Where Did Michael Phelps Go To High School?

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Where Did Michael Phelps Go To High School
Michael Phelps facts – Micheal Phelps Background

Born June 30, 1985 in Baltimore, MarylandGrew up in the Rodgers Forge neighborhood of nearby Towson.He attended Rodgers Forge Elementary, Dumbarton Middle School, and Towson High School.The youngest of three children. His mother, Deborah Sue “Debbie” Phelps ( née Davisson), is a middle school principal.His father, Michael Fred Phelps, is a retired Maryland State Trooper who played football in high school and college and tried out for the Washington Redskins in the 1970s.Phelps is of English, German, Irish, Scottish, and Welsh descent.His parents divorced in 1994, when he was nine years old, and his father remarried in 2000.2003 – graduated from Towson High School in 2003.Began swimming at the age of seven, Micheal diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in 6th grade.By the age of 10, he held a national record for his age group (in the 100-meter butterfly)Began to train at the North Baltimore Aquatic Club under coach Bob Bowman.As of August 21, 2018, Phelps still held 11 age group records, eight in long course, and three in short course.

Michael Phelps College

Michael Phelps Attended the University of Michigan While Training for the Olympics

Michael Phelps Career

The most successful and most decorated Olympian of all time, world record with a total of 28 medals. Holds the all-time greatest Olympian, records for Olympic gold medals (23), Olympic gold medals in individual events (13), and Olympic medals in individual events (16)Started the Michael Phelps Foundation in 20082012 -retired following the Olympics, 2914 – made a comeback in April 20142016 – was selected by his team to be the flag bearer of the United States 2016 – second retirement Is considered the greatest swimmer of all time.

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Where did Michael Phelps go to highschool?

Phelps was born in Baltimore, Maryland, and raised in the Rodgers Forge neighborhood of nearby Towson. He attended Rodgers Forge Elementary, Dumbarton Middle School, and Towson High School. Phelps is the youngest of three children.
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Did Michael Phelps finish high school?

Headed to University of Michigan – Phelps graduated from Towson High School in 2003, but delayed college plans to concentrate on training for the 2004 Olympics. In April of 2004, Bowman was hired as the new men’s swim coach at the University of Michigan, which had produced several top athletes in the sport over the years.

Phelps was not allowed to swim for the school because he had turned professional by accepting the Speedo endorsement in 2001. He went out and bought two U-M caps for himself and for Bowman, however, and planned to enroll there as a student so they could continue to train. In 2004 he said that he plans to swim for another ten years.

In his spare time Phelps likes to play video games. He makes appearances for Speedo and also serves as the national spokesperson for the Boys & Girls Clubs of America. Later in life, he has said, he would like to have a career in either sports marketing or in some technical field.
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How did Phelps overcome ADHD?

Struggling with an ADHD diagnosis – But the road to Rio wasn’t an easy path for Phelps or for his parents. When Phelps was in the sixth grade, he was fidgety and had trouble paying in the classroom. His pediatrician diagnosed him with ADHD and prescribed,

Phelps took the for several years, and it seemed to help. At age 13, however, however, he decided that he was using the drug as a crutch, even though it did help make him less “jumpy” at school. He thought that if he applied his mind to controlling his behavior and focusing, he could help himself without taking pills.

As Phelps recalls in his autobiography No Limits, he felt humiliated in front of his friends when the school nurse came to find him in class to remind him to take his Ritalin. At the age of 10, Phelps had attention and focus problems at school. He also acted out in class.

Eventually, he was diagnosed with ADHD and prescribed medication for several years. Feeling that the drug was a crutch, Phelps decided to learn to use his mind to focus and control himself in the classroom. However, as they say, nothing is impossible. Phelps found that swimming helped him control his energy and stopped him from being fidgety.

Phelps weaned himself off the medication with his doctor’s support and learned to use the power of his mind to focus on his school work and control himself in the classroom. At this point, Phelps’s teacher told his mother that her son would never succeed at anything because he couldn’t focus on anything for a long enough time.

His mother was also concerned about stopping the medication. Defying his teacher’s and his mother’s grim predictions, Phelps went on to become the most decorated athlete in the history of the Olympics. He had found in vigorous and disciplined swimming a solution for the nervous energy that made him jumpy and fidgety.

He learned self-discipline by forcing himself to go to swim practice.
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What was Michael Phelps childhood like?

Early Life and Family – Michael Fred Phelps was born on June 30, 1985, in Baltimore, Maryland. The youngest of three children, Phelps grew up in the neighborhood of Rodgers Forge. His father, Fred, an all-around athlete, was a state trooper and his mother, Debbie, was a middle-school principal.

  • When Phelps’ parents divorced in 1994, he and his sisters lived with their mother, with whom Phelps grew very close.
  • Phelps began swimming when his two older sisters, Whitney (born 1978) and Hilary (born 1980), joined a local swim team.
  • Whitney tried out for the U.S.
  • Olympic team in 1996, but injuries derailed her career.

At age seven, Phelps was still “a little scared” to put his head underwater, so his instructors allowed him to float around on his back. Not surprisingly, the first stroke he mastered was the backstroke. After he saw swimmers Tom Malchow and Tom Dolan compete at the 1996 Summer Games in Atlanta, Phelps began to dream of becoming a champion.

He launched his swimming career at the Loyola High School pool. He met his coach, Bob Bowman, when he started training at the North Baltimore Aquatic Club at the Meadowbrook Aquatic and Fitness Center. The coach immediately recognized Phelps’ talents and fierce sense of competition and began an intense training regime together.

By 1999, Phelps had made the U.S. National B Team.
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What age was Michael Phelps diagnosed with ADHD?

By Zahavit Paz “I had a teacher tell me that I would never amount to anything and I would never be successful. So it was a challenge and it was a struggle, but for me, it was something I’m thankful happened. And I’m thankful that I am how I am. I look at myself every day and I’m so proud and so happy of who I am and who I’ve been able to become.” So says Michael Phelps, winner of 28 medals, including 23 all-time records for Olympic gold, 13 Olympic gold medals in individual events, and 16 Olympic medals in individual events.

This is the same Michael Phelps who was diagnosed with ADHD when he was 9 years old. A Boy’s Dream and a Mother’s Support Michael said many times that he attributes much of his success to his mother’s parenting skills. In fact, his mother, Debbie Phelps, claims that Michael didn’t always love sport of swimming.

“When he was 7 years old, he didn’t want to put his face in the water. So I started him with a backstroke.” For anyone to become an Olympic swimmer, it requires focus, hard work, dedication and perseverance all the characteristics rarely associated with a child with ADHD.

As a young child in kindergarten, Phelps had trouble with inattention, A teacher told his mother “Your son will never be able to focus on anything.” But Debbie Phelps, who had taught middle school for more than two decades, was a staunch advocate for her son. “Whenever a teacher would say, ‘Michael can’t do this,’ I’d counter with, ‘Well, what are you doing to help him?’ I knew that, if I collaborated with Michael, he could achieve anything he set his mind to.” Once he was diagnosed with ADHD in the sixth grade, the doctor prescribed medication that helped him focus in school.

His mother established a routine at home, modified his diet to reduce his sugar intake and provided the strategies that helped him succeed. Though at that time his parents were going through a divorce, Michael had the support of his two older sisters, Hilary and Whitney, as well as his mother’s unwavering faith in him.

His two older sisters swam at a local aquatic club, so his mother decided Michael should go as well. Debbie Phelps believed that swimming helped Michael with his ADHD as well as his anxiety issues that often go hand in hand with ADHD. Her decision to help Michael succeed through exercise has been validated.

According to Patrick O’Connor, professor in the UGA College of Education’s kinesiology department “exercise can help control symptoms of ADHD by raising the baseline of dopamine.” In fact, he asserts that “exercise, even a small amount, can help alleviate symptoms of ADHD in adults.” (Source: Science Daily ) More than an Olympic champion, a champion for the people As a result of his experiences, Michael is a spokesperson for mental health.

In 2009, his book No Limits: The Will to Succeed provides insight to the journey he took that enabled him to overcome the challenges he faced. Then in 2017 Michael spoke candidly about his anxiety and depression publicly in the film Angst, a 56-minute film that explores anxiety, its causes, effects and what we can do about it.

In the movie, Phelps has a conversation with a young boy experiencing anxiety. He tells the boy, “I just didn’t like who I was. If something was bothering me that would start to come up, and I would start feeling angry or depressed or upset, I would almost ignore it.” According to Phelps “Many people don’t understand how debilitating mental illness truly can be, and even more than that, how common it is, yet people are afraid to have the serious discussions about it.” To encourage young people to pursue their dreams, Michael established The Michael Phelps Foundation which promotes “water safety, healthy living and the pursuit of dreams.” Believe in yourself, believe in your child Both Michael and Debbie Phelps are staunch advocates for parents, children and adults who are challenged with ADHD.

  1. Michael serves as a living symbol of what you can achieve with hard work and persistence.
  2. In an interview, Michael commented, “Your mind is the strongest medicine you can haveYou can overcome anything if you think you can and you want to.” Debbie has become a spokesperson for ADHD.
  3. She advises parents who have a child with ADHD to seek assistance and offer unconditional support.

There’s no telling how far your child can go – maybe even all the way to Olympic gold. Here is Michael Phelps facts and his learning disability
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Which high school has the most Olympians?

Wilson Olympians Celebrating our Olympians Woodrow Wilson High School is proud to recognize all of our Olympians. Wilson has had an Olympian in every Olympiad since Helsinki, Finland 1952 beginning with Pat McCormick, Diving and 10 Olympians in London 2012. That is 16 Olympiads and over 38 Olympians! GO TEAM USA and GO BRUINS!

Year Location Name Sport Medal
1952 Helsinki, Finland Pat McCormick Diving 2 Gold
1952 Helsinki, Finland John Barnes Track and Field
1956 Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Pat McCormick Diving 2 Gold
1960 Rome, Italy Chuck Bittick Water Polo & Swimming
1960 Rome, Italy Jim Kelsey Water Polo
1960 Rome, Italy Vince Reel Track and Field Coach
1964 Tokyo, Japan Chuck Bittick Water Polo
1964 Tokyo, Japan Frank Covelli Track and Field
1968 Mexico City, Mexico Frank Covelli Track and Field
1968 Mexico City, Mexico John Van Blom Rowing
1972 Munich, West Germany Alfredo Machado(Brazil) Swimming
1972 Munich, West Germany Tom Hermstad Water Polo Referee
1972 Munich, West Germany Kate Schmidt Track and Field-Javelin Bronze
1972 Munich, West Germany Vince Reel Track and Field Coach
1972 Munich, West Germany John Van Blom Rowing
1976 Montreal, Canada Joan Lind (Van Blom) Rowing Silver
1976 Montreal, Canada Tom Hermstad Water Polo Referee
1976 Montreal, Canada Tim Shaw Swimming Gold / Silver
1976 Montreal, Canada Kate Schmidt Track and Field -Javelin Bronze
1976 Montreal, Canada Ricardo Azevedo (Brazil) Water Polo
1976 Montreal, Canada Vince Reel Track and Field Coach
1976 Montreal, Canada John Van Blom Rowing
1984 Los Angeles, California, USA Joan Lind (Van Blom) Rowing Silver
1984 Los Angeles, California, USA Tom Hermstad Water Polo Referee
1984 Los Angeles, California, USA Tim Shaw Water Polo Silver
1984 Los Angeles, California, USA Jody Campbell Water Polo Silver
1984 Los Angeles, California, USA Cheri Swatek Windsurfing
1988 Seoul, South Korea Bob Ctvrtlik Men’s Volleyball Gold
1988 Seoul, South Korea Tom Hermstad Water Polo Referee
1988 Seoul, South Korea Jody Campbell Water Polo Silver
1988 Seoul, South Korea John Shadden Sailing 470s Bronze
1992 Barcelona, Spain Bob Ctvrtlik Men’s Volleyball Bronze
1992 Barcelona, Spain Rich Foster President of USA Water Polo
1996 Atlanta, Georgia, USA Ricardo Azevedo Asst. Water Polo Coach
1996 Atlanta, Georgia, USA Rich Foster President of USA Water Polo
1996 Atlanta, Georgia, USA Bob Ctvrtlik Men’s Volleyball
2000 Sydney, Australia Tony Azevedo Men’s Water Polo
2000 Sydney, Australia Chi Kredell Men’s Water Polo
2000 Sydney, Australia Robert Lynn Men’s Water Polo
2000 Sydney, Australia Maureen O’ Toole Women’s Water Polo Silver
2000 Sydney, Australia Sean Burroughs Baseball Gold
2004 Athens, Greece Lashinda Demus Track & Field
2004 Athens, Greece Adam Wright Water Polo
2004 Athens, Greece Tony Azevedo Water Polo
2004 Athens, Greece Ricardo Azevedo Asst. Water Polo Coach
2004 Athens, Greece Jackie Frank Water Polo Bronze
2004 Athens, Greece Rich Foster President of USA Water Polo
2004 Athens, Greece Larry Drum Water Polo Team Physician
2004 Athens, Greece Carol Rodriguez (Puerto Rico) Track and Field
2004 Athens, Greece Susan Batholomew Women’s Triathlon Bronze
2008 Beijing, China Lauren Wenger Women’s Water Polo Silver
2008 Beijing, China Adam Wright Water Polo Silver
2008 Beijing, China Robert Lynn Asst. Water Polo Coach
2008 Beijing, China Tony Azevedo Water Polo Silver
2008 Beijing, China Rich Foster President of US Aquatic Sports
2012 London, England Jessica Hardy Swimming Gold / Bronze
2012 London, England Tony Azevedo Water Polo
2012 London, England Adam Wright Water Polo
2012 London, England Lashinda Demus Track and Field Silver
2012 London, England Carol Rodriguez (Puerto Rico) Track and Field
2012 London, England Angele Cooper (Liberia) Track and Field
2012 London, England Chay Lapin Water Polo
2012 London, England Lauren Wenger Water Polo Gold
2012 London, England Robert Lynn Water Polo Asst. Coach
2012 London, England Rich Foster FINA Vice-President
2016 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Tony Azevedo Water Polo
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Wilson Olympians
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How much do elite swimmers train?

Swim Frequency by Level – Swimmers at the beginner level may swim two to three times per week. Pure competitive swimmers train more in the range of five to nine times per week. Most adults are not professional swimmers who can get to the pool every day, and sometimes twice a day.

  1. So, you need to figure out how much time you can devote to your swim, in tandem with whatever other goals you may have like triathlon training, strength training and so on.
  2. I usually recommend three swim sessions per week to maintain the balance of time and life demands.
  3. Athletes competing in long-distance marathon swims or with high-achieving goals in U.S.

Masters meets should swim more often. Beginners: You should focus the bulk of your practice on improving technique with swimming drills. There are a bunch of drills out there, but for beginners you need to focus on the essential basics. Body position, comfortable breathing, and forward reach/extension.

  • A practice like this can and should consist of lots of 50-yard repetitions of drills, a few 50s of kicking (fins if necessary), and just a bit of steady endurance swimming toward the end of the session.
  • Essentially your drills training to endurance swimming ratio should tilt toward 75 percent/25 percent.

Intermediates: As your mastery of the basics improves, you can graduate to more advanced drills. You should also start spending a larger percentage of your practice on improving strength and endurance. As an intermediate swimmer, your practice should be about 30 percent technique specific focus, and 70 percent ‘just swimming’.

  • That is a qualified ‘just swimming’ as you should continue to swim with good technique during these warm-ups and main sets.
  • Advanced: Once you’ve conquered the key techniques involved with swimming, you can spend less time actively doing drills, and more time training speed, strength and endurance.
  • The key here is that advanced swimmers have ingrained patterns that continually reinforce good technique habits.

An advanced swimmer should have a level of awareness of technique at all times during a workout. The ratio here for drills to training is closer to 10 percent/90 percent.
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How many hours a day did Michael Phelps train?

What did Michael Phelps eat for breakfast, lunch, and dinner? – For breakfast, he had three fried egg sandwiches, with cheese, tomatoes, lettuce, fried onions and mayonnaise, followed by three chocolate-chip pancakes. That was not all, after sandwiches and pancakes, it was time for a five-egg omelette, three sugar-coated slices of French toast, a bowl of grits, and two cups of coffee to wash down everything.

However, on the way to training if he felt like having anything more he would stop and have a go. For lunch, he would have half-kilogram of pasta, two large ham and cheese sandwiches on white bread smothered with mayonnaise, and another set of energy drinks.Whereas for dinner, add a pound of pasta with carbonara sauce, a large pizza, and energy drinks.This would make up around 10,000 calories a day which should ideally feed five average men a day!

Eat, sleep and swim, that’s all I can do,” the US swimmer told NBC, after winning his 11th Olympic gold. Phelps would train almost six hours a day, 365 days, to burn off those calories. Even during competitions, he would stick to this diet so there would be no glycogen depletion – the result of not getting enough carbohydrates.

  • Often athletes struggle to reach their personal best, as they are not getting enough carbohydrates and that’s what the muscles need for food.
  • The demanding schedule of heats, semi-finals, and finals, in multiple events, often leave the athlete gasping for energy, but Phelps who weighed 85kg in 2008, would always be on top of his game.

It was even rumoured that Phelps would go on to take 12,000 calories a day, which he debunked in his autobiography No Limits, “It’s just not true. Maybe eight to ten thousand calories per day,” he wrote. Before the Beijing Olympics, he was spotted at a Chinese restaurant and he then commented, “I don’t cook — at all.

I was told that I was supposed to eat between eight and 10,000 calories a day. I just sort of try to cram whatever I can into my body. It’s pretty much whatever I feel like eating, I’m going to eat,” he stated to NBC TV. In spite of this, Phelps had just 8 per cent body fat as he burnt 1000 calories per hour during his training.

His muscle-intensive physique and his metabolism converted food into energy much faster than that of an average man. And Phelps, who won the 400m medley, 200m freestyle, 200m butterfly, 4x100m free relay, 4x200m free relay and the 200m medley in world record times, is no average man.
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What high schooler breaks Phelps record?

Ultimately, Maximus posted a final time of 3:39.83, beating the 2002 record set by Phelps of 3:42.08, according to the school. Phelps was 16 when he set the record in 2002.
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Do most Olympians have ADHD?

Research suggests, in fact, that ADHD may be more common in elite athletes than it is in the general population; up to 8% of athletes have the condition compared to 2% to 7% of the general population.
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Why is swimming good for ADHD?

1) Swimming can increase attention span Kids with ADHD often seem to have too much energy, resulting in fidgety, restless behavior. Swimming is a fantastic way to release this excess energy as it helps with the lack of focus and impulsivity seen in children with ADHD.
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Do all athletes have ADHD?

Michael Phelps is not alone. A surprising number of professional athletes have attention deficit disorder (ADHD). In fact, an estimated eight to ten percent of all pro athletes have the condition, as compared to four to five percent of the general population of adults.

  • Many experts say a connection between ADHD and athletics makes sense.
  • Having ADD can actually be an advantage in certain sports for ADHD children,” says Mike Stabeno, author of The ADHD Affected Athlete,
  • While some activities require intense concentration, that’s not always the case with athletics.

Everything happens instantaneously. You’re in there for 10 minutes, you’ve got five people trying to take your head off, three referees, four teammates. You need to take in everything that’s going on all at once. That’s how people with ADD go through life.

So it makes sense that they thrive in this field.” Of course, ADHD does present certain challenges. Perhaps the biggest, say experts, is that many athletes are unaware that they have the condition. “A lot of athletes have ADD and don’t know it,” says Eric Morse, M.D., president of the International Society for Sports Psychiatry,

And no wonder, says Stabeno, himself the father of two sons with ADD. “Chances are, no one ever considered testing athletes for ADD,” he says, “since they are good at what they do. Sure, that pitcher may be a little flaky, but who cares, as long as he can throw a 95-mile-per-hour fastball?” Among the athletes who do know that they have ADD, few are open about it.

  1. They’re often scared of what it could do to their career,” says Morse.
  2. In sports, no one wants to admit to a weakness.” Despite the risks, a growing number of athletes have come forward to acknowledge that they have the condition – including Terry Bradshaw, the Pro Football Hall of Famer who quarterbacked the Pittsburgh Steelers to four Super Bowl victories in the 1970s; swimmer Michael Phelps, the first American to win eight medals in a single Olympic Games; and Pete Rose, whose ADD probably helped propel him to become the 1975 World Series MVP and to hold the major league all-time hit record — but also may have fueled the gambling problem that led to his lifetime ban from baseball.

In this article, you’ll meet three standouts in the current generation of athletes with ADHD. Each has had a different experience with the condition, but all are open about how it helped them, held them back, and ultimately shaped them into who they are today.
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Does Michael Phelps have genetic?

“The most decorated Olympian” they all say, Michael Phelps is easily one of the world’s greatest swimmers to ever live. Having 28 Olympic medals, 23 of them being gold, he is easily known for his swimming prowess. Despite these major accomplishments, many people question how he has made it this far.

  1. People believe genetics played a key role in his success, while others believe it was it was pure talent, and actual training and exercise.
  2. Other people believe it was a combination of both.
  3. Through extensive research, I will decide which is the true root of Phelps’ triumphs.
  4. It is important that I explain the career of Michael Phelps to know the basis of the debate.

Phelps was diagnosed with ADHD (Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder), a genetic condition. Although ADHD is truly genetic, it does not affect his performance. Other genetic conditions, on the other hand, is what people believe make him better. Nevertheless, Phelps found himself dedicated to swimming and competing in the 2000 Olympic Games in Sydney, Australia at the age of 15.

  • He was one of the youngest competitors in the 200-meter butterfly event.
  • Although only making fifth place, Phelps was very elated of his achievements.
  • It was great, I was fifth, that’s a pretty big accomplishment.
  • But I didn’t want it.
  • I wanted more.
  • I was within half a second of medaling – it was literally, if I would have taken it out a little bit faster, maybe I would have had a chance.” In 2001, still 15, Phelps competed at the World Championship Trials and broke a world record in the 200- meter butterfly.

He also broke the butterfly record at the World Championships in Fukoka, Japan. In 2004, Phelps participated in the Athens Olympics and won 6 gold medals and two bronze medals. In the 200m freestyle, Phelps competed against Ian Thorpe, Phelp’s swimming inspiration, and placed third in that race.

Ian Thorpe placed two spots above him in first, followed by Pieter van den Hoogenband. However, at that point of his career, Phelps was a force to be reckoned with in the swimming industry. In pursuit of achieving a new record, Phelps wanted to win 8 gold medals in one Olympics. Mark Spitz, who won seven gold medals in the 1972 Munich Games, had the record for most first place medals.

To achieve this, Phelps competed in eight events at the World Championship in 2007 as practice for the actual Olympics the following year. Phelps was able to win seven events at the World Championships. The 4×100 medley relay team was disqualified unfortunately, but Michael was determined to win all eight.

Although being doubted by Mark Spitz and Ian Thorpe, his own hero, Phelps proved them wrong and won all eight swimming events. The crowd stood in awe as Phelps won event after event. With fourteen gold medals under his belt, Phelps was now the most decorated Olympian ever. For the 2012 and 2016 Olympics, Phelps acquired nine gold medals and three silver medals, bringing his accumulated total to 23 gold medals, 3 silver medals, and 2 bronze medals.

There is still haziness when it comes to the root of Phelp’s success. It is argued that it is purely acquired and through rigorous training. According to Muscleprodigy.com, during the peak of his career (2008-2012), Phelps worked on body weight exercises like push-ups rather than weight exercises to improve muscle strength and endurance.

Phelps thinks that having all that muscle will slow him down in the water if he has more weight on him. He lifts weights 3 days a week and train 5-6 hours a day every single day. To have all this energy to sustain this exercise, he eats 12,000 calories a day because of his fast metabolism. Phelps ate foods that were full of carbohydrates and he would work the carbs off.

The reason why a myriad of people believes his ability is acquired is because of his extreme program. Many people believe that a program that intense would surely help a swimmer become amazing. Training for a big portion of the day during the peak of your career would surely help make you go faster, have endurance, and like Phelps, obtain 23 gold medals.

Another view of Phelps is that his genetics have given him advantages over other swimmers, making him such a great swimmer. Scientific American, during the peak of the career, elaborates on a couple of factors that give Phelps an edge in swimming. Phelps in 2008 was 6 ft 4 in, and his wingspan was only a couple inches more at 6 ft 8 in.

That is a huge wingspan for anyone and is really long in length. It was his incredible reach that made him win against Serbia’s Milo Cavic by one-hundredth of a second in the 100-meter butterfly at the 2008 Olympics. Experts believe that just this bit of extra height can make Phelps win a race over another.

This height leads into the main genetic condition that makes people think is the cause of Phelps’ success. It is also rumored that Phelps has a rare hereditary disorder called Marfan Syndrome. Symptoms consist of long arms and legs, tall and slender build, and curved spine. It is known these things give swimmers advantages in the water and it is also known that Phelps has these things.

People believe Michael Phelps has this disorder and it helps him in swimming. Although, symptoms like flat feet and heart murmurs are things Phelps also has which can be a disadvantage to his swimming. Maybe some symptoms are good for swimming, but his heart murmurs can greatly affect his future.

  • To add to this, Phelp’s ankles can bend more than an average swimmer, making his feet like a flipper.
  • Yet again, other swimmers can have this flexibility, so this is not really a huge advantage.
  • Through the debate of the cause of Michael Phelps’ swimming prowess, I believe it is a mixture of both skill and genetics.
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An Olympic athlete needs training to stay in shape and increase the five components of fitness: muscle strength, muscle endurance, cardiovascular endurance, flexibility, and body composition. Genetics just cannot give someone good endurance, this comes with training.

  1. However, his height, controlled by genetics, do allow him to acquire slight advantages in the water, proving genetics can make Phelps acquire clutch wins.
  2. Overall, no one can deny the legend that Michael Phelps is.
  3. He has taught us all that hard work and perseverance can make anyone can be successful in life.

Phelps claim that he has retired after the 2016 Rio Olympics, but many people believe the complete opposite and that he is still swimming. We can all agree on one thing: his legacy lives on.
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How rich is Michael Phelps?

Michael Phelps’ Net Worth in 2022 (Estimate): $100 million – Michael Phelps’ net worth in 2022 is $100 million. This is according to reputable outlets such as Celebrity Net Worth, Michael Phelps was born in Baltimore, Maryland. He studied in Towson High School. After graduating high school, Phelps trained for the Summer Olympics.

  • While doing so, he also attended University of Michigan and studied sports marketing and management.
  • At only age 15, Phelps became the youngest athlete to make the U.S.
  • Olympic team during that time.
  • Although he failed to snag a medal, Phelps still managed to make finals and settled for fifth place.
  • While Phelps’ debut didn’t result in medals, it was just the beginning of his dominance in the international swimming scene.

Roughly a year later in the 2001 World Championships, Phelps would go on to break the world record for the 200-meter butterfly. In the process of breaking the record, Phelps also broke the world record for becoming the youngest male athlete to set a world record in swimming.

In the said international tourney, Phelps would go on to shatter his previous world record to win the gold medal. In terms of World Championships alone, Phelps has a total tally of 34 medals including 27 being gold. His stint at the 2007 edition was arguably his best showing after breaking four individual records and winning seven gold medals.

Aside from dominating the World Championships, Phelps also reigned over the Pan Pacific Championships. As of this writing, Phelps has collected 21 medals since he joined the games in 2002. Among the 21, 16 of them were gold medals. Obviously, this would lead to insane sponsorships, which would add to Michael Phelps’ net worth in 2022 and far beyond.

Phelps’ dominance wasn’t limited to the World Championships and the Pan Pacific Games. In fact, his legacy was cemented after several masterful performances in the Olympic stage. While his Olympic debut didn’t see him win medals, Phelps’ next five Olympic appearances showed otherwise. From 2004 to 2016, Phelps would go on to win 28 Olympic medals to cement his legacy.

Among his appearances, Phelps’ 2008 campaign was arguably the most dominant. In the 2008 Beijing Olympics, Phelps captured a record of eight gold medals, which was enough to break Mark Spitz’s record that held for 36 years. Phelps has won a total of 23 gold medals in his Olympic swimming career which makes him the most decorated Olympian of all time.

In 2016, Phelps publicly announced his retirement, Nevertheless, with several Olympic medals to his name, Phelps has earned a lot of money from those victories. Based on reports, the Olympic committee awards medal winners with prize money. Phelps’ 28 medals should give him at least a respectable amount of $640,000 in cash,

Phelps has carved out a decorated swimming career that puts him as arguably the best swimmer in world history. Because of this, there’s no shortage of brands that want to sponsor a generational athlete like Phelps. According to sources, Phelps has signed sponsorship deals with Visa, Kellog’s, Under Armour, Intel, Beats, Radio Shack, PowerBar, AT&T, Call of Duty, Head & Shoulders, Colgate, Omega, Subway, and Speedo.

  • Furthermore, Phelps has also promoted brands such as Wheaties, Louis Vuitton, and KRAVE Jerky.
  • In 2003, Phelps inked a six year deal with Speedo that included a $1 million bonus if he broke Mark Spitz’s record.
  • As we all know, Phelps achieved the feat in the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing.
  • Despite their great partnership in the past, Phelps eventually left Speedo in 2014 and signed with rival brand Aqua Sphere on a six year deal.

In 2010, Phelps inked a dryland apparel deal with Under Armour. Five years later, Phelps was rewarded with a five year contract extension. Phelps earns approximately $10 million in brand sponsorships and endorsements alone. Apart from a decorated swimming career and various sponsorship deals, Phelps is also an equity investor for Talkspace, a company that advocates for mental health.
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What did Einstein have ADHD?

Did Albert Einstein Have ADHD? – Where Did Michael Phelps Go To High School Image by RODNAE Productions, Pexels.com Experts believed that Einstein had ADHD because he ‘ was as disorganised and forgetful as he was insightful and intelligent,’ Other traits he was known to have included: inattention by being frequently disciplined at school and college for not paying attention, being rebellious in the way he often opposed his school teachers and college professors, and being impulsive having several love affairs throughout his life.

There are other, more positive, points that suggest Einstein may have had ADHD, such as ‘hyper-focusing’ by conducting ‘highly complex thought experiments.’ This is similar to Mack, the girl in the Storybooth animation about Living with ADHD, turning the negativity of her focusing on a crumb on her desk during maths at school, into the positivity of noticing small details.

Einstein also had ‘exceptional creativity,’ which led to his Theory of General Relativity, another trait of ADHD.
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What is the youngest ADHD?

Download Fact Sheet At times preschoolers may have difficulty paying attention, following directions, and waiting or taking their turn. These behaviors can be common and age appropriate or they may indicate the need for an Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) evaluation.

  • As a parent, you might wonder whether your preschooler has ADHD or is just being rambunctious and acting typical for his or her age.
  • This fact sheet will tell you more about ADHD in preschoolers and what to do if you are concerned about your child.
  • Can preschoolers have or be diagnosed with ADHD Yes.
  • Children as young as age 4 can be diagnosed with ADHD.

According to the 2010-2011 National Survey of Children’s Health, approximately 194,000 preschoolers (2-5 years of age) had a current ADHD diagnosis. Some children outgrow the symptoms, but others may not. Research shows that 3-year-olds who show symptoms of ADHD are much more likely to meet the diagnostic criteria for ADHD by age 13.

How can I tell if my preschooler has ADHD Preschoolers with ADHD are more likely to be suspended from school or daycare because of their disruptive behavior. These kids have more trouble learning concepts at school, and many get special education placements at a very young age when compared to children without ADHD.

As a parent, you will want to know where your child’s behaviors fit along a range of behaviors that are typical of kids the same age. Ask yourself, “When compared with other preschoolers of the same age, where does my child’s behavior fall” Talking with your preschooler’s teachers and/or childcare providers can let you know what are common behaviors in young children and not related to a disorder and what is of more serious concern.

What is involved in having my preschooler evaluated for ADHD To be diagnosed with ADHD, a child must have a specified number of symptoms for at least 6 months that show up in more than one area of life. For example, if your child has behaviors at home that may look like ADHD but does not have these behaviors in situations outside the home, there may be another explanation.

If you suspect that your preschooler has ADHD, you will want to talk to a professional who is trained to diagnose and treat ADHD such as your child’s pediatrician, a child psychiatrist, psychologist, clinical social worker or other qualified mental health clinician.

It is also important to have your child checked for other conditions such as vision, hearing, or sleep problems because sometimes the symptoms look like ADHD. Evaluations for preschoolers should be thorough and follow the guidelines outlined by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP).

These guidelines recommend a detailed interview with you to determine how long the symptoms have been going on, how severe they are, how often they occur and in what settings. You and your child’s teachers or child care providers will be asked to complete questionnaires with rating scales to evaluate your child’s behavior.

The ADHD professional will conduct a detailed review of your preschooler’s school and medical records, talk with and observe your child directly, and check for other conditions your child may have along with ADHD. The professional may also suggest other psychological tests to help understand your preschooler’s strengths and weaknesses in learning and thinking skills and screen for learning disabilities.

What are the symptoms of ADHD in children A diagnosis of ADHD is based on The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM 5). The manual lists three presentations of ADHD–Inattentive, Hyperactive-Impulsive and Combined and the symptoms for each.

Fails to give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes Has difficulty sustaining attention Does not appear to listen Struggles to follow through on instructions Has difficulty with organization Avoids or dislikes tasks requiring a lot of thinking Loses things Is easily distracted Is forgetful in daily activities

Hyperactive Impulsive

Fidgets with hands or feet or squirms in chair Has difficulty remaining seated Runs about or climbs excessively in children; extreme restlessness in adults Difficulty engaging in activities quietly Acts as if driven by a motor; adults will often feel inside like they were driven by a motor Talks excessively Blurts out answers before questions have been completed Difficulty waiting or taking turns Interrupts or intrudes upon others

Combined, Inattentive & Hyperactive-impulsive

Has symptoms from both of the above lists

These symptoms can change over time, so children may fit different presentations as they age. What are the causes of ADHD Research has yet to determine the exact causes of ADHD. However, scientists have discovered a strong genetic link since ADHD can run in families. Other factors in the environment may increase the likelihood of having ADHD:

mother smoking cigarettes or drinking alcohol while pregnant exposure to lead or pesticides in early childhood premature birth or low birth weight brain injury

Scientists continue to study the exact relationship of ADHD to environmental factors, but point out that there is no single cause that explains all cases of ADHD and that many factors may play a part. The following factors are NOT known causes, but can make ADHD symptoms worse for some children:

watching too much television eating sugar family stress (poverty, family trauma)

Why is it important to address ADHD in my preschooler at an early age Preschoolers with ADHD are more likely to have difficulties in daycare or school, including problems with peer relationships, learning, and a higher risk of injuries. An early diagnosis is important so that your child can get the needed help to minimize these problems.

  • Even for the preschooler who might have some symptoms but does not have ADHD, these early years are the time when significant brain development occurs.
  • This is an optimal time for children to learn positive behaviors, and for you to know how to effectively help your child learn.
  • It’s best to address problematic behaviors sooner rather than later.

How should ADHD be treated in preschoolers When it comes to treatment for preschool and kindergarten-aged children, the AAP calls for behavioral treatments first and medication only when needed. Behavioral therapy from child and adolescent therapists who specialize in ADHD will provide both the parents and the children techniques to teach and reinforce positive behaviors and skills.

  1. This will help a preschooler with ADHD to successfully function at home and school.
  2. When medication is prescribed, the AAP recommends starting children ages 4-5 on a methylphenidate medication trial beginning with a low dose.
  3. Because children respond differently to medication, what may work for one child may not work for another.

The health care professional can adjust the dose to determine if it is helping, if a different medication is needed or if any side effects are present. Treating ADHD is complex, and it is important to continually monitor children to see if the treatment is working.

This includes periodically repeating the rating scale assessments to make sure the medication and behavioral therapy are having the desired effect. Additionally, the AACAP Preschool Pharmacology Working Group recommends that preschoolers who are taking ADHD medication have their medication stopped (under the prescribing doctor’s direction) after 6 months to reassess the symptoms and to consider whether the medication should be continued.

What is parent behavioral training and how can it benefit me and my child Children who have ADHD may not have the skills and behaviors that result in their receiving positive attention. Often they tend to misbehave and are in situations where they are punished more frequently than other children.

  • This can have a negative effect on their self-image and cause them to increase their problem behaviors.
  • Parents and caregivers (daycare providers, preschool teachers, and other caretakers) can learn to manage the behavior of preschoolers who have ADHD by becoming educated about the disorder and by receiving parent training in how to use behavioral techniques.

Parent training programs taught by trained therapists can give caretakers the tools and strategies to help children who have ADHD. A 2010 review by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) found that effective programs:

help parents develop a positive relationship with their child teach them about how children develop help them manage negative behavior and increase positive behavior with positive discipline

Parent behavioral training programs for parents of preschool-aged children that currently have enough research evidence to be described as effective:

Triple P (Positive Parenting Program) Incredible Years Parenting Program Parent-Child Interaction Therapy

Other programs that focus on the same elements may also be helpful. Parents and caregivers who wish to learn more about ADHD and ways to help their child may wish to enroll in Parent to Parent: Family Training on ADHD offered through CHADD, Are preschoolers receiving the recommended treatments The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that 1 in 2 preschoolers do not receive recommended behavioral treatment.

The rates of preschool-aged children taking medication for ADHD has doubled in the last four years, and 1 in 4 receive only medication treatment, which should be the last resort. There is a movement within the field of ADHD to increase access to behavior therapy for young children, particularly to behavioral parenting therapy that is considered evidence-based and effective.

The hope is to decrease the rates of preschool and kindergarten-aged children taking medication for ADHD as a first line of treatment. For More Information http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/adhd/treatment.html http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/128/5/1007.full
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Which Olympian goes to Harvard?

Where Did Michael Phelps Go To High School Emerance Maschmeyer (from left), Dan Cnossen, Nick Abruzzese, and Rémi Drolet are among Harvard athletes in Beijing Olympics. Photos by Matthew Murnaghan, Luc Percival, Gil Talbot; photo illustration by Judy Blomquist/Harvard Staff
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How many Olympians go to Harvard?

113 Years of Harvard Olympians When the National Hockey League announced it wasn’t sending any athletes to the Olympics this year, Sean Farrell ’24 and Nick Abruzzese ’23 of the Harvard men’s ice hockey team stepped up to the plate. Their student-filled team finished as the top seed from the qualifying round, although they eventually lost to Slovakia in a shootout in the quarterfinals.

Farrell and Abruzzese were two of the four current Harvard students and two alumni who competed at the Beijing Games. Keely Moy ’22 competed for the Swiss women’s hockey team, which ultimately finished fourth. The Canadian women’s hockey team, including Emerance Maschmeyer ’16, won gold. Harvard Winter Olympians are nothing new.

Throughout the history of the Winter Olympics, 56 Harvard students and alumni have competed in 23 games, winning a total of 17 gold medals and 18 silver medals. Harvard athletes have competed in a variety of Winter Olympic sports, including figure skating, bobsled, Nordic skiing.

  • The first Winter Olympic games, held in Chamonix, France in 1924, included two Harvard athletes.
  • Nathaniel W.
  • Niles ‘1909, a figure skater, and Willard W.
  • Rice ‘1922, an ice hockey player, the latter of which won a silver medal and thus kickstarted a long history of Harvard Olympic medalists.
  • Over the next 100 years, Harvard participated in every Olympics except for 1980, where the only Harvard affiliates were a coach and a cross country alternate.

In 1992, Paul Wylie ’91 broke the Harvard Olympic drought and won the silver medal in the men’s figure skating singles event. Although Harvard athletes have competed in many Olympic sports, no sport has seen as much Harvard representation as ice hockey.

Thirty-eight Harvard affiliated hockey players have won 35 of Harvard’s 43 Winter Olympic medals, with most of those coming in the past two decades. Since the introduction of women’s ice hockey at the 1998 Nagano Olympics, female Harvard hockey players have won 9 gold medals, 12 silver medals, and 4 bronze medals.

The ice hockey legacy is especially meaningful to Moy. “I’m in awe of all the people that came before me,” says Moy. “Regardless of if they’re an Olympian, they’re incredible hockey players and they’re even better people. I’m pretty thankful to even be held in that regard.” Hockey has always been a part of Moy’s life.

  • Introduced to the sport by her father, Moy recalls private lessons and family practices filling up any free time she had.
  • When the pandemic hit, Moy found herself without a hockey season or team.
  • Consequently, she decided to play for the Women’s League in Switzerland, her mother’s home country.
  • Two months ago, after the unexpected loss of her father in 2020, she found out she made the Swiss team.

This news significantly impacted her relation to the sport. ” didn’t know I was gonna go make this team,” she said. “I think it was always his dream for me to play at the highest level and work as hard as I possibly can to reach my goals. So, it was really cool to think that my dad has some pull upstairs for this opportunity to fall into my lap.” For Moy, the most memorable moment was stepping onto Olympic ice for the first time.

  • She said, “I’m on the ice looking up in the stands and seeing this big banner of the Olympic rings, and you’re like wow this isn’t a dream anymorethis is my reality.
  • In warm up, looking across the ice and seeking the best players in the world, and in playing against Canada and being like no, you can’t take this away from me.

This is such an incredible moment and feeling.” Although Covid-19 created controversy surrounding the Winter Olympics, Moy and other athletes welcomed the competition with excitement. Rémi Drolet ’24 spoke to me the day before his final event at the Beijing Games, the men’s Nordic skiing 50KM Mass Start.

  1. Drolet spoke about the volunteers rather than his upcoming race.
  2. He said, ” have been really great and always smiling behind their masks.
  3. They’re just really bubbly all the time and super happy to see you.
  4. What I’ve kind of realized is that when you go to the Olympics, everyone’s fighting for good results.

But there’s only a select few athletes that actually get to have medals. When you come back home after your race, sometimes it can feel a little disappointing when you don’t perform as well as you wanted to. Then having those volunteers there bringing in all the positive energy really makes it a lot easier and a lot more enjoyable.” As for coming back to school as newly crowned Olympians? Drolet and Moy are excited.

Moy is in the middle of her senior season and is looking forward to coming back to the “most elite college students and minds in the world” after spending two weeks among the most elite athletes in the world. Drolet said, “I’m excited to get back in the fall. It feels good to be showing that it can be done high level sport with a high level education.

Hopefully I can encourage more skiers to come to Harvard and go to college in general.” Kate DeGroote ’24 ( ) loves watching the Olympics and imagining she is as good at skiing as the Olympic athletes. : 113 Years of Harvard Olympians
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How many Olympians went to Harvard?

When thousands of men and women convened in London for the opening of the Games of the XXX Olympiad, some had a good shot at medals, and others were simply happy for the chance to represent their country on the world’s biggest sporting stage. (Continued below) Where Did Michael Phelps Go To High School Among the competitors were nine athletes with Harvard ties, and one Harvard coach, Together they continued the University’s long connection to the Olympics, a connection that began in 1896 when seven then and future Harvard men participating in events in track and field and shooting took home 12 medals, including eight gold.

  • Since then, Harvard has been represented at every Olympic Games, with a total of 223 participants (athletes, coaches, and administrators) representing 14 countries and 344 events.
  • Homecoming For the only current Harvard athlete at this year’s games, the competition has special meaning.
  • Six-foot-four-inch Temi Fagbenle ’15 was on familiar ground as she competed as a forward with Great Britain’s women’s basketball team, though her team did not win.

Fagbenle, a Londoner, preferred tennis in her early years and harbored dreams of becoming the next Venus Williams. But at 14 she traded her racket for a basketball.
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Was Michael Phelps medicated for ADHD?

Struggling with an ADHD diagnosis – But the road to Rio wasn’t an easy path for Phelps or for his parents. When Phelps was in the sixth grade, he was fidgety and had trouble paying in the classroom. His pediatrician diagnosed him with ADHD and prescribed,

Phelps took the for several years, and it seemed to help. At age 13, however, however, he decided that he was using the drug as a crutch, even though it did help make him less “jumpy” at school. He thought that if he applied his mind to controlling his behavior and focusing, he could help himself without taking pills.

As Phelps recalls in his autobiography No Limits, he felt humiliated in front of his friends when the school nurse came to find him in class to remind him to take his Ritalin. At the age of 10, Phelps had attention and focus problems at school. He also acted out in class.

  1. Eventually, he was diagnosed with ADHD and prescribed medication for several years.
  2. Feeling that the drug was a crutch, Phelps decided to learn to use his mind to focus and control himself in the classroom.
  3. However, as they say, nothing is impossible.
  4. Phelps found that swimming helped him control his energy and stopped him from being fidgety.

Phelps weaned himself off the medication with his doctor’s support and learned to use the power of his mind to focus on his school work and control himself in the classroom. At this point, Phelps’s teacher told his mother that her son would never succeed at anything because he couldn’t focus on anything for a long enough time.

His mother was also concerned about stopping the medication. Defying his teacher’s and his mother’s grim predictions, Phelps went on to become the most decorated athlete in the history of the Olympics. He had found in vigorous and disciplined swimming a solution for the nervous energy that made him jumpy and fidgety.

He learned self-discipline by forcing himself to go to swim practice.
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What high schooler breaks Phelps record?

Ultimately, Maximus posted a final time of 3:39.83, beating the 2002 record set by Phelps of 3:42.08, according to the school. Phelps was 16 when he set the record in 2002.
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What high school swimmer breaks Michael Phelps record?

December 15, 2022 / 1:38 PM / CBS Texas Your Thursday Afternoon Headlines, December 15th, 2022 Your Thursday Afternoon Headlines, December 15th, 2022 02:36 KELLER (CBSDFW.COM) – It was a momentous event on Dec.9 when Keller High sophomore Maximus Williamson broke the 400-Meter Individual Medley record previously held by the most decorated Olympian of all time, Michael Phelps. Maximus Williamson Keller ISD “It’s hard to grasp the concept of what just happened,” Williamson said. “I’m just left speechless to be compared to the GOAT,” Williamson broke the record swimming for the Lakeside Aquatic Club at the 2022 Winter Junior Nationals competition in Austin.

  1. He competed in the 15-16 National Age Group 400-Meter Individual Medley, posting a time of 3:39.83 and ultimately beating the 2002 record set by Phelps of 3:42.08.
  2. Breaking 40 was a goal for me,” Williamson said.
  3. I was so close to it last year.
  4. I think that’s what pushed me the most.” Keller High swim coach Jamie Shults talked about the magnitude of Williamson’s achievement.

“Michael Phelps is the most well-known swimmer of all time, so even people who don’t know swimming know Phelps,” Shults said. “To break a 20-year-old Michael Phelps record is truly an extraordinary accomplishment.” Williamson continues to perform at an elite level, earning medals and setting multiple records.

In: michael phelps Keller Texas

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How rich is Michael Phelps?

Michael Phelps’ Net Worth in 2022 (Estimate): $100 million – Michael Phelps’ net worth in 2022 is $100 million. This is according to reputable outlets such as Celebrity Net Worth, Michael Phelps was born in Baltimore, Maryland. He studied in Towson High School. After graduating high school, Phelps trained for the Summer Olympics.

  • While doing so, he also attended University of Michigan and studied sports marketing and management.
  • At only age 15, Phelps became the youngest athlete to make the U.S.
  • Olympic team during that time.
  • Although he failed to snag a medal, Phelps still managed to make finals and settled for fifth place.
  • While Phelps’ debut didn’t result in medals, it was just the beginning of his dominance in the international swimming scene.

Roughly a year later in the 2001 World Championships, Phelps would go on to break the world record for the 200-meter butterfly. In the process of breaking the record, Phelps also broke the world record for becoming the youngest male athlete to set a world record in swimming.

In the said international tourney, Phelps would go on to shatter his previous world record to win the gold medal. In terms of World Championships alone, Phelps has a total tally of 34 medals including 27 being gold. His stint at the 2007 edition was arguably his best showing after breaking four individual records and winning seven gold medals.

Aside from dominating the World Championships, Phelps also reigned over the Pan Pacific Championships. As of this writing, Phelps has collected 21 medals since he joined the games in 2002. Among the 21, 16 of them were gold medals. Obviously, this would lead to insane sponsorships, which would add to Michael Phelps’ net worth in 2022 and far beyond.

  • Phelps’ dominance wasn’t limited to the World Championships and the Pan Pacific Games.
  • In fact, his legacy was cemented after several masterful performances in the Olympic stage.
  • While his Olympic debut didn’t see him win medals, Phelps’ next five Olympic appearances showed otherwise.
  • From 2004 to 2016, Phelps would go on to win 28 Olympic medals to cement his legacy.

Among his appearances, Phelps’ 2008 campaign was arguably the most dominant. In the 2008 Beijing Olympics, Phelps captured a record of eight gold medals, which was enough to break Mark Spitz’s record that held for 36 years. Phelps has won a total of 23 gold medals in his Olympic swimming career which makes him the most decorated Olympian of all time.

  1. In 2016, Phelps publicly announced his retirement,
  2. Nevertheless, with several Olympic medals to his name, Phelps has earned a lot of money from those victories.
  3. Based on reports, the Olympic committee awards medal winners with prize money.
  4. Phelps’ 28 medals should give him at least a respectable amount of $640,000 in cash,

Phelps has carved out a decorated swimming career that puts him as arguably the best swimmer in world history. Because of this, there’s no shortage of brands that want to sponsor a generational athlete like Phelps. According to sources, Phelps has signed sponsorship deals with Visa, Kellog’s, Under Armour, Intel, Beats, Radio Shack, PowerBar, AT&T, Call of Duty, Head & Shoulders, Colgate, Omega, Subway, and Speedo.

Furthermore, Phelps has also promoted brands such as Wheaties, Louis Vuitton, and KRAVE Jerky. In 2003, Phelps inked a six year deal with Speedo that included a $1 million bonus if he broke Mark Spitz’s record. As we all know, Phelps achieved the feat in the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing. Despite their great partnership in the past, Phelps eventually left Speedo in 2014 and signed with rival brand Aqua Sphere on a six year deal.

In 2010, Phelps inked a dryland apparel deal with Under Armour. Five years later, Phelps was rewarded with a five year contract extension. Phelps earns approximately $10 million in brand sponsorships and endorsements alone. Apart from a decorated swimming career and various sponsorship deals, Phelps is also an equity investor for Talkspace, a company that advocates for mental health.
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