What Is Tier 2 In Education?

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What Is Tier 2 In Education
What are tiers? What Is Tier 2 In Education In medicine, mental health, and now in education, there are three generally accepted levels of prevention for various disorders or problems. Each of these levels represents ways that professionals can intervene in order to diminish problems in their clients.

Here we will describe each level without technical jargon, and relate them to our purpose in schools, particularly focusing on student behavior. Most often these three tiers are graphically represented in a triangle diagram. However, these tiers may also be represented as concentric circles. The tiers may help prioritize the type and intensity of interventions for behavior that students receive.

It is possible that any particular intervention can be used at any of these three tiers. What we have done on this website is identify the primary way strategies would be used. What Is Tier 2 In Education What Is Tier 2 In Education Tier 1. The first level of intervention, called primary or universal prevention, is often called Tier 1 intervention in schools. Primary level interventions are delivered to all students, and attempt to undertake modifications in the environment or system which prevent behavior or mental health problems from developing.

All students benefit from Tier 1 interventions in school. When Tier 1 interventions are implemented well, potentially fewer students will need additional services. Character education, a curricula intended to help all students understand and commit to behaviors that align with core ethical values, is an example of a Tier 1 intervention.

Tier 2. The secondary level of interventions in schools (now commonly called Tier 2) focuses on specific students who show initial signs or symptoms of difficulty. Data from these students is then used to provide targeted interventions to those “at-risk” students based on their specific needs and symptoms.

Signs may include behavior management problems in class, tardiness, office referrals, absences, etc. In a total school population, it is estimated that 15 percent of students, might develop some form of behavioral difficulty and require Tier 2 supports in addition to all Tier 1 supports. Check-in/Check-out, a strategy used to monitor student progress and provide positive daily contact with an adult in school, is an example of a Tier 2 intervention.

Tier 3. Tertiary level interventions (Tier 3) focus on rehabilitation and minimizing the risk of recurrence of mental health problems or behavioral episodes for students who have already experienced one or more behavioral crises. These supports are the most intensive and resource dependent, and thus are reserved for the approximately 5 percent or less of students who do not respond to Tier 1 and 2 interventions.

Again, students receiving Tier 3 supports must also receive all appropriate Tier 1 and Tier 2 supports. Conducting a functional behavior assessment (FBA) to determine the events preceding and following problem behavior, which is then used to create an individualized behavior plan, is an example of a Tier 3 intervention.

These three tiers of prevention, which inform interventions in schools, represent a useful framework for understanding how we can prevent behavioral crisis and make schools safer. Implementation of effective interventions at each of these three tiers would also prevent or diminish the need for physical restraint and seclusion.
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What does Tier 2 means?

What Is Tier 2 Capital? – The term tier 2 capital refers to one of the components of a bank’s required reserves. Tier 2 is designated as the second or supplementary layer of a bank’s capital and is composed of items such as revaluation reserves, hybrid instruments, and subordinated term debt.
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What is the meaning of Tier 1 and Tier 2?

How Do Tier 1 and Tier 2 Support Each Other? – What Is Tier 2 In Education Tier 1 instruction is standards-driven, focusing on students’ broad skills and generalizing to a learning target. In contrast, Tier 2 intervention targets a specific skill deficit that has been identified through assessment. Instruction and intervention targets this specific skill.

Educators develop a support plan to address the targeted skill with intervention tools that address the need and monitor growth on that specific skill with a normed progress monitoring tool. Ongoing progress monitoring of Tier 2 interventions helps teachers identify if students are improving and responding to the intervention.

If students make progress and achieve Tier 2 intervention plan goals, the students’ learning gap has been addressed, and they can continue with Tier 1 core instruction without the additional targeted support. A key difference between Tier 1 instruction and Tier 2 intervention is the focus on targeted skills.

  1. When teachers delineate Tier 1 and Tier 2 processes, they bring cohesion to their efforts around supporting student learning.
  2. Students are supported at a deeper level during core instruction.
  3. Teachers gain a clearer understanding of students that actually do need additional targeted instructional support.

Data is used to inform instruction and intervention, and teachers strengthen their practice by being more efficient and effective.
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What is Tier 2 examples?

Increased Opportunity for Positive Reinforcement – Tier 2 supports target expected behavior by providing positive reinforcement for often. For example, students who participate in a Tier 2 Check-in Check-out intervention engage in feedback sessions with their classroom teacher and other adults in the school as many as 5-7 times per day.
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What’s the difference between Tier 1 2 and 3?

Home Blog What is the difference between Tier 1, 2, and 3 suppliers and why do they matter?

Avetta x Sustain.Life Partnership This blog post has been adapted from Sustain.Life’s original, Within a supply chain, there are multiple tiers of suppliers, based on an organization’s closeness to the client organization or the final product. Having various tiers in a supply chain sounds complicated and can be, but it also enables companies to specialize in one area and contract out the rest.

  • Often, organizations focus on tier 1 suppliers but tend to overlook their tier 2 and 3 suppliers.
  • Although further removed from an organization, tier 2 and 3 suppliers are still connected to the client organization, meaning these suppliers can still bring with them risk and liability which can affect the hiring organization in a variety of ways, from reputation damage to costly litigation.

Although not all organizations create physical materials, we will illustrate the different tiers with a physical product example: Tier 3- raw material: cotton from a cotton plant farm (Tier 3 is not necessarily a raw material every time. We’re just pointing out that this example is a raw material.) Tier 2- cotton fabric mill (The cotton fabric is made from the cotton plants.) Tier 1- final product: a company that creates cotton t-shirts (The t-shirt is made from cotton fabric.) Tier 1 Suppliers: These are direct suppliers of the final product. Tier 2 suppliers: These are suppliers or subcontractors for your tier 1 suppliers.

Tier 3 suppliers: These are suppliers or subcontractors for your tier 2 suppliers. These tiers can extend longer than three. The tiers extend as much as needed for hiring companies, depending on how many levels of suppliers or subcontractors are needed in the supply chain to create the product or service.

Why should I know my suppliers? Knowing your suppliers can be useful for a variety of reasons:

Quality control — The further removed a supplier is from your organization, the harder it is to maintain quality if you don’t have the right controls in place. Ethics concerns — Do you know if your suppliers are involved with inhumane working conditions, human trafficking, or other unethical behaviors? Legal ramifications —Did you know you could be held liable for your contractors if they aren’t compliant with current labor laws? Social Responsibility — Are your suppliers sustainable, socially responsible, diverse, and inclusive? Do you know their ESG Index? How are your scope 3 emissions? Cybersecurity — Your company could have the strictest of digital security protocols, but if an insecure third party accesses your system, a breach is very possible.

At Avetta, we know how complicated it can be to manage a supply chain. With our supply chain management software, you can enjoy the peace of mind of greater compliance and decreased liability and risk. We can pinpoint ways to improve your suppliers’ compliance (or help you find better ones) through our prequalification process, training, audits, and real-time insights.
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Which is higher Tier 2 or Tier 3?

Assessment Factors – Three primary assessment differences between Tier 2 and 3 are (1) the use of individual versus group diagnostic information, (2) the frequency of progress monitoring, and (3) the use of a comprehensive assessment framework at Tier 3.

Individual versus group diagnostic information. Many of the same types of assessments are used across Tier 2 and Tier 3 (i.e., universal screening to inform initial tier assignment, progress monitoring and mastery assessments to inform student learning, summative assessments to inform intervention effectiveness, and fidelity measures to determine implementation; Hosp, 2008).

However, the level of analysis may differ, depending on the protocol adopted. A protocol guides schools’ thinking about who gets which level of support and when they are assigned and modified (Tilly, 2008). One protocol used by schools is the “combined protocol,” which specifies that standard interventions and group problem-solving are used at Tier 2, and individually designed interventions and individual problem solving are used at Tier 3 (Tilly, 2008).

  • With group problem-solving, the common instructional need is identified among students needing Tier 2 support using brief diagnostic assessments.
  • For example, if oral reading fluency is used as a screening assessment, an assessor can determine a student’s rate (i.e., number of words read correctly in 1 minute) and accuracy (i.e., percentage of words read correctly) when reading connected text.
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From there, educators can identify what skills within reading to focus on (e.g., inaccurate and slow readers are provided general reading instruction, whereas accurate and slow readers are provided fluency instruction). As another example, imagine a grade-level team that analyzed the results of a common assessment used in reading for their 2nd graders.

The results revealed that for students who received Tier 2, only 22% of them have mastered r -controlled vowels. Accordingly, a focus of decoding lessons in Tier 2 would include r -controlled vowels. This group level of problem analysis can help schools efficiently group larger numbers of students into appropriate levels of supports by pinpointing a common missing skill (or skills) to target during Tier 2.

As an analogy, imagine a health clinic that wants to identify the most frequent health concern expressed by its patients. Analyzing initial complaints from patients, the clinic discovers that a good portion of their patients frequently experience cold and flu symptoms.

Instead of meeting with each patient separately and developing an individualized plan, the clinic targets those patients’ needs all at once by providing a group-oriented intervention (a Tier 2 intervention). The clinic decides to share brochures on how to prevent spreading germs (e.g., washing hands frequently, covering mouth when coughing), passes out free hand sanitizer to those patients and to community venues (e.g., local grocery stores, coffee shops), and provides an on-call nurse to field questions for those individuals who have cold symptoms.

In this scenario, the clinic analyzed common areas of need at the group level among its patients needing “Tier 2,” without investing resources in analyzing individual patients’ complaints. At Tier 3, the unit of analysis moves from the group to the individual student.

As opposed to group analysis, educators use individualized diagnostic assessments to evaluate the exact skills a student has and does not have rather than the skills a group of students have and do not have. In an RTI process, diagnostic does not refer to diagnosing a disability; it refers to analyzing the instructional situation and student’s skills in order to plan for intervention.

Diagnostic assessments are those that assess discrete skills, such as identifying the specific letter patterns a student can and cannot read well or which multiplication tables a student has mastered (Hosp, 2008). Returning to the health clinic analogy, at Tier 3, the clinic would focus on one particular patient.

Imagine that one patient has a recurring cough and the typical “first line” of treatment (the Tier 2 example described above) did not work. From there, the clinic may draw blood to pinpoint a more aggressive approach. The clinic may also conduct an interview with the patient, asking questions about the patient’s day-to-day activities, and observe the patient taking deep breaths.

The results of such an evaluation would inform the doctors about the individualized course of action to take. In our case, the patient with a recurring cough had a bacterial infection. Low and behold, a round of intense antibiotics has gotten this patient back to full health.

  • With RTI, the goal is similar: to get students back to full educational health.
  • Frequency of progress monitoring.
  • Another assessment difference between Tier 2 and Tier 3 is the frequency with which students are progress monitored.
  • Students receiving Tier 2 support are monitored once per month or twice per month, compared to weekly or twice a week at Tier 3 (Brown-Chidsey & Steege, 2010).

Usually, students at Tier 2 are monitored monthly, but some suggest monitoring every 2 weeks (Kaminski, Cumming, Powell-Smith, & Good, 2008) or weekly monitoring (Johnson, Mellard, Fuchs, & McKnight, 2006). Progress monitoring at Tier 3 is more frequent, but relative to the frequency of monitoring at Tier 2.

If monthly monitoring occurs at Tier 2, then biweekly or weekly monitoring occurs for students in Tier 3 (Harn et al., 2007; Vaughn et al., 2007). The guiding principle is that, as the need of the student increases, so does the attention and responsiveness of the staff. The increase in data collection at Tier 3 reflects the urgency of the student’s educational need and allows the staff to make decisions regarding instruction more frequently (e.g., every 2 months instead of once per quarter) In deciding upon the frequency of progress monitoring, schools have to consider the number of data points needed.

The validity of the slope (i.e., rate of improvement or rate of growth) depends on the number of data points that comprise it (Kennedy, 2005), and anywhere from 8 to 14 data points are needed to make a valid judgment of a student’s growth (Christ, Zopluoglu, Long, & Monaghen, 2012).

  1. Consequently, schools may face a conundrum when the intervention has been implemented for a reasonable amount of time, yet the data is not sufficient to make a valid decision.
  2. For example, an intervention may have been implemented for 20 weeks, but monthly monitoring has resulted in only five data points.

In such a scenario, schools have three options:

  1. School staff can obviously increase the amount of progress monitoring to ensure they have at least eight data points in order to make a decision (e.g., collect data at least three more times to obtain at least eight data points).
  2. School staff may wish to administer more than one probe during progress-monitoring occasions. Instead of administering one oral reading fluency probe, for example, educators can administer three probes and record the mean or median. When less than weekly monitoring is used, multiple administrations of probes during a progress-monitoring occasion and using the median score provide for a more valid data point (Christ et al., 2012). This can decrease the rate of monitoring required to have sufficient data for accurate decisions from conducting weekly monitoring for several months to conducting weekly monitoring for 3–9 weeks (Christ et al., 2012).
  3. School staff can consider the data itself. Guidelines for progress monitoring are not hard and fast rules, because the number of data points needed depends in part on the amount of variability within the data. Specifically, the more variability within the data, the greater the number of data points needed to get a valid picture of the student’s growth (Kennedy, 2005). Conversely, lower variability in the data indicates more precision in measurement and, thus, less need for more data points (although it’s usually difficult to argue for fewer data points). When evaluating a student’s growth rate, an educator should be able to look at the graph and judge, with reasonable confidence, where the next data point will land. If one cannot judge that, then more data are needed until the educator can judge where the next data point will fall with reasonable confidence. Schools could easily encounter situations in which fewer than eight data points provide a clear indication that the intervention is not sufficient for the student and, thus, more data are not needed to make a decision (see Figure 1). To summarize, schools will have to consider intervention time, progress-monitoring schedules, variability within the data, and certain decision deadlines (e.g., end of term or school year) to ensure they have sufficient data to make accurate decisions about student progress.

Figure 1. Illustration of variability within data. Note : For Student 1, the data indicate that the student’s next data point can be predicted with reasonable confidence, whereas for Student 2, more data is needed. Both examples have fewer than eight data points.

  1. Assessment framework.
  2. A final difference with assessment between Tier 2 and Tier 3 is the use of a framework to structure the intensity and explicitness of decision making that corresponds with Tier 3 (Christ, 2008; Howell & Nolet, 2000).
  3. Whereas Tier 2 assessment is largely at the group-level, Tier 3 assessment is at the individual level.

Thus, assessment at Tier 3 requires a much more comprehensive, thorough, and intensive approach. To accomplish this, assessment at Tier 3 is organized within the RIOT/ICEL framework. RIOT and ICEL are acronyms for the type of assessments and instructional domains to analyze, respectively, when making decisions about individual students’ achievement.

  • ICEL includes instruction (how new skills are taught and reinforced), curriculum (what is being taught), environment (where the instruction takes place), and learner (the recipient of the skills being taught).
  • RIOT includes review (reviewing existing data, permanent products, attendance records, lessons plans, etc.) that inform the evaluator about the state of affairs, interviews (structured, semi-structured, and unstructured methods of assessment that involve question–answer formats) observations (directly observing the instructional settings and the student’s engagement during learning tasks to examine when and where the problem is most and least likely to occur), and test (the administration of formal and informal tests).

The RIOT methods are used to obtain information about ICEL (Christ, 2008; Howell & Nolet, 2000). RIOT and ICEL are best viewed as an organizing rubric that can guide the specifics of problem analysis (see Table 2). Table 2: Examples of Sources of Information and Assessment Methods Within the RIOT and ICEL Framework to Support Achievement in Tier 3

Review Interview Observe Test
Instruction

Examine permanent product, lesson plans to assess prior strategies and instructional demands

Interview educator(s) for philosophy and perception of student issues

  • Conduct direct observations to document critical elements of practices
  • Identify antecedents and consequences of behavior

Use checklists, scales, etc. to measure effective practices

Curriculum
  • Review lesson plans and learning objectives to determine match with student’s skills
  • Analyze curriculum materials to understand scope and sequence, amount of review, etc.

Interview educator(s) for understanding of curriculum, training received, expectations about pacing, etc.

  • Examine permanent products to determine alignment with objectives
  • Observe clarity of objectives and student’s completion of them

Assess difficulty of materials compared to student’s instructional level

Environment

Review lesson plans on behavioral expectations; school rules and policies to understand climate; and seating charts to determine distractions

  • Interview educator(s) to assess rules and routines
  • Talk with students to describe climate, rules, etc.

Observe school and classroom climate and interactions among staff and students

Compare student’s performance between different settings to assess impact of environment

Learner
  • Review records to assess previous history and learning, attendance
  • Examine permanent products to assess response to previous instruction

Interview student to describe perception of problem, coping methods, etc.

Observe target skills and behavior

Use a variety of tests to assess student’s skill level and behavior

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Note: The term educator is used to refer to all relevant personnel who work with the student. Adapted from Christ, 2008 and Howell & Nolet, 2000 to depict Tier 3 implementation of RIOT/ICEL. Depending on the hypothesis to test and the intensity of student need, an evaluation may only involve a few “cells” or several of the cells; the more severe the problem, the more areas to be assessed using the framework.

  1. The purpose of ICEL is to collect information that has high instructional relevance and pertains to controllable factors (Christ, 2008; Howell & Nolet, 2000).
  2. Because the student receiving instruction has not benefited from Tier 1 or Tier 2, much more time is spent analyzing the instructional environment to identify ways to correct the problem compared to students receiving Tier 2.

This is not to say that certain instructional domains or cells in the RIOT/ICEL rubric are ignored at Tier 2, but the comprehensive and individualized assessment within RIOT/ICEL at Tier 3 reflects the increase in need and resources from Tier 2 to Tier 3.
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What is Tier 2 children?

The heart of any Response-to-Intervention (RTI) model lies in the use of tiered instructional processes. Although the assessment components of RTI (universal screening and progress monitoring) are essential elements of implementation, it is the instruction that occurs as a function of the outcomes of the assessments that truly drives the changes we hope to see in students who are identified as being at some level of risk for not meeting academic expectations. Tiered instruction represents a model in which the instruction delivered to students varies on several dimensions that are related to the nature and severity of the student’s difficulties. Typically, RTI models consist of three tiers of instructional processes, although some models discuss an additional fourth tier and other models subdivide the tiers into smaller units. At Tier 1, considered the key component of tiered instruction, all students receive instruction within an evidence-based, scientifically researched core program. Usually, the Tier 1 instructional program is synonymous with the core reading or math curriculum that is typically aligned with state standards. The intent of the core program is the delivery of a high-quality instructional program in reading or math that has established known outcomes that cut across the skill development of the targeted area. Schools spend significant amounts of time, money, and personnel to make sure that the Tier 1 core program is well chosen from among the many choices available from commercial publishers. The teaching staff must receive sufficient and ongoing professional development to deliver the Tier 1 core instructional program in the way it was designed. The expectation is that if the Tier 1 program is implemented with a high degree of integrity and by highly trained teachers, then most of the students receiving this instruction will show outcomes upon assessment that indicate a level of proficiency that meets minimal benchmarks for performance in the skill area. Many who advocate RTI models indicate that around 75%–80% of children should, theoretically, be expected to reach successful levels of competency through Tier 1 delivery. Although these percentages represent the ideal level of expected outcomes, it may take several years of implementing RTI models to reach such outcome levels in schools with high percentages of students who are struggling. In many of the schools in which we are working, we see levels of around 50%–70% in the early years of implementing RTI models as being strong signals of overall success. In these schools with high percentages of children not reaching proficiency in Tier 1, schools need to organize the RTI model in a way that allows for tiered instruction to be implemented by the available personnel. An approach to such organization is discussed later in this article. Although we would like to find responsiveness to the core program at Tier 1 to be sufficient for all children, for some students the level of instruction is not successful in helping them achieve minimal levels of expected competency. All children receive Tier 1 instruction, but those children in need of supplemental intervention receive additional instruction at Tier 2 or Tier 3. Tier 2 consists of children who fall below the expected levels of accomplishment (called benchmarks) and are at some risk for academic failure but who are still above levels considered to indicate a high risk for failure. The needs of these students are identified through the assessment process, and instructional programs are delivered that focus on their specific needs. Instruction is provided in smaller groups than Tier 1 is (which would be all children in a teacher’s classroom). Typically, depending on the model of RTI being used, small groups consist of anywhere from about 5 to 8 children. Tier 3 consists of children who are considered to be at high risk for failure and, if not responsive, are considered to be candidates for identification as having special education needs. The groups of students at Tier 3 are of much smaller sizes, ranging from 3 to 5 children, with some models using one-to-one instruction. In such models where one-to-one instruction is used, Tier 3 is usually considered special education; however, in many models it is viewed as a tier that includes children who are not identified as being in need of special education but whose needs are at the intensive level.
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Who are Tier 2 students?

What are tiers? What Is Tier 2 In Education In medicine, mental health, and now in education, there are three generally accepted levels of prevention for various disorders or problems. Each of these levels represents ways that professionals can intervene in order to diminish problems in their clients.

  1. Here we will describe each level without technical jargon, and relate them to our purpose in schools, particularly focusing on student behavior.
  2. Most often these three tiers are graphically represented in a triangle diagram.
  3. However, these tiers may also be represented as concentric circles.
  4. The tiers may help prioritize the type and intensity of interventions for behavior that students receive.

It is possible that any particular intervention can be used at any of these three tiers. What we have done on this website is identify the primary way strategies would be used. What Is Tier 2 In Education What Is Tier 2 In Education Tier 1. The first level of intervention, called primary or universal prevention, is often called Tier 1 intervention in schools. Primary level interventions are delivered to all students, and attempt to undertake modifications in the environment or system which prevent behavior or mental health problems from developing.

All students benefit from Tier 1 interventions in school. When Tier 1 interventions are implemented well, potentially fewer students will need additional services. Character education, a curricula intended to help all students understand and commit to behaviors that align with core ethical values, is an example of a Tier 1 intervention.

Tier 2. The secondary level of interventions in schools (now commonly called Tier 2) focuses on specific students who show initial signs or symptoms of difficulty. Data from these students is then used to provide targeted interventions to those “at-risk” students based on their specific needs and symptoms.

  • Signs may include behavior management problems in class, tardiness, office referrals, absences, etc.
  • In a total school population, it is estimated that 15 percent of students, might develop some form of behavioral difficulty and require Tier 2 supports in addition to all Tier 1 supports.
  • Check-in/Check-out, a strategy used to monitor student progress and provide positive daily contact with an adult in school, is an example of a Tier 2 intervention.

Tier 3. Tertiary level interventions (Tier 3) focus on rehabilitation and minimizing the risk of recurrence of mental health problems or behavioral episodes for students who have already experienced one or more behavioral crises. These supports are the most intensive and resource dependent, and thus are reserved for the approximately 5 percent or less of students who do not respond to Tier 1 and 2 interventions.

  • Again, students receiving Tier 3 supports must also receive all appropriate Tier 1 and Tier 2 supports.
  • Conducting a functional behavior assessment (FBA) to determine the events preceding and following problem behavior, which is then used to create an individualized behavior plan, is an example of a Tier 3 intervention.

These three tiers of prevention, which inform interventions in schools, represent a useful framework for understanding how we can prevent behavioral crisis and make schools safer. Implementation of effective interventions at each of these three tiers would also prevent or diminish the need for physical restraint and seclusion.
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What is the difference between 3 tier and 2?

Pros –

More comfortable seating. The bench in AC 2 Tier is the same size as AC 3 Tier but seats only two people each instead of three. Passengers will also have more headroom at bedtime since there is no middle berth. You can also expect some better facilities in AC 2 Tier such as reading lights in all of the berths, along with more changing points. Not to mention most often you have a better guarantee that these charging points will all be functional.

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What does Tier 2 look like in the classroom?

Remember, teachers who provide Tier 2 interventions should: –

  • Provide instruction with modeling
  • Check that students are doing the activity correctly
  • Have students demonstrate what they are doing
  • Have students repeat instructions
  • Provide corrective feedback to individual students
  • Provide multiple examples

Phonemic Awareness: Here is an example of how Ms. Washington uses phonemic awareness. Say the parts of a word then put them together and say the word. The parts are /m/ /a/ /n/. Ms. Washington holds up a finger as she says each sound so that she has three fingers up when she finishes.

mat cat map pan
tap tack tan nap

/td>

Now look at the table below and compare the phonemic awareness lessons between Tier 1 and Tier 2. Although the lessons seem similar, Tier 2 provides a more intense level of instruction. This is achieved by providing additional attention, focus, and support, and by adjusting the pace of the lesson to match students’ needs.

  • For example, where a Tier 1 lesson might have students practice on three different sounds, a Tier 2 lesson might start with one sound and gradually progress to the second and third sounds once students can demonstrate their understanding of each previous sound.
  • Students have multiple opportunities to participate and respond, and Ms.

Washington is able to provide immediate corrective feedback.
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How many Tier 2 are there?

What are tier 1, tier 2, tier 3 and tier 4 cities in India? – Indian cities are classified as X (tier 1 cities in India), Y (tier 2 cities in India) and Z (tier 3 or 4 cities in India) categories by the government, based on the population density. Also, tier 1 cities in India are more developed cities, including the metropolitan cities, whereas tier 3 cities are the developing cities in India.

  1. There are eight metropolitan tier 1 cities in India – Delhi, Mumbai, Bangalore, Chennai, Hyderabad, Kolkata, Ahmedabad and Pune.
  2. On the other hand, 104 cities are categorised as tier 2 cities in India, while the remaining cities fall under the tier 3 or tier 4 cities in India category.
  3. Tier 1 cities in India are densely populated and have higher living expenses.

There are major international airports, industries, top multi-specialty hospitals, education, and research institutes in the Tier 1 cities. Urban planners and economists believe that certain cities, officially classified as tier 2 cities in India, are so good that there is not much difference between tier 1 and tier 2 cities.
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What percent of students should be in Tier 2?

Multi-Tiered Systems of Support (MTSS), also known as Response to Intervention (RTI), is a tiered instructional model focused on providing high quality instruction to every child. MTSS is implemented as a three-tiered approach to support student learning.

Tier I typically ensures the success of approximately 85% of the student population. Students whose data indicate a higher level of need or students who are not responsive to Tier I instruction or intervention may receive Tier II intervention services. Tier II services are inclusive of all of the supports at Tier I and add targeted supplemental instruction.

Typically, Tier II will meet the needs of between 10 and 15% of the student population. Tier II interventions and supports often occur inside of the classroom from skilled interventionists and specialists who can provide additional small group instruction.

  1. Tier III is an intensive, frequent, and consistently monitored level of support outside of the general education setting designed to close the gap between the student and his/her peers.
  2. Each student continues in the tiered intervention until the teaching team has data to indicate that the gap has been closed and that this intensive level of intervention is no longer necessary.

A small percentage of students, approximately 1-5% of the student population may require Tier III interventions and supports. In some circumstances, children do not close the gaps in learning and, in these situations, a team may consider the need for special education eligibility under an MTSS model.
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Which tier is better 1 or 2?

Key Takeaways –

Under Basel III, a bank’s tier 1 and tier 2 assets must be at least 10.5% of its risk-weighted assets, up from 8% under Basel II.    Tier 1 capital is the primary funding source of the bank.Tier 1 capital consists of shareholders’ equity and retained earnings. Tier 2 capital includes revaluation reserves, hybrid capital instruments and subordinated term debt, general loan-loss reserves, and undisclosed reserves.Tier 2 capital is considered less reliable than Tier 1 capital because it is more difficult to accurately calculate and more difficult to liquidate.

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Is tier 1 higher than Tier 4?

Data center tiers are a system used to describe specific kinds of data center infrastructure in a consistent way. Tier 1 is the simplest infrastructure, while Tier 4 is the most complex and has the most redundant components. Each tier includes the required components of all the tiers below it.
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What are tier 1 interventions in the classroom?

Examples of tier 1 interventions to use liberally include: Giving academic praise and feedback. Implementing academic response opportunities. Providing major concept summaries. Enforcing structure, rules, and routines.
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What is a Tier 2 job?

How to Write a Tier 2 Support Job Description + 5 Examples Tier 2 support team members are the folks responsible for handling technical escalations and more advanced inquiries that are beyond the skills or knowledge of your first level customer service representatives.

When supporting a highly technical product, a tier 2 team may handle implementation and core product guidance. In contrast, the tier 2 team supporting a retail product may handle lower priority bugs, dispute resolutions, or triage, as their skills are less about product knowledge and more about service experience.

In our examples below, we’ve chosen to use a SaaS (software as a service) product that helps users build and design websites. In the case of this company, a tier 2 support team would work directly with customers explaining technical details of the product and triaging or resolving bugs.
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What is Tier and Tier 2?

How To Claim Tax Benefits for Tier 1 And Tier 2 If you’re keen on finding out how to claim the National Pension Scheme (NPS) tax benefits on your Tier I and Tier II accounts, this article is for you. NPS is a great tax-saving and long-term investment tool.

  • One of the prime advantages of retirement planning through NPS is that along with saving for your post-retirement years; you also get to enjoy tax benefits.
  • Let’s take a close look at the NPS tax saving advantages.
  • NPS is a government-sponsored scheme with the dual benefits of retirement planning and tax saving.

It is managed by the Pension Fund Regulatory and Development Authority (PFRDA). The primary objective of the is to aid investors in building a sizeable retirement corpus. Any citizen of India between 18 and 60 years of age can invest in NPS. There are two types of NPS accounts – Tier I and Tier II.

  1. While NPS Tier I is well-suited for retirement planning, Tier II NPS accounts act as a voluntary savings account.
  2. Tier I NPS investment is a long-term one and the amount cannot be withdrawn until retirement.
  3. This is not the case with Tier II NPS accounts.Now that we have seen the difference between Tier I and Tier II NPS accounts, it’s time to explore the different NPS scheme tax benefits.

Under Section 80CCD (1) of the Income-Tax Act, NPS offers a tax exemption of up to Rs.1.5 lakh. In case a company provides an NPS facility, the employer’s contribution to NPS offers a tax rebate of up to 10% of the salary (basic plus DA) under Section 80CCD(2).For salaried individuals who have claimed tax exemption of Rs.1.5 lakh under Section 80C, NPS offers scope for additional tax savings.

  1. Both salaried and self-employed NPS account holders with an investment of up to Rs.50,000 qualify for an additional tax exemption under Section 80CCD (1B) of the Income-Tax Act.
  2. However, this additional deduction under Section 80CCD (1B) applies only to Tier I NPS account holders.
  3. Unlike a Tier I NPS account, Tier II NPS accounts do not qualify for a tax rebate under Section 80C of the Income Tax Act.When it comes to NPS tax benefits, another point to remember is that the deduction under Section 80CCD (1) is available to both salaried individuals and non-salaried individuals.

However, for salaried professionals, the maximum deduction allowed under Section 80CCD (1) is 10% of the salary for that year. On the other hand, for non-salaried individuals, it is 20% of their total gross income for that year.With this information of the NPS Income Tax benefit in your kitty, we are sure you will be able to grow your wealth and save on tax at the same time! Read more on the here.
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