When Was James Madison University Founded?

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When Was James Madison University Founded
People also search for George Mason University 1957 University of Virginia January 25, 1819, Charlottesville, Virginia, United States Virginia Tech June 20, 1872
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Who founded James Madison University?

History – Founded in 1908 as a women’s college, James Madison University was established by the Virginia General Assembly, It was originally called The State Normal and Industrial School for Women at Harrisonburg. In 1914, the name of the university was changed to the State Normal School for Women at Harrisonburg.

  1. At first, academic offerings included only the equivalent of technical training or junior college courses, but authorization to award bachelor’s degrees was granted in 1916.
  2. During this initial period of development, the campus plan was established and six buildings were constructed.
  3. The university became the State Teachers College at Harrisonburg in 1924 and continued under that name until 1938, when it was named Madison College in honor of James Madison, the fourth President of the United States, whose Montpelier estate is located in nearby Orange, Virginia,

In 1976, the university’s name was changed again to James Madison University. The first president of the university was Julian Ashby Burruss, The university opened its doors to its first student body in 1909 with an enrollment of 209 students and a faculty of 15.

Its first 20 graduates received diplomas in 1911. In 1919, Burruss resigned the presidency to become president of Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Samuel Page Duke was then chosen as the school’s second president. During Duke’s administration, nine major buildings were constructed. Duke served as president from 1919 to 1949.

In 1946, men were first enrolled as regular day students.G. Tyler Miller became the third president in 1949, following Duke’s retirement. During Miller’s administration, from 1949 to 1970, the campus was enlarged by 240 acres (0.97 km 2 ) and 19 buildings were constructed.
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When was James Madison University created?

Founded in 1908, James Madison University is a public university located in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley.
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Is James Madison University a prestigious school?

James Madison University is a public institution that was founded in 1908. It has a total undergraduate enrollment of 20,070 (fall 2021), its setting is city, and the campus size is 721 acres. It utilizes a semester-based academic calendar. James Madison University’s ranking in the 2022-2023 edition of Best Colleges is National Universities, #151.

  1. Its in-state tuition and fees are $13,092; out-of-state tuition and fees are $34,256.
  2. James Madison University is located in Harrisonburg, Va., just over two hours from both Washington, D.C., and Richmond.
  3. There are a variety of clubs and organizations on campus—students interested in film can join the Cinemuse Film Club, or those with underwater pursuits in mind can join the Scuba Diving Club.

The University Program Board is a student-run organization that puts on entertainment and educational events and activities for the campus community. A small but strong Greek system encompasses more than 30 fraternities and sororities. The James Madison Dukes, as JMU’s sports teams are called, compete at the NCAA Division I level, and their mascot is the Duke Dog.

Only freshmen are required to live on campus in one of the more than 30 residence halls. JMU is comprised of seven colleges serving undergraduate and graduate students. Graduate programs are offered in the College of Business, College of Education, and College of Integrated Science and Technology, among others.

Undergraduates can choose from more than 70 majors. JMU also has a strong study abroad program offering semester studies opportunities in Antwerp, Belgium; Beijing; Florence; London; and Salamanca, Spain, in addition to exchange programs through partner institutions all over the world.

  1. The school was not James Madison University until 1976; prior to that, it was known as Madison College.
  2. James Madison University is a public institution that was founded in 1908.
  3. It has a total undergraduate enrollment of 20,070 (fall 2021), its setting is city, and the campus size is 721 acres.
  4. It utilizes a semester-based academic calendar.

James Madison University’s ranking in the 2022-2023 edition of Best Colleges is National Universities, #151. Its in-state tuition and fees are $13,092; out-of-state tuition and fees are $34,256. James Madison University is located in Harrisonburg, Va., just over two hours from both Washington, D.C., and Richmond.

  1. There are a variety of clubs and organizations on campus—students interested in film can join the Cinemuse Film Club, or those with underwater pursuits in mind can join the Scuba Diving Club.
  2. The University Program Board is a student-run organization that puts on entertainment and educational events and activities for the campus community.

A small but strong Greek system encompasses more than 30 fraternities and sororities. The James Madison Dukes, as JMU’s sports teams are called, compete at the NCAA Division I level, and their mascot is the Duke Dog. Only freshmen are required to live on campus in one of the more than 30 residence halls.

JMU is comprised of seven colleges serving undergraduate and graduate students. Graduate programs are offered in the College of Business, College of Education, and College of Integrated Science and Technology, among others. Undergraduates can choose from more than 70 majors. JMU also has a strong study abroad program offering semester studies opportunities in Antwerp, Belgium; Beijing; Florence; London; and Salamanca, Spain, in addition to exchange programs through partner institutions all over the world.

The school was not James Madison University until 1976; prior to that, it was known as Madison College.
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Is James Madison University Ivy League?

There’s a wide variety and so many opportunities to find your career. Academics at JMU definitely aren’t Ivy League ; if they were, we’d be an Ivy League school. However, we have highly competitive and sought out colleges within the University.
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Why is James Madison famous for?

James Madison The biography for President Madison and past presidents is courtesy of the White House Historical Association. James Madison, America’s fourth President (1809-1817), made a major contribution to the ratification of the Constitution by writing The Federalist Papers, along with Alexander Hamilton and John Jay.

In later years, he was referred to as the “Father of the Constitution.” At his inauguration, James Madison, a small, wizened man, appeared old and worn; Washington Irving described him as “but a withered little apple-John.” But whatever his deficiencies in charm, Madison’s wife Dolley compensated for them with her warmth and gaiety.

She was the toast of Washington. Born in 1751, Madison was brought up in Orange County, Virginia, and attended Princeton (then called the College of New Jersey). A student of history and government, well-read in law, he participated in the framing of the Virginia Constitution in 1776, served in the Continental Congress, and was a leader in the Virginia Assembly.

When delegates to the Constitutional Convention assembled at Philadelphia, the 36-year-old Madison took frequent and emphatic part in the debates. Madison made a major contribution to the ratification of the Constitution by writing, with Alexander Hamilton and John Jay, the Federalist essays. In later years, when he was referred to as the “Father of the Constitution,” Madison protested that the document was not “the off-spring of a single brain,” but “the work of many heads and many hands.” In Congress, he helped frame the Bill of Rights and enact the first revenue legislation.

Out of his leadership in opposition to Hamilton’s financial proposals, which he felt would unduly bestow wealth and power upon northern financiers, came the development of the Republican, or Jeffersonian, Party. As President Jefferson’s Secretary of State, Madison protested to warring France and Britain that their seizure of American ships was contrary to international law.

The protests, John Randolph acidly commented, had the effect of “a shilling pamphlet hurled against eight hundred ships of war.” Despite the unpopular Embargo Act of 1807, which did not make the belligerent nations change their ways but did cause a depression in the United States, Madison was elected President in 1808.

Before he took office the Embargo Act was repealed. During the first year of Madison’s Administration, the United States prohibited trade with both Britain and France; then in May, 1810, Congress authorized trade with both, directing the President, if either would accept America’s view of neutral rights, to forbid trade with the other nation.

  • Napoleon pretended to comply.
  • Late in 1810, Madison proclaimed non-intercourse with Great Britain.
  • In Congress a young group including Henry Clay and John C.
  • Calhoun, the “War Hawks,” pressed the President for a more militant policy.
  • The British impressment of American seamen and the seizure of cargoes impelled Madison to give in to the pressure.

On June 1, 1812, he asked Congress to declare war. The young Nation was not prepared to fight; its forces took a severe trouncing. The British entered Washington and set fire to the White House and the Capitol. But a few notable naval and military victories, climaxed by Gen.

  1. Andrew Jackson’s triumph at New Orleans, convinced Americans that the War of 1812 had been gloriously successful.
  2. An upsurge of nationalism resulted.
  3. The New England Federalists who had opposed the war–and who had even talked secession–were so thoroughly repudiated that Federalism disappeared as a national party.

In retirement at Montpelier, his estate in Orange County, Virginia, Madison spoke out against the disruptive states’ rights influences that by the 1830’s threatened to shatter the Federal Union. In a note opened after his death in 1836, he stated, “The advice nearest to my heart and deepest in my convictions is that the Union of the States be cherished and perpetuated.” Learn more about James Madison’s spouse,,
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What is James Madison University best known for?

The student-faculty ratio at James Madison University is 16:1, and the school has 39.7% of its classes with fewer than 20 students. The most popular majors at James Madison University include: Health Professions and Related Programs; Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services; Communication, Journalism, and Related Programs; Social Sciences; Parks, Recreation, Leisure, Fitness, and Kinesiology; Computer and Information Sciences and Support Services; Liberal Arts and Sciences, General Studies and Humanities; Biological and Biomedical Sciences; Visual and Performing Arts; and Psychology.
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What is the ranking of Madison university?

University of Wisconsin-Madison Rankings – University of Wisconsin-Madison is ranked #38 out of 443 National Universities. Schools are ranked according to their performance across a set of widely accepted indicators of excellence. Read more about how we rank schools,
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Is JMU a Tier 1 school?

The university is being recognized in the top tier of academic institutions in the country. Additional notable rankings by U.S. News & World Report are: National Universities #151. Top Public Schools – National Universities #72.
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How hard is it to get into JMU?

James Madison admissions is somewhat selective with an acceptance rate of 80%. Students that get into James Madison have an average SAT score between 1120-1280 or an average ACT score of 23-28.
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What is the hardest school to get into Madison?

University of Wisconsin #1 Hardest Colleges to Get Into in Wisconsin.
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Are students happy at JMU?

JMU ranked ‘right choice’ by students; also scores high in student engagement When asked if they would do it all over again, that is, choose to attend James Madison University, students have answered with a resounding “yes.” According to The Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education inaugural ranking of U.S.

  1. Colleges and universities, JMU students feel strongly that they have made the right choice.
  2. More than 100,000 students from across the country were asked, “If you could start over, would you still choose this college?” JMU ranked No.5 among 1,061 public and private higher education institutions for the number of students who would choose to do it again.

The ranking, which specifically examines student success and learning, also found that not only are JMU students happy with their choice, but they are extremely engaged during their time on campus. JMU ranked in the top 20 percent of 1,061 public and private higher education institutions for student engagement.

The Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education defines engagement as “a measure of how connected the students are with their school, each other and the outside world, and how challenging their courses are, among other things.” Students were surveyed about engagement with learning, opportunities to interact with faculty and others and likelihood to recommend the school to a peer.

The rating also looked at data provided by the U.S. government about the number of accredited programs offered. “This ranking echoes what we have been saying for a long time about the quality of the student experience at Madison,” said Jonathan Alger, president of JMU.
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What GPA do you need to get into James Madison University?

Academic requirements – If you are applying to join the University directly, you must have at least a Grade Point Average (GPA) of 2.5 to join James Madison University. Undergraduate applicants who intend to major in theater, dance, music or studio art must also submit a portfolio and/or arrange an audition.
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What is considered the Harvard of the South?

The Harvard of the South – Vanderbilt University.
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What are 3 little known facts about James Madison?

LASTING LEGACY – After eight years in the White House, the Madisons settled in Montpelier, Virginia. Madison spent much of his time helping Jefferson create the University of Virginia. He also spoke with many of his peers about how to end slavery—even though he owned slaves himself.

• The smallest president, Madison was just 5 feet 4 inches tall, and weighed only a hundred pounds.• While enjoying a Sunday drive, Madison was once arrested with Thomas Jefferson because carriage riding was illegal on Sundays.• Madison wrote George Washington’s first speech as president of the United States.

From the Nat Geo Kids books by Ann Bausum and by Brianna Dumont, revised for digital by Avery Hurt : James Madison facts and photos
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What happened to James Madison?

James Madison: Life After the Presidency | Miller Center Madison left the White House and retired to his Virginia plantation, Montpelier, where he spent his remaining years supervising his large plantation holdings and slaves. Being a gentleman planter scarcely utilized all his energies, however, and the sixty-eight-year-old former President exercised his quill, a pen made from a feather, and gave his voice to several causes.

High on his list of activities was Jefferson’s University of Virginia, which Jefferson founded after leaving office. Madison served on its Board of Visitors and succeeded Jefferson as rector, or head, of the university in 1826. Three years later, Madison served as a delegate at the Virginia Constitutional Convention, negotiating once again, as he had done in youth, compromises between large slaveholders and western farmers.

In the great constitutional debate over the high protective tariff passed in 1828, Madison denounced the doctrine of nullification, the right of states to declare federal laws unconstitutional when they undermined state interests. Additionally, Madison was a founding member of the American Colonization Society, which favored a gradual abolition of slavery and the resettlement of slaves and free blacks in Africa.

Death took the aging President quietly at his breakfast on June 28, 1836, after having been confined to his room for chronic rheumatism and severe attacks from liver dysfunction for six months. His family and much of the nation had hoped that the eighty-five-year-old Madison would live to July 4, so as to join Jefferson and Adams in the list of former Presidents who had died on that historic date.

More than 100 slaves, family friends, and relatives attended his burial the next day at the family cemetery at Montpelier. : James Madison: Life After the Presidency | Miller Center
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What are 3 major accomplishments of James Madison?

At James Madison University, we define civic engagement as advancing the legacy of James Madison, the “Father of the Constitution,” by preparing individuals to be active and responsible participants in a representative democracy dedicated to the common good.

As philanthropist David Rubenstein noted in a speech on Constitution Day 2018 at JMU, as the university named for the “Father of the Constitution,” we “have a special obligation to know something about the Constitution” and our namesake because “people who are more knowledgeable about our government, more knowledgeable about our Constitution, probably are going to be better citizens, vote more intelligently and be more engaged in our country.” James Madison was born at Belle Grove plantation in Port Conway, Virginia on March 16, 1751.

A diligent and dedicated public servant, among Madison’s key achievements were: supporting the Virginia Declaration of Rights and the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom; helping to produce the Constitution of the United States of America and authoring the Bill of Rights; collaborating with Alexander Hamilton and John Jay on the Federalist Papers; leading the Democratic-Republican Party; serving as Secretary of State; becoming the fourth president of the United States; and serving as commander-in-chief in the War of 1812 (and the only president to lead troops in battle while in office).

  1. A respected leader, Madison was known for his brilliant persistence in politics, careful preparation and hard work.
  2. During his childhood, Madison had a host of privileges many lacked during this time.
  3. From the ages of 11 to 16, he was taught subjects ranging from mathematics, to geography, to Latin.
  4. His studies led him on a journey of fascination with ancient philosophy that would inform his ideas about democracy.

In 1769, Madison enrolled in the College of New Jersey, now known as Princeton University. Graduating in 1771, and longing for further education, Madison became the College of New Jersey’s first graduate student. After completing graduate studies, Madison returned home and became involved in local politics, serving as a member of the Orange County Committee of Public Safety in 1774,

  • In 1776, he was elected to the Virginia Legislature.
  • While serving in the state legislature, Madison began forging a relationship with Thomas Jefferson, a young innovative mind in Virginia at the time.
  • That same year, at the age of twenty-five, Madison fought to amend the Virginia Declaration of Rights to ground religious liberty in natural rights, not permission of the state.

Madison’s principle of “free exercise” of religion was enacted into law ten years later in the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom, written by Jefferson, but pushed by Madison through the General Assembly. In 1780, Madison was chosen to represent Virginia in the Continental Congress (1780-83 and 1786-88).

Although the youngest delegate, he played a major role in the deliberations of that body. Over time, the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation, the governing national document at the time, were exposed, and Madison believed the document lacked structure to adequately serve the new democracy. Madison also grew increasingly displeased with state legislatures and perceived that they too often pandered to the whims of their constituents at an unsustainable rate.

Madison was the main author of the Virginia Plan, a radical departure from the Articles of Confederation. Drawing on Charles Secondat, Baron de Montesquieu’s theory of the separation of powers, the Virginia Plan proposed to the Constitutional Convention a three-branch national government elevated over the states but grounded in the sovereignty of the people.

  • The heart of the proposed national government was a bicameral legislature, with the lower house apportioned according to some combination of wealth and population and elected by the people, and an upper chamber elected by the lower house from a list of candidates nominated by the states.
  • The second branch was a national judiciary of “one or more supreme tribunals,” and various “inferior tribunals” appointed with life tenure by the legislature.

The Virginia Plan also included a vaguely defined “national executive” “to be chosen by the National Legislature for a term of _ years.” Madison’s ideas also innovated the theory of separation of powers by mixing and sharing powers among the branches of the national government to ensure accountability across entities.

While much of the Virginia Plan was accepted by the Committee of the Whole at the Constitutional Convention, many compromises were also made to reach consensus (such as questions on representation of states in Congress) and to fill in details (such as the power and configuration of the executive). With regards to representation, one of the key questions revolved around the issue of slavery.

In a speech at the Constitutional Convention, Madison stated that “the greatest division of interests in the United Stateslay between the northern and southern.” To save the framework of the Virginia Plan, Madison proposed a “compromise” on representation in the legislature that would give proportional representation to one chamber, slaves included, and representation based only on the number of free inhabitants to the other chamber.

Madison explained, “By this arrangement the southern would have the advantage in one house, and the northern in the other.” Ultimately, the state delegates to the Convention agreed on a “compromise” proposed by James Wilson and Roger Sherman to include a clause in Article 1, Section 2 of the Constitution that counted three out of every five slaves as a person for purposes of taxation and representation, thus giving disproportionate representation to slaveholder interests in the House of Representatives until the Civil War.

While Madison has been called the “Father of the Constitution,” he himself noted in a letter to William Cogswell in 1834 that the Constitution “was not, like the fabled Goddess of Wisdom, the offspring of a single brain. It ought to be regarded as the work of many heads and many hands.” Indeed, there were many others who made essential contributions to its content, ratification and ideas for the first and most important amendments.

But, Madison played a central role in all of the stages – from the Constitution’s drafting, to arguing and explaining the Constitution in The Federalist Papers, and to sorting proposals that would become something like the first ten amendments (after being persuaded by Jefferson to accept the idea of a Bill of Rights ).

Not only did Madison help shape the Constitution, he was also the first historian of the Constitutional Convention. Madison’s notes from the Convention were the most complete set left by any delegate. Once the Constitution was drafted and awaiting ratification by the states, Madison, John Jay and Alexander Hamilton wrote The Federalist Papers urging citizens, especially in New York, to ratify the new Constitution and explaining how the government would function under it.

The Federalist papers are still considered some of the most innovative and impactful tenets of American political philosophy to date. Madison authored 29 of the 85 essays. In The Federalist No.49, Madison eloquently explicated the idea of popular sovereignty by which “The people are the only legitimate fountain of power, and it is from them that the constitutional charter, under which the several branches of government hold their power, is derived.” His essays also explained how a compound republic and complex federal system would preserve individual rights and buttress liberty by “extending the sphere” to “take a greater variety of parties and interest,” thereby making ambition check ambition.

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“Liberty is to faction what air is to fire, an aliment without which it instantly expires,” Madison wrote in The Federalist No.10. He continued, “But it could not be less folly to abolish liberty, which is essential to political life, because it nourishes faction, than it would be to wish the annihilation of air, which is essential to animal life, because it imparts to fire its destructive agency.” Madison also authored The Federalist No.54, which was an effort to justify the three-fifths rule for counting slaves in the formulation for representation in the lower chamber of Congress.

In the paper, Madison claims to be persuaded by the arguments of “one of our Southern Brethren,” that slaves are both “irrational animals, which fall under the legal denomination of property,” but are also “moral persons” under the law. The three-fifths rule, therefore reflects their ” mixed character of persons and of property,” Madison had argued in The Federalist Papers that the size of the United States and complexity of the federal system would uphold liberty and make it difficult for factions to seize power.

However, after ratification, Madison came to believe that in addition to the structural arrangements in the Constitution, another guarantee was necessary. In 1791, he argued that enlightened public opinion would thwart threats to liberty. He wrote in the ” Popular Basis of Political Authority ” that “public opinion sets bounds to every government, and is the real sovereign in every free one.” In the early 1790s, Madison helped found America’s first political party, the Democratic-Republicans.

Madison viewed politics as essentially partisan and stated in a speech to the Constitutional Convention on the Right of Suffrage : “No free country has ever been without parties, which are a natural offspring of freedom.” Indeed, he observed later in a letter to Henry Lee that, “The Constitution itself must be an unfailing source of party distinctions.” Following from his interest in freedom of the press and “enlightening” public opinion, Madison also helped found the first party newspaper, the National Gazette, which analyzed and criticized issues and personalities all with an ideological ax to grind, much like FoxNews, MSNBC, The Nation or The New Republic today.

Madison also regularly penned articles to analyze and deconstruct issues and to attack political personalities with whom he and Jefferson disagreed. Madison served in Congress during the presidency of George Washington and was the chief supporter of his policies and agenda.

Despite originally opposing a Bill of Rights in the Constitution because he believed an enumeration of rights was not a sufficient barrier to government encroachments on individual liberty, Madison’s most notable accomplishment in Congress was the introduction and guiding to passage of the first ten amendments to the Constitution.

Ratified in 1791, the Bill of Rights codified constitutional protections for what Jefferson and Madison viewed as fundamental human and civil rights, including religious liberty, freedom of speech, and due process, and rights against unreasonable, unsupported, or impulsive governmental authority.

  1. Madison also led the fight in Congress against the Alien and Sedition Acts, which attempted to suppress opposition to a Federalist foreign policy that favored England over France, and were viewed by Democratic-Republicans as fundamental violations of the Bill of Rights.
  2. When Thomas Jefferson was elected president, he appointed James Madison as Secretary of State.

Perhaps most notably in this position, Madison helped negotiate the Louisiana Purchase, which doubled the size of U.S. territory. Madison was elected president of the United States in 1808. On June 1, 1812, Madison urged Congress to declare war against Great Britain, the first war message by an American president, somewhat an irony given that Madison feared and wrote about war as the enemy of liberty and preferred trade war as his policy instrument of choice (see the Pacificus-Helvidius Debates ).

At issue in 1812 was evidence that the British were supplying arms to American Indians, who were angered by settlers encroaching on tribal lands in the Michigan and Indiana territories; by British seizures of American ships; and by the British seeking to acquire additional territory in Canada and Spanish Florida.

Once a staunch opponent of Alexander Hamilton’s plans for a national bank, Madison discovered in war the limitations of the principles of states’ rights, and in his seventh annual message in December 1815 recommended several measures, including chartering the Second Bank of the United States.

The Democratic-Republicans had allowed the first bank to expire in 1811 and with no national bank during the War of 1812, the federal government lacked a source of currency that exacerbated a financial crisis. Believing that a national bank was a necessary evil, he signed the bank bill into law in 1816.

After the presidency, Madison retired to his home at Montpelier. Madison also advised Jefferson on the founding of the University of Virginia, served on its Board of Visitors and succeeded Jefferson as rector of the university in 1826. James Madison was at the center of American constitutionalism.
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Did James Madison attend Harvard?

– Once Gouverneur Morris was offered a bet of one dinner if he would approach George Washington, slap him on the back and give him a friendly greeting. He wanted to show people how “close” he was to the “chief.” Morris carried out the bet, but later admitted that after seeing the cold stare from Washington, he wouldn’t do it again for a thousand dinners! George Washington was born on February 11, 1731 under the Julian calendar. In the early 1750s, Great Britain converted to the Gregorian calendar. An act of Parliament added eleven days to complete the adjustment and Washington’s birthday became February 22, 1732! Of the Founding Fathers who became president, only George Washington did not go to college. John Adams graduated from Harvard, James Madison graduated from Princeton, and Thomas Jefferson attended the College of William and Mary. John Adams was the first President to live in the White House when he came to Washington, D.C. in November of 1800. However, he was only there for four months after losing the election of 1800 to Thomas Jefferson. George Washington gave the shortest inauguration speech in American history on March 4, 1793. It was only 133 words long. William Henry Harrison gave the longest at 8,443 words on March 4, 1841 on a cold and blustery day in Washington, D.C. He died one month later of a severe cold. Thomas Jefferson has been described as a(n): agriculturalist, anthropologist, architect, astronomer, bibliophile, botanist, classicist, diplomat, educator, ethnologist, farmer, geographer, gourmet, horseman, horticulturist, inventor, lawyer, lexicographer, linguist, mathematician, meteorologist, musician, naturalist, numismatist, paleontologist, philosopher, political philosopher, scientist, statesman, violinist, writer. Upon graduating from Harvard, John Adams became a grammar school teacher. “My little school, like the great world, is made up of Kings, politicians, divines, fops, buffoons, fiddlers, fools, coxcombs, sycophants, chimney sweeps, and every other character I see in the world. Washington Irving described James Madison as “a withered little applejohn” and his wife Dolley as a “fine, portly, buxom dame.” The Marquis de Lafayette thought so much of George Washington that he named his son George Washington Lafayette. Thomas Jefferson died broke. Before his death, Jefferson was able to alleviate part of his financial problems by accepting $25,000 for his books from Congress. Those books were used to begin the Library of Congress. Friends even tried to organize a lottery to sell part of his land to help, but it was not enough. When Jefferson died, he left “my gold mounted walking staff of animal horn as a token of cordial and affectionate friendship” to James Madison. Jefferson’s epitaph read: “Here was buried Thomas Jefferson, author of the Declaration of Independence, of the statute of Virginia for Religious Freedom, and the father of the University of Virginia.” It didn’t include “President of the United States”! John Adams was the only president to be the father of a future president (John Quincy Adams) until George W. Bush became president in 2000, making George Bush Sr. the second president to have a son also be a president. Thomas Jefferson sometimes spent $50 a day (about $1,179 today) for groceries because of his lavish entertaining. The wine bill for the eight years he served as president was $11,000 (about $260,000 today!). He was also the first President to grow tomatoes in North America. John Adams died on July 4, 1826 at the age of 90 years, 247 days. His wife Abigail had died in 1818 after 54 years of marriage. In terms of entertainment George Washington enjoyed raffles and lotteries, card playing, fox hunting, duck hunting, fishing, cockfighting, horse racing, boat racing, and dancing. Although it is common knowledge that George Washington called for the emancipation of his slaves in his last will and testament, he stipulated that it would only take place upon the death of his wife, Martha. However, in Martha’s will she did not free the slaves. The original intent was for George Washington to be buried beneath the Rotunda floor under the dome of the Capitol. He died before the Rotunda was finished, and in 1828 the crypt was covered up. President George Washington would bow to guests at presidential receptions to avoid physical contact and the tradition lasted through the presidency of John Adams. Washington would rest one hand on a sword and the other holding a hat to avoid the remote possibility of anyone forcing a handshake! Thomas Jefferson ended the tradition of “bowing” by shaking hands when greeting people. Thomas Jefferson at eighty-three years of age felt that he would not live through the summer of 1826, but he hoped to live through July 4th (the 50th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence). Both he and John Adams died on July 4, 1826 after long and distinguished careers. President James Monroe also died on July 4, 1831 — five years after Thomas Jefferson and John Adams. When George Washington died on December 14, 1799, his last words were: “I die hard, but I am not afraid to go, Let me go quietly. I cannot last long, It is well.” Alexander Hamilton was killed by Aaron Burr in a duel in Weehawken, New Jersey on July 1804. Hamilton’s son, Philip, had died in a duel three years earlier (1801) at the same location. Benjamin Franklin died on April 17, 1790. His daughter asked him to change positions on his bed to improve his breathing and his last words were: “A dying man can do nothing easy. James Madison of Virginia was responsible for proposing the resolution to create the various Cabinet positions within the Executive Branch of our government and twelve amendments to the Constitution of which ten became the Bill of Rights. James Madison proposed that congressional pay would be determined by the average price of wheat during the previous six years of a congressional session. Back To Top © Oak Hill Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Oak Hill Publishing Company. Box 6473, Naperville, IL 60567 For questions or comments about this site please email us at [email protected]
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What is the gender ratio at JMU?

JMU Undergraduate Population – Male/Female Breakdown of Undergraduates The full-time JMU undergraduate population is made up of 59% women, and 41% men. For the gender breakdown for all students, go here, JMU Racial/Ethnic Breakdown of Undergraduates

Race/Ethnicity Number
White 13,902
Hispanic 1,334
Multi-Ethnic 899
Black or African American 881
Asian 873
Unknown 274
International 222
Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander 17

See racial/ethnic breakdown for all students,
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Who is James Madison University named for?

JMU Centennial Celebration ~ JMU Presidents June 4, 2020

Julian Ashby Burruss – President, 1908-1919 Julian Ashby Burruss was named president of the State Normal and Industrial School for Women at Harrisonburg in 1908, shortly after the institution was founded by the Virginia General Assembly. The school opened its doors to its first student body in 1909 with an enrollment of 150 students and 15 faculty members. The first 20 graduates received diplomas in 1911. President Burruss’ administration changed the name of the school to the State Normal School for Women at Harisonburg in 1914 and the school received authorization to award bachelor’s degrees in 1916. During this initial development of James Madison University, President Burruss established the campus plan and oversaw the construction of six buildings. He left the Normal School in 1919 to become president of Virginia Tech.
Dr. Samuel Page Duke – President, 1919-1949 During the 30 years of Dr. Samuel Page Duke’s presidency, enrollment at the institution grew from 300 to around 1,400. Nine major campus buildings were constructed during his administration. In 1924, the institution became the State Teachers College at Harrisonburg and continued under that name until 1938 when it was named Madison College in honor of James Madison, the fourth president of the United States. In making his argument for the name change, President Duke pointed out that no other college honored Mr. Madison and the name would be appropriate if the institution ever became coeducational. In 1946, Dr. Duke’s administration admitted men to Madison College as day students in regular sessions. Men had always attended summer sessions at the school, but this marked the first time men attended regular session classes.
Dr.G. Tyler Miller – President, 1949-1971 President G. Tyler Miller successfully convinced the Virginia General Assembly in 1966 to allow Madison College to build residence halls for men so the institution could become fully educational. He had first expressed the wish for Madison to become coeducational in the early 1950s but he was unsuccessful in that effort. Dr. Miller enlarged the institution’s campus by 240 acres and constructed 19 major buildings. The Miller administration revamped the institution’s curriculum, developing a full liberal arts program to join the teacher education program. In 1954, the expanding school received authorization to award master’s degrees. During Dr. Miller’s presidency, enrollment grew from 1,400 to 4,000.
Dr. Ronald E. Carrier – President, 1971-1998 During the presidency of Dr. Ronald E. Carrier, the institution changed from a 4,000-student, predominantly female teachers college to a major comprehensive university with 14,000 students. The school changed its name to James Madison University in 1977, following a unanimous vote of the Virginia General Assembly. During Dr. Carrier’s presidency, JMU received national acclaim as one of the nation’s finest comprehensive public universities. The institution received authorization to offer the educational specialist degree and the doctoral degree. A major athletic program was developed. The size of the campus was enlarged by more than 100 acres and the university spread to the east side of Interstate 81. During Dr. Carrier’s administration, some 40 major buildings with the value of $210 million were built. Applications for admission rose from 3,800 a year to 15,000 a year and SAT scores for entering freshmen rose from 987 to 1,174.
Dr. Linwood H. Rose – President, 1998-Present Under the leadership of Dr. Linwood H. Rose, JMU has solidified its position of national prominence and established itself as a leader in institutional performance measurement, accountability and assessment of student learning. Some $175 million in new facilities will have been constructed or added to the JMU campus by the end of the first decade of the 21 st Century. In addition to the new construction, JMU purchased the Rockingham Memorial Hospital complex and the old Harrisonburg High School building to help meet current future space needs. Dr. Rose has led an effort to expand JMU’s funding sources. In recent years, the University has received 15 private gifts of $1 million or more, established new records for private giving and expanded sponsored program activity to almost $25 million annually. Efforts of Dr. Rose have resulted in JMU aligning itself more closely with the legacy of President James Madison. JMU is the only university in America named for the fourth U.S. president and primary author of the U.S. Constitution. Since Dr. Rose became president in 1998, enrollment has increased from 14,400 to 17,000.

JMU Centennial Celebration ~ JMU Presidents
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Did James Madison attend Harvard?

– Once Gouverneur Morris was offered a bet of one dinner if he would approach George Washington, slap him on the back and give him a friendly greeting. He wanted to show people how “close” he was to the “chief.” Morris carried out the bet, but later admitted that after seeing the cold stare from Washington, he wouldn’t do it again for a thousand dinners! George Washington was born on February 11, 1731 under the Julian calendar. In the early 1750s, Great Britain converted to the Gregorian calendar. An act of Parliament added eleven days to complete the adjustment and Washington’s birthday became February 22, 1732! Of the Founding Fathers who became president, only George Washington did not go to college. John Adams graduated from Harvard, James Madison graduated from Princeton, and Thomas Jefferson attended the College of William and Mary. John Adams was the first President to live in the White House when he came to Washington, D.C. in November of 1800. However, he was only there for four months after losing the election of 1800 to Thomas Jefferson. George Washington gave the shortest inauguration speech in American history on March 4, 1793. It was only 133 words long. William Henry Harrison gave the longest at 8,443 words on March 4, 1841 on a cold and blustery day in Washington, D.C. He died one month later of a severe cold. Thomas Jefferson has been described as a(n): agriculturalist, anthropologist, architect, astronomer, bibliophile, botanist, classicist, diplomat, educator, ethnologist, farmer, geographer, gourmet, horseman, horticulturist, inventor, lawyer, lexicographer, linguist, mathematician, meteorologist, musician, naturalist, numismatist, paleontologist, philosopher, political philosopher, scientist, statesman, violinist, writer. Upon graduating from Harvard, John Adams became a grammar school teacher. “My little school, like the great world, is made up of Kings, politicians, divines, fops, buffoons, fiddlers, fools, coxcombs, sycophants, chimney sweeps, and every other character I see in the world. Washington Irving described James Madison as “a withered little applejohn” and his wife Dolley as a “fine, portly, buxom dame.” The Marquis de Lafayette thought so much of George Washington that he named his son George Washington Lafayette. Thomas Jefferson died broke. Before his death, Jefferson was able to alleviate part of his financial problems by accepting $25,000 for his books from Congress. Those books were used to begin the Library of Congress. Friends even tried to organize a lottery to sell part of his land to help, but it was not enough. When Jefferson died, he left “my gold mounted walking staff of animal horn as a token of cordial and affectionate friendship” to James Madison. Jefferson’s epitaph read: “Here was buried Thomas Jefferson, author of the Declaration of Independence, of the statute of Virginia for Religious Freedom, and the father of the University of Virginia.” It didn’t include “President of the United States”! John Adams was the only president to be the father of a future president (John Quincy Adams) until George W. Bush became president in 2000, making George Bush Sr. the second president to have a son also be a president. Thomas Jefferson sometimes spent $50 a day (about $1,179 today) for groceries because of his lavish entertaining. The wine bill for the eight years he served as president was $11,000 (about $260,000 today!). He was also the first President to grow tomatoes in North America. John Adams died on July 4, 1826 at the age of 90 years, 247 days. His wife Abigail had died in 1818 after 54 years of marriage. In terms of entertainment George Washington enjoyed raffles and lotteries, card playing, fox hunting, duck hunting, fishing, cockfighting, horse racing, boat racing, and dancing. Although it is common knowledge that George Washington called for the emancipation of his slaves in his last will and testament, he stipulated that it would only take place upon the death of his wife, Martha. However, in Martha’s will she did not free the slaves. The original intent was for George Washington to be buried beneath the Rotunda floor under the dome of the Capitol. He died before the Rotunda was finished, and in 1828 the crypt was covered up. President George Washington would bow to guests at presidential receptions to avoid physical contact and the tradition lasted through the presidency of John Adams. Washington would rest one hand on a sword and the other holding a hat to avoid the remote possibility of anyone forcing a handshake! Thomas Jefferson ended the tradition of “bowing” by shaking hands when greeting people. Thomas Jefferson at eighty-three years of age felt that he would not live through the summer of 1826, but he hoped to live through July 4th (the 50th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence). Both he and John Adams died on July 4, 1826 after long and distinguished careers. President James Monroe also died on July 4, 1831 — five years after Thomas Jefferson and John Adams. When George Washington died on December 14, 1799, his last words were: “I die hard, but I am not afraid to go, Let me go quietly. I cannot last long, It is well.” Alexander Hamilton was killed by Aaron Burr in a duel in Weehawken, New Jersey on July 1804. Hamilton’s son, Philip, had died in a duel three years earlier (1801) at the same location. Benjamin Franklin died on April 17, 1790. His daughter asked him to change positions on his bed to improve his breathing and his last words were: “A dying man can do nothing easy. James Madison of Virginia was responsible for proposing the resolution to create the various Cabinet positions within the Executive Branch of our government and twelve amendments to the Constitution of which ten became the Bill of Rights. James Madison proposed that congressional pay would be determined by the average price of wheat during the previous six years of a congressional session. Back To Top © Oak Hill Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Oak Hill Publishing Company. Box 6473, Naperville, IL 60567 For questions or comments about this site please email us at [email protected]
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Who was JMU first black student?

1966. Dr. Sheary Darcus Johnson was the first known Black female student to be enrolled at Madison College, which is now James Madison University, and graduate.
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Did James Madison graduate from Princeton?

Our History Since day one, people have been at the heart of our most notable accomplishments. Similarly, everything we do today is focused on delivering a graduate education that prepares students to apply their talents to the world’s most pressing opportunities and challenges.

After James Madison graduated from Princeton (then called the College of New Jersey) in 1771, he remained for a year of “graduate work” to study Hebrew with President John Witherspoon. In the following decades, other promising students were permitted to stay on after receiving their bachelor’s degree.

However, it wasn’t until 1869 that graduate education at Princeton systematically began to take shape. In that year, three fellowships were established as an experiment to encourage outstanding members of the senior class to continue their studies. The terms of the awards (in classics, mathematics, and philosophy) were considered rather bold in education circles; the awards were given after competitive examinations and each fellow was free to choose where and how he could most profitably spend his year.
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