What Education Is Required To Be A Graphic Designer?

0 Comments

What Education Is Required To Be A Graphic Designer
Education – Graphic designers typically need a bachelor’s degree in graphic design or a related fine arts field. People who have a bachelor’s degree in another field may complete technical training in graphic design to meet most hiring qualifications.

  1. The National Association of Schools of Art and Design accredits more than 360 postsecondary colleges, universities, and independent institutes with programs in art and design.
  2. Most programs include courses in studio art, principles of design, computerized design, commercial graphics production, printing techniques, and website design.

In addition, students should consider courses in writing, marketing, and business, all of which are useful in helping designers work effectively on project teams. High school students interested in graphic design should take basic art and design courses, if available.

Many bachelor’s degree programs require students to complete a year of basic art and design courses before being admitted to a formal degree program. Some schools require applicants to submit sketches and other examples of their artistic ability. Many programs provide students with the opportunity to build a portfolio—a collection of completed works that demonstrates an artist’s styles and abilities.

For many artists, including graphic designers, developing a portfolio is essential because employers rely on portfolios in making hiring decisions. Graphic designers must keep up with new and updated computer graphics and design software, either on their own or through formal software training programs.
View complete answer

Does graphic design require math?

Graphic Design Graphic design focuses on creating art for a purpose such as an advertisement or company logo. For this major you’ll take lots of graphic design classes. But you’ll also need to take classes in the arts, science, math, and social sciences to earn your bachelor’s degree.

Drawing Drawing for Design Visual Communication Photography Elements of Type Typographic Systems Design Understanding Designer as Author Design Social Interaction Publication and Editorial Design for Change Portfolio History of Design Film Media

General Curriculum Requirements:

Arts Courses: Art, History, Languages, Literature, Music Math Courses: Algebra, Calculus, Computer Science, Logic, Statistics Natural Sciences Courses: Astronomy, Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science, Physics Social Sciences Courses: Anthropology, Economics, Government, Psychology, Sociology

Design Major Sydney S. “I am a freshman in college currently, and I am majoring in design. I chose design because I’ve always known that that was something that I wanted to do. I wasn’t really sure exactly where I stood as a designer if I wanted to do interior design or set design or costume design. I just knew that design was where I needed to be.” Visit Sydney’s Page Cookies help us provide, protect and improve our products and services. By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies. View our Privacy policy, I Agree
View complete answer

What is the best degree for graphic design?

A. To study Graphic Design at the professional level, students can seek certification, diploma, or degree in Graphic Design. BDes Graphic Design and MDes Graphic Design are the best Graphic Design courses at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels.
View complete answer

What will I study in graphic design?

Your Curriculum: What to Expect – Depending on what area of graphic design you wish to pursue, your curriculum may include website visual design, studio art, computerized design, motion graphics, printing techniques, commercial graphics production, typography, and other similar coursework that falls under a fine art or graphic design program.

Other courses may revolve around design principles, including design theory and learning the design process. Additionally, a liberal arts education will also include courses such as art history, sociology, psychology, writing, foreign languages/cultural studies, marketing, and business, among others.

Such coursework enables aspiring graphic designers to become more well-rounded and better prepared for their industry, which typically requires a great deal of communication and collaborative efforts.
View complete answer

Is graphic designing hard?

Is Graphic Design Hard to Learn? – Learning graphic design is not hard, but it does require creative thinking, an aptitude towards art and design, and time and dedication. Graphic design requires learning the necessary tools, as well as understanding and applying the principles and theories of design.
View complete answer

Can anyone become a graphic designer?

What Does a Graphic Designer Do? – We’ll start off your journey to becoming a graphic designer with a little about who and what are graphic designers. First off, who. You may have a picture in your head of who a graphic designer is and what they look like.

Though, forget the stereotypes and the clichés, a graphic designer can be anyone and anyone can be a graphic designer. The design industry is full of people from all walks of life. Okay, that’s all good. But what is a graphic designer? That’s what you really need to know to become one. We define graphic design as effective visual communication of an idea or concept.

This means that, first and foremost, graphic designers are visual communicators. In other words, in order to become a graphic designer you should be able to take information and turn it into something visual or graphic. To break this down further, the information usually comes in the form of a brief from a client and the something visual or graphic can be many things—we’ll break some of these down further now.
View complete answer

Is being a graphic designer in high demand?

This skill is in ‘giant’ demand—and can pay up to $145 an hour as a side hustle As far as creative skills go, graphic design is in high demand. Work marketplace Upwork for the most in 2023, taking into account freelancer earnings and number of projects worked, among other metrics.

Topping the list of skills was graphic design. Good design is “so important for businesses who want to have a consistent and cohesive product and connect with their customers,” says Margaret Lilani, vice president of talent solutions at Upwork. “Businesses are understanding this more and more and therefore they’re looking for additional help and support from designers and creatives at a higher rate.” Here’s what graphic design entails and how much freelancers and stand to make.

Businesses hire graphic designers to create the look and feel of a website, a brochure, an app and so on. Designers use tools like Adobe Illustrator, Sketch and Canva. “It is the art and practice of planning and projecting ideas and experiences with visual and textual context,” says Lilani.

It’s taking those ideas and translating them into something visual that can be consumed by the user or the buyer.” Many graphic designers have a bachelor’s degree in the field but if you’re keen to dive in, you won’t necessarily need one. There are various courses you can take online through universities and sites like Udemy and LinkedIn to learn the skills needed to dive in.

These can be tailored to specific needs, like user experience design, or more general courses which cover the basics of design software. Many employers simply look for proof of experience like internships or other projects to consider you. Once you’ve gained some know-how and training, include your graphic design skills on sites like LinkedIn so employers can find you.

  • You can also create profiles on sites like and Upwork and look for one-off projects on job list sites like,
  • Depending on the platform through which you find the job, samples of your work might be included in your profile.
  • Otherwise, look for ways to create an online portfolio to show potential employers.

Side hustle expert also recommends checking out sites like and for other freelance opportunities. She describes the demand for graphic designers as “giant.” In terms of pay, rates will likely differ depending on your level of skill and the project. The median hourly wage for a graphic designer is about $24, according to the,

Check out: Sign up now:

What Education Is Required To Be A Graphic Designer : This skill is in ‘giant’ demand—and can pay up to $145 an hour as a side hustle
View complete answer

What’s the difference between digital arts and graphic design?

What’s The Difference Between Digital Art and Graphic Design? – Digital art is a form of art that involves the use of digital tools to produce images and videos. Meanwhile, graphic design is a profession that combines artwork, text, and typography for use in advertising, web design, and other forms of communication. A digital artist can create any type of artwork they want and be called a digital artist as long as they use digital tools. They can take as long as they like to produce an artwork and may choose to sell or exhibit it. However, a graphic designer does not have the same freedoms when creating work for a client.
View complete answer

You might be interested:  How To Get Into Barber School?

Is graphic design a stressful job?

Is graphic design stressful? – The answer to whether graphic design is stressful is ultimately subjective and will depend a lot on both your personality and the people you work with. “Graphic design is no more stressful than any other field,” says graphic designer Ryan Mungia.

Keeping up with deadlinesNavigating conflicting creative opinionsProducing creative work on demand

As with any job, there will be busy times and tight schedules, highs and lows. Getting a sense of what a typical day involves will help you decide if the field is right for you. Freelance graphic designers and in-house graphic designers alike must handle constant deadlines, client expectations, rush jobs and varying levels of creative energy.
View complete answer

Do graphic designers make a lot of money?

Graphic designers can also earn high salaries because of the specialized nature of their work and because the demand for graphic designers is high. Especially in the age of technology, more content means more opportunities to design the visual aspects of that content, hence the growing need for graphic designers.
View complete answer

What are the levels of graphic design?

Different graphic design career paths – The typical graphic design career path begins as a junior graphic designer at a creative agency or an in-house design team at a big company. From there you might seek to progress through to midweight designer, followed by senior designer, art director, creative director and beyond.

  • Alternatively, there’s the freelance route.
  • Many graphic designers go freelance once they’ve got a few years’ job experience.
  • But there’s no rule saying you have to go straight into a job, and if you’re attracted by the freedom offered by freelancing (and ideally have some funds to get you through the first few months), it could be worth considering straight after graduation.

Whether you’re a freelance or salaried designer, you may find that the graphic design career path leads you to an area of specialization. If there’s something you have a real passion for, that’s a smart move, as good people with specialized skills will always be in demand, whether you become a book cover designer, packaging designer, digital designer, UI designer, web designer, web developer, motion designer, animator, 3D designer, game designer, mural artist, sign painter, email marketing designer, VR designer, product designer.

  • Or anything else that floats your boat.
  • Another industry that’s open to you is marketing and advertising.
  • Being experienced in graphic design means you’re able to brief creatives on all aspects of communications, from brochure copy to web design, and so you’re in a great place to apply for jobs such as digital marketing manager.

Teaching is another graphic design career path that’s open to experienced designers. If you have a passion for design, what better way to share it than by inspiring the next generation of graphic designers? Jobs in teaching graphic design can be found at general schools and colleges, as well as specialist education and training facilities.

Ultimately, of course, many graphic designers decide they want to work for themselves, rather than make money for someone else. So you may eventually wish to found your own agency or other design-related company. With some of the world’s biggest companies being partly or entirely design-driven, the sky really is the limit! Or—you might find yourself on a career path you never expected! Here we share 15 of the most unexpected occupations of graphic designers to help inspire your creative career, as told by our graduates and teachers.

Fashion Designer As you’ll know, creatives are seldom interested in just one area of design. Fashion, for example, is an extension of many other forms of visual expression, and so it makes sense that some graphic design career paths lead to garment and accessory design.

  1. Shillington New York graduate, Greg Bemis, took his illustration talents to Nike’s headquarters in Oregon where he excelled in the Basketball Footwear department.
  2. I think it is a career that allows you to wear different hats and do a multitude of different things.” Marketing Manager Having a background in graphic design will particularly help with roles that involve briefing creatives, such as marketing, for example.

This is a career path that not many people think of at first, but it’s a great fit. Marketing Managers are expected to oversee all aspects of the mix, from brochure and website design to written communications. Shillington Sydney graduate Alexander Wu-Kim applied his skill-set to a role as Digital Marketing Manager at fashion label, Local Supply.

Teacher / Lecturer At Shillington, a high number of our graduates go on to become lecturers, with some returning to the places they studied to help nurture the graphic design careers of budding professionals. Laura Weldon from Shillington Manchester, explains the appeal: “I teach because I am as passionate about design today as I was first starting out.

I love seeing that passion and interest for design in the students. It’s such a great process to be part of—we have students come in that have never used a Mac before, and they graduate with the skills to be a designer. It also keeps me on my toes and gives me a fresh perspective on things as I am surrounded by 22 students that have completely different outlooks.” UX/UI Designer Although the visual element of design is the main reason many people choose to study graphics, some prefer to explore more of the behind-the-scenes ‘process’ when entering the industry.

  1. UX and UI provide fantastic graphic design careers to the technically skilled, utilising designers’ abilities to help users to easily interact with a product.
  2. Shillington Melbourne graduate, Lori Beth Kaye, has done just this working at The Iconic.
  3. Wedding Invitation Designer Weddings are now big business, with the average bride and groom spending £33K on their special day.

With the industry booming, roles for the creatively gifted are plentiful, with couples requiring all manner of stationery, from save the dates to table plans. This is a graphic design career path that has enticed many Shillington graduates, including Emily Kerr, who has a few words of advice for designers entering the field: “My main learning from doing invites is that its key to involve mother of the bride from the start.

So many times friends have been charmed by quirky personalised first drafts. However, later down the line, the family get to see and suddenly things have to become more traditional! I love that my days are never the same; every day poses a new question or problem that I have to solve through design.” Letterpress Printer Cemented in the heritage of graphic design, letterpress printing is likely to be on the list of dream careers for many.

However, being a highly skilled practice, it takes years of work to develop the trade. Shillington graduate Eleanor Rogers worked as an administrative assistant in corporate finance before deciding to kickstart her graphic design career. After graduation, she landed an amazing opportunity at Chapel Press, a specialist letterpress print studio in Melbourne, and has enjoyed her unique role since.3D Illustrator Rather than opt for a career that fully encompasses traditional skills, 3D illustration can be a happy medium between this and focusing on contemporary computer processes.

At Shillington, we host a ‘handmade day’ to encourage more exploration into this field. One of our recent guest lecturers, Kyle Bean, who’s worked for clients including Google, Emirates, Kinfolk and Wallpaper, offers advice to those considering a career in 3D illustration: “Having good making skills is only half of what is really necessary when it comes to this kind of work.

You also need to be good at communicating your ideas and carefully planning your projects.” Book Cover Designer Ebooks may now be a popular choice for readers, but printed pages are still very much in demand by book lovers the world over. As such, there is high demand for enticing covers that will draw in potential readers – great news for creatives.

Holly Ovenden is a stellar example of an inspiring designer that specialises in book covers. She is currently working in-house at Bloomsbury Publishing in London, after graduating from Shillington. Similarly, guest lecturer David Pearson has created critically-acclaimed artwork for a variety of clients including Penguin and guest lecturer Hazel Lam won Emerging Designer of the Year at the 2018 Australian Book Design Awards.

Sign Painter Again drawing on the more traditional elements of design practice, sign painting and hand lettering is still a highly coveted skill, especially in the hospitality industry. Restaurants hoping to stand out in a crowded market may call upon designers to help create unique signage.

  • Shillington guest lecturer Josh Harris, aka The A Board Dude, has dedicated his graphic design career to the art.
  • I kinda stumbled into it purely by chance while I was working at The Breakfast Club in Angel, London.
  • I noticed their sandwich board design was looking pretty flaccid and decorated with outdated trivia.
You might be interested:  How To Get Financial Aid For Cosmetology School?

So, I scribbled on it. And another board. The big boss man, Jon took a liking to it, informed my manager at the time and she offered me a new role painting the boards at their four locations around the city every week! The rest is history.” Surface Pattern Designer Designers and artists tend to work across many different mediums, using a variation of materials along the way.

  • Fabric provides an interesting canvas for designers to work on, enabling them to apply their art to a number of end products.
  • Shillington Melbourne teacher Spenceroni decided that surface pattern design was the route for him, after originally studying science and then graphic design.
  • He’s since gone on to win awards with his bright and engaging visual style.

Shillington New York graduate Courtney Capone also specialises in surface design and illustration – check out her inspiring work and her pattern tutorial, Game Designer For fans of 8-bit, Oculus Rift and everything in between, gaming design might seem a tempting challenge to apply your skills.

  • With the industry growing incredibly fast, this is a graphic design career path that will be viable for a long time.
  • Winner of the Shillumni competition Vanille Cuvelier, caught our attention when she designed a mobile game called Shillorun, with no previous game design experience.
  • On developing her new skill-set, she said: “Creating a game is really straightforward once you get the hang of how rules, behaviours and attributes work.” If you’re looking to make the segue into this creative offshoot, Vanille recommends GameSalad as a starting point.

Packaging Designer Brands are constantly on the lookout for new and creative ways to market their products, and as such require designers to help produce engaging artwork for their packaging. From drinks companies to confectionary and toiletries, there’s a whole host of career opportunities for savvy designers and illustrators to be part of this lucrative industry.

Shillington graduate Roo Cassels works for UK branding and packaging agency, Big Fish. He secured a job after working in advertising. “Every day’s different so sometimes I may be cutting and sticking, making mock-ups, designing on the computer, on a photo shoot or at a meeting with clients—it’s definitely an upgrade from my old job.” Web Designer In addition to UX and UI, truly memorable websites require strong design aesthetics, which is what graphic design is used for and where graphic designers can make their mark.

Shillington graduate and the former Head of Digital, John Fry, knows more than a thing or two about the world of web design. Running Sixheads, alongside co-founder Bec Brown, John uses his 15 years of design and development experience to assist his clients in achieving websites that both look and work beautifully.

  • I still sketch ideas out to explain to clients what I intend to do—that is a really important stage of the process.
  • Email Marketing Designer With brands now having the opportunity to reach a mass audience through social media, email marketing is arguably now more important than ever before.
  • Curated lists ensure that companies can talk directly to potential customers, through controlled and customised messaging.

In order to ensure the brand’s identity is conveyed across all forms of communication, many design agencies and creative freelancers are finding their niche in specifically designing for email platforms. For designers with a penchant for digital, this could be a sidestep into the graphic design career of your dreams and certainly answers the question, what is design used for! Muralist In cities all around the world, street art is becoming increasingly celebrated for its unique visual appeal, which can instantly transform the ambience of a street or entire area.
View complete answer

How to become a digital designer?

The qualifications for most digital designer jobs are a bachelor’s degree in graphic design, digital design, or digital art. However, you could qualify for an entry-level position with an associate’s degree and relevant experience, and as a freelance designer, you need nothing but a robust portfolio.
View complete answer

Can I be a graphic designer if I can’t draw?

What is graphic design? – A Graphic designer’s job is to create engaging compositions to either sell a product, service or promote a message. Graphic Designers do not need to draw but instead need to create appealing designs using assets such as images, typography, illustrations. What Education Is Required To Be A Graphic Designer
View complete answer

Can I become a graphic designer in 3 months?

It is possible to become an amateur Graphic Designer who is well on the road to becoming a professional Graphic Designer in about three months. In short, three months is what it will take to receive the professional training required to start building a set of competitive professional job materials.
View complete answer

Can I learn graphic design on my own?

What Education Is Required To Be A Graphic Designer Do you really need a degree to be successful today? It’s easy to wonder when prominent figures like Bill Gates, Steve Jobs and Mark Zuckerberg have become wildly successful despite dropping out of school—even if you know they’re the exception to the rule.

If you have hopes of becoming a lawyer or a surgeon, bypassing a formal education isn’t really an option. But if you dream of being a designer, you’ll inevitably ask the question sooner or later: Is a graphic design degree necessary? The honest answer is no—it’s not absolutely necessary. There are certainly exceptional self-taught graphic designers who have launched careers without a formal education.

While it’s true that it can be done, that doesn’t mean it’s the best route for you. There are several overlooked advantages of a formal education that you should consider before trying to stake out on your own. We spoke with a handful of graphic designers with degrees who insist their formal education has played an instrumental role in their careers.
View complete answer

What is the career path of a graphic designer?

Different graphic design career paths – The typical graphic design career path begins as a junior graphic designer at a creative agency or an in-house design team at a big company. From there you might seek to progress through to midweight designer, followed by senior designer, art director, creative director and beyond.

  • Alternatively, there’s the freelance route.
  • Many graphic designers go freelance once they’ve got a few years’ job experience.
  • But there’s no rule saying you have to go straight into a job, and if you’re attracted by the freedom offered by freelancing (and ideally have some funds to get you through the first few months), it could be worth considering straight after graduation.

Whether you’re a freelance or salaried designer, you may find that the graphic design career path leads you to an area of specialization. If there’s something you have a real passion for, that’s a smart move, as good people with specialized skills will always be in demand, whether you become a book cover designer, packaging designer, digital designer, UI designer, web designer, web developer, motion designer, animator, 3D designer, game designer, mural artist, sign painter, email marketing designer, VR designer, product designer.

  • Or anything else that floats your boat.
  • Another industry that’s open to you is marketing and advertising.
  • Being experienced in graphic design means you’re able to brief creatives on all aspects of communications, from brochure copy to web design, and so you’re in a great place to apply for jobs such as digital marketing manager.

Teaching is another graphic design career path that’s open to experienced designers. If you have a passion for design, what better way to share it than by inspiring the next generation of graphic designers? Jobs in teaching graphic design can be found at general schools and colleges, as well as specialist education and training facilities.

Ultimately, of course, many graphic designers decide they want to work for themselves, rather than make money for someone else. So you may eventually wish to found your own agency or other design-related company. With some of the world’s biggest companies being partly or entirely design-driven, the sky really is the limit! Or—you might find yourself on a career path you never expected! Here we share 15 of the most unexpected occupations of graphic designers to help inspire your creative career, as told by our graduates and teachers.

Fashion Designer As you’ll know, creatives are seldom interested in just one area of design. Fashion, for example, is an extension of many other forms of visual expression, and so it makes sense that some graphic design career paths lead to garment and accessory design.

  1. Shillington New York graduate, Greg Bemis, took his illustration talents to Nike’s headquarters in Oregon where he excelled in the Basketball Footwear department.
  2. I think it is a career that allows you to wear different hats and do a multitude of different things.” Marketing Manager Having a background in graphic design will particularly help with roles that involve briefing creatives, such as marketing, for example.
You might be interested:  Why Is America So Far Behind In Education?

This is a career path that not many people think of at first, but it’s a great fit. Marketing Managers are expected to oversee all aspects of the mix, from brochure and website design to written communications. Shillington Sydney graduate Alexander Wu-Kim applied his skill-set to a role as Digital Marketing Manager at fashion label, Local Supply.

Teacher / Lecturer At Shillington, a high number of our graduates go on to become lecturers, with some returning to the places they studied to help nurture the graphic design careers of budding professionals. Laura Weldon from Shillington Manchester, explains the appeal: “I teach because I am as passionate about design today as I was first starting out.

I love seeing that passion and interest for design in the students. It’s such a great process to be part of—we have students come in that have never used a Mac before, and they graduate with the skills to be a designer. It also keeps me on my toes and gives me a fresh perspective on things as I am surrounded by 22 students that have completely different outlooks.” UX/UI Designer Although the visual element of design is the main reason many people choose to study graphics, some prefer to explore more of the behind-the-scenes ‘process’ when entering the industry.

UX and UI provide fantastic graphic design careers to the technically skilled, utilising designers’ abilities to help users to easily interact with a product. Shillington Melbourne graduate, Lori Beth Kaye, has done just this working at The Iconic. Wedding Invitation Designer Weddings are now big business, with the average bride and groom spending £33K on their special day.

With the industry booming, roles for the creatively gifted are plentiful, with couples requiring all manner of stationery, from save the dates to table plans. This is a graphic design career path that has enticed many Shillington graduates, including Emily Kerr, who has a few words of advice for designers entering the field: “My main learning from doing invites is that its key to involve mother of the bride from the start.

So many times friends have been charmed by quirky personalised first drafts. However, later down the line, the family get to see and suddenly things have to become more traditional! I love that my days are never the same; every day poses a new question or problem that I have to solve through design.” Letterpress Printer Cemented in the heritage of graphic design, letterpress printing is likely to be on the list of dream careers for many.

However, being a highly skilled practice, it takes years of work to develop the trade. Shillington graduate Eleanor Rogers worked as an administrative assistant in corporate finance before deciding to kickstart her graphic design career. After graduation, she landed an amazing opportunity at Chapel Press, a specialist letterpress print studio in Melbourne, and has enjoyed her unique role since.3D Illustrator Rather than opt for a career that fully encompasses traditional skills, 3D illustration can be a happy medium between this and focusing on contemporary computer processes.

At Shillington, we host a ‘handmade day’ to encourage more exploration into this field. One of our recent guest lecturers, Kyle Bean, who’s worked for clients including Google, Emirates, Kinfolk and Wallpaper, offers advice to those considering a career in 3D illustration: “Having good making skills is only half of what is really necessary when it comes to this kind of work.

You also need to be good at communicating your ideas and carefully planning your projects.” Book Cover Designer Ebooks may now be a popular choice for readers, but printed pages are still very much in demand by book lovers the world over. As such, there is high demand for enticing covers that will draw in potential readers – great news for creatives.

  • Holly Ovenden is a stellar example of an inspiring designer that specialises in book covers.
  • She is currently working in-house at Bloomsbury Publishing in London, after graduating from Shillington.
  • Similarly, guest lecturer David Pearson has created critically-acclaimed artwork for a variety of clients including Penguin and guest lecturer Hazel Lam won Emerging Designer of the Year at the 2018 Australian Book Design Awards.

Sign Painter Again drawing on the more traditional elements of design practice, sign painting and hand lettering is still a highly coveted skill, especially in the hospitality industry. Restaurants hoping to stand out in a crowded market may call upon designers to help create unique signage.

Shillington guest lecturer Josh Harris, aka The A Board Dude, has dedicated his graphic design career to the art. “I kinda stumbled into it purely by chance while I was working at The Breakfast Club in Angel, London. I noticed their sandwich board design was looking pretty flaccid and decorated with outdated trivia.

So, I scribbled on it. And another board. The big boss man, Jon took a liking to it, informed my manager at the time and she offered me a new role painting the boards at their four locations around the city every week! The rest is history.” Surface Pattern Designer Designers and artists tend to work across many different mediums, using a variation of materials along the way.

Fabric provides an interesting canvas for designers to work on, enabling them to apply their art to a number of end products. Shillington Melbourne teacher Spenceroni decided that surface pattern design was the route for him, after originally studying science and then graphic design. He’s since gone on to win awards with his bright and engaging visual style.

Shillington New York graduate Courtney Capone also specialises in surface design and illustration – check out her inspiring work and her pattern tutorial, Game Designer For fans of 8-bit, Oculus Rift and everything in between, gaming design might seem a tempting challenge to apply your skills.

  1. With the industry growing incredibly fast, this is a graphic design career path that will be viable for a long time.
  2. Winner of the Shillumni competition Vanille Cuvelier, caught our attention when she designed a mobile game called Shillorun, with no previous game design experience.
  3. On developing her new skill-set, she said: “Creating a game is really straightforward once you get the hang of how rules, behaviours and attributes work.” If you’re looking to make the segue into this creative offshoot, Vanille recommends GameSalad as a starting point.

Packaging Designer Brands are constantly on the lookout for new and creative ways to market their products, and as such require designers to help produce engaging artwork for their packaging. From drinks companies to confectionary and toiletries, there’s a whole host of career opportunities for savvy designers and illustrators to be part of this lucrative industry.

  • Shillington graduate Roo Cassels works for UK branding and packaging agency, Big Fish.
  • He secured a job after working in advertising.
  • Every day’s different so sometimes I may be cutting and sticking, making mock-ups, designing on the computer, on a photo shoot or at a meeting with clients—it’s definitely an upgrade from my old job.” Web Designer In addition to UX and UI, truly memorable websites require strong design aesthetics, which is what graphic design is used for and where graphic designers can make their mark.

Shillington graduate and the former Head of Digital, John Fry, knows more than a thing or two about the world of web design. Running Sixheads, alongside co-founder Bec Brown, John uses his 15 years of design and development experience to assist his clients in achieving websites that both look and work beautifully.

  • I still sketch ideas out to explain to clients what I intend to do—that is a really important stage of the process.
  • Email Marketing Designer With brands now having the opportunity to reach a mass audience through social media, email marketing is arguably now more important than ever before.
  • Curated lists ensure that companies can talk directly to potential customers, through controlled and customised messaging.

In order to ensure the brand’s identity is conveyed across all forms of communication, many design agencies and creative freelancers are finding their niche in specifically designing for email platforms. For designers with a penchant for digital, this could be a sidestep into the graphic design career of your dreams and certainly answers the question, what is design used for! Muralist In cities all around the world, street art is becoming increasingly celebrated for its unique visual appeal, which can instantly transform the ambience of a street or entire area.
View complete answer