How To Study For The Asvab?

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How To Study For The Asvab
How to Study for the ASVAB Test

  1. Take a solid core of science, English, and mathematics classes.
  2. Check out sample questions.
  3. Look for other online resources.
  4. Utilize your local library.
  5. Ask your recruiter for help studying.
  6. Seek advice from your guidance counselor.
  7. Take a practice test.

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How long should you study for the ASVAB?

As with any test, how well you do depends in large part upon how well you prepare. To study effectively for the ASVAB, you really need to begin studying at least two months before you plan to take the test, if not more! Here are some basic steps to take:

Find a comfortable, quiet area to study. Gather paper, pens and pencils, a calculator and other tools. Make a basic study schedule.

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Is the ASVAB test hard?

The P&P-ASVAB contains some very easy and very hard questions, but most are of average difficulty. The CAT-ASVAB software adjusts to your ability level and administers questions that are best suited for you. If you are above average ability, you will receive questions that are above average difficulty.
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What type of math is on ASVAB?

What kind of math is on the ASVAB? – There are two ASVAB math tests: Arithmetic Reasoning and Math Knowledge. The Arithmetic Reasoning test covers word problems that involve arithmetic. The Math Knowledge test covers high school math skills.
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Is there a way to practice the ASVAB?

Getting Ready for the Test – One of the most important aspects of preparing for this necessary entrance exam into the military is by taking ASVAB practice tests online., research conducted by psychologists and published in the journal Psychological Science in the Public Interest on the top methods for testing concluded that there are two study strategies that are the most effective when it comes to success on tests and memory recall down the line.

The article discussing the study states, “only two techniques got the top rating: practice testing and “distributed practice,” which means scheduling study activities over a period of time — the opposite of cramming.” Cognitive psychologist Thomas Toppino goes on to explain, “We know that the act of retrieval is an extremely potent learning experience.

We have tons of evidence about the relative effectiveness of retrieval as opposed to restudying.”

  1. Essentially, if you want to do well on any test, then you want to:
  2. · Take practice tests
  3. · Study over a period of time and not in just one night
  4. Researchers noted a number of different reasons for this, but according to an article published on, “A 2011 study finds students who tested themselves with a practice test after learning the material retained 50% more of the information a week later than their peers who did not take a practice test.”

Practice testing, then is one of the best ways that you can set yourself up for success on this all-important military aptitude test. And one of the most effective ways to take the test for practice is with ASVAB practice tests online.
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Is it hard to get a 100 on the ASVAB?

ASVAB Scores for the Marines – The maximum score that you can receive on the ASVAB exam is a 99. For enlistment into the Marine Corps, you will need to have a score of at least 32. Marine Corps jobs are called Military Occupational Specialty (MOS). Each job has a different ASVAB score requirement. How To Study For The Asvab How To Study For The Asvab
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Can you get 100 on the ASVAB test?

ASVAB Scores and Army Jobs To join the Army as an enlisted member, you usually must take the (ASVAB) test and get a good score. The maximum ASVAB score is 99. For enlistment into the Army, you must get a minimum ASVAB score of 31. Each Army job is given a code known as a (MOS).

  • Every MOS has different ASVAB score requirements.
  • The ASVAB test actually consists of several different subject areas, or subtests.
  • They are general science ( GS ), arithmetic reasoning ( AR ), word knowledge ( WK ), paragraph comprehension ( PC ), mathematics knowledge ( MK ), electronics information ( EI ), auto and shop information ( AS ), mechanical comprehension ( MC ) and assembling objects (AO).

Use the Army line scores information below in conjunction with the table that follows to determine the Army jobs you qualify for, based on your ASVAB scores.
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Is a 70 ASVAB good?

With ASVAB Standard scores, the majority of students score between 30 and 70. This means that a standard score of 50 is an average score, and a score of 60 would be an above-average score.
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Is a 40 bad on the ASVAB?

Standard Scores are scores that have a fixed mean and standard deviation in the population of examinees. – A Standard Score indicates how many units of the standard deviation a particular score is above or below the mean. In the case of the ASVAB subtests, the mean is set to 50 and the standard deviation is set to 10.
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Is a 92 ASVAB good?

Examinees also receive a score on what is called the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT). – AFQT scores are computed using the Standard Scores from four ASVAB subtests: Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), Mathematics Knowledge (MK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), and Word Knowledge (WK).

  • AFQT scores are reported as percentiles between 1-99.
  • An AFQT percentile score indicates the percentage of examinees in a reference group that scored at or below that particular score.
  • For current AFQT scores, the reference group is a sample of 18 to 23 year old youth who took the ASVAB as part of a national norming study conducted in 1997.

Thus, an AFQT score of 90 indicates that the examinee scored as well as or better than 90% of the nationally-representative sample of 18 to 23 year old youth. An AFQT score of 50 indicates that the examinee scored as well as or better than 50% of the nationally-representative sample.
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Is the ASVAB a type of IQ test?

ASVAB compared to other IQ tests The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) is a test that measures an individual’s developed knowledge in order to assess their academic ability in a branch of the military, and to predict which occupational specialty they would be best suited for.

It is most commonly taken by high school students as they become eligible for enlistment. The ASVAB is categorized into ten sub-tests. Four of these tests, Word Knowledge (WK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), and Mathematics Knowledge (MK), are used to determine if the individual is eligible to join the armed forces, and if so, which branch.

These four categories are compiled to create a composite score, and are referred to as the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT). The remaining six tests are used to identify which specialty they would be the most successful in. The AFQT is comparable to other popular intelligence quotient (IQ) test in the fact that is tests an individual’s base intelligence level.

  • Common IQ tests include: the or WISC-IV, the (SB), and the,
  • All three featured IQ tests use similar subtests to determine the individual’s innate cognitive ability.
  • For example, the AFQT measures word knowledge and paragraph comprehension, while the WISC-III measures verbal comprehension, and the Stanford Binet measures knowledge, fluid reasoning, and working memory.

Each test is analyzing word recognition, retention, and reasoning by reviewing the individual’s vocabulary, and ability to identify critical information from text. Each test also measures the individual’s quantitative reasoning through arithmetic section.

The ASVAB varies from other IQ tests in the fact that success is strongly influenced by the quality of education. The test assumes applicants have reached a certain level of vocabulary and mathematical ability. Applicants from strong curriculum or from schools tailored to preparing students for standardized tests like the ASVAB or ACT/SAT while have a greater propensity to score higher than students from weaker programs.

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The ASVAB is also the only test that is given in a written format rather than verbally. This written format affects the time allotments per question. The WISC-III, and SB factor in the applicant’s response time per question, awarding faster work with higher scores.

  1. The ASVAB is unable to measure time per question, and applies a time limit per section instead.
  2. This requires students to manage their time so that they may attempt each question.
  3. It does not reward students capable of finishing faster that the allotted time, and penalizes students for questions they may not have answered due to time restraints.

The ASVAB is commonly given in a large group setting, which also creates difficulty for the individual to receive clarification on questions, unlike the one on one setting IQ tests are most frequently given in. The ASVAB measures cognitive ability like other common IQ test, but it dependent upon the individual’s previous education for successful scores.
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Is the ASVAB based on IQ?

The ASVAB stands for Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery. It’s designed to test your skill set, not your IQ. Sure, you can extrapolate some measure of IQ from an ASVAB, but it’s not what the military is looking for. It’s looking for vocational aptitude.
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Is calculator allowed in ASVAB?

The answer to this question is ‘No.’ Calculators are not allowed for either the pen and paper version or the computer version.
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Is the ASVAB harder than the SAT?

The ASVAB is similar to the SAT or ACT – The ASVAB test is similar to the SAT or ACT, but harder. This test, more than the SAT and ACT, is designed to show the whole skillset of a person. Reading, math, and science are part of the test, but other things like electronic, automotive, and mechanical questions are included as well.
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Is it OK to fail the ASVAB?

General ASVAB Questions – What if I fail the ASVAB? There is no pass or fail on the ASVAB. You cannot “ace” the ASVAB or “flunk” it! Your scores reflect your own abilities! You will want to do your best so that you will be eligible for the military skill specialty that matches your ability and interests.

In addition, to be eligible to enlist in one of the military services, you must obtain a minimum Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) score, which varies between services. What’s the AFQT? To gain entrance into the military service, you must obtain a minimum qualifying score on the ASVAB – your AFQT score.

That score predicts your potential for training in military occupations. Your AFQT score reflects your standing compared to men and women ages 18-23. What subtests make up the AFQT? Your AFQT score is comprised of your test results in arithmetic reasoning (AR), math knowledge (MK) and verbal expression (VE) times two.

  1. Your VE score is a combination of your word knowledge and paragraph comprehension scores.
  2. Your AFQT entrance score varies by service.
  3. Some occupations require higher subtest scores than others; these scores determine how qualified you are for certain military specialties.
  4. For instance, a career in journalism requires a higher ASVAB score than a career as a secretary.

Why is that? There are more verbal and analytical skills required in writing, editing and critiquing the written word. Contact your area recruiter to find out what score you need. How long are ASVAB scores valid? ASVAB scores are good for two years. Is there a Spanish ASVAB? This is a frequently asked question, but the ASVAB test does not exist in any other language.

Service regulations, technical manuals, operations orders, etc., are written in English. You will have to be able to function in English in the military, which is why the ASVAB test is given in English only. If you score high enough on the ASVAB and your native language is not English, you may be screened on the English Comprehension Level (ECL) test.

The ECL is a standardized test that measures your listening and reading comprehension skills. Depending on your test results, you may be given follow-on testing and further training. Can I use my student ASVAB results for processing at MEPS? If you are 17 or older, you may process at the MEPS using Student ASVAB scores from a test you took in high school when you were 16 years old.

  • That is provided you were a junior or senior when you took the test, and the test has not expired (two years from the date of the test).
  • Sophomore tests are invalid for enlistment purposes, regardless of age on the date of the test.
  • When can I take the ASVAB? Can I take it over again if necessary? You can take the ASVAB as early as your sophomore year in high school.

If you take the ASVAB as a sophomore, though, your score will not be used for joining the military. If need be, you may retake the ASVAB after 30 days – and again 30 days later. If I take the ASVAB, am I committed to joining the military? Taking the ASVAB does not commit you to anything, but a military recruiter may contact you.

  • The ASVAB can help you determine your own interests and aptitude, even if you are not planning to enter the military or are undecided.
  • It can help you choose courses for college and make your personal career decisions.
  • Does the ASVAB Have Any Influence on My High School Grades? The ASVAB has no impact on your high school grades.

You have nothing to lose, and everything to gain. Where Can I Take the ASVAB? It depends on which version of the ASVAB you intend to take. You can take the test at a nearby high school (the student ASVAB) or arrange to take it through a local recruiter (the Military Entrance Test-site ASVAB or CAT-ASVAB).
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How many times can I fail the ASVAB?

What Happens if You Fail the ASVAB for the Third Time? The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery is a standard application requirement for entrance into a major branch of the U.S. Military. Each branch has minimum scores for eligibility for various military jobs.

  • If you don’t perform well on the ASVAB to get positions you desire, you can retake the test.
  • On its website, ASVAB indicates that you can retake the test infinite times, but the process does change a bit after a third attempt.
  • If you take the test once and don’t do well, you can retake it after just one month.

If you fail to perform well on this second attempt, you can retake it again after another month. Your fourth attempt, and any subsequent attempt, requires a six-month wait from the previous test. : What Happens if You Fail the ASVAB for the Third Time?
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Has anyone gotten a 99 on the ASVAB?

I recently became aware of an Airman who scored a perfect 99 on Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery, or ASVAB test.
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What can a 90% on ASVAB get you?

How is the ASVAB Scored? – ASVAB Flashcards Study System When your ASVAB exam is scored, you’ll receive ten different scores, one for each section on the exam. Your ASVAB score also includes your AFQT score which is calculated by combining these four sections on the exam:

Word Knowledge Paragraph Comprehension Arithmetic Comprehension Mathematics Knowledge

What to Expect on the ASVAB Your AFQT score is very important. This score will determine if you are eligible for enlistment into the military. Your AFQT scores will show on your score report as a percentile ranging from 1 to 99. This percentile is based on the number of questions that you answered correctly compared to others that have taken the ASVAB. How To Study For The Asvab You’ll also receive a Composite Score, which is used by the military to determine which job you would be best suited for. Certain branches of the military and jobs require certain composite scores. Your Composite Score is a combination of the scores that you received on each subtest of the exam.
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Is 55 a bad ASVAB score?

What does the ASVAB test you on? – The ASVAB test is designed to measure aptitudes in four domains: Verbal, Math, Science and Technical, and Spatial. The table below describes the content of the ASVAB tests and presented in that order:

Test Section Description Domain Number of Questions Time (minutes)
General Science (GS) Knowledge of physical and biological sciences Science / Technical 16 8
Arithmetic Reasoning (AR) Arithmetic Reasoning (AR) Math 16 39
Word Knowledge (WK) Ability to select the correct meaning of a word presented in context and to identify best synonym for a given word Verbal 16 8
Paragraph Comprehension (PC) Ability to obtain information from written passages Verbal 11 22
Mathematics Knowledge (MK) Knowledge of high school mathematics principles Math 16 20
Electronics Information (EI) Knowledge of electricity and electronics Science / Technical 16 8
Auto Information (AI) Knowledge of automobile technology Science / Technical 11 7
Shop Information (SI) Knowledge of tools and shops terminology and practices Science / Technical 11 6
Mechanical Comprehension (MC) Knowledge of mechanical and physical principles Science / Technical 16 20
Assembling Objects (AO) Ability to determine how an object will look when its parts are put together Spatial 16 16
145 154
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Aside from raw ASVAB test scores, the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) score is used to determine basic qualification for enlistment and provides an indication of how each person performed compared with the base population. Meaning, someone who receives an AFQT score of 55, scored better than 55 percent of all other members of the base population.

  • The highest possible percentile is 99.
  • The way it is calculated: AR + MK + (2 x VE).
  • The VE (verbal) score is determined by adding the raw scores from the PC and WK.
  • The minimum score for enlistment varies according to branch of service and whether the enlistee has a high school diploma.
  • Eligibility is not determined by score alone.

Certain recruiting goal practices may require an applicant to achieve a higher score than the required minimum AFQT score in order to be considered for enlistment. Rules and regulations are subject to change and future recruits should call their recruiter for up to date qualification information.
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How rare is a 95 ASVAB score?

AFQT – There are ten sections on the ASVAB exam. Your ASVAB score includes your AFQT score which is calculated by combining four sections of the exam. Scores that are on the individual subtests are reported as ASVAB Standard Scores. • Word Knowledge • Paragraph Comprehension • Arithmetic Reasoning • Mathematics Knowledge ASVAB Secrets Study Guide Your score on these four areas will determine your eligibility for enlistment into the military. The scores you receive on the other six content areas of the ASVAB are used to determine which job in the military would be best suited for you.
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Is 29 a good ASVAB score?

With ASVAB Standard scores, the majority of students score between 30 and 70. This means that a standard score of 50 is an average score, and a score of 60 would be an above-average score.
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What is a 75% ASVAB score?

The score a person receives indicates what percentage of those sample test-takers he or she did better than. Therefore, earning a score of 75 means that you did better than 75% of the sample group.
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Can you study for the ASVAB in a week?

Yes, you can ace the ASVAB with one week of study and free online tests! Don’t settle for a 2020 – 2021 ASVAB Study Guide, get the current version. You don’t need to spend big bucks or spend two months wading through a manual longer than a phone book!
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How many times should I study for the ASVAB?

The ASVAB—or Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery—is a military aptitude test that you’ll be required to take before enlisting in any branch of the U.S. Armed Services. The ASVAB comprises 10 separate tests that gauge your knowledge on a variety of subjects.

  1. 1 Begin studying at least 2 months before the test date. Your military recruiter should have given you a date on which you’ll be taking the ASVAB. In order to give yourself enough time to study for all of the test’s categories, begin to study at least 8 weeks in advance. This will allow you to study at a reasonable pace rather than cramming for the ASVAB the night before you take it.
    • If you’re not sure of your testing date, get in touch with your military recruiter. They’ll be able to tell you.
  2. 2 Study for the ASVAB at least 1 hour per day at a consistent time. It’s important that studying for the ASVAB becomes part of your daily routine. Study for the test for about 1 hour every day as part of your studying schedule. If you don’t set up a daily study hour, you’ll be much more likely to procrastinate and put off studying, leading to a lower score on the test.
    • For example, plan to study from 7 to 8 am before going in to work. Or, if you’re more of a night owl, study after dinner from 9 to 10 pm.
  3. 3 Gather the supplies you’ll need to study for and take the ASVAB, To study for and take the ASVAB, you’ll need a pen or pencil, paper or a notebook, and a calculator. Make sure to also take these items with you to the testing center! If you don’t feel particularly confident in your knowledge of electronics or mechanics, you might want to purchase or borrow a simple motor and circuit board to practice on.
    • Don’t just use the calculator on your phone. During the real ASVAB test, you’ll need to either turn off or surrender your phone so you can’t use it to look up information online.
  4. 4 Download a free study guide to help you study in specific areas. Rather than borrowing 10 separate textbooks from a library to help you study, use an ASVAB study guide. Study guides allow you to brush up on knowledge in each specific testing area and also help to familiarize you with the types of questions asked in each testing section.
    • For example, the Union Test Prep guide lets you hone in on each of the 10 study areas. Learn more online at: https://uniontestprep.com/asvab/study-guide,
    • Also check out the free study guide provided by ASVAB Tutor online here: https://asvabtutor.com/asvab-study-guides//
  5. 5 Take practice tests to prepare you for taking the actual ASVAB exam. As the testing date approaches, take at least 3–4 practice ASVAB tests to get yourself ready for taking the real thing. This is especially important if you’re not great at taking tests in general or if you get nervous during exams.
    • Access the official military-run ASVAB practice test site online at: https://www.asvabpracticetests.com/,
    • You can also view sample questions on the official ASVAB exam website online at: http://official-asvab.com/samples_coun.htm,
  1. 1 Practice your reading comprehension skills for the Paragraph Comprehension test. This important section of the text will quiz you on reading comprehension at the paragraph level. The test is used to determine your aptitude for certain types of reading-heavy military positions.
    • If you take the ASVAB with pencil and paper, you’ll be given 13 minutes to answer 15 questions. In the computer version of the test—known as the CAT-ASVAB—you’ll have 22 minutes to answer 11 questions.
    • Keep your reading and vocabulary skills current by spending some time each day reading major periodicals, magazines, and books.
  2. 2 Brush up on your vocabulary to prepare for the Word Knowledge test. The Word Knowledge test asks you both to define given words and to figure out the meaning of a word used in a sentence. When asked to define a word, you’ll be given 3 or 4 options and asked to choose the 1 that most closely matches the given word.
    • On the paper version of the ASVAB, you’ll be given 11 minutes to answer 35 questions. If you take the test on a computer, you’ll have 8 minutes to answer 16 questions.
  3. 3 Take a look at word problems to prepare for Arithmetic Reasoning. This section of the ASVAB presents a series of mathematical word problems and tests your fitness for math-heavy military positions. This test will ask you to read a word problem and then reason through it and find a solution.
    • If you take a pen-and-paper ASVAB test, you’ll have 36 minutes to answer 30 questions. In the computer-administered version, you’ll have 39 minutes to answer 16 questions.
    • You are not allowed to use a calculator on this test.
  4. 4 Crack a math textbook to prepare for the Mathematics Knowledge test. As its name suggests, this portion of the ASVAB tests your knowledge of high-school-level math topics including geometry and algebra. You’ll also be asked to convert fractions into decimals and to add and subtract fractions.
    • This is the only ASVAB test on which you’re allowed to use a calculator.
    • In the paper version of the ASVAB, you’ll have 24 minutes to answer 25 questions. In the CAT-ASVAB, you’ll have 20 minutes to answer 16 questions.
    • The math portion is often the most difficult, especially if you’ve been out of school for a while. It may help to hire a tutor to help you brush up on math concepts like algebra and geometry.
  5. 5 Learn about simple machines for the Mechanical Comprehension test. This portion of the ASVAB tests your understanding of the ways simple machines. You’ll be presented with a diagram of a machine and asked to assess its function or point out inaccuracies in its design.
    • If you take the CAT-ASVAB, you’ll have 20 minutes to answer 16 questions. In the paper version, you’ll be given 19 minutes to answer 25 questions.
  6. 6 Practice visualizing how objects fit together for the Assembling Objects test. The Assembling Objects portion of the ASVAB tests your ability to visualize the spatial relationships between the parts of disassembled objects. To study, look closely at the images of objects in the official ASVAB study guide and think of ways to reassemble them.
    • If you do well on this portion of the ASVAB, you’ll be considered for positions that involve interpreting technical drawings and working with maps.
    • If you take the CAT-ASVAB, you’ll have 15 minutes to solve 16 problems. For the paper version, you’ll have 16 minutes to solve 25 problems.
  7. 7 Familiarize yourself with vehicles for the Automotive Information test. Automotive information tests your knowledge of vehicles, their functions, and how to repair them if a part breaks or malfunctions. If you do well on this portion of the test, you’ll likely be considered for a job working with military vehicles and engines.
    • In the CAT-ASVAB, you’ll have 7 minutes to answer 11 questions. In the paper version, you’ll be given 11 minutes to answer 25 questions (but some of these questions may be part of the Shop Information test as well).
  8. 8 Learn about tools and their uses for the Shop Information test. Test-takers who excel on the Shop Information test are often assigned to work in military shops or in production facilities. Study for it by learning the names and functions of common tools used in shops. For example, familiarize yourself with the appearance and function of wrenches, fasteners, and welding tools.
    • In the CAT-ASVAB, you’ll have 6 minutes to answer 11 questions. In the paper version, you’ll have 11 minutes to answer 25 questions.
    • In the paper ASVAB, the Automotive and Shop portions of the ASVAB are often combined into 1 test.
  9. 9 Learn how electronics function for the Electronics Information test. This test covers a fairly broad array of topics that range from the principles of electricity to the uses and functions of magnets, radios, televisions, transistors, and motors. To brush up on your knowledge, read through a high-school level electronics textbook, or take a free electronics course online to understand different types of currents and how to use conductors and insulators.
    • For the CAT-ASVAB, you’ll have 8 minutes to answer 6 questions. If you take the ASVAB with pen and paper, you’ll have 9 minutes to answer 20 questions.
  10. 10 Review a variety of hard sciences for the General Science test. This portion of the ASVAB tests your knowledge of a handful of fields within the sciences. All of the knowledge is generalized; you won’t be asked to solve difficult physics questions, for example.
    • If you take the CAT-ASVAB, you’ll have 16 minutes to answer 8 questions. In the paper version of the test, you’ll have 11 minutes to answer 25 questions.
  1. 1 Focus on those testing areas that you’re weakest in. The ASVAB tests many different kinds of knowledge. Instead of exhausting yourself by studying maximally in each of the test’s 10 areas, focus on those that you’re weakest in. Look through the categories and pick out 4–5 that you don’t have much knowledge of, and spend the majority of your time studying those.
    • Of course, it’s still a good idea to brush up on the areas in which your strengths lie. Just don’t spend too much time studying materials that you already know well!
  2. 2 Read the directions for each section of the test. This is a good habit to get into when you’re taking ASVAB practice tests. Different sections of the test have different time limits and ask you to answer different types of questions. Reading the introductory material will keep you informed of how to answer each question and how quickly you need to move through the test.
    • It’s worth noting that the ASVAB is only administered in English. If you’re not a strong English speaker or reader, brush up on the language prior to the test.
  3. 3 Use the process of elimination to remove incorrect answers. In both practice tests and the real ASVAB, you probably won’t know the answer to every question. Instead of just guessing, though, use the process of elimination to cross out answers that you know are incorrect. This will dramatically improve your odds of finding the correct answer.
    • For example, say you’re taking the Word Knowledge test and aren’t able to match the meaning of a given word to 4 given options. But, if you know that 2 of the 4 words are incorrect, mark them off on the testing page. Now you have a 1 in 2 chance of guessing the correct answer instead of a 1 in 4 chance.
  4. 4 Answer the easiest questions before moving on to harder ones. Whether you’re taking a practice test or the real ASVAB, skim through the answers and identify those which seem easier than others. Work on these questions first to make sure you finish them before the time runs out.
    • When you’ve finished the easier questions, return and answer the difficult ones.
    • It’s also in your best interests to answer every question on the test. Answers left blank are counted as incorrect.
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Question How should I study for the ASVAB? Ted Coopersmith is an Academic Tutor for Manhattan Elite Prep, a test prep and academic tutoring company based in New York City. In addition to general academic advising, Ted has expertise in preparing for the ACT, SAT, SSAT, and ASVAB tests. He also has over 30 years of financial controller advising and consulting experience. Academic Tutor Expert Answer Keep your reading and vocabulary skills current by doing daily reading of major periodicals, magazines, books, and your tablet. Mathematics is typically the sore point on this exam with most test takers. There are two math sections which test all areas of study from basic through algebra and geometry. It’s probably worthwhile to invest in a good tutor to reinforce and revisit those concepts. You can also purchase test prep books to help you prepare for the ASVAB.

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  • Out of the 10 areas on the test, 4 are given higher priority when determining your eligibility for military enlistment. These areas are Paragraph Comprehension, Arithmetic Reasoning, Word Knowledge, and Mathematics Knowledge. The composite of these 4 scores is what’s known as the Armed Services Qualification Test, or ASQT.
  • Your score on the ASVAB will be a percentage point on a scale from 1–99. You’ll be ranked against how well other test-takers performed. So, if you score a 65, it means that you scored better than 65% of the other test-takers.
  • If you don’t perform as well as you’d like to on the ASVAB, you can always take the test again. However, you must wait 1 month after your first test to retake it. If you’d like to retake the ASVAB a second time, you must wait 1 additional month. For any retakes after that, the military requires you to wait 6 months before retaking the test.

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How hard is it to get a 98 on the ASVAB?

98 ASVAB Score – Understanding 98 AFQT Score The U.S. military officially started to use the ASVAB test in 1976. The current AFQT score is the most essential ASVAB score for you. The Armed Services Qualification Test (AFQT) is a percentile score based on the study of 1997, where the Department of Defense conducted the ASVAB test in which 12000 people took part.

  • Your 98 means that you performed better than 98% and worse than 1% of those 12000 people who took the ASVAB test in 1997.
  • Congratulations, your 98 ASVAB score is in TOP 10.
  • You’re a top-tier candidate to the military for enlistment! Your 98 AFQT score allows you to enter every military branch, including Army, Marines, Navy, Air Forces and Coast Guard.

Your score is pretty good, but it is still worse than average. Here are the minimum scores you must get on AFQT to enter different military branches:

Military Branch Minimum ASVAB Score
Army 31
Marines 32
Navy 35
Air Force 36
Coast Guard 40

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Is a 47 on the ASVAB good?

47 ASVAB Score – Understanding 47 AFQT Score The U.S. military officially started to use the ASVAB test in 1976. The current AFQT score is the most crucial ASVAB score for you. The Armed Services Qualification Test (AFQT) is a percentile score based on the study of 1997, where the Department of Defense conducted the ASVAB test in which 12000 people took part.

Your 47 means that you performed worse than 52% and better than other 47% of those 12000 people who completed the ASVAB test in 1997. Congratulations! Your 47 ASVAB score allows you to enter every military branch, including Army, Marines, Navy, Air Forces and Coast Guard. Your score is pretty good, but it is still worse than average.

Here are the minimum scores you must get on ASVAB to enter different military branches:

Military Branch Minimum ASVAB Score
Army 31
Marines 32
Navy 35
Air Force 36
Coast Guard 40

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