concern, because we have undervalued much of this heritage during the last several decades and is vanishing at an astonishing pace. Though we admire and value the Ajanta and Ellora Caves, Taj Mahal and environmentally-friendly colonial buildings, we have done little to actively preserve them. As environmentally-conscious individuals, we need to lobby for the protection of the wilderness and our glorious architectural heritage. Equitable use of resources: The equitable use of resources is seen as an essential aspect of human well-being and must become a shared point of view among all socially and environmentally-conscious individuals. In spite of the great number of people in the more populous developing countries, the smaller number of people in the developed countries uses more resources and energy than those in the developing world. Similarly, the small number of rich people in poor countries whose per capita use of energy and resources, and the generation of waste based on the one-time use of disposable products leads to great pressures on the environment. We need to discourage this kind of consumption and need more sustainable lifestyles. Common property resources: There are several commonly-owned resources that all of us use as a community. The water that nature recycles, the air that we all breathe, the forests and grasslands which maintain our climate and soil, are all common property resources. Managing local forests through village-level FPCs has shown that if people know that they can benefit from the forests, they will begin to protect them. This essentially means sharing the power to control forests between the Forest Department and the local people. Ecological degradation: In many situations, valuable ecological assets are turned into serious environmental problems. The changes in landuse from natural ecosystems to more intensive utilization or marginal lands into intensive agricultural patterns or changes into urban or industrial land carry an ecological price. Wetlands provide usable resources and a variety of services, when destroyed to provide additional farmland, produce lower returns. A natural forest provides valuable NTFPs, whose economic returns are high that provided by felling the forest for timber. These values must form a part of a new conservation ethic. Social justice: We need to respect and value the diverse aspects of the societies. If poor are not respected as they are lacking the best things in life, they will rebel, anarchy and terrorism will spread. The developing world will face a crisis than the developed countries, unless we protect the rights of poor people.

View complete answer

What is meant by value education in environmental studies?

Find out more about environmental education and how values play a role in environmental literacy and decision making. See how educators use values as a way to teach EE and help youth better understand how to be good earth stewards. Values play an important role within environmental education.

All human values are linked to satisfying our biological needs. These basic needs of survival (food, water, shelter, clothing) all place demands on the environment. Other values exist (social, political, economic) but the primary values of survival become principle in our daily lives. Since all we have comes from what the earth provides, there is an obvious connection between our values and the environment.

The third goal of Environmental Education (EE) as determined by the Tbilisi Declaration of 1977 is attitudes. The goal states: to help social groups and individuals acquire a set of values and feelings of concern for the environment and the motivation for actively participating in environmental improvement and protection.

Values we develop as youngsters and carry to adulthood are shaped from a variety of sources. Throughout our developing years we are influenced by our family, schools, neighborhoods and churches. Later, we are additionally swayed by the media, social institutions and organizations of membership. Michigan State University Extension states these many factors shape the values we hold as adults and ultimately will pass on to those we foster.

There are stages of value development all people progress through. The initial stage is based on the satisfaction of needs being met and interactions of significant adults. Things are seen as right or wrong, good or bad. As environmental interactions increase, one becomes more influenced by perception and ideas.

An understanding develops that others have feelings and that not everyone agrees on what is right or wrong, good or bad. Influences increase with age and awareness develops about economic considerations, decisions and rules for one’s self and of others. Pros and cons of environmental issues are often resolved by accepting behavior of the majority.

A transition slowly emerges where decisions are made between personal needs and wants and those of one’s groups of membership. Eventually, judgment and reasoning become important tools for determining a position on environmental issues. Human error is recognized even though careful deliberation and thought is given.

  • Hopefully in the end, reflection and decision making create answers to environmental issues that are compatible with the environment.
  • The environmental values we hold come down to a matter of making choices about the environment.
  • Should I use CFL or incandescent bulbs? Can I walk instead of drive? Do I need to purchase a new item, repair the old one or do without? Should I shorten my shower time? The answer to these questions is indeed personal and gives careful consideration to economics, comfort, convenience and social acceptance.

It is not always easy. Teaching environmental values to youth should not be teaching our own values but rather fostering youth to develop their own. Imparting your own values creates a danger that youth are being “brainwashed”. Most environmental educators are environmentalists yet not all environmentalists are environmental educators.

You might be interested:  In What Ways Did Gandhiji And Tagore Differ On Education?

It is important to ask questions and give answers that are non-biased. At the same time, environmental educators ask questions that are intriguing and thought provoking. In doing so, we as environmental educators give value to what we do and increase environmental literacy to those who will be the future caretakers of our world.

This article was published by Michigan State University Extension, For more information, visit https://extension.msu.edu, To have a digest of information delivered straight to your email inbox, visit https://extension.msu.edu/newsletters, To contact an expert in your area, visit https://extension.msu.edu/experts, or call 888-MSUE4MI (888-678-3464).
View complete answer

What are the values related with environmental education?

Environmental Education & Values What Is Value Education In Environmental Studies Environmental Education Environment learning is formally taught by classroom teachers and is a prominent component in the cycle of integrated topics covered by teachers in the planned cycle of learning. Environmental learning is also one of the ‘through lines’ which has an emphasis in the classroom on a regular basis.

Learning in this area is supported by classroom structures which nominate duties regarding energy management, recycling and waste management responsibilities to children. Children have a natural passion for environmental learning and topics and issues for discussion and investigation come into the life of a classroom on a regular basis.Brunswick North West Primary School employs a garden and environmental educator to operate a garden based program for children.

This program aims to assist the school in establishing and maintaining an environmentally sustainable productive food garden. The program also aims to integrate the garden into the school curriculum with garden-based activities which support healthy food choices and develop knowledge about ecosystems and our connection to the natural world.

This program engages the school community with a number of parents involved in regular garden and maintenance work around the school. The school is very fortunate to have an active group of parents and grandparents who work tirelessly to create an attractive and safe environment for our children. Environmental Values The environmental values of Brunswick North West Primary School support a lifelong approach to learning aimed at helping children to understand and appreciate their connection to, and impact upon the natural environment.

Our school community believes every child should have the opportunity to benefit from a quality education where they learn the values, behaviour and lifestyles required for a sustainable future.A sustainable society is based on a set of values, including:

Respect, care and compassion for ourselves, others and our environment Responsibility for our actions Acknowledgment of the importance of all life on earth Understanding and inclusion of all peoples and perspectives.

Our schools approach to sustainability is through:

Governance that supports sustainability policies, procedures and programs Curriculum that is developed and delivered on the principles of environmental education for sustainability Responsive resource management and innovation, including utilities, facilities and the creation of natural environments within the school Partnerships, alliances and networks with government, communities and business Implementation and evaluation of strategies and actions to reduce the school’s ecological footprint

Brunswick North West Primary School has adopted a whole-school approach to developing a sustainable lifestyle and policy development which reflects our environmental values. This includes making decisions based on sustainable practices with regard to purchasing, energy consumption, water usage, recycling and waste disposal.
View complete answer

What is value education How does it help to maintain a sustainable environment?

Value Education – Value education is a process of teaching and learning about the ideals that society considers them to be important. Value education can take place in different forms, but the main aim of providing it to students in their educational institutions is to make them understand the importance of good values; use and reflect them in their behaviour and attitudes; and finally contribute to the society through their good responsibility and ethics.

In simpler terms, Value education is defined as the process by which people give moral values to others. It can be seen as an activity taken place in an institution or organisation in which people are assisted or helped by others, who are elder or have more experience or have authority over the people.

This activity of value education will be used to make an individual better and it is important to assess the result of it in order to see the long-term well-being of an individual and others. In the words of John Dewey (1966), “Value education means primarily to prize to esteem to appraise, holding it dear and also, the act of passing judgment upon the nature and amount of its value as compared with something else”.
View complete answer

What is value education easy definition?

Value education is the process by which people give moral values to each other. According to Powney et al. It can be an activity that can take place in any human organisation. during which people are assisted by others, who may be older, in a condition experienced to make explicit our ethics in order to assess the effectiveness of these values and associated behaviour for their own and others’ long term well-being, and to reflect on and acquire other values and behaviour which they recognise as being more effective for long term well-being of self and others.

There is a difference between literacy and education. There has been very little reliable research on the results of values education classes, but there are some encouraging preliminary results. One definition refers to it as the process that gives young people an initiation into values, giving knowledge of the rules needed to function in this mode of relating to other people and to seek the development in the student a grasp of certain underlying principles, together with the ability to apply these rules intelligently, and to have the settled disposition to do so Some researchers use the concept values education as an umbrella of concepts that includes moral education and citizenship education Themes that values education can address to varying degrees are character, moral development, Religious Education, Spiritual development, citizenship education, personal development, social development and cultural development,

There is a further distinction between explicit values education and implicit values education where:

explicit values education is associated with those different pedagogies, methods or programmes that teachers or educators use in order to create learning experiences for students when it comes to value questions.

Another definition of value education is “learning about self and wisdom of life” in a self-exploratory, systematic and scientific way through formal education. According to C.V.Good’value education is the aggregate of all the process by means of which a person develops abilities and other forms of behaviour of the positive values in the society in which he lives.
View complete answer

What is value education and its importance?

THE AIMS OF VALUES EDUCATION – This concept is about the educational process that instils moral standards to create more civil and democratic societies. Values education therefore promotes tolerance and understanding above and beyond our political, cultural and religious differences, putting special emphasis on the defence of human rights, the protection of ethnic minorities and the most vulnerable groups, and the conservation of the environment. Characteristics of values education.
View complete answer

What are the four values of environment?

Four types of values are most relevant to understanding individuals’ climate actions: biospheric (caring about the environment), altruistic (caring about others), egoistic (caring about personal resources) and hedonic (caring about pleasure and comfort).
View complete answer

What are the objective of value education in environmental education?

Love, compassion, tolerance and justice which are the basic teachings of most of our religions need to be woven into environmental education. These are the values to be nurtured so that all forms of life and the biodiversity on this earth are protected.
View complete answer

What is the importance of value the environment?

The natural world is an incredible wonder that inspires us all. It underpins our economy, our society, indeed our very existence. Our forests, rivers, oceans and soils provide us with the food we eat, the air we breathe, the water we irrigate our crops with.

  • We also rely on them for numerous other goods and services we depend on for our health, happiness and prosperity.
  • These natural assets are often called the world’s ‘natural capital’.
  • These benefits are also hugely important to the economy – from farming and forestry to leisure and tourism.
  • If you add them all up, the total value of these benefits is phenomenal – at least US$125 trillion every year,

Because nature is free, we often take it for granted and overexploit it. We clear forests, overfish oceans, pollute rivers and build over wetlands without taking account of the impact this will have. By not taking into account the benefits we get from nature, we create huge social and economic costs for ourselves.

You might be interested:  What Is Universalisation Of Education?

We need to look at the value of nature in economic and social terms to help us better understand the full implications of the choices we make. Instead of making decisions based on short-term financial interests, we can look at the longer-term benefits for people and the economy – and of course nature itself.

Using this argument, we’re persuading governments and businesses to take better care of the natural world, so that it can continue to sustain us all into the future.
View complete answer

How is environmental education given as value education helpful to society?

Responsible action is taken to better the environment – EE helps students understand how their decisions and actions affect the environment, builds knowledge and skills necessary to address complex environmental issues, as well as ways we can take action to keep our environment healthy and sustainable for the future. Service-learning programs offered by PLT and other EE organizations provide students and teachers with support through grants and other resources for action projects.

  • View complete answer

    What is value education PDF?

    Values education (alternatively, moral education, character education) is the attempt, within schools, to craft pedagogies and supportive structures to foster the development of positive, ethical, pro-social inclinations and competencies in youth, including around strengthening their academic focus and achievement.
    View complete answer

    Who gave the concept of value education?

    Gandhi on Value Education – By Ravindra Kumar MAHATMA GANDHI’S name requires no introduction because of his invaluable contribution to the national liberation movement of India. His reputation as a true nationalist as well as an internationalist shines like the sun itself.

    • But in the academic sense of the term, he is not considered a great scholar or an educationist.
    • We have not been enlightened by his views on education or on the problems relating to it, through any particular book written by him.
    • There is no special research article available which could have given us a glimpse of his ideas or suggestions on the education system, except his occasional articles on the future of education in India written in a very simple manner.

    The same thing applies to the views he expressed on the subject now and then. Despite this fact, the8 few articles that Gandhi has written in the simplest manner, and the views he expressed on education as a common man are of utmost importance. They provide us with a guideline to proceed towards value education.

    • Not only this, if we apply them even in the modern perspective, they can definitely give a new dimension to our education system.
    • Gandhi once said: “Education means all-round drawing out of the best in child and man-body, mind, and spirit.” As such, education becomes the basis of personality development in all dimensions-moral, mental, and emotional.

    Therefore we can say that in the long run education forms the foundations on which the castles of peace and prosperity can be built. Since ancient times, it is said “Sa Vidya Ya Vimuktaye,” which means that with education we finally attain salvation. This small Sanskrit phrase essentially contains the thought and essence of Value Education that is relevant in all perspectives.

    1. This very concept, when applied to the simple but refined approach of Mahatma Gandhi, can provide us with a new dimension of educational development.
    2. As such, while analysing the views of Mahatma Gandhi, we can examine his views under two main heads: morality and ethics.
    3. Moral and ethical knowledge is the first point on which Mahatma Gandhi’s concept of value education is based.

    Any education system that lacks these two cannot be termed as good. The reason behind such a thought is that, without morality and without ethics, no student, in a real sense, can be considered to be healthy in mental and physical terms because, for it, self-control and good character are essential.

    A person who is not a moralist and who does not differentiate between right and wrong cannot rise to the essential level of a true student. The the attainment of spiritual growth that has been described by Mahatma Gandhi as an essential part of education can be gained only through morality and ethics.

    Seeing it through another viewpoint also proves the same thing, because when we consider education as a means of attaining salvation and also as a support on the pathway to liberation, we cannot differentiate it from spiritualism. Mahatma Gandhi laid down some rules for students so as to ensure that morality and righteousness always be considered as an essential part of education so that every student shall gain in terms of knowledge and spirituality.

    He said that, on the one hand, where students should gain education under the strict regimen of high morals, self-control, and right thinking; on the other, they should also be expected to provide service to the society in general. This includes their respect towards parents, teachers and elders, love for children, following of social traditions and constant awareness towards their duties and responsibilities.

    In order to strengthen morality and ethics in students, Mahatma Gandhi advocated the introduction of religious education. This kind of education brings the values of forbearance, tolerance, and reverence in one’s character. And, in turn, these values are an indivisible part of ethics.

    1. Explaining the importance and need of religious education, Gandhi writes in Young India of 6 December 1923: “A curriculum of religious instructions should include a study of the tenets of faiths other than one’s own.
    2. For this purpose the students should be trained to cultivate the habit of understanding and appreciating the doctrine of various great religions of the world in a spirit of reverence and broadminded tolerance.” Mahatma Gandhi calls upon all teachers to impart proper education of morality and ethics to students both at the school and at the college levels.

    In this regard while suggesting some guidelines for teachers, he says that it is the duty of teachers to develop high morals and strong character in their students. If teachers fail to do so, it means that they depart from their social and national responsibilities and, as such, they are also insincere towards their noble profession.

    • He said that a teacher should lay an example to be followed before society and students.
    • This can only be done when he himself leads his life with high standards of morality and strong character.
    • An ideal teacher should be free from any addiction.
    • He needs to be polite and should set an example of simple living and high thinking.

    He should also remember that wasting time is a sin; therefore, he should be aware of his duties towards students and society. Moreover, he should have a good reputation in society. Therefore it is the foremost duty of students, as well as of teachers, to make certain that moral and ethical knowledge continues to be an integral part of the educational process.

    By doing so, they can contribute to the development of value education. Another important aspect of Mahatma Gandhi’s value education is basic or technical education. The word buniyadi (or basic), which Mahatma Gandhi used in the third and the fourth decades of the twentieth century, meant knowledge or education that could help rural people in the promotion of village handicrafts or to establish cottage industries.

    The ultimate purpose behind his attempt was to make young men and women self-reliant in the economic field. Even in the modern perspective, his idea of buniyadi or basic education is applicable and it does not clash with the concept of today’s job-oriented or technical education.

    In fact, Mahatma Gandhi wanted the students to prepare themselves for technical knowledge right from the days of their primary level of education. In this regard, his logic is not only important but adaptable; it can prove to be a milestone in the direction of value education. It is not that Mahatma Gandhi did not talk of all-round or complete education on different occasions.

    He definitely spoke of imparting education based on curriculum; he, more or less wrote about graduate and postgraduate levels of education. Not only this, as I have just discussed, he laid emphasis on moral and ethical knowledge, which is helpful for character building and for the physical and mental development of a student from the very beginning of his education.

    He clearly believed that without a healthy body; the mind could not be developed fully. It is but obvious that when a child starts his formal education, he enters at the primary level and, step by step, at an age of twenty or twenty-two, he graduates from university. After so many years, if he does not find a goal or lacks a direction to begin his career, then what could be the use of such an education? What is the use of the degree that he has in his hand? After obtaining a degree, students should have a clear direction for their future; they should have no doubts towards their future goal and should be full of self confidence.

    Side by side, they should be self-dependent and capable of tackling unavoidable day-to-day problems. They must not be worried about a suitable job. But, in reality, these days we see that our younger generation is directionless. Our youths are diverted and a feeling of helplessness and dejection is prevailing on them.

    1. According to a survey, there are millions of men and women who, even after completing their studies at graduation, post graduation, and doctorate levels, fail to seek an employment of their choice.
    2. Is it not a failure of our social and educational system? Even after spending the golden years of one’s life in attaining higher education, our youths are not self-dependent.
    You might be interested:  Who Is The Present Education Minister Of Tamilnadu?

    As such, how would they be able to get rid of their day-to-day problems and how would they contribute to the society and the nation? Therefore it is a challenge not only before the youths of this country but also before the educationists, scholars, and those in the government to solve this problem.

    1. To tackle this problem, Mahatma Gandhi’s views can be of great help.
    2. In this reference, he has said that there is a need of result-oriented education.
    3. He said that every child has some special qualities that can also be termed as inherited traits of personality; so at the primary level, a student’s quality and worth should be identified by his teacher.

    A student should gain education according to a curriculum and moral guidance and as such also improve his physical strength. But the teacher should watch and identify his quality that could be of help in his later life. For that purpose, it is necessary that after completing studies up to a certain level, he must, in addition to the three kinds of education-general (according to syllabi), moral, and physical-be provided facilities to gain technical knowledge in accordance with the special trait that has already been identified in his personality by his teacher.

    1. Since by nature he has interest in that knowledge, he will easily gain it; he will become adept in that.
    2. When he completes his study up to graduate level and with this extra knowledge comes out of a college or university, he would have a direction.
    3. As such, even if he does not get a private or government job, he would manage to get through some sort of self-employment on the basis of his technical knowledge.

    At least, then, his education would be considered as result-oriented. This is Gandhi’s view-point pertaining to value education which should be applied in a wider perspective. Its worth lies in the fact that education should necessarily be helpful in employment and its foundations should be laid on morality and ethics.
    View complete answer

    Why value education is essential in environmental studies?

    Value education is expected to bring about a new sustainable way life. Education, both through formal and non-formal processes, must address understanding environmental, natural and cultural values, social justice, human heritage, equitable use of resources, managing common property resources and the causes of ecological degradation.

    Environmental values: Every human being has a great variety of feelings for different aspects of his or her surroundings. True environmental values go beyond valuing a river for its water, a forest for its timber and NTFPs, or the sea for its fish. Environmental values are inherent in feelings that bring about sensitivity for preserving nature as a whole. This is a more spiritual, Eastern, traditional value. There are several writings and sayings in Indian thought that support the concept of the oneness of all creation, of respecting and valuing all the different components of nature. Value system has been altered with time and circumstances. With enormous numbers of people throwing away large quantities of non-degradable waste, it is damaging to the environment and value system must prevent all this through a strong environmental value education system. Pro-environmental actions must begin to move from the domain of individuals to that of a community. Environmental values must stress on the importance of preserving ancient structures. The characteristic architecture, sculpture, artworks and crafts of ancient cultures are invaluable environmental assets. Valuing nature: We must learn to value and respect diverse human cultures. We have a great responsibility to protect life in all its glorious forms and must therefore respect the wilderness with all its living creatures. On one hand, we need to protect natural ecosystems ; while on the other hand, we must protect the rights of local people. We must also attempt to restore degraded areas to their former natural ecological state. Valuing cultures: Every culture has a right to exist. Tribal people are frequently linked closely with nature and we have no right to disturb and disrupt their life. We need to appreciate that many ancient and tribal cultures have a wisdom and knowledge of their own environments that is based on a deep sense of respect for nature. Tribal have produced unique art forms, such as painting, sculpture and crafts, which are beautiful and can enrich living experiences for everyone. The world will be culturally impoverished if we lose this traditional knowledge. Human heritage: The earth itself is a heritage left to us by our ancestors. Heritage preservation is now a growing environmental concern, because we have undervalued much of this heritage during the last several decades and is vanishing at an astonishing pace. Though we admire and value the Ajanta and Ellora Caves, Taj Mahal and environmentally-friendly colonial buildings, we have done little to actively preserve them. As environmentally-conscious individuals, we need to lobby for the protection of the wilderness and our glorious architectural heritage. Equitable use of resources: The equitable use of resources is seen as an essential aspect of human well-being and must become a shared point of view among all socially and environmentally-conscious individuals. In spite of the great number of people in the more populous developing countries, the smaller number of people in the developed countries uses more resources and energy than those in the developing world. Similarly, the small number of rich people in poor countries whose per capita use of energy and resources, and the generation of waste based on the one-time use of disposable products leads to great pressures on the environment. We need to discourage this kind of consumption and need more sustainable lifestyles. Common property resources: There are several commonly-owned resources that all of us use as a community. The water that nature recycles, the air that we all breathe, the forests and grasslands which maintain our climate and soil, are all common property resources. Managing local forests through village-level FPCs has shown that if people know that they can benefit from the forests, they will begin to protect them. This essentially means sharing the power to control forests between the Forest Department and the local people. Ecological degradation: In many situations, valuable ecological assets are turned into serious environmental problems. The changes in landuse from natural ecosystems to more intensive utilization or marginal lands into intensive agricultural patterns or changes into urban or industrial land carry an ecological price. Wetlands provide usable resources and a variety of services, when destroyed to provide additional farmland, produce lower returns. A natural forest provides valuable NTFPs, whose economic returns are high that provided by felling the forest for timber. These values must form a part of a new conservation ethic. Social justice: We need to respect and value the diverse aspects of the societies. If poor are not respected as they are lacking the best things in life, they will rebel, anarchy and terrorism will spread. The developing world will face a crisis than the developed countries, unless we protect the rights of poor people.

    View complete answer

    What are the objective of value education in environmental education?

    Love, compassion, tolerance and justice which are the basic teachings of most of our religions need to be woven into environmental education. These are the values to be nurtured so that all forms of life and the biodiversity on this earth are protected.
    View complete answer

    What is value education and its importance?

    THE AIMS OF VALUES EDUCATION – This concept is about the educational process that instils moral standards to create more civil and democratic societies. Values education therefore promotes tolerance and understanding above and beyond our political, cultural and religious differences, putting special emphasis on the defence of human rights, the protection of ethnic minorities and the most vulnerable groups, and the conservation of the environment. Characteristics of values education.
    View complete answer