What Are The University Of Florida’S Five Core Competencies?

0 Comments

What Are The University Of Florida
Division Staff Core Competencies: – The Division of Student Affairs at the University of Florida has adopted the Core Competency Areas developed by the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators ( NASPA ) and the American College Personnel Association ( ACPA ).

This set of Professional Competency Areas is intended to define the broad professional knowledge, skills, and for some competencies, attitudes expected of student affairs professionals working in the U.S., regardless of their area of specialization or positional role within the field. All student affairs professionals should be able to demonstrate their ability to meet the basic list of outcomes under each competency area regardless of how they entered the profession.

These Professional Competency Areas are:

Personal and Ethical Foundations (PEF) Values, Philosophy, and History (VPH) Assessment, Evaluation, and Research (AER) Law, Policy, and Governance (LPG) Organizational and Human Resources (OHR) Leadership (LEAD) Social Justice and Inclusion (SJI) Student Learning and Development (SLD) Technology (TECH) Advising and Supporting (A/S)

More Information can be found in the complete document.
View complete answer

What are the 5 core competencies?

The CASEL 5 – Back to top The CASEL 5 addresses five broad and interrelated areas of competence and highlights examples for each: self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, relationship skills, and responsible decision-making. The CASEL 5 can be taught and applied at various developmental stages from childhood to adulthood and across diverse cultural contexts.

Many school districts, states, and countries have used the CASEL 5 to establish preschool to high school learning standards and competencies that articulate what students should know and be able to do for academic success, school and civic engagement, health and wellness, and fulfilling careers. A developmental perspective to SEL considers how the social and emotional competencies can be expressed and enhanced at different ages from preschool through adulthood.

Students’ social, emotional, and cognitive developmental levels and age-appropriate tasks and challenges should inform the design of SEL standards, instruction, and assessment. Given that, stakeholders should decide how best to prioritize, teach, and assess the growth and development of the CASEL 5 in their local schools and communities.
View complete answer

What are the core competencies in education?

The Core skills Critical thinking and problem solving. Communication and collaboration. Creativity and imagination. Student leadership.
View complete answer

What are the core competencies for afterschool practitioners in Florida?

Afterschool and Youth Development practitioners ensure children and youth’s safety, promote sound health practices, recognize and respond to child abuse and neglect, and provide nutritious meals and snacks. They know and implement a broad array of prevention, preparedness, and health and safety practices.
View complete answer

What are the five 5 competencies for entrepreneurial success?

Entrepreneurship competencies combine creativity, a sense of initiative, problem-solving, the ability to marshal resources, and financial and technological knowledge.
View complete answer

What are the 5 categories that frame the entry to practice competencies?

The 76 entry-level competencies are organized in five categories: 1) professional practice, 2) legal practice, 3) ethical practice, 4) foundations of practice and 5) collaborative practice. The order of the categories and competencies is not an indication of priority or importance.
View complete answer

What are the top 4 competencies?

Spotlight for Career Services Professionals Spotlight for Recruiting Professionals What career readiness competencies do employers value most in their new college hires? Employers responding to NACE’s Job Outlook surveys have consistently indicated that critical thinking/problem solving, teamwork/collaboration, professionalism/work ethic, and oral/written communications are all essential competencies.

The top four competencies have remained consistent the past three years. When rating the eight NACE Career Readiness Competencies by essential need in the Job Outlook 2019 survey, critical thinking/problem solving once again tops the list. (See Figure 1.) Teamwork/collaboration, professionalism/work ethic, and oral/written communications fall second through fourth, as they did last year.

All of the four top-rated competencies are rated above “essential.” However, the competencies that are rated between “somewhat essential” and “essential” have changed order. This year, digital technology is the fifth most essential competency, according to respondents, and leadership is sixth.

This is interesting since the Job Outlook 2019 survey found that leadership skills were also lower on this year’s list of attributes that employers look for on a student’s resume. The final two competencies—career management and global/multi-cultural fluency—remain in the same order, but their average ratings fell.

In terms of proficiency, employers gave students slightly higher marks on all eight competencies this year, but all ratings still fall in the range between “somewhat proficient” and “very proficient.” Employers feel that recent graduates are most proficient in teamwork/collaboration, digital technology, and critical thinking/problem solving.

You might be interested:  What Does Esl Mean In Education?

See Figure 2.) Data for the Job Outlook 2019 survey were collected from August 1, 2018, through October 8, 2018. A total of 172 surveys were returned—an 18.5 percent response rate. The Job Outlook 2019 report is available free to members through MyNACE, Nonmembers can purchase the report through the NACE Store,

Figure 1: Employers rate the essential need of the career readiness competencies

Competencies Weighted Average Rating*
2019 2018 2017
Critical thinking/problem solving 4.66 4.62 4.58
Teamwork/collaboration 4.48 4.56 4.43
Professionalism/work ethic 4.41 4.46 4.56
Oral/written communications 4.30 4.30 4.43
Digital technology 3.84 3.73 3.78**
Leadership 3.65 3.82 3.86
Career management 3.38 3.46 3.47
Global/multi-cultural fluency 2.78 3.01 2.85

Source: Job Outlook 2019, National Association of Colleges and Employers. *5-point scale, where 1=Not essential, 2=Not very essential, 3=Somewhat essential, 4=essential, 5=Absolutely essential. **This competency was called “information technology application” in the Job Outlook 2017 report. Figure 2: Employers rate recent graduates on the eight career readiness competencies

Competencies Weighted Average Rating*
2019 2018 2017
Teamwork/collaboration 3.83 3.82 3.96
Digital technology 3.76 3.71 3.92**
Critical thinking/problem solving 3.64 3.58 3.59
Oral/written communications 3.49 3.39 3.41
Professionalism/work ethic 3.47 3.35 3.43
Leadership 3.31 3.28 3.38
Global/multi-cultural fluency 3.13 2.94 2.93
Career management 3.05 3.01 3.09

Source: Job Outlook 2019, National Association of Colleges and Employers. *5-point scale, where 1=Not at all proficient, 2=Not very proficient, 3=Somewhat proficient, 4=Very proficient, 5=Extremely proficient. **This competency was called “information technology application” in the Job Outlook 2017 report.
View complete answer

What are the 4 main competencies?

The IPEC core competencies were first adopted in 2011 and updated in 2016. In the years since the original document’s release and update, the IPEC core competencies have been widely disseminated throughout the health professions and embedded into both curriculum and accreditation standards. IPEC Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice Revision, 2021-2023 In May 2021, IPEC announced plans to begin a formal process to review and revise the 2016 IPEC Core Competencies, Key drivers for the 2021-2023 revision include the need to empower the IPE community with the best available evidence and research related to IPE and CP; conduct a cyclical review on common definitions for competence, competency and competency framework; and ensure that this framework accurately reflects any changes in research, policy, and practice. A preliminary draft of proposed 2023 revisions to the IPEC Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice: 2016 Update is now available for open comment. Download the materials below.

2023 Preliminary Draft of Revisions Draft Comparison Guide Draft Glossary of Terms

Feedback can be shared by:

Leaving comments on the Comments form Emailing Contacting IPEC on Twitter Joining the April 25, 2023 virtual town hall forum

IPEC Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice: 2016 Update This 2016 update reflects the changes that have occurred in the health system since the release of the original report, two of the most significant of which are the increased focus on the Triple Aim (improving the experience of care, improving the health of populations, and reducing the per capita cost of health care) and implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in 2010. IPEC Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice: 2011 Original This report is inspired by a vision of interprofessional collaborative practice as key to the safe, high quality, accessible, patient-centered care desired by all. The intent was to build on each profession’s expected disciplinary competencies in defining competencies for interprofessional collaborative practice. Team-Based Competencies, Building a Shared Foundation for Education and Clinical Practice This summary document is based on the February 2011 meeting that was held to advance interprofessional education, which provides both academic and clinical experiences for students from two or more health professions to work in a collaborative partnership to provide patient-centered care.

View complete answer

How many core competencies are there?

The 28 Leadership Core Competencies are divided into five levels. Definitions are listed below organized by the leadership levels.
View complete answer

What is common core in Florida education?

Why Elementary Math Lessons Are Changing In Florida Schools – At dinner tables across Florida, parents and their elementary school children are trying to solve a math problem: What’s going on with my kid’s homework? Florida is one of dozens of states that has switched to new math standards based on Common Core. The standards outline what students should know in every grade. Experts say
View complete answer

You might be interested:  How To Lead A Small Group Bible Study?

What are the five 5 entrepreneurial mindset?

The five dimensions of an entrepreneurial mindset – In any mindset, there are five dimensions: self-efficacy, locus of control, beliefs about our capabilities, motivation, and level of resilience. When we strive toward a compelling goal using entrepreneurial thinking, it shapes these five dimensions in the following ways.
View complete answer

What are the 5 C’s of entrepreneurial mind?

The Five Cs of entrepreneurship Breakthrough tech entrepreneur Chinedu Echerou is urging budding businesses to observe what he calls the ‘Five Cs of Entrepreneurship’ – credibility, clarity, conviction, capital and concentration in execution. He says these elements have proved invaluable for him over time up to the point where he recently sold two of the technology companies he created – Hopspot.com to Apple; and Tripology.com to Rand McNally and eventually, USA Today.

Echerou presented on his themed approach to business at last week’s Venture Capital Conference in New Kingston. Creativity, he said, is not limited to only people with a particular talent, but rather is whatever exists in anybody’s head. It requires awareness of happenings in the local and international environments.

“In anything you do, the first creation is in your mind because you see it. Every desire to do something starts with the fact that you recognise that it is something to be done,” Echerou said. Once an idea is generated, it should then be tested for clarity.
View complete answer

What are the 4 dimensions of core competencies?

The four dimensions of the competence model | Yocomo Self-Assessment Tool What Are The University Of Florida In the competence model, we focus on the following four dimensions: attitudes, knowledge, skills, and behaviours.

• Attitudes (the youth worker’s willingness) are the pre-requisite, the foundation for competence development. They lead to • knowledge (gained through experience, books, the Internet, etc.) and • skills (ability to perform a task, to apply knowledge and turn attitudes into actions), which will then lead to • appropriate and contextual behaviour.

Therefore, behaviour encompasses attitudes, knowledge, and skills. Through behaviour we can assess the competence level of the youth worker and whether it is sufficient for his/her work. In short: behaviour reflects the underlying attitudes of a youth worker.

  1. Feel free to use behaviour as the starting point to develop indicators and tools to accompany this competence model.
  2. Imagine the competence framework as a pyramid or cylinder, but in no way as something linear.
  3. Competences are dynamic and all its elements are interrelated and interdependent.
  4. There is no hierarchy between the various elements mentioned in each competence area (under attitudes, knowledge, skills, and behaviours, respectively).

The elements mentioned first are no more important than those mentioned last.
View complete answer

What are the three 3 main types of competency standards?

There are many organizations that believe in three types of competencies that are considered important for their employees. These three types include – core competencies, cross functional competencies and functional competencies. In this article, let us look at each of these competency types and understand how they can contribute to the success of an organization.

But before going in-depth in finding more about these competencies, it is important to understand the concept of competency and its importance. To put it simply, competency can be described as the behavioral attributes, skills, and knowledge that are required for putting in suitable performances while at the job.

While behavioral attributes refer to the personality characteristics that are needed to be successful on the job, skills refer to practical or technical skills that are required for performing the job satisfactorily and knowledge refers to the experience and previous education that is needed while on the job.
View complete answer

What are the 6 critical competencies?

THE SIX COMPETENCIES: CREATIVITY, COMMUNICATION, CRITICAL THINKING, COLLABORATION, CITIZENSHIP AND CONNECTIVITY FOR THE FUTURE EDUCATION.
View complete answer

What are the 4 main competencies?

The IPEC core competencies were first adopted in 2011 and updated in 2016. In the years since the original document’s release and update, the IPEC core competencies have been widely disseminated throughout the health professions and embedded into both curriculum and accreditation standards. IPEC Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice Revision, 2021-2023 In May 2021, IPEC announced plans to begin a formal process to review and revise the 2016 IPEC Core Competencies, Key drivers for the 2021-2023 revision include the need to empower the IPE community with the best available evidence and research related to IPE and CP; conduct a cyclical review on common definitions for competence, competency and competency framework; and ensure that this framework accurately reflects any changes in research, policy, and practice. A preliminary draft of proposed 2023 revisions to the IPEC Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice: 2016 Update is now available for open comment. Download the materials below.

You might be interested:  How Long To Study For Clep?

2023 Preliminary Draft of Revisions Draft Comparison Guide Draft Glossary of Terms

Feedback can be shared by:

Leaving comments on the Comments form Emailing Contacting IPEC on Twitter Joining the April 25, 2023 virtual town hall forum

IPEC Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice: 2016 Update This 2016 update reflects the changes that have occurred in the health system since the release of the original report, two of the most significant of which are the increased focus on the Triple Aim (improving the experience of care, improving the health of populations, and reducing the per capita cost of health care) and implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in 2010. IPEC Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice: 2011 Original This report is inspired by a vision of interprofessional collaborative practice as key to the safe, high quality, accessible, patient-centered care desired by all. The intent was to build on each profession’s expected disciplinary competencies in defining competencies for interprofessional collaborative practice. Team-Based Competencies, Building a Shared Foundation for Education and Clinical Practice This summary document is based on the February 2011 meeting that was held to advance interprofessional education, which provides both academic and clinical experiences for students from two or more health professions to work in a collaborative partnership to provide patient-centered care.

View complete answer

What are the top 4 competencies?

Spotlight for Career Services Professionals Spotlight for Recruiting Professionals What career readiness competencies do employers value most in their new college hires? Employers responding to NACE’s Job Outlook surveys have consistently indicated that critical thinking/problem solving, teamwork/collaboration, professionalism/work ethic, and oral/written communications are all essential competencies.

  1. The top four competencies have remained consistent the past three years.
  2. When rating the eight NACE Career Readiness Competencies by essential need in the Job Outlook 2019 survey, critical thinking/problem solving once again tops the list.
  3. See Figure 1.) Teamwork/collaboration, professionalism/work ethic, and oral/written communications fall second through fourth, as they did last year.

All of the four top-rated competencies are rated above “essential.” However, the competencies that are rated between “somewhat essential” and “essential” have changed order. This year, digital technology is the fifth most essential competency, according to respondents, and leadership is sixth.

  • This is interesting since the Job Outlook 2019 survey found that leadership skills were also lower on this year’s list of attributes that employers look for on a student’s resume.
  • The final two competencies—career management and global/multi-cultural fluency—remain in the same order, but their average ratings fell.

In terms of proficiency, employers gave students slightly higher marks on all eight competencies this year, but all ratings still fall in the range between “somewhat proficient” and “very proficient.” Employers feel that recent graduates are most proficient in teamwork/collaboration, digital technology, and critical thinking/problem solving.

(See Figure 2.) Data for the Job Outlook 2019 survey were collected from August 1, 2018, through October 8, 2018. A total of 172 surveys were returned—an 18.5 percent response rate. The Job Outlook 2019 report is available free to members through MyNACE, Nonmembers can purchase the report through the NACE Store,

Figure 1: Employers rate the essential need of the career readiness competencies

Competencies Weighted Average Rating*
2019 2018 2017
Critical thinking/problem solving 4.66 4.62 4.58
Teamwork/collaboration 4.48 4.56 4.43
Professionalism/work ethic 4.41 4.46 4.56
Oral/written communications 4.30 4.30 4.43
Digital technology 3.84 3.73 3.78**
Leadership 3.65 3.82 3.86
Career management 3.38 3.46 3.47
Global/multi-cultural fluency 2.78 3.01 2.85

Source: Job Outlook 2019, National Association of Colleges and Employers. *5-point scale, where 1=Not essential, 2=Not very essential, 3=Somewhat essential, 4=essential, 5=Absolutely essential. **This competency was called “information technology application” in the Job Outlook 2017 report. Figure 2: Employers rate recent graduates on the eight career readiness competencies

Competencies Weighted Average Rating*
2019 2018 2017
Teamwork/collaboration 3.83 3.82 3.96
Digital technology 3.76 3.71 3.92**
Critical thinking/problem solving 3.64 3.58 3.59
Oral/written communications 3.49 3.39 3.41
Professionalism/work ethic 3.47 3.35 3.43
Leadership 3.31 3.28 3.38
Global/multi-cultural fluency 3.13 2.94 2.93
Career management 3.05 3.01 3.09

Source: Job Outlook 2019, National Association of Colleges and Employers. *5-point scale, where 1=Not at all proficient, 2=Not very proficient, 3=Somewhat proficient, 4=Very proficient, 5=Extremely proficient. **This competency was called “information technology application” in the Job Outlook 2017 report.
View complete answer