What Education Is Needed To Become A Probation Officer?

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What Education Is Needed To Become A Probation Officer
Probation Officer Requirements and Helpful Characteristics – As you find answers to your “how to become a probation officer” question, you’ll find that specific job qualifications and descriptions vary based on position type and location. However, in general, probation officer requirements typically have a few things in common.

You should have a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice, social work, or a related field.You will have to pass a competency exam.You must hold a valid driver’s license.While there is no formal age requirement, typically, officers are at least 21 years old.You must pass a criminal background check.You must pass a pre-employment drug test.

In addition to coursework in a bachelor’s degree program, as you train to be a probation officer, you might also consider an internship. For example, as a student at National University, you could take part in practical learning experiences at a courthouse, correctional facility, law enforcement agency, social service organization, or related location. What Education Is Needed To Become A Probation Officer
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What level of education do most probation officers have at least?

Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) – The Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) program produces employment and wage estimates annually for over 800 occupations. These estimates are available for the nation as a whole, for individual states, and for metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas.

Probation officers and correctional treatment specialists

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What do you need to become a probation officer in NYC?

TRAINING –

Probation Officer Qualifications and Training Probation Training in New York State Fundamentals of Community Corrections (FCC) Training for ATIs Specialized Training

The importance of comprehensive and current training for community corrections practitioners cannot be overemphasized. NYS Division of Criminal Justice Services, Office of Probation and Correctional Alternatives (OPCA) educates and trains probation officers and other community corrections professionals in line with the best interests of public safety and the reduction of crime.

The OPCA provides virtual and live training to all levels of community corrections practitioners within our funding umbrella. OPCA works with members of a Statewide Training Committee, made up of probation professionals from across New York State, in the development, design and delivery of training curricula and the promotion of evidence based practices.

OPCA also provides ongoing leadership and standards for required training of probation practitioners provided in regional locations. Probation Officer Qualifications and Training Qualifications for Probation Officers – The qualifications and training requirements for probation positions are regulated by the NYS Office of Probation and Correctional Alternatives.

  • Probation Officer exams are given periodically.
  • For testing and employment opportunities contact the appropriate county department of civil service.
  • Probation Officer positions are open-competitive civil-service positions in New York State.
  • Each candidate must meet the minimum requirements of a graduate degree in many of the social sciences, or a bachelor’s degree plus two years experience in counseling or casework.

Promotional opportunities are regulated by Civil Service and OPCA Rule as well. Probation Training in New York State The qualifications and training requirements for probation positions are regulated by the NYS Division of Criminal Justice Services, Office of Probation and Correctional Alternatives (OPCA).

In collaboration with counties, OPCA provides a variety of professional development opportunities for new and experienced probation officers. Within the first six months of employment, probation officers are required to complete a two week classroom program: the Fundamentals of Probation Practice (FPP),

In New York State, all probation officers are peace officers, Peace officer training requires a complete week of basic peace officer training. Probation Officers must each obtain 21 hours of approved continuing education annually after the first 12 months of employment.

  • Fundamentals of Community Corrections (FCC) Training for ATIs The Division of Criminal Justice Services, Office of Probation and Correctional Alternatives provides a complete training curriculum designed especially for community correction’s professionals.
  • This 28 hour training is the first of its kind and was developed through the efforts of a statewide workgroup comprised of the Office of Probation and Correctional Alternatives (OPCA) staff and Alternative to Incarceration (ATI) program professionals.

The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) also provided technical assistance to New York State in the development of this program. This training captures the most innovative approaches and best practices in the field today. It incorporates evidence-based practices and will teach participants the skills required to assist offenders in changing their behaviors and in leading law-abiding lives.
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How much money does a probation officer make in California?

Avg Salary Probation officers earn an average yearly salary of $99,090.
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What is the top salary for a probation officer?

FAQS The average salary for a probation officer in California is $70,000 per year. Probation officer salaries in California can vary between $37,500 to $112,500 and depend on various factors, including skills, experience, employer, bonuses, tips, and more. Was this helpful? This data is exclusive to Mint Salary and is based on 481 tax returns from TurboTax customers who reported their occupation as probation officer. Was this helpful? The following companies offer the highest salaries for probation officers in California: County of Santa Clara ($112,000 a year), County of Sonoma ($89,500 a year), and Los Angeles County ($86,000 a year). Was this helpful? The following cities offer the highest salaries for probation officers in California: Santa Rosa, CA ($85,000 a year), Sacramento, CA ($75,500 a year), and San Diego, CA ($75,000 a year). Was this helpful?
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What level of Education do most probation officers have?

Probation Officer Education – To become a probation officer, you’ll need a 4-year bachelor’s degree in criminal justice, social work, psychology, or a related area. Many parole and probation officers have a master’s degree in criminal justice, In addition to their training, federal officers must also have at least two years of work experience.
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Do you need a degree to be a probation officer in Texas?

Minimum Standards –

Must be a U.S. citizen or an immigrant with lawful status, who is authorized to work in the U.S. Must be at least 18 years old Bachelor’s degree conferred by an institution of higher education accredited by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). Major course work in Criminal Justice, Counseling, Social Work, Psychology, or Sociology preferred. View information about foreign education credentials, Must possess a valid state driver’s license. Must have or be able to obtain a certificate of course completion for the Texas Law Enforcement Telecommunications System (TLETS) policy and procedures training from the Texas Department of Public Safety within six months of employment date. Must meet and maintain TLETS access eligibility for continued employment in position. For details see:,/hr-home/tletseligibility.html Must not have been convicted of any offense involving domestic violence. View additional information, Must not be on active duty in the military (okay if on terminal leave) Must not have been discharged from the Armed Forces under dishonorable conditions. Must not be on probation for any criminal offense. View additional information,

Must not have pending charges for any criminal offense or have an outstanding warrant Must be able to perform the essential functions of a Parole Officer, with or without reasonable accommodations Must pass the TDCJ pre-employment drug test Males ages 18 through 25, must be registered with the Selective Services if required to do so by Federal Law. If you are not registered, you may register by clicking the following link: https://www.sss.gov/RegVer/wfRegistration.aspx

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How long is US probation officer training?

Main content Published on March 30, 2017 For its graduates, the Federal Probation and Pretrial Academy in Charleston, S.C., is often a life-changing experience. In this video, students and instructors discuss and also demonstrate the intensive new officer training that takes place at the academy, which covers everything from establishing meaningful relationships with defendants and offenders to responding to dangerous encounters.

Video of The Federal Probation and Pretrial Academy: Making a Well-Rounded Officer Over the course of six weeks, student officers engage in both classroom learning and real-life simulations. Perhaps most importantly, they gain confidence in their skills and build relationships that will last their entire careers.

“It also allows us to form a culture so that we and the new officers here can help shape what we stand for, not only now but what we’re going stand for moving forward,” said Matthew Rowland, chief of the U.S. Probation and Pretrial Services Office, part of the Administrative Office of the U.S.

  1. Courts. “And I think that’s only possible because you have a common experience, and the academy offers that common experience.” Approximately 400 new officers graduate from the academy each year and another 800 graduate from one of the Academy’s advanced programs.
  2. Use of the state-of-the-art training facility is made possible through a partnership between the Administrative Office of the US Courts and the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center.
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Related Topics: Probation and Pretrial Services
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Are probation officers armed in the US?

How to Become a Probation Officer Probation officers are tasked with monitoring and keeping tabs on paroled criminals. And while the vast majority of criminals tend to prefer to avoid confrontation with their probation officer, sometimes criminals will verbally or even physically attack a PO, while seeing them as a representation of a system they feel is against them.

  • This leads to a logical question: do probation officers carry guns? The answer, as with so many of these kinds of questions, is that it depends on multiple factors.
  • The American Probation and Parole Association issued a statement in 1994 in which it neither affirmed nor denied its support for the arming of probation officers in the United States.

The organization did say, however, that it believed that in cases where probation officers are armed, such arming should have the safety of the officer as its focus, and should only be done when needed. This statement belies the reality of arming probation officers in the country: some jurisdictions and municipalities have decided that it is warranted, while others have decided that it is not.

In early April 2014 Luzerne County, Pennsylvania announced that its probation officers would begin to carry guns on the job as a matter of protection. The decision resulted in a heated debate among those for and against the new policy, with many people claiming that the carrying of guns by the county’s probation officers would send the wrong message.

Proponents of the change insist that the officers’ lives are at risk when dealing with hardened criminals, and that they should be able to protect themselves. They say that criminals are often armed, and that the officers are at a distinct disadvantage if they are forced to always conduct their jobs unarmed.
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Do probation officers carry guns in NYC?

Firearms Survey New York

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Information Updated March 7, 2006 (Probation only)

Juvenile and Adult Probation The Division of Probation and Correctional Alternatives (DPCA), within the Executive Branch of state government, is the regulatory and standard-setting agency. It issues rules and procedures for the delivery of adult and juvenile probation services, as well as numerous other alternatives programs.

  • The DPCA monitors services and reimburses localities for approved expenditures; provides training (Fundamentals of Probation Practice and Peace Officer) and approves training provided directly by local probation agencies; and provides technical assistance to local probation personnel.
  • County probation departments supervise juveniles and adults on probation.

In New York State all Probation Officers are Peace Officers and are entitled to carry weapons. All officers are mandated to undergo initial firearms training. However, it is up to the County Probation Director to determine if officers are to be armed while on duty and if they are able to exercise the power to arrest.

  • There are no private companies providing probation supervision services.
  • Juvenile Parole Juvenile services are organized with state and local agencies.
  • The local agencies administer probation services and the state agency administers aftercare services.
  • The Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS), is a branch of the New York State Department of Family Assistance.

OCFS’s Division of Rehabilitative Services – Bureau of Juvenile Aftercare, oversees aftercare services to adjudicated juveniles leaving OCFS’s placement and employs aftercare counselors to provide community supervision. Aftercare Counselors do not carry a firearm.

  • They typically provide supervision, case management and treatment to OCFS youth.
  • They are not classified as peace officers.
  • They do have the power to revoke release, through a due process hearing.
  • They are empowered to supervise and apprehend youth under placement under the Executive Law.
  • There is an OCFS policy that prohibits juvenile aftercare counselors from carrying a firearm.

At the time of the survey, it was not under consideration to allow these counselors to carry a firearm. There are contracts with a few private agencies that provide juvenile aftercare supervision. These agencies do not carry a firearm. Adult Parole The New York State Division of Parole is in the Executive Department.

  • It is responsible for community protection and the supervision of offenders released from state prisons.
  • Parole officers in New York State are required to carry a firearm.
  • They are classified as peace officers with powers of arrest.
  • New York’s firearm policy was instituted in 1930.
  • Upon completion of testing, careful background investigations, interview and selection of parole officer candidates, new parole officers must successfully complete basic recruit training.

The firearms component of recruit training is conducted by state certified Division firearm instructors per state standards set by the New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services. The training includes both classroom and range instruction. Recruits must pass at least two qualifying courses of firearms and demonstrate appropriate firearms handling skills in order to graduate and be issued a firearm by the Division.

Current recruit training provides seven days of firearms training. After the first year, all peace officers participate in a minimum of two firearms training programs annually. One session consists of a standard qualification, which is set higher than the minimum state requirement. The other program consists of realistic tactical firearms training such as low light firing; barricade shooting, moving and shooting.

Additional basic and advanced firearm training is made available to the officers.

Officers are required to carry a 9mm that is provided by the state. There are no private companies providing adult parole supervision. For updates or corrections to the information on this page, please contact:

: Firearms Survey New York
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What is the salary requirement for a probation officer in NYC?

How much does a Probation Officer make in New York, NY? The average Probation Officer salary in New York, NY is $55,479 as of February 27, 2023, but the salary range typically falls between $49,370 and $63,248.
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How old do you have to be to be a probation officer in NYC?

In accordance with section 257 of the Executive Law, you must have reached your 21st birthday by the time ofappointment. There is no minimum age to file for this examination.
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What is probation salary in Texas?

As of Apr 17, 2023, the average annual pay for a Probation Officer in Texas is $34,686 a year. Just in case you need a simple salary calculator, that works out to be approximately $16.68 an hour. This is the equivalent of $667/week or $2,890/month.
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What is the highest level of probation?

What are the five types of probation? – The term probation is often used as a general term to describe individuals placed on one of the five main types of probation due to a crime they have been accused and sentenced of committing. However, it is important to distinguish between five different types of probation:

Informal probation : Informal probation, otherwise known as unsupervised probation, is a common type of probation that is mainly and commonly assigned to low-risk offenders.

It involves an individual paying their fines and creating an agreement with the court about not committing additional crimes during their probation period. Unsupervised probation period usually lasts for twelve to eighteen months.

Formal probation : Formal probation is also known as supervised probation. It is a more stringent form of probation and it involves the offender having to report to their probation officer on a regular basis prescribed by the court.

Formal probation often has strict requirements, and failure to meet them will result in immediate incarceration. There requirements include:

    1. Attending counselling
    2. Submitting to alcohol or drug checks
    3. Making restitution payments to victims
    4. Maintaining gainful employment
  • Community control : This is the strictest type of probation. Many individuals perceive community control as a jail sentence, but without actually going to jail. This probation involves the use of ankle monitors for the entire duration of the probation period.

An ankle monitor allows monitoring of the offender’s location at any given time. What’s more, all other probation requirements als apply, such as paying fines, maintaining employment, and attending counseling.

Shock probation : Shock probation involves an individual being sentenced to the maximum jail or prison sentence that the law allows for the offense in question. Then, after a short period of usually thirty days, the judge will bring the offender back to and place them on a standardized supervised probation.

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The logic behind shocked probation is that brief prison or jail stay will make the offender better comply with the probation regulations.

Crime-specific probation : This type of probation requires an offender to undergo specific probation terms that pertain to the crime they committed. This can include mandatory drug tests and counselling for drug-related offenses, or placement in a public registry for sex offenders.

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How much do juvenile probation officers make in Los Angeles?

How much does a Juvenile Probation Officer make in Los Angeles, California? As of Apr 8, 2023, the average annual pay for a Juvenile Probation Officer in Los Angeles is $37,724 a year. Just in case you need a simple salary calculator, that works out to be approximately $18.14 an hour.
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How much do parole agents make in California?

How much does aParole Officer make in California? The average Parole Officer salary in California is $69,558 as of March 28, 2023, but the range typically falls between $61,792 and $77,335, Salary ranges can vary widely depending on the city and many other important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession.
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What is the most common type of probation?

Supervised Probation : This is the most common form of probation.
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What is the education level of most prisoners?

While only 18% of people outside of prison have not obtained a high school diploma or equivalent, the number of inmates without this level of education is much higher. JUNE 30, 2015 By Christopher Zoukis Prisoners are significantly less educated than the general population of adults.

  1. When looking at the educational level of inmates, it is clear there is a deep need for education.
  2. It’s twice as common for inmates to have only a grade eight education or less, and a high percentage of prisoners don’t have a high school diploma or equivalent or a college education.
  3. Learning disabilities are common and prisoners with an ethnic minor background tend to have lower education levels.

The Educational Level of Inmates It’s easier to understand the educational needs, programs, and challenges of the American prison system once you understand the educational spectrum of the inmates. The most comprehensive and reliable data comes from a Bureau of Justice Statistics special report from January 2003, using data from “representative surveys” conducted mostly in 1997 (Harlow, 2003).

  1. Loss of interest or behavioral or academic problems – more than a third and twice as many as the general population
  2. Family or personal problems – 16% of local jail inmates compared to 19% of general population
  3. Going to work or enlisting in the military – 13% of local jail inmates versus 24% of general population
  4. Going to prison – 11% of local jail inmates

Citation: Harlow, 2003 Those with military service were almost four times more likely to earn their GED or high school diploma, while drug offenders were somewhat less likely (Harlow, 2003). While only 18% of people outside of prison have not obtained a high school diploma or equivalent, the number of inmates without this level of education is much higher:

  • 47% of inmates in county jails
  • 40% of inmates in state jails
  • 27% of inmates in federal prison

Citation: Harlow, 2003 Obtaining a GED Many inmates work toward a General Educational Development (GED) test while in prison. A GED is equivalent to a high school diploma and is the highest level of education some inmates have. Click the infographic above to find out the statistics.

  • 75% of state inmates failed to complete high school versus 47% who earned GED
  • 59% of federal inmates failed to complete high school versus 55% who earned GED
  • 69% of local jail inmates failed to complete high school versus 32% who earned GED*

*This figure may represent the shorter time inmates spent in local jails as well as poorer provision of educational programs. Citation: Harlow, 2003 Learning Disabilities Play an Important Role Learning disabilities are widespread and appear to play a large role when looking at education levels.

  • This is especially true for inmates with a grade eight education (or less).
  • State prisoners are twice as likely as the general adult population to have a grade eight or less education.
  • In the federal system, the failure to exceed grade eight is two-thirds higher than the general population (Harlow, 2003).

In 1994, the Ohio Legislative Office of Educational Oversight estimated that 50 to 80% of the state’s offenders were learning disabled, while the Bureau of Justice Statistics data showed that two-thirds of inmates without a high school diploma or GED had a learning disability (Cogswell, 1994; Harlow, 2003).

  • Post-Secondary Education is Rare As expected, the number of individuals with college degrees is much lower in prisons than on the outside.
  • In state prisons and local jails, the number of individuals with college degrees is only one-eighth of that in the general population.
  • For federal inmates, that rate is almost three times higher than in state and local jails (Harlow, 2003).

Participation in post-secondary college or vocational programs is two to three times higher than actual college graduation, but still lags behind the general adult population (Harlow, 2003). Ethnicity and Gender Play a Role Men and women are fairly equal in education levels up to a high school diploma or GED.

However, women are 27% more likely to have taken some college or other post-secondary education, and 35% more likely to be college graduates (Cogswell, 1994; Harlow, 2003). Inmates from ethnic minority backgrounds tend to have lower academic attainment. For example, 44% of black inmates and 53% of Hispanic inmates do not have a high school diploma or GED, compared to 27% Caucasian inmates.

Few state prisoners with an ethnic minor background hold a college degree. Only 1.6% of black inmates and 1.9% of Hispanic inmates have a degree compared to 3.5% of Caucasian inmates. Citation: Cogswell, 1994 Learn more about the associations between ethnic background and educational opportunities in our policy paper ‘The Importance of Ethnicity in Correctional Education.’ The Path Forward There is a broad educational background of inmates, from poor basic achievement, very often associated with learning disability, to college graduates and even graduate degree holders.

  1. Each inmate brings their own educational needs or aspirations, and presents a challenge to correctional educators.
  2. The most pressing need is from those with no high school diploma or GED, and this is where the most effort is directed.
  3. References: Cogswell, S. (1994).
  4. Education behind bars: Opportunities and obstacles,

Ohio Legislative Office of Educational Oversight. Harlow, C.W. (2003). Education and correctional populations, Bureau of Justice Statistics Special Report, U.S. Department of Justice. NCJ 195670. Kennedy, B. (2014, February 11). ACLU says legal costs punish the poor,

CBS Moneywatch, Retrieved 9/19/2014 from http://www.cbsnews.com/news/is-the-us-creating-a-new-debtors-prison-system/ Tolbert, M. (2009, March). Partnerships between community colleges and prisons: Providing workforce education and training to reduce recidivism,U.S. Department of Education, Office of Vocational and Adult Education, Office of Correctional Education.

Published Jun 16, 2017 by Christopher Zoukis, JD, MBA | Last Updated by Christopher Zoukis, JD, MBA on Oct 24, 2021 at 7:08 pm
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How do I become a probation officer in SC?

Officer Requirements – Applicants for the Probation and Parole Law Enforcement Officer Career Track must hold a bachelor’s degree with at least 15 semester hours in social or behavioral science courses; an associate’s degree and two (2) years of military or law enforcement experience (to include Class1 or Offender Supervision Specialist experience) may be substituted; or a high school diploma and four (4) years of military or law enforcement experience (to include Class 1 or Offender Supervision Specialist experience) may be substituted.

  • Cannot have been convicted of a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence or be subject to a criminal domestic violence restraining order. (Forfeiture of bond, a guilty plea, or a plea of nolo contendere is considered the equivalent of a conviction.)
  • Must complete a Fair Credit Reporting Act Disclosure authorization.
  • Will be fingerprinted for a criminal background check.

Upon a conditional offer of employment, an applicant must undergo a screening for illicit drugs a physical examination, and a psychological screening. To Apply: Applicants interested in applying for any position at SCDPPPS should first complete the State Application online at https://www.governmentjobs.com/careers/sc/SCDPPPS,

  • Applicants interested in applying for the position of Probation and Parole Law Enforcement Officer I, must then take the Department’s test focusing on reading comprehension and vocabulary.
  • On the date of testing, applicants must bring a copy of the state application which includes the Probation and Parole Agent Checklist, certified college transcripts or high school diploma & DD -214 (if applicable), photo ID and Social Security Card to the designated test site.

General Recruitment: The goal of any recruitment process is to generate a pool of qualified applicants. There is no minimum or maximum number of applicants to be included in an applicant pool. However, a competitive pool should reflect racial and gender diversity.

  • Recruitment efforts will include sources or means by which this diversity can be achieved.
  • All qualified applicants will be considered.
  • Employee Benefits: Vehicles All Probation and Parole Agents will be assigned their own law enforcement vehicle to execute department related duties.
  • Insurance State insurance to include health, dental, vision, and/or life insurance and disability.
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Please visit PEBA Insurance Benefits for more information. Retirement All employees are eligible to enroll in the SC State Retirement System. Our law enforcement positions are eligible for the Police Office Retirement Systems (PORS) and our non-law enforcement positions are eligible for either the SC Retirement Systems (SCRS) or the State Optional Retirement Program (ORP).

  • Please visit PEBA Retirement Benefits for more information.
  • Employees can also contribute to a 401(k) or 457(b) plan through the SC Deferred Compensation Program.
  • This voluntary program allows you to save and invest extra money for retirement through before-tax and/or after-tax contributions.
  • Please visit SC Deferred Compensation for more information.

Leave and Holidays All employees in a full-time equivalent position receive 15 days paid annual leave per year and 15 days paid sick leave per year. There are also 13 paid holidays per year. Please visit State Human Resources Division for more information.
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What is the education level of most prisoners?

While only 18% of people outside of prison have not obtained a high school diploma or equivalent, the number of inmates without this level of education is much higher. JUNE 30, 2015 By Christopher Zoukis Prisoners are significantly less educated than the general population of adults.

When looking at the educational level of inmates, it is clear there is a deep need for education. It’s twice as common for inmates to have only a grade eight education or less, and a high percentage of prisoners don’t have a high school diploma or equivalent or a college education. Learning disabilities are common and prisoners with an ethnic minor background tend to have lower education levels.

The Educational Level of Inmates It’s easier to understand the educational needs, programs, and challenges of the American prison system once you understand the educational spectrum of the inmates. The most comprehensive and reliable data comes from a Bureau of Justice Statistics special report from January 2003, using data from “representative surveys” conducted mostly in 1997 (Harlow, 2003).

  1. Loss of interest or behavioral or academic problems – more than a third and twice as many as the general population
  2. Family or personal problems – 16% of local jail inmates compared to 19% of general population
  3. Going to work or enlisting in the military – 13% of local jail inmates versus 24% of general population
  4. Going to prison – 11% of local jail inmates

Citation: Harlow, 2003 Those with military service were almost four times more likely to earn their GED or high school diploma, while drug offenders were somewhat less likely (Harlow, 2003). While only 18% of people outside of prison have not obtained a high school diploma or equivalent, the number of inmates without this level of education is much higher:

  • 47% of inmates in county jails
  • 40% of inmates in state jails
  • 27% of inmates in federal prison

Citation: Harlow, 2003 Obtaining a GED Many inmates work toward a General Educational Development (GED) test while in prison. A GED is equivalent to a high school diploma and is the highest level of education some inmates have. Click the infographic above to find out the statistics.

  • 75% of state inmates failed to complete high school versus 47% who earned GED
  • 59% of federal inmates failed to complete high school versus 55% who earned GED
  • 69% of local jail inmates failed to complete high school versus 32% who earned GED*

*This figure may represent the shorter time inmates spent in local jails as well as poorer provision of educational programs. Citation: Harlow, 2003 Learning Disabilities Play an Important Role Learning disabilities are widespread and appear to play a large role when looking at education levels.

  1. This is especially true for inmates with a grade eight education (or less).
  2. State prisoners are twice as likely as the general adult population to have a grade eight or less education.
  3. In the federal system, the failure to exceed grade eight is two-thirds higher than the general population (Harlow, 2003).

In 1994, the Ohio Legislative Office of Educational Oversight estimated that 50 to 80% of the state’s offenders were learning disabled, while the Bureau of Justice Statistics data showed that two-thirds of inmates without a high school diploma or GED had a learning disability (Cogswell, 1994; Harlow, 2003).

Post-Secondary Education is Rare As expected, the number of individuals with college degrees is much lower in prisons than on the outside. In state prisons and local jails, the number of individuals with college degrees is only one-eighth of that in the general population. For federal inmates, that rate is almost three times higher than in state and local jails (Harlow, 2003).

Participation in post-secondary college or vocational programs is two to three times higher than actual college graduation, but still lags behind the general adult population (Harlow, 2003). Ethnicity and Gender Play a Role Men and women are fairly equal in education levels up to a high school diploma or GED.

  1. However, women are 27% more likely to have taken some college or other post-secondary education, and 35% more likely to be college graduates (Cogswell, 1994; Harlow, 2003).
  2. Inmates from ethnic minority backgrounds tend to have lower academic attainment.
  3. For example, 44% of black inmates and 53% of Hispanic inmates do not have a high school diploma or GED, compared to 27% Caucasian inmates.

Few state prisoners with an ethnic minor background hold a college degree. Only 1.6% of black inmates and 1.9% of Hispanic inmates have a degree compared to 3.5% of Caucasian inmates. Citation: Cogswell, 1994 Learn more about the associations between ethnic background and educational opportunities in our policy paper ‘The Importance of Ethnicity in Correctional Education.’ The Path Forward There is a broad educational background of inmates, from poor basic achievement, very often associated with learning disability, to college graduates and even graduate degree holders.

  • Each inmate brings their own educational needs or aspirations, and presents a challenge to correctional educators.
  • The most pressing need is from those with no high school diploma or GED, and this is where the most effort is directed.
  • References: Cogswell, S. (1994).
  • Education behind bars: Opportunities and obstacles,

Ohio Legislative Office of Educational Oversight. Harlow, C.W. (2003). Education and correctional populations, Bureau of Justice Statistics Special Report, U.S. Department of Justice. NCJ 195670. Kennedy, B. (2014, February 11). ACLU says legal costs punish the poor,

CBS Moneywatch, Retrieved 9/19/2014 from http://www.cbsnews.com/news/is-the-us-creating-a-new-debtors-prison-system/ Tolbert, M. (2009, March). Partnerships between community colleges and prisons: Providing workforce education and training to reduce recidivism,U.S. Department of Education, Office of Vocational and Adult Education, Office of Correctional Education.

Published Jun 16, 2017 by Christopher Zoukis, JD, MBA | Last Updated by Christopher Zoukis, JD, MBA on Oct 24, 2021 at 7:08 pm
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What level of education do most law enforcement agencies require?

Home » Local Law Enforcement » Education What Education Is Needed To Become A Probation Officer The demand for police officers at all levels is expected to increase considerably over the next few decades. The right training and education prepare candidates to pursue careers in law enforcement such as:

Police officer Sheriff’s deputy State trooper Juvenile officer Detective or investigator Game warden or park patrol Narcotics officer Crime scene investigator

Most law enforcement agencies around the country require a high school a high school diploma for entry-level police and patrol careers, but if you want to be competitive, a college degree might give you an edge. “If there are two equal candidates, and one of them has a college degree, that’s the one they’re going to hire,” says Stephen Webb, instructor of criminal justice and a retired Virginia state trooper.

Any kind of college degree will give you the advantage of being exposed to perspectives and experiences that you wouldn’t otherwise encounter, Webb says. Many people who know they want a career as a police officer will enroll in a law enforcement degree or criminal justice program at a college or university.

Both associate and bachelor’s degree programs are available. Compared to the past, it’s becoming more common for local and state police forces to require an associate degree as the minimum education for candidates, Webb explains. To advance to the highest ranks, a bachelor’s, master’s, or doctoral degree may be required.
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What is the lowest level of probation?

Unsupervised, or informal, probation is the least intensive punishment. This is usually given to offenders with the lowest risk of repeating the criminal activity. Unsupervised probation usually involves paying all fines and fees and refraining from any other law violations for the duration of the probation.
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