Which University Claims The Most Presidents?

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Which University Claims The Most Presidents
Harvard University What College Has Produced the Most Presidents? Harvard University has produced the most Presidents when it comes to their undergraduate school with 8! That includes John Adams, John Quincy Adams, Theodore Roosevelt, Rutherford B.
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What percent of US presidents went to Harvard?

1. Harvard University – Five Presidents – Harvard University takes the top spot when it comes to producing the most presidents in US history, with a staggering 5 Presidents. To put that in perspective, only 44 people have ever served as president, meaning over 10% are graduates from this prestigious university! Included are John Adams, John Quincy Adams, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt and John F.

Ennedy. In reaching this achievement, Harvard has history on its side, being the United States’ oldest university. For instance, founding father John Adams graduated at Harvard in 1755 and served as the second US president between 1797 and 1801, well before most other non-Ivy League universities had been founded.

Harvard has also gone to great lengths to foster a culture of leadership and excellence, unsurprisingly attracting prospective US presidents and world-leaders over the years. The legacy of the Presidents who boast Harvard as their alma mater is evident at the University.

One of the undergraduate residential Houses at Harvard University is named Adams House, named in honour of John Adams and John Quincy Adams. Theodore Roosevelt was known as being one of the best Harvard boxers of his time, Franklin D. Roosevelt was editor of The Harvard Crimson, and JFK produced his class’ annual “Freshman Smoker” show.

It should also be noted the number of US presidents who attended Harvard Law school for postgraduate study, including Barack Obama. Read about how Barack and Michelle Obama used their top-educations to empower their communities here, Did you know – Crimson Students are 4 x more likely to gain admission to Harvard University ? If you would like to understand how likely you are to get into an Ivy League college based on your current scores, use our US College Admissions Calculator!
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How many US presidents studied in Harvard?

Eight Presidents of the United States have graduated from Harvard University: John Adams, John Quincy Adams, Rutherford B. Hayes, John F. Kennedy, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama.
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Which president went to Harvard University?

John F. Kennedy – John F. Kennedy, born into what is commonly referred to as America’s royal family, was groomed for politics at an early age. In 1936, following a brief two-month stint at Princeton, he registered for classes at Harvard. Despite being one of the presidents who went to Harvard, he had some difficulty succeeding academically because he was always his brother Joe’s shadow. He did not develop an interest in academics until much later in his education at Harvard when he began to study political philosophy. Before starting his senior year, he traveled throughout Europe and the Soviet Union to gather information for his honors thesis, which was going to be about Britain’s participation in the Munich Agreement.
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Which president weighed the most?

Bathtub – Here is William Howard Tafts Younger Brother here is william’s wife Taft was the most president. He was 5 feet 11 inches (1.80 m) tall and his weight was between 325 pounds (147 kg) and 280 pounds (130 kg) toward the end of his presidency. He had difficulty getting out of the White House, so he had a 7-foot (2.1 m) long, 41-inch (1.0 m) wide tub installed.
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What 4 Presidents went to Yale?

Undergraduate

School Location President(s)
United States Naval Academy Annapolis, Maryland Jimmy Carter
Whittier College Whittier, California Richard Nixon
Williams College Williamstown, Massachusetts James A. Garfield
Yale University New Haven, Connecticut William Howard Taft George H.W. Bush George W. Bush

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Who attended Yale for 5 U.S. presidents?

With his decision to serve as legal adviser to the U.S. Department of State, Yale Law School dean Harold Hongju Koh continues a tradition of commitment to government or public service that has distinguished the University for three centuries. (See related story,) A number of Yale alumni have been appointed to serve in President Barack Obama’s new administration, and others have served on his transition team.

  1. These appointments include Gary Locke ‘72, the newly named 36th secretary of commerce; Austan Goolsbee ‘91, staff director and chief economist of the President’s Economic Recovery Advisory Board; Hillary Rodham Clinton LAW ‘73, the 67th U.S.
  2. Secretary of state; and Gregory Craig LAW ‘73, the White House counsel to the president.

Yale faculty members are also sharing their insight and expertise in advisory roles to the president. For instance, Yale’s chief investment officer David Swensen, who is also an adjunct professor at the Yale School of Management and a lecturer in economics, was recently appointed by Obama to the newly established Economic Recovery Advisory Board.

  • Five Yale alumni have served as U.S.
  • Presidents, most recently George W.
  • Bush ‘68, the nation’s 43rd president.
  • Two alumni currently serve on the U.S.
  • Supreme Court.
  • In earlier days in the nation’s history, 25 Yale graduates served in the Continental Congress and four signed the Declaration of Independence.

Below is a by-the-numbers look at Yale men and women in public service. • 17 Yale Law School graduates have been appointed to positions in the Obama administration; • More than 40 Yale alumni and faculty members participated in the new administration’s transition team; • 16 graduates have served on the U.S.

Supreme Court, including current justices Clarence Thomas LAW ‘74 and Samuel Alito LAW ‘75; • 5 graduates have been presidents of the United States: William Howard Taft (1878), Gerald Ford LAW ‘41, George H.W. Bush ‘48, Bill Clinton LAW ‘73 and George W. Bush ‘68. • 8 alumni are sitting U.S. senators: Michael F.

Bennett LAW ‘73, Sherrod Brown ‘74, John Kerry ‘66, Amy Klobuchar ‘82, Joseph Lieberman ‘64, LAW ‘67, Bill Nelson ‘65, Arlen Spector LAW ‘56, and Sheldon Whitehouse ‘78; • 52 alumni, including Gary Hart LAW ‘64 and John Ashcroft ‘64, have formerly served as U.S.
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How many CEOs come from Harvard?

Graduate Schools With the Most Alumni Who Are CEOs of Fortune 500 Companies –

Rank College or University Alumni Who are CEOs of Fortune 500 Companies
1 Harvard University 41
2 University of Pennsylvania 23
2 Stanford University 22
4 Northwestern University 20
5 Columbia University 18
6 University of Chicago 15
7 University of Michigan 12
8 Cornell University 10
8 Dartmouth College 10
8 University of Virginia 10
11 Boston College 9
11 University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign 9
11 University of Texas at Austin 9
11 Michigan State University 8
11 New York University 8
11 Purdue University 8
11 Texas A&M University 8
18 Georgetown University 7
18 Georgia Tech 7
18 Princeton University 7
18 University of Wisconsin–Madison 7
22 Arizona State University 6
22 Iowa State University 6
22 United States Military Academy 6
22 University of California, Berkeley 6
22 University of California, Los Angeles 6
27 Brown University 5
27 Claremont McKenna College 5
27 Lehigh University 5
27 Miami University 5
27 Syracuse University 5
27 University of Colorado Boulder 5
27 University of Iowa 5
27 Yale University 5
35 Boston University 4
35 Bucknell University 4
35 Indiana University 4
35 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 4
35 Pennsylvania State University 4
35 Rutgers University 4
35 University of Cincinnati 4
35 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 4
35 University of Notre Dame 4
44 Central Michigan University 3
44 William & Mary 3
44 Drexel University 3
44 Duke University 3
44 Johns Hopkins University 3
44 Manhattan College 3
44 Pepperdine University 3
44 Santa Clara University 3
44 Tufts University 3
44 University of Arkansas 3
44 University of Houston 3
44 University of Miami 3
44 University of Missouri 3
44 University of Nevada, Las Vegas 3
44 University of Rochester 3
44 University of Washington 3
44 University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee 3
44 Wake Forest University 3

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What famous person went to Harvard?

33 Most Famous Harvard Students of All Time In this article we will take a look at the 33 most famous Harvard students of all time. You can skip our detailed analysis about Harvard University, and go directly to the, Harvard has produced hundreds of geniuses who made the world a better place in their own ways.

  • Harvard graduates went on to found disruptive companies, invent new technologies, discover new treatments, make award-winning movies and impact lives of billions of people around the world.
  • It’s impossible to cover all the important Harvard students in one article.
  • In this list we will mention some of the most notable Harvard students who achieve great milestones in several walks of life.

Some of the students in this list disrupted the world after graduating from Harvard and found or worked for companies like Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE: BRK-A), Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ: MSFT), Facebook, Inc. Common Stock (NASDAQ: FB), 21 st Century Fox Corporation (NASDAQ: FOXA), News Corporation (NASDAQ: NWSA), The Boeing Company (NYSE: BA), Coca Cola Company (NYSE: KO) and Daily Journal Corporation (NASDAQ: DJCO).

  1. In 1636, when Harvard University opened its halls, there were already well-reputed institutes in Chile, Colombia, Argentina, Peru, and Mexico.
  2. What made Harvard supersede immediately was that it introduced the best quality of the modern education system.
  3. Since then, the institute is ranked as one of the best universities in the world.

Admission to Harvard is not easy. The acceptance rate is very low. It was not more than 4.6 percent in 2020. Still, thousands of students strive to take admission into Harvard every year. According to a report, 39,041 students applied last year and only 2,037 applications got accepted including early-action applicants.

  1. The university has recently shared a of the admission statistics for the class of 2023.
  2. According to it, 43,330 students applied and a mere 2,009 applications got accepted.
  3. This shows the level of competition for enrolling in the Harvard programs.
  4. Once admitted, students expect a great career after completing their education.

Harvard University has produced many notable figures from different walks of life including scientists, politicians, celebrities, and royalty etcetera. Some popular Harvardians include Barack Obama, J.F. Kennedy, Thomas Stearns Eliot, Facebook, Inc. Common Stock (NASDAQ: FB) founder Mark Zuckerberg, Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE: )’s Charlie Munger and Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ: ) founder Bill Gates.

Our Methodology The given list is based on the level of popularity of each person and the significant accomplishment/service of these former Harvard students in their respective fields. Most of the people included in this list are Nobel laureates, Pulitzer Prize winners, politicians, celebrities, businesspeople, and more.

With this context in mind, let’s take a look at the 33 most famous Harvard students of all time. Most Famous Harvard Students of All Time Photo by on
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Why is it so hard to get into Harvard?

Why Is It So Difficult? It’s so difficult to get into Harvard because of the sheer number of well-equipped and well-educated students trying to get in! The school regularly ranks in the top 5 in the country and employers are impressed if you have a degree from there.
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Has Harvard ever had a female president?

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Drew Gilpin Faust
28th President of Harvard University
In office July 1, 2007 – July 1, 2018
Preceded by Lawrence Summers Derek Bok (acting)
Succeeded by Lawrence Bacow
Personal details
Born Catharine Drew Gilpin September 18, 1947 (age 75) New York City, U.S.
Spouse Charles E. Rosenberg
Children 2
Education Bryn Mawr College ( BA ) University of Pennsylvania ( MA, PhD )
Academic background
Thesis A Sacred Circle: The Social Role of the Intellectual in the Old South, 1840–1860 (1975)
Doctoral advisor Charles E. Rosenberg
Academic work
Discipline History
Sub-discipline American South
Institutions University of Pennsylvania Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study Harvard University

Catharine Drew Gilpin Faust (born September 18, 1947) is an American historian, and the 28th president of Harvard University, and the first woman in that role. She was Harvard’s first president since 1672 without an undergraduate or graduate degree from Harvard and the first to have been raised in the South.
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What did Bill Gates take at Harvard?

Bill Gates’ Legacy at Harvard University – Gates enrolled at Harvard in the fall of 1973 as a pre-law student, though he loaded up on mathematics and graduate-level computer science courses. He quickly gained academic accolades at the acclaimed university when he developed an algorithm to address an unsolved problem posed by Professor Harry Lewis in his combinatorics course.

  • Gates’s solution, which held the record as the fastest for over 30 years, was published in collaboration with computer science theorist Christos Papadimitriou.
  • After two years, Gates took a leave of absence from Harvard to found a computer software company, Microsoft (originally “Micro-Soft” — a combination of “microcomputer” and “software”), with Allen.

In a 1994 interview, Gates said that the possibility of returning to college had been a safety net: “If things hadn’t worked out, I could’ve always gone back to school. I was officially on leave.” As it happened, Gates never returned to college. More than 30 years later, however, Harvard awarded him with an honorary doctorate,

  1. When he accepted the honorary degree in 2007, Gates also delivered the university’s commencement speech,
  2. In it, he called attending Harvard “a phenomenal experience Academic life was fascinating.
  3. I used to sit in on lots of classes I hadn’t even signed up for.” The Harvard degree wasn’t Gates’s first nor last academic honor.

He has also received honorary doctorates from Nyenrode Business Universiteit, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Waseda University, Tsinghua University, the Karolinska Institute, and Cambridge University. Gates is an elected member of the National Academy of Engineering, an honorary member of the American Library Association, a foreign member of the Chinese Academy of Engineering, a Distinguished Fellow of the British Computer Society, a recipient of the New York Institute of Technology’s President’s Medal, and an honorary trustee of Peking University.
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Which President never got married?

James Buchanan The biography for President Buchanan and past presidents is courtesy of the White House Historical Association. James Buchanan, the 15th President of the United States (1857-1861), served immediately prior to the American Civil War. He remains the only President to be elected from Pennsylvania and to remain a lifelong bachelor.

Tall, stately, stiffly formal in the high stock he wore around his jowls, James Buchanan was the only President who never married. Presiding over a rapidly dividing Nation, Buchanan grasped inadequately the political realities of the time. Relying on constitutional doctrines to close the widening rift over slavery, he failed to understand that the North would not accept constitutional arguments which favored the South.

Nor could he realize how sectionalism had realigned political parties: the Democrats split; the Whigs were destroyed, giving rise to the Republicans. Born into a well-to-do Pennsylvania family in 1791, Buchanan, a graduate of Dickinson College, was gifted as a debater and learned in the law.

  1. He was elected five times to the House of Representatives; then, after an interlude as Minister to Russia, served for a decade in the Senate.
  2. He became Polk’s Secretary of State and Pierce’s Minister to Great Britain.
  3. Service abroad helped to bring him the Democratic nomination in 1856 because it had exempted him from involvement in bitter domestic controversies.

As President-elect, Buchanan thought the crisis would disappear if he maintained a sectional balance in his appointments and could persuade the people to accept constitutional law as the Supreme Court interpreted it. The Court was considering the legality of restricting slavery in the territories, and two justices hinted to Buchanan what the decision would be.

Thus, in his Inaugural the President referred to the territorial question as “happily, a matter of but little practical importance” since the Supreme Court was about to settle it “speedily and finally.” Two days later Chief Justice Roger B. Taney delivered the Dred Scott decision, asserting that Congress had no constitutional power to deprive persons of their property rights in slaves in the territories.

Southerners were delighted, but the decision created a furor in the North. Buchanan decided to end the troubles in Kansas by urging the admission of the territory as a slave state. Although he directed his Presidential authority to this goal, he further angered the Republicans and alienated members of his own party.

  1. Ansas remained a territory.
  2. When Republicans won a plurality in the House in 1858, every significant bill they passed fell before southern votes in the Senate or a Presidential veto.
  3. The Federal Government reached a stalemate.
  4. Sectional strife rose to such a pitch in 1860 that the Democratic Party split into northern and southern wings, each nominating its own candidate for the Presidency.

Consequently, when the Republicans nominated Abraham Lincoln, it was a foregone conclusion that he would be elected even though his name appeared on no southern ballot. Rather than accept a Republican administration, the southern “fire-eaters” advocated secession.

President Buchanan, dismayed and hesitant, denied the legal right of states to secede but held that the Federal Government legally could not prevent them. He hoped for compromise, but secessionist leaders did not want compromise. Then Buchanan took a more militant tack. As several Cabinet members resigned, he appointed northerners, and sent the Star of the West to carry reinforcements to Fort Sumter.

On January 9, 1861, the vessel was far away. Buchanan reverted to a policy of inactivity that continued until he left office. In March 1861 he retired to his Pennsylvania home Wheatland–where he died seven years later–leaving his successor to resolve the frightful issue facing the Nation.
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Who was #1 President?

The biography for President Washington and past presidents is courtesy of the White House Historical Association. On April 30, 1789, George Washington, standing on the balcony of Federal Hall on Wall Street in New York, took his oath of office as the first President of the United States.

“As the first of every thing, in our situation will serve to establish a Precedent,” he wrote James Madison, “it is devoutly wished on my part, that these precedents may be fixed on true principles.” Born in 1732 into a Virginia planter family, he learned the morals, manners, and body of knowledge requisite for an 18th century Virginia gentleman.

He pursued two intertwined interests: military arts and western expansion. At 16 he helped survey Shenandoah lands for Thomas, Lord Fairfax. Commissioned a lieutenant colonel in 1754, he fought the first skirmishes of what grew into the French and Indian War.

  1. The next year, as an aide to Gen.
  2. Edward Braddock, he escaped injury although four bullets ripped his coat and two horses were shot from under him.
  3. From 1759 to the outbreak of the American Revolution, Washington managed his lands around Mount Vernon and served in the Virginia House of Burgesses.
  4. Married to a widow, Martha Dandridge Custis, he devoted himself to a busy and happy life.

But like his fellow planters, Washington felt himself exploited by British merchants and hampered by British regulations. As the quarrel with the mother country grew acute, he moderately but firmly voiced his resistance to the restrictions. When the Second Continental Congress assembled in Philadelphia in May 1775, Washington, one of the Virginia delegates, was elected Commander in Chief of the Continental Army.

On July 3, 1775, at Cambridge, Massachusetts, he took command of his ill-trained troops and embarked upon a war that was to last six grueling years. He realized early that the best strategy was to harass the British. He reported to Congress, “we should on all Occasions avoid a general Action, or put anything to the Risque, unless compelled by a necessity, into which we ought never to be drawn.” Ensuing battles saw him fall back slowly, then strike unexpectedly.

Finally in 1781 with the aid of French allies–he forced the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown. Washington longed to retire to his fields at Mount Vernon. But he soon realized that the Nation under its Articles of Confederation was not functioning well, so he became a prime mover in the steps leading to the Constitutional Convention at Philadelphia in 1787.

  1. When the new Constitution was ratified, the Electoral College unanimously elected Washington President.
  2. He did not infringe upon the policy making powers that he felt the Constitution gave Congress.
  3. But the determination of foreign policy became preponderantly a Presidential concern.
  4. When the French Revolution led to a major war between France and England, Washington refused to accept entirely the recommendations of either his Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson, who was pro-French, or his Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton, who was pro-British.

Rather, he insisted upon a neutral course until the United States could grow stronger. To his disappointment, two parties were developing by the end of his first term. Wearied of politics, feeling old, he retired at the end of his second. In his Farewell Address, he urged his countrymen to forswear excessive party spirit and geographical distinctions.
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Which President drank a lot?

James Buchanan (1857-1861) – James Buchanan was a heavy drinker. He reportedly could drink several bottles of alcohol in the course of an evening. He was known to hold his liquor very well and did not exhibit the characteristics of an alcoholic,
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Did any celebrities go to Yale?

11. Indra Nooyi – Former Chief Executive Officer and Chairperson of PepsiCo Indra Nooyi is an Indian-American corporate leader and former CEO and chairman of PepsiCo. She has regularly been listed among the world’s most influential women. In 1978, she was accepted into the Yale School of Management and relocated to the US, where she earned a master’s degree in both public and private management in 1980.

  • Indra Nooyi is one of the most famous Yale students of all time.
  • Yale alumni can be found at leadership positions in companies like PepsiCo, Inc.
  • NASDAQ:PEP), Blackstone Inc.
  • NYSE:BX), and Franklin Resources, Inc.
  • NYSE:BEN).
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  • The 30 Most Famous Yale Students Of All Time is originally published on Insider Monkey.

: The 30 Most Famous Yale Students Of All Time
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Who went to Yale at 13?

Namesake – Yale’s first and foremost child prodigy, Jonathan Edwards matriculated at Yale (then Collegiate School of Connecticut) in 1716 just before reaching 13. At this time, entrance into college required fluency in Latin, Greek, and Hebrew. Four years and one intense conversion later, he graduated as valedictorian, received his Masters of Divinity from Yale in 1722 and went on to become one of America’s most renowned theologians and philosophers, and a testimony to Yale’s mind-altering powers.
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Has Yale ever had a woman President?

Shattering Yale’s glass ceiling When the University of Pennsylvania named then-Yale Provost Judith Rodin its president in December of 1993, much was made of the fact that a woman had finally risen to the top post at an Ivy League school. “I think it’s about time,” Rodin said at the time.

  1. Yale pointed out that it had already had a female president.
  2. Hanna Holborn Gray, after all, had served as acting president from when Kingman Brewster stepped down in 1977 to when A.
  3. Bartlett Giamatti assumed the presidency in 1978.
  4. But, as Penn dutifully rebutted, an acting president is not a full president.

At Yale, Giamatti was followed by Benno Schmidt, who was followed by Richard Levin. The presidency here, to the chagrin of many, has remained in male hands. And even putting aside the presidency, of course, women still face tremendous challenges at Yale and elsewhere in higher education.

Some female employees say Yale’s childcare and day care and maternity leave policies are insufficient; nobody denies that the overwhelming majority of tenured professors are men. But the news is not all bad for women at Yale in 2009, just 40 years after coeducation began in Yale College. Today, women hold four of the eight permanent officer positions and five of 14 school deanships, and make up 64 percent of the managerial and professional ranks at Yale.

YALE’S FIRST FEMALE ‘PRESIDENT’ On any list of Yale firsts, Hanna Gray is among the most frequently mentioned names. In 1971, when Gray was a professor at the University of Chicago, she and Marian Wright Edelman were the first women appointed to the Yale Corporation, the University’s highest governing body.

  1. In 1974, Gray was named the first female officer of the University, when Brewster made her provost.
  2. And, in 1977, she became the first female president at Yale, or at least the first female acting president.
  3. Gray would go on to become president at the University of Chicago, where she is still an emerita professor.

In a telephone interview recently, she recalled Brewster’s enthusiasm for her success, and especially for her potential as a president. “He made it clear that he was pleased to be appointing a woman, and he thought people would be rather surprised,” Gray said.

  • But she added that even those alumni who resented Brewster’s efforts to make Yale a more inclusive place were proud when their daughters and granddaughters began to attend Yale.
  • In fact, Gray said, the real challenge of being provost and president at Yale in the 1970s came not from alumni who wanted Yale to remain a boys’ club but from the energy crisis and stagflation that hamstrung budgets throughout the decade.
  • Economic challenges would continue to haunt Gray in her early years at Chicago, but she ultimately served with distinction as its president for 15 years.
  • ENTER LORIMER AND ROBINSON
  • Just a short while after Gray left Yale in 1978, Jose Cabranes LAW ’65 hired two young lawyers to help him start a general counsel’s office in the University.
  • Those two lawyers — Dorothy Robinson and Linda Lorimer — were both women, and they are today the two highest-ranking women at Yale, serving as general counsel and secretary, respectively.

In separate interviews last week, Robinson and Lorimer recalled only good memories of their first days in that three-person General Counsel’s Office. Like Gray, they said, the majority of the challenges they faced were not about gender but about work.

  1. I really didn’t see the issues as being gender challenges,” Robinson said.
  2. I saw the challenges as being in my job.” Indeed, the two worked hard; Lorimer remembers a day early on in her time at Yale when she had to sleep on her desk because of a pressing deadline.
  3. The two were also mentored by extraordinary men.

Cabranes, they said, helped them become better lawyers; Giamatti guided Lorimer, in particular, to a career in university administration. In 1983, Giamatti called on the 33-year-old Lorimer to become associate provost. Giamatti, who would go on to become the commissioner of Major League Baseball, called her his “utility infielder.” Just three years later, Randolph-Macon Woman’s College asked Lorimer to be its president.

  • Robinson stayed at Yale, becoming the University’s top lawyer in 1986 and its second female officer in 1987.
  • The only other senior women at Yale at the time, Robinson said, were the dean of the Nursing School and University Librarian Millicent Abell.
  • Since its founding in 1923, the Nursing School has always been led by a woman.) Lorimer came back to Yale, in a way, when she was named a fellow of the Yale Corporation in 1990.

She was part of the search committee charged with finding a successor to Schmidt, who abruptly resigned on the morning of Commencement in 1992.

  1. “We would have appointed a woman if we thought there was a woman who was more qualified than the person we ended up with,” Lorimer said in the interview, addressing claims that Rodin was passed over for the presidency because Yale was not ready for a female president.
  2. Ultimately, Yale did not find a female president in 1993, instead choosing Levin, who in turn asked Lorimer that year to return to Yale as University secretary and chief counselor to the president.
  3. YALE’S ‘STRONG BENCH’
  4. It is very easy to group Levin’s accomplishments as Yale president into three categories: restoring a damaged campus, improving ties with New Haven, and creating connections between Yale and the rest of the world.
  5. One accomplishment that is more difficult to categorize, though, is Levin’s record of grooming female (and male) leaders.
  6. Though Rodin left for Penn, her alma mater, soon after Levin became president, he quickly named Alison Richard as her successor.

Richard served at Yale from 1994 to 2002; she went on to be vice-chancellor of the University of Cambridge, the university’s top administrative post. Susan Hockfield, who took the provostship after Richard, served from 2003 until 2004, when she was named president of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Im Bottomly, who was a deputy provost at Yale, was named president of Wellesley College in 2007. Yale, then, has had a “very strong bench,” as Lorimer put it. Levin said he is “very proud” of all the women who have gone on to top positions elsewhere, though he noted that Andrew Hamilton, who took over as provost from Hockfield, and Richard Brodhead, a former dean of Yale College, have also attained top positions at other schools after leaving Yale.

THAT GLASS CEILING But what about the women who remain at Yale? With this year’s appointments of Mary Miller, Sharon Oster and Kate Stith as deans of Yale College and the School of Management and acting dean of the Law School, respectively, this is a very good moment for women administrators.

(The story is somewhat different for women faculty; according to a report published in 2007 by the Women Faculty Forum, only around a fifth of the University’s tenured faculty are women.) Even still, in a recent workplace survey, women responded more favorably than men on 46 of 52 questions, Vice President for Human Resources and Administration Michael Peel said.

“Women clearly see Yale as a great place to work,” he said. There are still challenges for up-and-coming women, though. Judith Chevalier ’89, a professor at the School of Management, will formally step down from her post as deputy provost for faculty development at the end of the semester.

While Chevalier said in an interview that she decided to step down from the administrative work so she could teach more, she added that the challenge of raising children — she has a newborn as well as kids aged 11 and 7 — was difficult. “I’ve gotten pretty good at writing computer programs with a kid on my lap,” she said.

“But your kids always take up a lot of time and that’s why you have them.” For his part, Peel assures that “there clearly is no glass ceiling at Yale for women.” With the naming of Mary Miller as the first female dean of Yale College in the fall, that would seem to be true.

But the lack of a female president at Yale is conspicuous, especially a time when Penn, Princeton and Harvard all have women at their helms. Chevalier, who sources said was a leading candidate to be named provost last summer and is rumored as a possible successor to Levin, sees things differently. After all, Chevalier said, higher education has come a long way from the days when even colleges for women had male presidents.

What is most important, she said, is that women are well-represented in presidents’ offices across the country. She added: “Whether Yale specifically must have its next president be a woman — I wouldn’t say that.” : Shattering Yale’s glass ceiling
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What actor went to Yale?

Meryl Streep – Yale University – Getty The Oscar-winner earned her MFA from Yale Drama School in 1975.
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Who was the first student at Yale?

Yale’s First Student (May/June 2004)

Yale’s First Student May/June 2004 by Judith Ann Schiff Judith Ann Schiff is chief research archivist at the Yale University Library In the beginning, Yale was a simple place: one teacher, one student, no campus.

Founded in 1701 as the Collegiate School, the college that would become Yale opened for business in March 1702, when a young man named Jacob Heminway arrived at the parsonage of Abraham Pierson in Killingworth (now Clinton), Connecticut, paid his 30 shillings for a year of tuition, and began his studies. Heminway, the first student to receive instruction at Yale, graduated three centuries ago.

Admission to Yale depended wholly upon a reading knowledge of the classics.

In October 1701 Connecticut had granted a charter to establish Yale. On November 11, the founding trustees, then also known as “undertakers,” held their first meeting. During three days of deliberation in the town of Saybrook (now Old Saybrook), they organized the school, appointed Pierson as the first rector (president), and decided that admission to the school would depend wholly upon a reading knowledge of the classics.

The rector was empowered to examine candidates in person, “and finding them duly prepared and expert in Latin and Greek authors, both poetic and oratorical, and also making good Latin,” to admit them. The founders intended that there should be four years of instruction for the bachelor of arts degree, but if the student was qualified, he could finish early.

During the first decade nearly all of the students graduated in three years. Jacob Heminway was born in East Haven, a village of New Haven, in 1683. His father, Samuel, was one of the wealthiest men in the area. Jacob had nine brothers and sisters, including an older brother, Abraham, who was the direct ancestor of Ernest Hemingway.

  • Jacob’s family belonged to the New Haven parish of the Rev.
  • James Pierpont, the principal founder of Yale, who probably prepared him for admission.
  • When the 19-year-old Jacob settled in the rector’s home, no other students were ready.
  • Ezra Stiles, Yale’s seventh president, recorded Heminway’s comment that he “solus was all the College the first half-year.” In September, three students joined Jacob, and by the time he graduated the student body had 15 to 20 members.

As the classes grew, Pierson acquired the assistance of a recent Harvard graduate, who taught the younger students. It was a rigorous education. Classes began about 6:30 a.m., right after morning prayers. Following a hearty midday dinner of boiled meat and vegetables with cider and beer, the students had an hour and a half of recreation.

The afternoon classes were followed by early evening prayers. Study ended at bedtime, which was 9 p.m. The principal subjects were Greek, Latin, and Hebrew, with additional instruction in Latin texts on logic, metaphysics, mathematics, and physics. All recitations were in Latin, and students were expected to speak Latin outside the classroom as well.

Since Yale’s mission was to educate youth “for publick Imployment both in the Church and in the Civil State,” instruction in theology and rhetoric was mandatory. On Sunday the students attended church twice, and the rector required that they be prepared to repeat his sermons.

John Hart, who had transferred from Harvard in September 1702, was the solitary graduate in 1703. (Yale awarded its first diplomas in 1702, but those degrees went to four Harvard grads and a student who had received a private education elsewhere.) Jacob had two classmates in the Class of 1704—Phineas Fiske, who became a minister, and John Russell, who became a civic and military leader.

Jacob himself had no trouble finding a job. Two months after his graduation a new Congregational church forming in East Haven was charged to “seek Sir Heminway that he would give them a taste of his gifts in the preaching of the word.” He was approved informally, at a salary of 50 pounds a year, until the General Court confirmed the agreement in 1706 and supplemented his pay with wood and “a good convenient dwelling-house.” Heminway continued as sole pastor until his death in 1754.

  1. He left a substantial estate—valued at 6,556 pounds—after his death, but bequeathed just five pounds to his only child, Lydia, whose second husband was a member of the Church of England.
  2. In 1936, Heminway’s portrait was commissioned for the 225th anniversary of his church in East Haven, now known as the Old Stone Church.

As there was no known likeness of Heminway, the artist, Donald Kirby ’35BFA, aided by Yale English professor Samuel B. Hemingway ’04, ’08PhD, used portraits of later Hemingways to create a composite. For their part, the later Hemingways never forgot Jacob.
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How many CEOs come from Harvard?

Graduate Schools With the Most Alumni Who Are CEOs of Fortune 500 Companies –

Rank College or University Alumni Who are CEOs of Fortune 500 Companies
1 Harvard University 41
2 University of Pennsylvania 23
2 Stanford University 22
4 Northwestern University 20
5 Columbia University 18
6 University of Chicago 15
7 University of Michigan 12
8 Cornell University 10
8 Dartmouth College 10
8 University of Virginia 10
11 Boston College 9
11 University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign 9
11 University of Texas at Austin 9
11 Michigan State University 8
11 New York University 8
11 Purdue University 8
11 Texas A&M University 8
18 Georgetown University 7
18 Georgia Tech 7
18 Princeton University 7
18 University of Wisconsin–Madison 7
22 Arizona State University 6
22 Iowa State University 6
22 United States Military Academy 6
22 University of California, Berkeley 6
22 University of California, Los Angeles 6
27 Brown University 5
27 Claremont McKenna College 5
27 Lehigh University 5
27 Miami University 5
27 Syracuse University 5
27 University of Colorado Boulder 5
27 University of Iowa 5
27 Yale University 5
35 Boston University 4
35 Bucknell University 4
35 Indiana University 4
35 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 4
35 Pennsylvania State University 4
35 Rutgers University 4
35 University of Cincinnati 4
35 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 4
35 University of Notre Dame 4
44 Central Michigan University 3
44 William & Mary 3
44 Drexel University 3
44 Duke University 3
44 Johns Hopkins University 3
44 Manhattan College 3
44 Pepperdine University 3
44 Santa Clara University 3
44 Tufts University 3
44 University of Arkansas 3
44 University of Houston 3
44 University of Miami 3
44 University of Missouri 3
44 University of Nevada, Las Vegas 3
44 University of Rochester 3
44 University of Washington 3
44 University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee 3
44 Wake Forest University 3

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How many CEOs are from Harvard?

The Colleges and Universities with the most alumni who are CEOs of Fortune 500 companies No College or University has more alumni who are now the CEOs of Fortune 500 companies than, with 41 former students in those coveted spots at their respective companies. What’s the most common undergraduate degree of Fortune 500 CEOs? The most common undergraduate degree of Fortune 500 CEOs is in Engineering, where 96 individuals with engineering degrees have gone on to become CEOs. Other top undergraduate degrees that Fortune 500 CEOs have obtained include Economics (59), Business Administration (40), Accounting (36), Finance (12), Computer Science (11), Marketing (9), Political Science (8) and Mathematics (8). Harvard University has the most alumni who are now CEOs of Fortune 500 companies (41) Per the research from the team at Academic Influence, here are the colleges and universities which have seen at least eight different alumni go on to become CEOs of Fortune 500 companies.

Harvard University (41)University of Pennsylvania (23)Stanford University (22)Northwestern University (20)Columbia University (18)University of Chicago (15)University of Michigan (12)Cornell University (10)Dartmouth University (10)University of Virginia (10)Boston College (9)University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (9)University of Texas at Austin (9)Michigan State University (8)New York University (8)Purdue University (8)Texas A&M University (8)

: The Colleges and Universities with the most alumni who are CEOs of Fortune 500 companies
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What politician went to Harvard?

Heads of state

Name Class year Notability
Arnulfo Arias (born 1901) 1925 – HMS President of Panama
George W. Bush (born 1946) 1973 – HBS President of the United States
Felipe Calderón Hinojosa (born 1962) 2000 – HKS President of Mexico
Tsakhiagiin Elbegdorj (born 1963) 2002 – HKS President of Mongolia

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Did George W Bush attend Harvard?

Upbringing and education – George W. Bush as a baby with his parents. George Walker Bush, the oldest son of George Herbert Walker Bush and Barbara Bush, was born in New Haven, Connecticut, on July 6, 1946. When Bush was just two years old, his father moved the family from New Haven to the town of Odessa in West Texas to begin a career in the oil industry.

  • According to George W., then age two, the family lived in one of the few duplexes in Odessa with an indoor bathroom, which they “shared with a couple of hookers”.
  • He was subsequently raised in Midland and Houston, Texas, with siblings Jeb, Neil, Marvin, and Dorothy,
  • A younger sister, Robin, died of leukemia in 1953 at the age of three, when Bush was 7.

His parents came to pick him up from school two days after her death; Bush ran up to their car hoping to see Robin with them, and they told him the news. Bush understood that his sister had died, but his younger brother Jeb did not. The family spent the summers and most holidays at the Bush Compound in Maine. The Midland boyhood home of Bush. Bush attended Sam Houston Elementary School and San Jacinto Junior High School in Midland, Texas, He later moved to The Kinkaid School in Piney Point Village, Texas for two years. Afterward, like his father, Bush attended Phillips Academy (September 1961–June 1964) and later Yale University (September 1964–May 1968).

  1. Bush scored a 1206 out of 1600 on the SAT ; 566 on the verbal section, and 640 on the math section.
  2. Bush cheered for both Philips Academy’s and Yale’s football teams, as it was quite common for cheerleaders to be male in Bush’s time.
  3. At Yale, he joined Delta Kappa Epsilon, of which he was from October 1965 until graduation, and the Skull and Bones secret society ; Bush’s father George H.W.

Bush (1948) and grandfather Prescott S. Bush (1917) were also members of Skull and Bones. Bush was also in the Yale First XV rugby union team in 1968. He was a C student, scoring 77% (with no As and one D, in astronomy) with a grade point average of 2.35 out of a possible 4.00.

  • Bush joked that he was known more for his social life than for his grades.
  • He received a Bachelor of Arts degree in history in 1968.
  • The entire entry from his yearbook read: GEORGE BUSH.
  • Born July 6, 1946, in New Haven, Connecticut, son of George H.W.
  • Bush (Class of ’48) and Barbara Pierce Bush.
  • Prepared at Phillips Academy-Andover, Andover, Massachusetts.

Entered Yale, September, 1964. History Major. Resident Member: Davenport (Social Council, 1964-68; Football, 1964-68, Captain, 1967-68; Baseball, 1965-68); Delta Kappa Epsilon, President, 1966-67; Skull and Bones; Inter- Council, 1966-67; Freshman Baseball, 1965; Rugby Club, 1966-68.

Roommates: R.J. Dieter, C. Johnson, III, C. Johnson, Jr. Address: Apt.8, 5000 Longmont Drive, Houston, Texas 77027. Bush’s 1970 application to the University of Texas School of Law was rejected, and after his service in the Texas Air National Guard he entered Harvard Business School in 1973. He graduated with a Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree in 1975, the first U.S.

president with an MBA.
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