What Is Shared Leadership In Education?

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What Is Shared Leadership In Education
Instead of a single individual leading to success, other individuals, who are partners or group members, are invited to share the responsibility for leadership and develop a positive school climate.
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What is an example of shared leadership?

Shared leadership vs. team leadership – Many people think they have shared leadership if there are teams in place. While this does break down the hierarchy, it isn’t truly shared leadership. Within a team, there is typically still a team leader; even if there’s no team leader, the shared power is relevant only within the context of the team rather than being more broadly applied to the entire company.

However, teams can be a good place to introduce shared leadership when building a company culture, Teams offer smaller containers and can give employees experience within a leadership structure. According to an Academy of Management Journal study, for shared leadership to work within a team setting, the team should already have a cohesive environment, with well-understood goals and a strong atmosphere of mutual support.

According to a Harvard Business Review article, shared leadership leads to better organizational performance overall. Shared leadership positively influences the way a company operates because this model encourages and values personal initiative. When employees feel empowered to do what they know they need to do instead of waiting to be told, productivity and job satisfaction increase.

And when employees are happy, the company runs more smoothly in a positive environment. When individuals feel they impact the organization and have some power and responsibility, they have a greater desire for success. Goals become more personal to them, and people naturally work harder at anything in which they’re personally invested.

“The best examples of shared leadership are when decision-making gets spread across multiple individuals,” said Greg A. Chung-Yan, a professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Windsor in Ontario, Canada. Shared power creates a sense of ownership for employees, which increases productivity and job satisfaction.

  1. Shared leadership may be a relatively new concept in the business world, but it can be seen as far back as the Roman Empire, where individuals came together to share power with their peers in the Senate, giving the people a voice to which the emperor had to listen.
  2. Shared leadership can also be seen in the government structure of modern democracies.

Instead of one person, such as a king or an authoritarian leader, having all the decision-making power, the power is shared among different branches of government, with the president or prime minister taking the ultimate leadership role. Collins gave an example related to the business world.

Newark, Delaware-based W.L. Gore & Associates – a 9,000-employee firm that makes Gore-Tex, among other products – is large, but it keeps its offices small, with no more than 150 people in each office. According to Collins, W.L. Gore works essentially without supervisors, and work is accepted by, rather than assigned to, employees.

The company uses its employees’ collective knowledge of people to develop ideas and workflow. There are three basic principles of creating shared leadership:

  1. Encourage transparency.
  2. Provide a safe environment.
  3. Support autonomy.

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What is meant by shared leadership?

Published July 4, 2022 Most organizations still favor a traditional leadership model over a shared leadership style, and this can lead to a decrease in performance and productivity. A growing body of research suggests that shared leadership can be highly effective in certain situations but crucially, only if it has been planned and implemented. In this piece, we will discuss:

  • What is shared leadership
  • Examples of shared leadership
  • Traditional leadership vs. shared leadership
  • Benefits of shared leadership
  • Challenges of shared leadership
  • How can you apply shared leadership in an organizational context?
    1. Conditions that promote and sustain shared leadership
    2. Put shared leadership into actions

Shared leadership is when each employee within an organization takes ownership and responsibility for the part they play. In effect, shared leadership enables each employee to shoulder their work without the oversight from a command-and-control style manager. It is a horizontal leadership model, where teams and employees make up the collective direction of the organization, as opposed to the traditional triangle model where vision and direction are dictated by an executive suite. However, a critical aspect of shared leadership is that it is a gradient.
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What is shared leadership vs distributed leadership?

What is distributed leadership and what is shared leadership? – Distributed leadership is a model where leadership responsibilities and decision-making are spread out among multiple individuals within an organization. Shared leadership, on the other hand, refers to a collaborative approach to decision-making where all members of a team have equal input and influence.
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What are the key elements of shared leadership?

Purpose Megaprojects present an intricated pattern of leadership activities, which evolve over their planning and delivery and comprises several stakeholders. A framework is useful to navigate this complexity; it allows to identify and cluster the key elements.

  • This paper aims to introduce a novel framework based on boundary spanners to describe the structural pattern of shared leadership in megaprojects.
  • Design/methodology/approach A systematic literature review about boundary spanning and shared leadership is used to identify and cluster the key elements of shared leadership in megaprojects.

The systematic literature review provides a rich theoretical background to develop the novel shared leadership framework based on boundary spanners. Findings There are three key dimensions characterizing shared leadership topology in megaprojects: stakeholders, boundary spanning leadership roles and project phases.

  1. The novel framework shows how project leadership dynamically transfers among different stakeholders, showing the importance of shared leadership as a leadership paradigm in megaprojects.
  2. Research limitations/implications The novel framework epitomizes shared leadership in megaprojects by exploring its antecedents with social network metrics.

This paper stresses that shared leadership is the envisaged form of leadership in megaprojects. By modeling complex project leadership in a simple, yet effective way, the framework fosters critical thinking for future research. The modeling introduced by this framework would also benefit practitioners in charge of megaprojects.
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What are the five shared leadership responsibilities?

What Collective Leadership Is and Isn’t – We have defined collective leadership as a group of people working together toward a shared goal.1 When collective leadership is happening, people are internally and externally motivated—working together toward a shared vision within a group and using their unique talents and skills to contribute to the success.

  • In fact, collective leadership recognizes that lasting success is not possible without diverse perspectives and contributions.
  • Collective leadership is a process.
  • It is dependent on the relationships among the parts in the system, whether that system is two people working together; a classroom, team, board, or organization; or a system initiative.

In collective leadership, the way the group works together makes it different from a more traditional model of leadership. How the group works together and the unique results that are possible only when this happens differentiate a group that is sharing leadership from one that is not.

  • In collective leadership, there is shared responsibility and decision making, accountability, and authentic engagement.
  • All members are involved in creating the vision and are committed to working to achieve that vision.
  • Collective leadership is based on the assumption that everyone can and should lead.2 Collective leadership requires specific conditions for the success of the whole: trust, shared power, transparent and effective communication, accountability, and shared learning.
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It is based on the recognition that without the gifts, talents, perspectives, and efforts of many, sustainable change is difficult to achieve. Creativity is unleashed as people tap into their fullest abilities and capacities. When collective leadership is present, people say, “We have done this ourselves.” A key aspect of collective leadership is that the success depends on the leadership within the entire group rather than the skills of one person.

Mary Parker Follett, whom we consider to be the mother of collective leadership, wrote about power with others rather than power over others.3 This means that rather than having leadership limited to one charismatic person or one powerful organization, leadership is shared among many. This shift from focusing on the skills of any one individual to the capacities, relationships, behaviors, and practices of an entire group (two or more people) makes collective leadership different from other types of leadership and leadership models.

In “Leadership in the Age of Complexity,” Margaret Wheatley and Debbie Frieze discuss a shift from thinking of a leader as a “hero” to thinking of a leader as a “host.” 4 When a leader is the “hero,” he or she is expected to have all the answers, solve all the problems, and fix everything for everyone else.

The “hero” is dynamic, charismatic, and brilliant. The problem with this mind-set is that the command-and-control model often uses quick solutions that are created by a few in power (the top of an organizational chart)—and often these solutions are not well suited for the complex issues that we face today.

Instead, we need leaders as “hosts”: those who have the skills to promote shared learning, effective group decision making, reflection, visioning and goal setting, and mutual accountability. What does this shift from “hero” to “host” look like? The following table shows some of the key differences between traditional and collective leadership. What Is Shared Leadership In Education
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How do you measure shared leadership in a team?

Measuring – There are two main ways that most researchers measure the existence and extent of shared leadership in a team: Ratings of the team’s collective leadership behavior and Social Network Analysis. A less common technique of measuring shared leadership is with the use of behaviorally anchored rating scales.
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Who developed shared leadership theory?

The Moderating Role of the Project Life Cycle – Notwithstanding the fact that research on the relationship between shared leadership and team effectiveness brings valuable insights into the understanding of shared leadership in teams, there is an important omission in prior studies regarding its temporal moderating roles on such a relationship ( Carson et al., 2007 ; D’Innocenzo et al., 2014 ; Wang et al., 2014 ).

In an attempt to open the black box, this study seeks to examine a potential moderator of shared leadership, namely the project life cycle, and expects that the positive association between shared leadership and team effectiveness will be stronger at the early phase than the later phase of the project.

This is because the focal concern of the early stage is toward planning and strategy generation ( Chang et al., 2003 ; Farh et al., 2010 ), where project team members are more willing to engage in mutual leadership as they become proactively involved in constructive communication and decision-making ( Wu and Cormican, 2016 ).

It thus allows individuals to bring more resources to the task, share more information, and to experience higher levels of commitment ( Bergman et al., 2012 ). Collectively, these consequences would result in greater team effectiveness ( Day et al., 2004 ; D’Innocenzo et al., 2014 ). Furthermore, as time and resources are less constrained at the early stage ( Farh et al., 2010 ), members are able to take initiative to develop their own leadership abilities as well as to facilitate the leadership skills of others, which subsequently fosters the effectiveness of project teams ( Ensley et al., 2006 ; Serban and Roberts, 2016 ).

However, when the project advances into the later stage, resources are dedicated to execute project plans ( Farh et al., 2010 ). This leads to a change in the leadership distribution from many team members to a few individuals, who assume the responsibility of integrating resources, controlling the development of the project to meet deadlines and keeping costs within budget ( Wu and Cormican, 2016 ).

  1. Teams may no longer afford to spend too much time cultivating a positive team environment to promote shared leadership ( Carson et al., 2007 ).
  2. As such, any potential of shared leadership for enhancing team effectiveness would be more difficult to realize in the later stage of the project life cycle.

Therefore, this research expects that: Hypothesis 2 : The stage of the project life cycle moderates the positive association between shared leadership and team effectiveness, such that this relationship will be stronger at the early phase than at the later phase of the project in engineering design teams.
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What are the 4 C’s of effective leadership?

Dr. Katharina Schmidt PsyD ( Inspiration & Discipline ) is an executive coach, independent corporate sense-maker and leadership researcher. getty Anybody who thinks leadership becomes easier with more formal power does not get it. The complexity only increases with more power.

  1. It comes with unintended side effects on both the leader and their co-workers.
  2. Leadership is what author Ronald Heifetz, one of my favorite leadership thinkers, calls an adaptive challenge.
  3. It means there are no quick fixes, silver bullets or one-size-fits-all approaches that work for all people in any situation.

Leading people and organizations is an ongoing process of interaction, awareness, experimentation, learning and adaptation. When we are in a follower role, most of us have very high expectations of our leaders; subconsciously, we often expect them to have all the answers, solve big problems with ease and take away all our suffering.

  • That might be why research finds we spend an average of six days a year complaining about our bosses.
  • And yet, there is no such thing as a leader who has all the answers.
  • Think about climate change: No leader can solve that problem alone; it will take every human on the planet to address this adaptive problem, and it will take years to untangle and rebuild a more sustainable way of living.

Leading people comes with responsibility, and it’s not an easy job, To stay highly functioning as a high-powered leader, it takes a lot of inner work (a.k.a. self-reflection), assimilating feedback and an ongoing beginner’s mindset. While inner work on your purpose, vision and values is necessary to counterbalance the potential blindfolding effects of power, there are some additional principles every leader can use as guidance to engage with herself and the world around her.
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What is the difference between vertical and shared leadership?

Abstract – The current study investigated the relative influence of vertical versus shared leadership within new venture top management teams on the performance of startups using two different samples. Vertical leadership stems from an appointed or formal leader of a team (e.g., the CEO), whereas shared leadership is a form of distributed leadership stemming from within a team.

  • Transformational, transactional, empowering, and directive dimensions of both vertical and shared leadership were examined.
  • New venture performance was considered in terms of revenue growth and employee growth.
  • The first sample was comprised of 66 top management teams of firms drawn from Inc.
  • Magazine ‘s annual list of America’s 500 fastest growing startups.

The seconded sample consisted of 154 top management teams of startups randomly drawn from Dun and Bradstreet, which compiles the most extensive database available for identifying relatively young American-based ventures. Both vertical and shared leadership were found to be highly significant predictors of new venture performance.

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Further, hierarchical regression analysis found the shared leadership variables to account for a significant amount of variance in new venture performance beyond the vertical leadership variables. These results were consistent across both samples, thus providing robust evidence for the value of shared leadership, in addition to the more traditional concept of vertical leadership.

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Which is the best example of shared leadership?

Reform – In most cases, the decision to adopt a shared-leadership model, or to create opportunities for shared leadership in a school, results from an affirmative decision to abandon top-down, administration-driven, or hierarchical systems of school governance.

By distributing leadership roles and responsibilities throughout an organization, principals and administrators will be less managerially burdened and can devote more time to bigger-picture leadership responsibilities related to the overall condition and performance of the school—e.g., ensuring that the school culture remains positive and productive, that teachers continue to grow and improve their teaching abilities, that student achievement improves, that important responsibilities are being effectively executed and coordinated, that the staff remains accountable to the school’s mission and vision and to its students, etc. In a school setting, administrators can build greater support and understanding among faculty, staff members, students, and parents when they provide opportunities for others to lead, take on more responsibility, and contribute to important decisions. Sharing leadership responsibilities helps schools become more inclusive and self-reflective because more people are exchanging important information, discussing issues, and making decisions collaboratively. Distributing leadership responsibilities encourages teachers, staff members, and others to feel more personally invested in the success of the school and more responsible for its performance and results. By sharing decision-making authority with others in the organization, people will become more engaged in and committed to what they are doing. By sharing leadership more broadly, administrators are not only encouraging the professional aspirations and growth of other members of the school organization, but they are also nurturing the development of leadership experience and skills within the school, and thereby cultivating the next generation of school leaders. Shared leadership enables schools to draw on a larger pool of talent, wisdom, expertise, and experience beyond a single principal or relatively small group of administrators. By letting individuals focus their attention, energy, and skills on what they do best, the whole organization, and the students in particular, will benefit.

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What are the pros and cons of distributed leadership?

Distributed leadership There are many leaders, not just one. Leadership is distributed. It resides not solely in the individual at the top, but in every person at entry level who, in one way or another, acts as a leader ” (Goleman, 2002) It is argued that distributed leadership is not a ‘style’ of leadership – as transformational, transactional – but a method (Petrov 2006).

It is more likely and more appropriate to use in HE. It is less about leader/follower, but involves contribution from many stakeholders. It is an integral part of daily activities and interactions between everyone across the organisation, irrespective of position’ (ibid). Distributed leadership has the advantage of ‘increasing initiative, creativity and spontaneity and therefore individuals have the power to influence events’.

However, as accountability stays with the leader, individuals are ‘shielded’ both from the risks and the rewards. As important as a collective working approach to this method is the need for a clear vision.
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Which is the best example of shared leadership?

Reform – In most cases, the decision to adopt a shared-leadership model, or to create opportunities for shared leadership in a school, results from an affirmative decision to abandon top-down, administration-driven, or hierarchical systems of school governance.

By distributing leadership roles and responsibilities throughout an organization, principals and administrators will be less managerially burdened and can devote more time to bigger-picture leadership responsibilities related to the overall condition and performance of the school—e.g., ensuring that the school culture remains positive and productive, that teachers continue to grow and improve their teaching abilities, that student achievement improves, that important responsibilities are being effectively executed and coordinated, that the staff remains accountable to the school’s mission and vision and to its students, etc. In a school setting, administrators can build greater support and understanding among faculty, staff members, students, and parents when they provide opportunities for others to lead, take on more responsibility, and contribute to important decisions. Sharing leadership responsibilities helps schools become more inclusive and self-reflective because more people are exchanging important information, discussing issues, and making decisions collaboratively. Distributing leadership responsibilities encourages teachers, staff members, and others to feel more personally invested in the success of the school and more responsible for its performance and results. By sharing decision-making authority with others in the organization, people will become more engaged in and committed to what they are doing. By sharing leadership more broadly, administrators are not only encouraging the professional aspirations and growth of other members of the school organization, but they are also nurturing the development of leadership experience and skills within the school, and thereby cultivating the next generation of school leaders. Shared leadership enables schools to draw on a larger pool of talent, wisdom, expertise, and experience beyond a single principal or relatively small group of administrators. By letting individuals focus their attention, energy, and skills on what they do best, the whole organization, and the students in particular, will benefit.

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What is 1 example of leadership?

37 Leadership Examples What Is Shared Leadership In Education You often need to demonstrate your when interviewing for a new job or promotion. Employers want to hire people who can take the lead by managing less experienced staff or taking a project from ideation to completion.

To demonstrate your leadership skills in an interview, you will need to discuss specific times when you took charge and helped others.Examples of leadership include managing a study group, coaching a sports team, being elected onto a council team, and to younger or less experienced people.Below are 37 examples of leadership that may resonate with you.

Putting yourself forward to be on your school’s student council team. Organizing your friendship group to participate in an event. Encouraging others to get involved in a new activity at school or work. Showing in your school or community projects. Being a role model for younger students or children. Taking on a leadership position in a club or team you are involved in. Helping out with event planning and execution within your organization. Fundraising for a cause you are passionate about. Mobilizing your peers to take action on an issue you care about. Training new staff in your workplace. Taking a promotion at work where you need to manage and direct less experienced stadd members. a team in a sport like football, soccer, or hockey. Starting your own business and hiring employees. Getting elected to serve on your city’s council or board of directors. Running for political office. Taking on a leadership role in your church or place of worship. Organizing a protest or march for a cause you believe in. Being the head of a household and taking care of your family. Helping out with neighborhood watch or community policing initiatives. Volunteering to be a mentor for someone else in your field or industry. Serving as a leader in the military. Becoming a teacher and working with students every day. Tutoring a group of peers during study sessions. Taking a stand for something that is right (but not necessarily popular) and then encouraging others to follow your lead. Putting your hand up to manage the finances in a sports organization. Stepping up to take action when everyone else around you is looking for someone to do it! Being the person who checks-in on everyone in a school project to make sure they’re on track and will complete on time. Having the responsibility to check-in on other team members to make sure they’re doing things the right way. Running a staff meeting or training session. Providing professional development to others, such as presenting new research on a topic then leading a discussion on how to implement it in our daily lives. Setting up a workout routine for someone then checking-in on them regularly to make sure they’re on track. Leading by example, for example, by not only telling other people they should read books but actually being seen reading regularly yourself. Helping a friend study for an upcoming test then celebrating their success together. Having the initiative when something needs to be done and there is no one else around to do it. Helping someone new to your organization feel welcomed and comfortable in their new environment. Stepping-in when your boss is away for the day and doing their tasks, including any delegation tasks they may have. Being responsible for preparing a school event like a fete or a disco and then completing it successfully.

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To show a potential employer that you have strong leadership skills, you could discuss a time when you managed a group of people, whether it was at work, in a volunteer role, or simply during group projects at school. When discussing your experience, be sure to include concrete examples of what you did to lead the group and achieve success.

  • For example, you might say something like: “I led a team of five people in our company’s annual charity drive.
  • I delegated tasks, provided support and guidance when needed, and helped to resolve any conflicts that arose.
  • As a result of our hard work, we were able to raise $10,000 for the charity, which was $2,000 more than our goal.” Often, our first experiences of leadership occur when our own boss gives us a little more responsibility.

This might occur when a new project arises at work or school, or simply when your teacher sees you as a mature person who can handle additional responsibilities. When discussing this experience in an interview, be sure to include what the added responsibility entailed and how you handled it.

  • For example, you might say: “My boss asked me to take on additional responsibility for leading client calls during our busy season.
  • I made sure to prepare for each call by doing my research, and I was always calm and professional when speaking with clients.
  • I made sure all clients had a chance to talk an no one spoke over anyone else.

As a result of my efforts, our team was able to complete the project on time and under budget successfully.” In many cases, leadership is about taking initiative—seeing what needs to be done and then doing it, without being asked. This might mean taking on a new project at work, or simply being the one to organize a social event for your friends.

When discussing this experience in an interview, be sure to include what you did and why you did it. For example, you might say: “I noticed that our team was struggling to complete a project on time, so I took it upon myself to create a new system for organizing our work. I divided the project into smaller tasks and assigned each task to a different team member.

I also created a schedule and deadlines for each task. As a result of my efforts, the project was completed on time and everyone was happy with the results.” In many cases, leadership is about making decisions—whether it’s deciding what to do in a difficult situation or simply being the one to choose where to go for lunch.

  • When discussing this experience in an interview, be sure to include the situation you were in and why you made the decision you did.
  • For example, you might say: “I was in charge of planning a company event, and I had to decide whether to hold it at a hotel or an outdoor venue.
  • After considering the pros and cons of each option, I decided to hold the event at an outdoor venue.

I thought it would be more fun for everyone and it would give us a chance to save money on the rental fee.” Role models have to be leaders. This is because people look up to them and expect them to set a good example. For example, if you found yourself in a situation where you were a role model to younger students at school, you might have had to make sure you demonstrated maturity and then talked to younger students about what it means to be mature.

Here’s an example of what you could say about being a role model: “I was chosen to be a mentor for a new employee, so I made sure to always arrive at work on time and take my work seriously. I also tried to be friendly and helpful, so that the new employee would feel comfortable asking me for help. As a result of my efforts, the new employee was able to successfully adjust to her new job.” Encouraging others is an important part of leadership.

Leaders inspire the people they are leading and make sure they get the best out of everyone. The best leaders put their team first and prioritize their needs. When discussing this experience in an interview, be sure to include what you said or did to encourage others.

  • For example, you might say: “I was working on a project with a team of people, and I noticed that one team member was starting to get overwhelmed.
  • I could tell she was about to give up, so I encouraged her to keep going.
  • I told her that she was doing a great job and that I knew she could finish the project.

As a result of my encouragement, she was able to keep going and we were able to successfully complete the project.” If an employer is looking for someone with leadership skills, it means you’re applying for a job in which you will need to manage, delegate responsibility, and take charge.

  • These are some of the most motivating types of jobs you can get! But to get the job, you usually need to show some ability to exercise leadership.
  • This means you need to talk about times when you were a manager, delegator, organizer, or role model to others.
  • By talking about examples of times you demonstrated leadership, you can show that you don’t only know how to lead, but also have the practical experience in leadership roles.

: 37 Leadership Examples
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Can you share an example of your leadership skills?

1. Leading a project or task in school – This can be any level of school. Choose whatever you completed most recently. If you’re a college graduate, pick a project from the last one or two years of college. If you just graduated high school, choose something from your senior year.

  • Taking a lead role in a school project is a great example of leadership experience.
  • If you delegated tasks, chose the overall strategy for the project, or anything like that, that’s leadership! Organizing a team presentation can also be considered leadership.
  • Example answer: I was assigned to lead a team of three colleagues in my college marketing course.

We had to develop a comprehensive digital marketing strategy for a hypothetical e-commerce company. I organized our group to work on different components of the plan, including our content, social media, and email strategy. We developed a 15-page report and earned an A+.
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