When Does School Start In Massachusetts?

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When Does School Start In Massachusetts
Massachusetts School Holidays – edarabia.com School holidays in Massachusetts include term dates and breaks such as spring, winter, and Thanksgiving break. The first day of school usually starts in late August and ends mid-June. For more updated information on school holidays in Massachusetts,, please visit individual school websites.
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What time does school start in Massachusetts?

2021-2022 Bell Times

School Name AM Bell Citywide Early Dismissal Bell
Boston Day/Evening Academy 9:00 AM 12:00 PM
Boston Day/Evening Academy 10:00 AM 1:00 PM
Boston Green Academy 8:00 AM 12:30 PM
Boston International Newcomers Academy 8:00 AM 12:00 PM

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What is the first day of school for Boston Public Schools?

BPS is required to provide 180 days of instruction to its students. The first day of the 2022-23 school year is September 1, 2022 and the last is scheduled to be June 22, 2023. Here is the complete 2022-23 School Calendar,

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What time does school start in Boston Massachusetts?

School hours are 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
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What age does public school start in Boston?

BPS UPK seats are available in elementary schools and early learning centers. – In addition to K0 and K1 offerings in traditional elementary schools, spanning grades PK-5 or PK-6, BPS also has several early learning centers, offering full-day PK through grade 1, 2 or grade 3.

All general education kindergarten students, including UPK students in our K1 and K0 classrooms, are guaranteed a seat through the highest grade of their assigned school, following the guidelines of our student assignment plan. Exceptions cannot be made to our entry age policy, regardless of the child’s previous school experience. State law states each child must attend school beginning in September of the calendar year in which the child turns six years old. While the K0 and K1 program at BPS for 3- and 4-year-olds has expanded in recent years, assignment cannot be guaranteed. If you need a program and our seats are full, we encourage you to check out more options on the UPK site, as well as Child Care Choices of Boston, and other preschool options.

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What states start school the earliest?

What State Has the Earliest School Start Times? – For both middle school start times and high school start times, Louisiana is the earliest state, at 7:37 a.m. and 7:30 a.m. respectively. The earliest elementary school start time is in Mississippi, at 7:40 a.m.! The team at AAA State of Play has conducted an analysis of school start times in the United States to shed light on where students are rising the earliest and latest. When Does School Start In Massachusetts Embed this image on your site: Here are the top five states with the earliest elementary school start times:

  1. Mississippi: 7:40
  2. South Carolina: 7:44
  3. Alabama: 7:49
  4. Hawaii: 7:53
  5. Texas: 7:56

Here are the top five states with the earliest middle school start times:

  1. Louisiana: 7:37
  2. Delaware: 7:40
  3. Mississippi: 7:44
  4. Maine: 7:46
  5. Alabama: 7:49

Here are the top five states with the earliest high school start times:

  1. Louisiana: 7:30
  2. Connecticut: 7:39
  3. Massachusetts: 7:38
  4. New Hampshire: 7:41
  5. Nevada: 7:45
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    How long are school days in Massachusetts?

    State Minimum amount of instructional times per school year (by grade, if applicable)
    In days 1
    Maryland 180
    Massachusetts 180
    Michigan 180 16

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    Are public schools free in Boston?

    Massachusetts Traditional Public Schools – Massachusetts’s traditional public schools are operated by school districts, free to attend, open to all students, and funded by federal, state, and local government. Massachusetts spends an average of $18,733 per public school student each year.

    You can search your school’s spending and that of nearby schools at Project Nickel, In Massachusetts, each district decides whether it will participate in open enrollment, “Open enrollment” allows parents to send their children to any public school, regardless of where it is located. For the 2021-2022 school year, 170 Massachusetts districts (53% of districts statewide ) chose to participate in open enrollment.

    Some of these districts, however, only allowed transfers for certain grades. If you are interested in transferring your child to a different public school than you are assigned, you should talk to your local school district about its policies. Open enrollment is a valuable option for parents because it gives them more opportunities within the public school system, allowing them to select the school that best matches their child’s needs.

    For an example of the transfer process and timeline in your state, check out Boston Public Schools’ transfer guidelines. Keep in mind that parents are generally responsible for transportation when their student is participating in open enrollment, unless the transfer addresses racial imbalances or the student qualifies for free or reduced price lunch,

    Find out more about public schools in your state at the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education,
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    Is there school in Boston tomorrow?

    Forecast: School’s Open.
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    What day do kids start school in New York?

    Mark your calendar: Sept.8 will be the first day of classes for New York City students next school year. Education department officials released the 2022-2023 school year calendar on Tuesday, as families have been anxiously awaiting official news about when school will begin.

    Historically, the school calendar is released much earlier — typically in March or April. Last year, it was released in early May. City officials didn’t say what caused the delay. School principals and families are still waiting on other critical pieces of information about next school year. High school admissions offers have not been released; they are expected in June, later than normal,

    And schools have not yet received their budgets, Similar to last year, snow days will no longer mean a break from schoolwork, at least officially. The city will expect students to complete assignments virtually if school buildings close due to severe weather.

    1. But in a break from last year’s calendar, students will get a respite on Election Day — Nov.8 — instead of being required to submit assignments virtually.
    2. Also, families might be pleased there won’t be a repeat of this year’s days off in June for “Anniversary Day” and “Clerical Day,” which fall in the middle of a school week (Tuesday, June 7 and Thursday, June 9, respectively).

    Next year, those days will fall on a Thursday and Friday (June 8 and 9). And unlike this year’s last day of school falling on a Monday, next year’s last day will be Tuesday, June 27. Next school year will mark the full first academic year under Mayor Eric Adams and his schools Chancellor, David Banks,

    1. The pair have slowly begun revealing their plans for the city’s schools, including pushing schools to adopt stronger reading curriculums, expanding gifted programs, and vowing to launch more remote learning options,
    2. Their full agenda has yet to come into focus.
    3. Big challenges remain.
    4. The pandemic has continued to bring significant disruptions, with more than one in three students on track to be chronically absent this year, missing at least 10% of the school year.

    And enrollment in the city’s schools has continued to drop, raising difficult decisions about whether to merge or close schools with few students. Nathaniel Styer, an education department spokesperson, said the city “will be sharing exciting updates regarding programming in the months to come.” Amy Zimmer contributed Alex Zimmerman is a reporter for Chalkbeat New York, covering NYC public schools.
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    How long is a school year in Massachusetts?

    This is turning out to be a difficult winter, and many districts have had to cancel school for several days due to the severe weather, which has prompted inquiries about waivers from the 180-day minimum school year requirement. At this point in the school year it is premature to grant any waivers.

    • There is still time for districts that have had to close for multiple days to adjust their calendars to ensure that our students do not lose out on valuable learning time.
    • Making up missed days can be done in several ways.
    • School districts may decide to take one or more of these actions: cancel or shorten either their February or April vacations, convert scheduled professional development days into school days for students, hold school days on Saturday, keep school open on Good Friday, or add days later in June beyond the originally scheduled last day of school.

    This memo provides guidance regarding the 180-day requirement and student learning time. We will keep an eye on how the rest of the winter and the school year progress and will notify you if this guidance changes. Under the Massachusetts Student Learning Time regulations ( 603 CMR 27 ), school committees are required to schedule a school year that includes at least 185 days at each school, and are required to operate the schools for at least 180 school days in a school year.

    1. In addition, schools must ensure that students are scheduled to receive a minimum of 900 hours of structured learning time per school year for elementary school students and a minimum of 990 hours of structured learning time per school year for secondary school students.
    2. Indergarten students must receive a minimum of 425 hours of structured learning time per school year.

    Student learning time is a precious resource. We recognize that rescheduling missed days mid-year may be inconvenient, but depending on when in the year the days are missed, school officials should be able to make the arrangements necessary to ensure that student learning time is not shortchanged.

    1. All days lost to health, weather, or safety emergencies between the first day of the school year and March 31 must be made up by rescheduling full school days to ensure a 180-day school year.
    2. All days lost to health, weather, or safety emergencies between April 1 and June 1 must be made up to ensure a 180-day school year or at least until the district has reached its previously-scheduled 185th day, whichever comes first. If all five snow days have been used prior to this point, the district is not required to schedule additional school days.
    3. Districts will not be expected to make up any days lost to health, weather, or safety emergencies that occur after June 1,

    The Board of Elementary and Secondary Education adopted the 185-day regulation in anticipation that at least five days might be lost each year to weather emergencies. Increasingly, school districts have taken the initiative to start the school year before Labor Day, thereby building in additional flexibility to make up lost days before the end of June.

    • Such planning is commendable.
    • I remain committed to meeting the need for all students to be engaged in structured learning time in school for a minimum of 180 days.
    • To that end, I urge you to prepare parents and others in your school communities to anticipate that days lost during the course of the year prior to June 1 will most likely have to be made up.

    Please see below for answers to frequently asked questions about student learning time. If you have any questions on these guidelines, please contact Helene Bettencourt a [email protected],
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    Do kids have to go to school in Massachusetts?

    Administration and Finance All school-age children who live in Massachusetts are entitled to attend a public school free of charge and all children between the ages of 6 and 16 must attend school. Most children attend school in their home district, the school district in which they live.

    • In certain situations, families may choose to enroll children in public schools outside of their home district.
    • These choices include the inter-district school choice program, charter schools, vocational technical schools, METCO, Commonwealth Virtual Schools, and the Massachusetts Academy of Math and Science at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI).

    Families may also choose to educate their children in non-public settings through private schools or home schooling. This advisory provides information and links to additional resources on these options.

    Your Home School District In general, children have a right to attend public school in the city or town where they actually reside, whether they live with their family or in a foster or group home. If your child lives in a city or town that operates its own school district, this district is your child’s home district. For example, students living in Boston are entitled to attend the Boston Public Schools. These districts are sometimes referred to as local or municipal school districts. Each local district is governed by a local school committee, whose members are either elected by the voters or appointed by the city’s mayor. Some cities and towns, particularly smaller towns, have joined together to establish a regional school district. For example, the Wachusett Regional School District has five member towns-Holden, Paxton, Princeton, Rutland, and Sterling. If your child lives in any one of those five towns, they have a right to attend school in the Wachusett Regional School District. The Wachusett Regional School District is your child’s home district. Regional districts are governed by a regional school committee, whose members are either elected or appointed as provided in state law. In some cases, a town may have a local school district for the lower grades and be a member of a regional district for the upper grades. For example, the town of Sturbridge has a local school district for grades K–6, and the town is a member of the Tantasqua Regional School District, which serves grades 7–12. If a child lives in Sturbridge and is in grades K–6, they have a right to attend the Sturbridge Public Schools. If a child lives in Sturbridge and is in grades 7–12, they have a right to attend school in the Tantasqua Regional School District. A few towns do not operate their own school district and are not members of a regional school district. In these cases, the town is required to have an agreement with a nearby school district, under which the town pays tuition to that district to educate the town’s students. For example, the town of Tyringham has a tuition agreement with the town of Lee under which all Tyringham students can attend the Lee Public Schools. If your child lives in Tyringham, they have a right to attend the Lee Public Schools, which is considered your child’s home district. Choosing a school within your home district. Some school districts have only one school serving each grade; others may have several schools for all or some grades. If your home district has more than one school for your child’s grade level, the district’s policy will determine which school students attend. In some cases, your child might be assigned to a school based on where you live. In other cases, you might be able to express a choice as to which school your child will attend. Policies on how students are assigned to schools within a school district are set by the school committee. To find out more about the school assignment policies in your home district, you should contact your district’s family information center or superintendent’s office, Attending Public School Outside Your Home District There are several different programs that allow your child to attend public school outside of their home district. Each program has its own rules regarding eligibility for admission.

    The Inter-District School Choice Program The inter-district school choice program allows families to enroll their children in a school district that is not the child’s home district. Because of space limitations, not all school districts accept out-of-district students under this program. Every year the school committee in each school district decides whether it will accept new enrollments under this program and, if so, in what grades. The school district profiles page on the Department’s website shows, for each district, whether they are accepting school choice students. If you are interested in having your child attend school in another district under this program and that district is accepting students, you should contact the superintendent’s office in the district in which you want to enroll your child. It is advisable to contact districts in advance, generally during the winter or spring prior to the year in which you want to enroll your child. Districts generally require the submission of an application. If more students apply than there are spaces available, the district will hold a lottery to select which students will be admitted. If a district has fewer applicants than it has seats for school choice students, it may choose to accept students at any time during the school year. A sibling of a child currently attending school in another district under school choice will receive preference in the admissions lottery. Your home district does not have to approve your child’s application for admission to another district. Your child is eligible to apply for the school choice program in another district even if your home district is not accepting enrollment through school choice. Once your child is accepted into another district under school choice, they are entitled to attend that district’s schools until high school graduation or until they complete the highest grade offered by that district. You do not have to reapply each year. Except for certain students with disabilities, who may be entitled to transportation, transportation is not provided for students attending another school district under this program. For additional general information about the inter-district school choice program, contact the Department’s school finance office, Charter Schools Charter schools are public schools that operate independently of local school districts. Each school is governed by a board of trustees. The board of trustees receives a charter directly from the state Board of Elementary and Secondary Education to operate a public school, after going through a rigorous application process. Charter schools are located throughout the state. A listing of all charter schools is available on the Department’s website. Each charter school determines what grade levels it will serve and what particular programs it will offer, and that decision is contained in its charter. Most charter schools are “Commonwealth” charter schools, and any student in the state can apply for admission. If more students apply to a charter school than there is space available, the charter school will hold a lottery to determine which students will be admitted. Enrollment preference is given to siblings of students who currently attend the school and to students living in the city or town where the charter school is located. Once a student is admitted to a charter school, they are entitled to attend in subsequent years without reapplying. Some Commonwealth charter schools are designated as regional schools and serve several cities or towns. For regional charter schools, students living in any one of the cities or towns in the region receive enrollment preference. A few charter schools are designated as Horace Mann charter schools. These schools, although still independent, have closer ties to the local school district. Generally, transportation is provided to charter school students only if they live in the school district in which the charter school is located or if they are students with disabilities who are entitled to transportation under special education laws. If your child lives in a school district outside of the one in which the charter school is located and is not entitled to transportation under special education laws, you are responsible for getting your child to and from the charter school. The Board of Elementary and Secondary Education must decide every five years whether to renew the school’s charter. In addition, the Board may revoke a charter before the end of the five years if the school fails to meet certain requirements of its charter. If your child is attending a charter school and the school’s charter is revoked or not renewed, your child will need to transfer back to their home district or select another option for enrolling outside of the home district. For information about a particular charter school, or to apply for admission, contact the school directly. Most schools conduct their enrollment lotteries during January or February, so early applications are advised. For general information about the charter school program, contact the Department’s charter school office, Vocational Technical Education Programs In grades 9–12, students may choose to participate in vocational technical education programs, such as automotive technology, culinary arts, or design and visual communications, in preparation for a future career. Students in these programs take academic courses in addition to their technical courses and must meet the same requirements for high school graduation that all high school students must meet, including passing the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System or “MCAS” tests. These vocational technical education programs are approved by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and are sometimes referred to as “Chapter 74-approved” programs. Several school districts offer vocational technical education programs within the district itself, either in the district’s regular high school or in a separate vocational technical high school. Most cities and towns, however, choose to offer vocational technical education programs by joining a regional vocational school district. For example, the Greater Lowell Regional Vocational School District serves the city of Lowell and the towns of Dracut, Dunstable, and Tyngsborough. Each regional vocational technical school district operates a regional vocational technical high school that serves a number of cities and towns in its geographic area and offers a range of vocational technical education programs and academic courses. If your city or town belongs to a regional vocational school district, your child is eligible to apply for admission for grades 9–12. Vocational technical high schools have admissions criteria and may have enrollment limits. Transportation is provided for students from the member towns. If you are interested, contact the vocational technical high school to which your town belongs. To see if your town belongs to a regional vocational high school, look up your town on the school profile page on the Department’s website. Out-of-District Vocational Technical Education Programs: If your child would like to attend a vocational technical education program other than the one in your home district or in the regional vocational district to which your town belongs, you have two choices. First, your child may apply to another vocational technical high school under the inter-district school choice program, described earlier, if that high school accepts school choice students. Students attending another vocational technical high school under the school choice program can elect any vocational technical program offered by that school. Second, if your city or town does not offer the particular vocational technical education program in which your child is interested, either in its own high school or in the regional vocational technical high school to which your city or town belongs, your child may apply for admission, under the Chapter 74 non-resident option, to any vocational technical high school or other high school in the state that offers the program. To enroll through this option, your child must meet the school’s admissions criteria. Some vocational technical high schools will admit out-of-district students only through the Chapter 74 non-resident option and will not admit out-of-district students through the inter-district school choice program. If your child is admitted through the Chapter 74 non-resident option, transportation will be provided. The Chapter 74 non-resident option is described in greater detail in the program guidelines. Out-of-district students enrolled through Chapter 74 may continue at the school only as long as they continue to be enrolled in the particular vocational technical program to which they were admitted. If a student wants to switch to a different program and that vocational technical education program is offered by your city or town, the student will have to return to the home district or seek admission to the regional vocational technical high school to which the city or town belongs. Agricultural schools: The state has four vocational technical high schools that offer specialized agricultural programs in addition to other vocational technical education programs. The Norfolk County Agricultural School, located in Walpole, and the Bristol County Agricultural School, located in Dighton, give enrollment preference to residents of Norfolk and Bristol counties, respectively. The Essex North Shore Agricultural and Technical High School is located in Danvers and has seventeen member cities and towns and accepts non-resident students from other communities. The Smith Vocational and Agricultural School in Northampton is operated by the City of Northampton independent of the Northampton Public Schools. It gives enrollment preference to Northampton residents and also enrolls many students from nearby towns under the non-resident option in Chapter 74 described earlier. If your child is interested in any of these four schools, contact the school directly for additional information and enrollment applications. In addition to these four schools, other high schools offer programs in agriculture. Please check with your local high school and regional vocational technical high school to learn about their offerings. For more information on vocational technical education, contact the Department’s career/vocational technical education unit, METCO The METCO program was started in the 1960s to provide enhanced educational opportunities for participating students, to reduce the racial isolation of suburban school districts, and to reduce segregation in city schools. Today, the METCO program serves about 3,300 Boston and Springfield students in grades K–12 who attend school in more than thirty suburban districts. Enrollment in the program is limited and there is a long waiting list. Students who are accepted into the program are assigned to a suburban district by the program; students do not choose the district that they will attend. Once enrolled, students are provided with transportation to and from the suburban district and a range of services to help them adjust academically and socially to their new district. For more information and to apply for the Boston area program, families should contact METCO, For more information and to apply for the Springfield area program, contact the Springfield Public Schools, Commonwealth Virtual Schools (CMVS) A Commonwealth of Massachusetts Virtual School (CMVS) is a public school operated by a board of trustees where teachers primarily teach from a remote location using the Internet or other computer-based methods and students are not required to be located at the physical premises of the school. Each CMVS determines what grade levels it will serve and what particular programs it will offer. List of Massachusetts virtual schools: Any student in the state can apply for admission to a virtual school. If more students apply to a CMVS than there is space available, the school will hold a lottery to determine which students will be admitted. Once a student is admitted to a CMVS, they are entitled to attend in subsequent years without reapplying. For information about a particular CMVS, or to apply for admission, contact the school directly. The information provided in the Frequently Asked Questions for Families will help you determine whether your child is prepared to thrive in an online program. Massachusetts Academy of Math & Science at WPI The Massachusetts Academy of Math and Science at WPI, located in Worcester, is an independent public high school operated in partnership with Worcester Polytechnic Institute. It provides an advanced course of study, focusing on science and mathematics, for eleventh and twelfth graders. Admission is selective. For further information, see the Academy’s website,

    Private Education and Home Schooling In addition to the public education options described above, families may also choose to send their children to a private or parochial school (at their own expense) or choose to educate their children at home. Private and parochial schools must be approved by the local school committee in order to enroll children of compulsory school age (6–16). Private and parochial schools charge tuition, although some may offer scholarships and other financial assistance. A list of the private and parochial schools in each town is included on the school profile page on this website. Families may choose to educate their children at home. For a child of compulsory school age, the home schooling program must be approved in advance by the superintendent or school committee of the home district. For further information on this option, see the Department’s website and contact your school district’s superintendent’s office,

    Last Updated: August 5, 2022 Contact Us Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 75 Pleasant Street, Malden, MA 02148-4906 Voice: (781) 338-3000 TTY: (800) 439-2370 Directions Disclaimer: A reference in this website to any specific commercial products, processes, or services, or the use of any trade, firm, or corporation name is for the information and convenience of the public and does not constitute endorsement or recommendation by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.
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    Is school mandatory in Massachusetts?

    Compulsory Education – Every state requires children within a specified age range to attend some form of structured schooling, which may be homeschooling or private school instead of public school. Massachusetts’ require children age seven and older to attend school, unless they are deemed mentally or physically unable to attend or have immediate needs at home.
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    Do 3 year olds go to school in Massachusetts?

    Eligibility – Head Start accepts eligible 3 and 4 year old children until they can enter kindergarten. Early Head Start accepts eligible infants and toddlers.
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    Is kindergarten mandatory in Massachusetts?

    Massachusetts State Law requires a child must attend school in September of the calendar year in which they turn six-years- old.
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    Does Boston have a good school system?

    Boston Public Schools is an above average, public school district located in ROXBURY, MA. It has 48,112 students in grades PK, K-12 with a student-teacher ratio of 10 to 1. According to state test scores, 35% of students are at least proficient in math and 37% in reading.
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    Why does school start so early in the USA?

    The school bus problem – Why do American high schools generally start so early? One large part of the answer: school buses. A lot of school districts re-use the same buses to pick up students from different schools: first the high schoolers, then the middle schoolers, and finally the elementary schoolers.

    In South Carolina, the order is generally reversed, which is why it is among the “latest” states on this map. Early school starts are not the only cause of teenage drowsiness, but they are a crucial factor — especially because natural sleep cycles make it difficult for post-puberty teenagers to fall asleep before 11 pm.

    A poll by the National Sleep Foundation found that 59 percent of 6th through 8th graders and 87 percent of high school students got less than the recommended amount of sleep (8.5 to 9.5 hours) on school nights. In the words of America’s leading soporific publication Sleep Review, the average American adolescent is “chronically sleep-deprived and pathologically sleepy”.

    Adolescents with sleep debt and/or disrupted sleep-wake cycles may suffer from poor judgment, lack of motivation, and overall reduced alertness, leading to poor academic performance.There is a bidirectional relationship between sleep disturbances and mood disorders, especially depression.Irregular and insufficient sleep in high school students has been found to predict certain types of risky behavior such as drunk driving, smoking, taking drugs, and delinquency.Adolescents with insufficient sleep have an increased risk of suicidal ideation.Several studies found links between sleep deprivation and obesity. One study estimates that for each hour of sleep lost (over a long period of time), the odds of being obese increased by 80 percent.Sleep deprivation leads to metabolic perturbations that increase the risk of type 2 diabetes.Sleepiness increases the risk of traffic accidents. Young people are particularly affected. A 1995 study found that 55 percent of crashes due to drowsiness were caused by drivers 25 years or younger.

    Because of all those reasons, not just the AAP but also the CDC recommends later school start times and urges parents to advocate for them. Fortunately, this has met some success. In 2019, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed into law Bill 328, which requires middle schools to begin no earlier than 8:00 am and high schools no earlier than 8:30 am.

    It will go into effect in 2022. If the measure proves successful, other states may consider similar moves. And there is some evidence that starting school later is beneficial. Around 400 school districts around the country have already moved their start time to 8:30 or later, often resulting in dramatically improved test scores, attendance rates, and graduation rates.

    (One Texas school district reported an 11 percent increase in its graduation rate.) Subscribe for counterintuitive, surprising, and impactful stories delivered to your inbox every Thursday The map by u/1ew is found here on the Data is Beautiful subreddit. Strange Maps #1103 Got a strange map? Let me know at, Follow Strange Maps on Twitter and Facebook,
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    How many snow days are allowed in Massachusetts?

    Public school districts in the state broadly have five snow days built into their calendars, Massachusetts Association of School Committees said.
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    How many school hours required Massachusetts?

    27.07: Implementation – (1) The requirements set forth in 603 CMR 27.00, as amended, shall be effective July 1, 1995, and shall govern the operation of all public schools within the Commonwealth of Massachusetts beginning with the 1995 – 1996 school year, with the exception of the structured learning time requirements set out in 603 CMR 27.04, which shall be effective July 1, 1997.

    1. (a) Elementary schools shall offer to all enrolled students a minimum of 900 hours per school year of learning time. Structured learning time, as defined in 603 CMR 27.02 shall be the focus of that time, but time spent delivering school services other than those listed below and offering optional school programs may also be counted toward meeting the minimum learning time requirement. Time scheduled for school breakfast and lunch, passing between classes, homeroom, and recess will not count toward meeting the minimum learning time requirement.
    2. (b) Secondary schools shall offer to all enrolled students a minimum of 990 hours per school year of learning time. Structured learning time, as defined in 603 CMR 27.02 shall be the focus of that time, but time spent delivering school services other than those listed below and offering optional school programs may also be counted toward meeting the minimum learning time requirement. Time scheduled for school breakfast and lunch, passing between classes, homeroom, and recess will not count toward meeting the minimum learning time requirement.

    (3) In preparation for the 1995 – 1996 school year, each school council shall submit to the district school committee, as part of its school improvement plan, any recommended scheduling changes or changes in school practices or structure that will be needed to ensure that their school will be in compliance with the learning time requirements set out in 603 CMR 27.07(2) and school year requirements set out in 603 CMR 27.03.

    4) During the 1995 – 1996 school year, each school council shall submit to the district school committee, as part of its school improvement plan, recommended actions to be taken to ensure that, no later than September 1997, each student within the school will be scheduled to receive at least the minimum required hours per year of structured learning time required under 603 CMR 27.00, and the school will comply with all other requirements set forth in 603 CMR 27.00.

    (5) No later than June 30, 1996, every school district shall submit to the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, for review and approval, a Learning Time Implementation Plan which describes changes that are being undertaken at the school and district level to ensure that, on or before September 1997, every student in every school within the district is scheduled to receive at least the minimum amount of structured learning time per school year specified in 603 CMR 27.04, and the district’s schools will comply with all other requirements set forth in 603 CMR 27.04.
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    Is it illegal to take away recess in Massachusetts?

    Recess is unpredictable. Some days you have outdoor recess, some days you might be stuck indoors. Some days children have twenty minutes to play, other days only ten minutes after conflicts occur in the lunchroom. Some days every student plays at recess, but other days the majority stand on the sidelines.

    1. Playworks’ mission is to improve the health and well-being of children by increasing opportunities for physical activity and safe, healthy play.
    2. We have proven that recess is an untapped opportunity to accomplish this goal.
    3. The more recess the better! And now, Massachusetts has an opportunity to make recess more predictable — at least the amount of recess time during the school day.

    Bill H.235 “An Act to Mandate Recess for Elementary School Children” is a state law requiring that all K-5 students receive at least twenty consecutive minutes of supervised, safe, and unstructured free-play recess daily. According to a 2016 report released by SHAPE America (The Society of Health and Physical Educators), only eight states have policies requiring daily recess in schools.

    1. Playworks is serious about play.
    2. We help schools across the country create recess environments where kids feel included, stay active, and build valuable social and emotional skills.
    3. We have proven that safe, healthy play at recess can increase vigorous physical activity, decrease bullying, and recover valuable instructional time.

    We are not in the business of advocacy; however, we do love that this bill raises awareness about the importance of recess. It’s time we reimagine recess as a crucial part of the school day. If you’re a fan of recess, and feel inclined, please consider calling your state representative and tell them why you love recess.

    1. Find out who your state representative is here,
    2. Call their office.
    3. Speak with an aid or leave a message in which you:
      • State your name and address
      • Mention that you are calling about Bill H.235 (the recess bill)
      • Explain why you love recess
      • Ask them to speak up on behalf of the bill

    One phone call. It’s that simple. We look forward to increasing awareness around the importance of recess and ensuring children in Massachusetts have the opportunity to play every day.
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    What time do public schools start in the US?

    A Typical Day At School | In the U.S., a typical day of high school starts at about 7:30 a.m. and ends around 3:00 p.m., Monday to Friday. Extracurricular activities are typically scheduled in the afternoons and early evenings during the school week; however, some extracurricular activities may also be scheduled on weekends.

    Class schedules will vary by school. At some schools, students will attend the same classes every day. At other schools, students may take one set of classes Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, and a different set of classes on Tuesday and Thursday. The sample schedule below may be different from the schedule you end up with but should give you an idea of what a typical day in a U.S.

    high school is like.
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    How long is a school year in Massachusetts?

    This is turning out to be a difficult winter, and many districts have had to cancel school for several days due to the severe weather, which has prompted inquiries about waivers from the 180-day minimum school year requirement. At this point in the school year it is premature to grant any waivers.

    There is still time for districts that have had to close for multiple days to adjust their calendars to ensure that our students do not lose out on valuable learning time. Making up missed days can be done in several ways. School districts may decide to take one or more of these actions: cancel or shorten either their February or April vacations, convert scheduled professional development days into school days for students, hold school days on Saturday, keep school open on Good Friday, or add days later in June beyond the originally scheduled last day of school.

    This memo provides guidance regarding the 180-day requirement and student learning time. We will keep an eye on how the rest of the winter and the school year progress and will notify you if this guidance changes. Under the Massachusetts Student Learning Time regulations ( 603 CMR 27 ), school committees are required to schedule a school year that includes at least 185 days at each school, and are required to operate the schools for at least 180 school days in a school year.

    • In addition, schools must ensure that students are scheduled to receive a minimum of 900 hours of structured learning time per school year for elementary school students and a minimum of 990 hours of structured learning time per school year for secondary school students.
    • Indergarten students must receive a minimum of 425 hours of structured learning time per school year.

    Student learning time is a precious resource. We recognize that rescheduling missed days mid-year may be inconvenient, but depending on when in the year the days are missed, school officials should be able to make the arrangements necessary to ensure that student learning time is not shortchanged.

    1. All days lost to health, weather, or safety emergencies between the first day of the school year and March 31 must be made up by rescheduling full school days to ensure a 180-day school year.
    2. All days lost to health, weather, or safety emergencies between April 1 and June 1 must be made up to ensure a 180-day school year or at least until the district has reached its previously-scheduled 185th day, whichever comes first. If all five snow days have been used prior to this point, the district is not required to schedule additional school days.
    3. Districts will not be expected to make up any days lost to health, weather, or safety emergencies that occur after June 1,

    The Board of Elementary and Secondary Education adopted the 185-day regulation in anticipation that at least five days might be lost each year to weather emergencies. Increasingly, school districts have taken the initiative to start the school year before Labor Day, thereby building in additional flexibility to make up lost days before the end of June.

    Such planning is commendable. I remain committed to meeting the need for all students to be engaged in structured learning time in school for a minimum of 180 days. To that end, I urge you to prepare parents and others in your school communities to anticipate that days lost during the course of the year prior to June 1 will most likely have to be made up.

    Please see below for answers to frequently asked questions about student learning time. If you have any questions on these guidelines, please contact Helene Bettencourt a [email protected],
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    What time do schools in England start?

    School Hours in the UK – In the UK, schools must open for at least 380 sessions (190 days) during a school year. The school hours are determined by each school but on average is about 5-6 hours per day. Normally, school starts at around 8:00- 9:00, and fishes at 15:00-16:00, but every school has different schedules.
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