How To Study For The Afoqt?

0 Comments

How To Study For The Afoqt
How to Study Effectively – Your success on AFOQT test day depends not only on how many hours you put into preparing but also on whether you prepared the right way. It’s good to check along the way to see whether your studying is paying off. One of the most effective ways to do this is by taking AFOQT practice tests to evaluate your progress.

The questions you got wrongThe ones you had to guess on, even if you guessed rightThe ones you found difficult or slow to work through

This will show you exactly what your weak areas are and where you need to devote more study time. Ask yourself why each of these questions gave you trouble. Was it because you didn’t understand the material? Was it because you didn’t remember the vocabulary? Do you need more repetitions on this type of question to build speed and confidence? Dig into those questions and figure out how you can strengthen your weak areas as you go back to review the material.
View complete answer

How long should I prepare for Afoqt?

Therefore, it is important to be familiar with the content in order to prepare yourself for this exam. You will want a qualifying score, and with anything of this exam’s magnitude, a little practice is in order. We recommend at least 6 weeks of AFOQT test prep to prepare you for exam day.
View complete answer

Is it hard to pass the Afoqt?

If you need help with your AFOQT prep, Varsity Tutors can provide you with our AFOQT course. You can study for the Air Force Officer Qualifying Test with one-on-one instruction and receive comprehensive coverage of this standardized exam. In your AFOQT class time together, your AFOQT test prep instructor can also focus on specific areas you find challenging.

With qualified AFOQT tutoring, your study time can focus on your unique requirements. You can feel confident whether you’re testing for Officer Training School, the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps, or other officer commissioning programs. You can also expect full AFOQT prep support if you’re looking into qualifying as a pilot, air battle manager (ABM), or combat systems officer (CSO), or if you need AFOQT test prep assistance as part of the Pilot Candidate Selection Method score.

Whatever your goal, Varsity Tutors has an AFOQT test preparation solution for you. The AFOQT test questions should not be overly difficult, especially if you work hard at your AFOQT test prep, but the test itself is very demanding. You will be faced with 550 test items divided into 12 unique sections as follows:

Verbal Analogies Arithmetic Reasoning Word Knowledge Math Knowledge Reading Comprehension Situational Judgment Test Self-Description Inventory Physical Science Table Reading Instrument Comprehension Block Counting Aviation Information

The entire test, including one break, takes about five hours. The kind of stamina needed to do well can best be built up through thorough AFOQT preparation, which is why Varsity Tutors offers personalized AFOQT classes featuring knowledgeable tutors. It’s important to pay attention to the time allotted for each section.

  1. Towards this end, AFOQT tutors can provide timed practice-test scenarios in which you answer the number and type of questions you’ll see on a section.
  2. One of the things that make Varsity Tutors AFOQT test prep so valuable is that you can cover more than just content.
  3. Test-taking skills and strategies are useful for the AFOQT test.

Another important part of your AFOQT prep involves being familiar with the various sections. During your time together, your private tutor can provide more detailed information on each section, but here’s a brief description. The first four sections test basic high school verbal and math skills.

After a short break, the Reading Comprehension and Situational Judgment sections explore your reasoning and understanding of printed material and leadership skills. The Self-Description Inventory is a basic personality test. The Physical Science and Table Reading sections examine basic high school knowledge.

The Instrument Comprehension and Block Counting sections require you to use practical skills. Finally, the Aviation Information section tests your aviation knowledge and terminology. By now, you can see how our AFOQT courses could help you study more effectively.
View complete answer

What is a good score on Afoqt?

Minimum composite scores on the AFOQT to qualify for Air Force Pilot training are Verbal 15, Quantitative 10, Pilot 25, and CSO 10 —anything above those numbers are ‘good’ scores.
View complete answer

How hard is the math on the Afoqt?

How is the structure of the Arithmetic Reasoning section of the AFOQT test? – This subtest primarily involves word problems that require multiple steps to solve. Test candidates must rely on their knowledge of geometry, percentages, proportions, ratios, mixtures, integers, and time distance.

You must respond to 25 questions of the arithmetic within 29 minutes, which means that you will have a little over a minute to solve each question. Each question may have up to five possible answers. You should first understand the question well, then you can decide which of the answer options is correct.

Calculations are usually not difficult, but the main challenge is often in determining the types of calculations that need to be done. Scratch paper is provided, and the use of the calculator is not allowed. The Common formulas are listed in the test booklet, but memorizing those saves you time.
View complete answer

What is a 99 Afoqt score?

Scoring – The AFOQT is scored with percentile scores (1 to 99) in the following categories:

Pilot CSO ABM Academic Aptitude Verbal Quantitative The minimum qualifying score is a 15 in the verbal section, and a 10 in the quantitative section,

You can check your AFOQT scores here, Keep in mind the scores for paper tests can take up to two weeks to appear on this site after your Test Control Officer ships them off. If you got a 50 on any section of the AFOQT, it means you scored higher than 50% of a control group in that section that took the test back in 2014.

  1. If you get a 99 it means you scored higher than 99% of the people that took the test.
  2. If you get a 5, it means you only scored higher than 5% of the people that took the test, and you did not meet the minimum score so you’ll have to try again.
  3. Your AFOQT scores are NOT compared against the people that took the test with you that day! I’ve had some cadets try to say they got a low score because they tested with the ‘smart people’ in their class that day.

That is not the case. You are compared to a control group that took the test back in 2014. If you’re not interested in a rated (flying) job, then only the Verbal and Quantitative scores matter. If you’re interested in a rated job, then you have to meet the minimums on the Verbal and Quantitative, plus get the minimum scores in the other areas like Pilot and CSO,
View complete answer

What is the lowest Afoqt score?

Air Force Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT) The AFOQT is a standardized multiple-choice test similar to the SAT, with additional sections for pilot and navigator aptitude testing. It takes about three-and-a-half hours to complete the test, and it is scored in five areas. You will receive a score based on percentile for each area (0-99):

Verbal: All candidates must achieve a minimum score of 15. Quantitative: All candidates must achieve a minimum score of 10. Academic Aptitude: No minimum score required.

You may take the AFOQT only twice, and you must wait 180 days between tests. The most recent score counts, even though it may not necessarily be the highest score. Cadets are not permitted to group study nor share commercial study guides and/or study notes. : Air Force Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT)
View complete answer

Do you get a calculator for Afoqt?

Instructions –

Get a good night’s sleep the night before the test. Arrive on time to take the AFOQT. If you arrive late, you will not be allowed to take the test. Wear comfortable, yet professional civilian clothing to take the test. You may not use a calculator on the test. Watches are allowed if they do not have a calculator feature. Food and Drink will not be allowed in the testing area during test taking. Pencils and scratch paper will be provided.

View complete answer

What happens if you fail the Afoqt twice?

How Long Are My AFOQT Scores Valid? – Your AFOQT scores are held indefinitely. However, if you take the test again, the original scores are no longer valid, even if you score lower the next time.
View complete answer

Is the Afoqt easier than the SAT?

The AFOQT is not too difficult, but it’s very different from most tests most people have taken. It’s more similar to an IQ test than it is to, say, the SATs. The geospatial sections and navigation sections are not particularly difficult, but if you’ve never seen them before, it will take some time to figure it out.
View complete answer

Is the Afoqt an IQ test?

The AFOQT is a multiple aptitude battery and the MAB is an intelligence test.
View complete answer

How much math is on the Afoqt?

Math Knowledge You’ll have 25 minutes to get through 22 problems, so you’ll need to solve 1 to 2 problems per minute to complete this section in time, but the lack of traditional word problems helps to make that accomplishable.
View complete answer

What happens if you fail the Afoqt 3 times?

They will need to obtain an authorization for a waiver from the Air Force Personnel Center to take the test a third time. Candidates can request one via email at [email protected] or by calling 210-565-4221. If they meet all the criteria, they will receive a waiver to take the test after 150 days.
View complete answer

Can you take Afoqt 3 times?

Air Force Officer Qualification Test (AFOQT) – The AFOQT is used to help select candidates for officer commissioning programs and to classify commissioned officers into utilization specialties such as pilot, combat system operators, air battle manager, or technical.

  1. AFOQT scores are also used as a quality metric in the integrated officer classification model.
  2. Officer candidates with higher Verbal and Quantitative composite scores typically have a greater likelihood of success in university coursework, basic officer training, and technical training.
  3. The AFOQT process is upgrading to electronic AFOQT (eAFOQT).

ALL testers must register for a Pearson Vue account to take the eAFOQT. If you are not currently an AFROTC cadet, you must go to a Pearson Vue test center or 3rd party test center to take this test. AFROTC cadets may take the eAFOQT at USF AFROTC Det 158 on cadre-designated test dates.

If you are taking the AFOQT for the second time, you will need to notify the test administrator upon booking your appointment. You must to bring your previous AFOQT score sheet. If this is your third time taking the test you will need to bring your previous AFOQT score printouts and an approval letter from AFPC or AFROTC allowing a second retest.

View complete answer

What is the Afoqt score for pilots?

What Is The Minimum Passing Score for the AFOQT? The Air Force Officer Qualifying Test Subtests are (in the order you will be tested):

  1. Verbal Analogies (VA)
  2. Arithmetic Reasoning (AR)
  3. Word Knowledge (WK)
  4. Math Knowledge (MK)
  5. Reading Comprehension (RC)
  6. Situational Judgment (SJ)
  7. Self-Description Inventory (personality based – no prep necessary)
  8. Physical Science (PS)
  9. Table Reading (TR)
  10. Instrument Comprehension (IC)
  11. Block Counting (BC)
  12. Aviation Information (AI)
  • * Visit AFOQTGuide.com for
  • Pilot Composite (MK + IC + TR + AI) : Pilot hopefuls will want to focus their attention on these subtests and those that comprise the Verbal & Quantitative Composites (VA + WK + RC; AR),
  • Combat Systems Officer (CSO) Composite (WK+ MK + BC + TR) : Study regimen should be focused on these subtests plus the subtests included in Verbal/Quantitative Composites.
You might be interested:  What Is Psychology Class In High School?

Air Battle Manager (ABM) Composite (VA + MK + TR + IC + BC + AI), You’ve got the idea – just add Verbal & Quantitative Composites.

  1. Verbal Composite (VA + WK + RC) : All prospective Air Force Officers must score a minimum of 15 on this composite.
  2. Quantitative Composite (AR + MK) : Minimum required score for all test-takers is 10.
  3. Academic Aptitude Composite (VA + AR + WK + MK + RC) : No minimum required score.
  4. Question: Now, why should you – or any prospective Air Force Officer – be concerned with the make-up of these composite scores?
  5. Answer: Understanding which subtests are included in a given composite score will help you tailor your study regimen for your desired Air Force Officer career.

Have your heart set on becoming a pilot? Great. Focus your AFOQT Prep on the subtests that make-up the Verbal, Quantitative, & Pilot Composites. This will also help you identify your strengths and weaknesses and determine whether any of the latter fall within critical aptitudes.

Now that we’ve addressed the minimum required scores and hashed out the elements of the AFOQT Composite Scores, we can get to the meat of that burning question – What Score Do I Need to Pass the AFOQT? Well, it depends. After you take the AFOQT, you will receive 6 composite scores: Pilot, CSO, ABM, Academic, Verbal & Quantitative.

Each number (from 1-99) indicates how well you scored compared to other Air Force Officer Candidates who tested during the same test cycle as you. Meaning, for example, perhaps you’re not feeling overly confident about your Verbal Composite performance.

  1. Maybe you only get 60/75 possible questions (VA + WK + RC) correct.
  2. But, if only 15 percent of the other members of your testing cohort score better than you – you can expect to score somewhere in the mid-eighty range on the Verbal Composite because you performed better than roughly 85 percent of your fellow test-takers.

: What Is The Minimum Passing Score for the AFOQT?
View complete answer

Are fighter pilots good at math?

Fighter Pilot Math “Do you have to be good at math to be a fighter pilot?” This question comes up a lot—especially from young listeners who, I presume, struggled with math throughout school but nevertheless hope to join the ranks of military aviators.

  • It’s a fair question; after all, clearly some mathematical aptitude is required in this business.
  • Numbers are one thing.
  • Flying is full of numbers: airspeeds, altitudes, headings, runways, time, fuel all involve numerals.
  • And air combat involves even more—air-to-air employment timelines and air-to-ground delivery “Z-diagrams,” to name a couple.

But how good do you have to be at math ? This is not a straightforward question to answer as there are differing opinions on what it means to be good at this discipline. I was a math major at, Basic mental arithmetic has always been relatively easy for me, as have percentages and rudimentary geometry, but I’m no,

  1. Not by a mile.
  2. Heck, the only reason I ended up a math major in the first place is because the high school counselor helping fill out my college applications grew weary trying to coax a desired field of study out of me.
  3. He finally asked, “ok, when you get home from school, what homework do you do first?” I responded “math,” explaining it was the easiest.

So, I became a math major. My course of study was relatively straightforward: algebra, trigonometry, differential equations, statistical analysis not easy, but all do-able. That is, until I got to the class where there were no numbers. I kid you not, we had this class—I forget the name of it—where a typical problem was something along the lines of, “If A is a subset of B, and B is in the neighborhood of C, then prove that A is related to C.” It sucked.

  • I could not make sense of it and that was the only D I ever received in college.
  • To me, the students who breezed through that class and then grad school and are likely math professors at colleges around the country now— they are “good at math,” not me.
  • But as with so many things in life, being “good” at something is relative.

To right-brained folks more adept at creative or expressive disciplines, perhaps I am good at math. The real question, however, is how good do you need to be—mathematically speaking—to fly a fighter jet? To be sure, designing a fighter requires aerodynamic theories and principles involving advanced mathematics, but flying one requires mainly simple arithmetic.

  • And the most common concept pilots need to master is ‘rate.’ Most of us are already familiar with various rates used in everyday life—like the speed of an automobile or the $3.499 price of gasoline ( I hate that trailing 9! ).
  • Mathematically, rate is defined as the ratio between two related quantities in different units, like miles per hour or dollars per gallon.

Common rates used in flying include speed (kts, knots, or nautical miles per hour), rate of climb or descent (fpm, or feet per minute), and fuel burn (pph, or pounds per hour). I’m not sure if it is considered being “good at math” to know that flying along at 360 kts is the equivalent to 6 nm per minute, or covering a mile every 10 seconds 1 ; or that when air traffic control directs you to climb from 20,000 feet to 29,000 feet and to be level within the next six minutes that you need to maintain a minimum climb rate of 1,500 fpm 2, but those are examples of the types of rate calculations that need to be second nature to fighter pilots.

Fuel burn awareness is also important, especially for Navy folks around the ship where fuel is always at a premium—as is a place to land. If I’m in my trusty F/A-18C, for example, burning 2,400 pph per engine at high holding, it’s 20 minutes to land, and I need to cross the ramp with at least a 5.0 (5,000 pounds of fuel on board), how much fuel should I have right now? Easy, 6.6 3,

Other math I routinely used during my flying career involved angular relationships. Without delving into all the reasons why (let’s leave that to the mathematicians), it is accepted that 1° equates to 100 feet at 1 nm. That is, if an aircraft is flying down a 3° glideslope, say, then the pilot would expect to be 1,200 feet above the touchdown elevation when 4 miles away, 900 feet at 3, 600 at 2, and 300 at 1. How To Study For The Afoqt This works the other way around too. If being vectored to final at 2,000 feet for a 2.5° glideslope then the pilot would expect to intercept glideslope eight miles from the field 4, Being able to make these quick calculations can greatly improve a pilot’s situational awareness, leading to the ever-desirable status of being “ahead of the jet.” Angular relationship awareness is also useful when dealing with radials from a point.

  • For example, when 60 nm from a NAVAID, pilots should know there is 1 nm between degrees 5,
  • So, if a particular approach procedure requires clockwise arcing on the 20 DME arc Air Reserve Components.
  • A structure of the U.S.
  • Military that provides operational capabilities and strategic depth to meet US defense requirements across the range of military operations.

Consists of the Air Force Reserve (AFR) and Air National Guard of the United States (ANGUS). from the 240 radial to the 270 radial, then the pilot knows that is 10 miles of arc 6, If flying 240 kts ground speed, then the pilot further knows 2 minutes 30 seconds will be spent on the arc 7, and if the 90° turn to final is expected to take 3 nm at that speed, then the turn should begin at the 261 radial 8, How To Study For The Afoqt There are other arithmetic examples, like the headwind component of crosswinds at various strengths and directions, but you get the point. Again, numbers are one thing but to be a fighter pilot how good do you have to be at math ? I suppose it depends how easily you followed the arithmetic examples above. Some might think you need to be good at math, but I don’t. But then, I was a math major.

360 kts = 360 nm / 60 min = 6 nm / min = 6 nm / 60 sec = 1 nm / 10 sec.29,000 – 20,000 = 9,000 feet.9,000 feet ÷ 6 minutes = 1,500 fpm.2,400 pph * 2 engines = 4,800 pph total.20 minutes = 1/3 of an hour.1/3 of 4,800 lbs = 1,600 lbs.1,600 lbs + 5,000 lbs = 6,600 lbs. Never mind the fuel saved in the idle descent, that’s gravy. If x° = x*100 ft / nm then the number of nm = x*100 ft / x°. In our example 2,000 / 2.5 = 8 (ignoring units, which is usually a mathematical no-no). If 1° = 100 ft / nm then 1° = 6,000 feet / 60 nm, and 6,000 feet is 1 nm (not exactly, but close enough). Arcing from the 240 to 270 radial is 30°, and 30° = 60,000 feet / 20 nm, and 60,000 feet is 10 nm.240 kts = 4 nm / min, and 10 nm ÷ 4 nm / min = 2.5 minutes. Given footnote 5, 1° = 1/3 nm at 20 nm or 3° = 1 nm there. So a 3 nm turn requires 9°, thus the turn should begin 9° before the 270 while arcing clockwise, which is the 261 radial.

: Fighter Pilot Math
View complete answer

Can you get the Afoqt waived?

The Air Force Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT) Explained – Part 3 How To Study For The Afoqt BogiDope fans, we are wrapping up this three part series with this final article. In theory, you have learned about, studied and taken the AFOQT. Now you are patiently waiting to receive your scores and understand where you fall in the order of merit of AFOQT scores.

  1. This article will help you understand where you can find your AFOQT scores, give you a rough gauge of your competitiveness based on your scores and explain the process for taking the test a second time.
  2. Let jump right in.
  3. When Can I Get My AFOQT Scores? AFOQT answer sheets are graded at AFPC headquarters at Randolph AFB (San Antonio, TX).

The answer sheets are delivered via traditional mail, so the turnaround time is largely influenced by the geographical distance from your testing center to San Antonio, TX. Most applicants report waiting anywhere from 3 days to 2 weeks to receive scores.

Once your scores are processed, you can view them on this, You will need to enter your social security number and last name, and select your testing center from the list. This page will provide you with your Pilot, Navigator, Academic Aptitude, Verbal, and Quantitative subscores. To access your ABM subscore, you will need to visit this on the AFPC PCSM website and enter your first name, initials, and the last 4 digits of your social security number.

This page also retrieves a CSO subscore, but this is identical to the Navigator subscore available on the previously mentioned site. If you are working with a Line Officer Recruiter or you are an Air Force Academy or Air Force ROTC cadet, your recruiter or your cadre will be sent a copy of your scores when they are processed.

  • If you are applying with a Guard or Reserve unit, you’ll likely need to retrieve the scores yourself and include copies of the score printout sheets in your application.
  • Minimum AFOQT Scores The Air Force has established sets of minimum AFOQT score requirements which must be achieved in order to apply for a commission.

These requirements differ depending on the position being sought and are listed below. Pilot and RPA Operator AFOQT Score Minimums Pilot: 25* Navigator/CSO: (no minimum)* ABM: (no minimum) Academic Aptitude: (no minimum) Verbal: 15 Quantitative: 10 *Previously, Pilot/RPA applicants were also required to have a minimum Navigator/CSO score of 10 and a combined Pilot and Navigator/CSO subscore total of 50.

  1. These requirements have been removed according to the latest version of,
  2. However, many Guard and Reserve units still utilize these requirements.
  3. CSO AFOQT Score Minimums Pilot: (no minimum)* Navigator/CSO: 25* ABM: (no minimum) Academic Aptitude: (no minimum) Verbal: 15 Quantitative: 10 *Previously, Navigator/CSO applicants were also required to have a minimum Pilot score of 10 and a combined Navigator/CSO and Pilot subscore total of 50.
You might be interested:  How Long Does Online Traffic School Take?

These requirements have been removed according to the latest version of, However, many Guard and Reserve units still utilize these requirements. ABM AFOQT Score Minimums Pilot: (no minimum)* Navigator/CSO: (no minimum)* ABM: 25 Academic Aptitude: (no minimum) Verbal: 15 Quantitative: 10 *Previously, ABM applicants were also required to have a minimum Pilot score of 10, a minimum Navigator/CSO score of 10, and a combined Pilot and Navigator/CSO subscore total of 50.

General Commissioning (Non-Rated) AFOQT Score Minimums Pilot: (no minimum) Navigator/CSO: (no minimum) ABM: (no minimum) Academic Aptitude: (no minimum) Verbal: 15 Quantitative: 10 Competitive AFOQT Scores

There’s no magic set of AFOQT score thresholds that will guarantee you will be selected with a Pilot slot. Applicants at the upper end of the spectrum are sometimes not selected, just as applicants with unimpressive scores sometimes snag slots. The rest of your application is obviously very important.

That said, it’s always a good idea to do everything within your control to maximize your odds, so you might as well study hard and do the best you possibly can. We’re often asked, “What AFOQT scores do I need to be competitive?” I call this the “how do I compare” statistic. The following AFOQT score figures are based on a fairly small sample size of 46 Pilot selectees from some of the Officer Training School selection boards for fiscal years 2013 through 2017.

In this example we averaged the scores (in each category) for the individuals who were selected to pilot training. It’s important to note that these statistics don’t actually represent one individual person. Instead it is simply an average. So here is what we found (keep in mind this is a small sample size and it always depends).

Average Pilot Selectee AFOQT Scores (based on individual subscores) Pilot: 90.8 Navigator/CSO: 89 Academic Aptitude: 79.3 Verbal: 78.3 Quantitative: 73.6 Here is another “how do I compare example” from an official Air Force Reserve site (sample size unknown). Air Force Reserve Command (AFRC) publishes official statistics following most of their unsponsored rated selection boards.

The following are the average AFOQT subscores for Pilot selectees from the first board of fiscal year 2016 (16-01). AFRC 16-01 Average Pilot Selectee AFOQT Scores (based on individual subscores) Pilot: 91.5 Navigator/CSO: 76.2 Academic Aptitude: 64.4 Verbal: 60.3 Quantitative: 61 Ok thats enough statics for one article.

  • Don’t get wrapped up in the comparison game.
  • You have to do your best on every part of the test and that is all you can control.
  • It’s important to note that GPA and (which utilizes the AFOQT Pilot subscore in its calculation) are also important aptitude factors that are reviewed as parts of your application.

But as you can see, you don’t have to score above the 90th percentile in each component to get a Pilot slot. In fact, since the AFOQT Pilot score directly affects your PCSM score, often that’s the one that truly matters. In my experience, a 90+ Pilot score with sub-50s in every other subsection is more competitive than 80’s across the board.

They’re hiring you to fly, not write a novel, so make sure you focus on knocking the Pilot sections out of the park! It’s impossible, however, to predict exactly how much weight each member of a selection board will put into aptitude scores and it’s easy to drive yourself crazy comparing yourself to others.

Keep in mind that board members are aware that standardized testing is not a perfectly accurate measure of potential military aviator performance and that other factors about character and work ethic are sometimes better indicators of potential for success.

Make the rest of your application as outstanding as you possibly can and the selection board might give you the benefit of the doubt if your scores don’t seem competitive. Can The AFOQT Be Taken Multiple Times? states that two AFOQT test attempts are authorized without the need for a waiver, but the retest must occur at least 90 days after the first testing attempt.

These regulations also indicate that a waiver to retake the test within this waiting period is a possibility if justification is sent to the AFPC Testing Office for approval, but it is likely that this would require extenuating circumstances. Taking the AFOQT a third time is a possibility with a waiver, but approval requires an applicant to provide substantive proof of pursuing relevant education since the last test attempt, such as completing a related college course or gaining significant flight experience.

Those who have not yet taken the Form T version of the test but have taken Form S twice are also permitted to take the test one more time, but must submit a request to the AFPC Testing Office to gain approval. It is important to note that the scores from the most recent test attempt are the ones that count, even if they are worse than the original ones.

Prepare well and be sure that you will make an improvement if you retest. Next Steps After Taking the AFOQT If you’re not happy with your AFOQT scores, don’t beat yourself up. You can retake the test 90 days after your first attempt and just having the experience of knowing what to expect the second time is sure to make a positive difference.

  1. Discipline yourself and create a regimented study routine.
  2. By the time you’re eligible to retest, you’ll have gained a wealth of knowledge and will be able to approach your retake with confidence.
  3. Just be sure that you put in the effort and truly commit to studying.
  4. If you do worse on your retake, you’re out of luck because the most recent scores are the valid ones.

Be absolutely sure that you’re significantly more prepared so that you don’t waste your retake. If you’re satisfied with your AFOQT scores, then congratulations — you’ve gotten one of the most important (and stressful) components of your application out of the way! If you haven’t already taken the TBAS, you can now do so and receive a PCSM score.

If you’ve taken the TBAS before, your PCSM score will now be available since it utilizes the AFOQT Pilot subscore in its calculation. Breathe a sigh of relief and start making sure the rest of your application is top notch. Aptitude scores are important, but the “whole-person concept” is a reality and the selection boards want to see that you’re a well-rounded person.

Acing the AFOQT is a huge help but it doesn’t guarantee selection. Your scores should augment a well-crafted application rather than attempt to make up for an otherwise subpar application. Conclusion We hope you have learned a ton and enjoyed this three part series.

  • BogiDope enjoyed putting it together and hopes it will help you prepare for the AFOQT.
  • It might seem overwhelming to you but it’s just another step in the process.
  • The path to the cockpit is a long journey.
  • Eep taking strides to attain your dream and continue to put one foot in front of the other.
  • Note: this article was written using mulitple different sources.

These sources include, the Pilot Candidate Selection Method website, prep books for the AFOQT test, USAF AFPC Official AFOQT Form T Prep Course and multiple phone calls to understand the process. Welcome back to Part 2 of our series about career progression for Air Force pilots, from the pilot perspective.

If you haven’t already read Part Part 1: Air Force Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (AFROTC) Table of Contents What is AFROTC? How to Join and Requirements Scholarship Opportunities Cadet Life – If you’re headed to pilot training, you absolutely must read our 3-part series on Winning UPT. It explains how to perform well in your training We’re going to discuss career progression today.

As a former Active Duty pilot, I’ll admit I don’t love this topic. You have to understand: I’m Have you seen Top Gun or any of the (objectively terrible) Iron Eagle movies more times than you’re willing to admit? Do you daydream of : The Air Force Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT) Explained – Part 3
View complete answer

How many times can you take the Afoqt?

Academic Standards | U.S. Air Force ROTC Proving Yourself Begins In The Classroom As an officer in the U.S. Air Force or Space Force, others will look to you for your leadership and expertise. That begins in college and Air Force ROTC, where you’ll take the necessary courses and learn what it takes to become an officer.

GENERAL MILITARY COURSE (GMC) The General Military Course (GMC) comprises the first two years of Air Force ROTC program. All cadets must successfully complete classes in aerospace studies and pass all leadership laboratories that are part of AFROTC curriculum. Professional Officer Course (POC) Cadets compete for an allocation in the Professional Officer Course (POC) during the second year of the GMC.

During the POC, cadets must be enrolled as a full-time student at a college or university that offers AFROTC classes or has a crosstown agreement.

  1. Cadets on scholarship must maintain a 2.5 grade point average, and cadets not on scholarship must maintain a 2.0 grade point average.
  2. All cadets must be enrolled full time as a student at a college that offers AFROTC classes or has a crosstown agreement with one.

Air Force Officer Qualification Test The Air Force Officer Qualification Test (AFOQT) is a standardized test that measures verbal and mathematical aptitude (similar to the SAT and ACT) as well as additional aptitudes relevant to specific career fields.

The test is used to select applicants for Air Force ROTC as well as Officer Training School (OTS). It is also used to qualify for Pilot, Combat Systems Officer and Air Battle Manager training and is a component of the Pilot Candidate Selection Method (PCSM) score. The AFOQT is a required test for all cadets on scholarship or in the POC.

Important Things To Know:

  • The AFOQT is taken during your sophomore year in AFROTC.
  • The AFOQT can only be taken twice, and you must wait 150 days between tests.
  • The most recent AFOQT test score is the one that counts.

The AFOQT takes approximately five hours to complete and contains 550 questions divided into 12 subtests:

  1. Verbal Analogies
  2. Arithmetic Reasoning
  3. Word Knowledge
  4. Math Knowledge
  5. Reading Comprehension
  6. Situational Judgment
  7. Self-description Inventory
  8. Physical Science
  9. Table Reading
  10. Instrument Comprehension
  11. Block Counting
  12. Aviation Information
  1. Review official,
  2. Shop online or your local bookstore for commercial AFOQT test-preparation guides. Review the official Form T prep materials closely as some subtests have changed and commercial study guides may be based on previous versions of the test.
  3. Any ACT, SAT or GRE review material may be useful as you prepare for the verbal and quantitative (math) sections.

You’ll receive test results in these areas:

  1. Pilot
  2. Combat Systems Officer
  3. Air Battle Manager
  4. Verbal
  5. Quantitative (Math)
  6. Academic Aptitude

Learn About The Fitness Requirements : Academic Standards | U.S. Air Force ROTC
View complete answer

What Afoqt scores are needed for OTS?

Passing Score on the AFOQT – The test does not have a pass or fail scores. The better you score, the better your chances are of being considered for officer candidacy. Each commission source determines what scores are needed to be selected or considered for their programs.
View complete answer

Do I need to study for Afoqt?

Preparing for the AFOQT In most cases, examinees are only allowed to take the exam twice, so it’s imperative that you prepare extensively in order to pass the exam before you run out of attempts. Some of the tools and study guides that you can use to improve your score and pass the exam are outlined below.
View complete answer

How much should you study for the Afoqt?

Step 2: Establish Your Study Schedule – When your test date is a month or more away it’s easy to let the procrastination bug fly off with your study plan. You’re busy, you probably have a ton of things to get done today, carving out time to study for the AFOQT is difficult.

  • But, if it were easy – would it really be of much interest to you? Doubtful.
  • Make time to set your study schedule TODAY.
  • Test day will arrive before you know it.
  • Studying most days of the week will increase the likelihood of a higher test score.
  • Many students prepping for standardized tests have found studying 5 days a week in three 30-minute intervals (1.5 hours each day) proves helpful.
You might be interested:  When Do Secondary Applications Come Out For Medical School?

Writing has also been shown to help people commit things to memory. Flashcards are your friend. In the month leading up to your AFOQT test date, block out time to take three full-length ‘Form T’ practice tests – taking the last test a week before test day.
View complete answer

How long does it take to grade the Afoqt?

The Air Force Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT) Explained – Part 3 How To Study For The Afoqt BogiDope fans, we are wrapping up this three part series with this final article. In theory, you have learned about, studied and taken the AFOQT. Now you are patiently waiting to receive your scores and understand where you fall in the order of merit of AFOQT scores.

  • This article will help you understand where you can find your AFOQT scores, give you a rough gauge of your competitiveness based on your scores and explain the process for taking the test a second time.
  • Let jump right in.
  • When Can I Get My AFOQT Scores? AFOQT answer sheets are graded at AFPC headquarters at Randolph AFB (San Antonio, TX).

The answer sheets are delivered via traditional mail, so the turnaround time is largely influenced by the geographical distance from your testing center to San Antonio, TX. Most applicants report waiting anywhere from 3 days to 2 weeks to receive scores.

Once your scores are processed, you can view them on this, You will need to enter your social security number and last name, and select your testing center from the list. This page will provide you with your Pilot, Navigator, Academic Aptitude, Verbal, and Quantitative subscores. To access your ABM subscore, you will need to visit this on the AFPC PCSM website and enter your first name, initials, and the last 4 digits of your social security number.

This page also retrieves a CSO subscore, but this is identical to the Navigator subscore available on the previously mentioned site. If you are working with a Line Officer Recruiter or you are an Air Force Academy or Air Force ROTC cadet, your recruiter or your cadre will be sent a copy of your scores when they are processed.

If you are applying with a Guard or Reserve unit, you’ll likely need to retrieve the scores yourself and include copies of the score printout sheets in your application. Minimum AFOQT Scores The Air Force has established sets of minimum AFOQT score requirements which must be achieved in order to apply for a commission.

These requirements differ depending on the position being sought and are listed below. Pilot and RPA Operator AFOQT Score Minimums Pilot: 25* Navigator/CSO: (no minimum)* ABM: (no minimum) Academic Aptitude: (no minimum) Verbal: 15 Quantitative: 10 *Previously, Pilot/RPA applicants were also required to have a minimum Navigator/CSO score of 10 and a combined Pilot and Navigator/CSO subscore total of 50.

  • These requirements have been removed according to the latest version of,
  • However, many Guard and Reserve units still utilize these requirements.
  • CSO AFOQT Score Minimums Pilot: (no minimum)* Navigator/CSO: 25* ABM: (no minimum) Academic Aptitude: (no minimum) Verbal: 15 Quantitative: 10 *Previously, Navigator/CSO applicants were also required to have a minimum Pilot score of 10 and a combined Navigator/CSO and Pilot subscore total of 50.

These requirements have been removed according to the latest version of, However, many Guard and Reserve units still utilize these requirements. ABM AFOQT Score Minimums Pilot: (no minimum)* Navigator/CSO: (no minimum)* ABM: 25 Academic Aptitude: (no minimum) Verbal: 15 Quantitative: 10 *Previously, ABM applicants were also required to have a minimum Pilot score of 10, a minimum Navigator/CSO score of 10, and a combined Pilot and Navigator/CSO subscore total of 50.

General Commissioning (Non-Rated) AFOQT Score Minimums Pilot: (no minimum) Navigator/CSO: (no minimum) ABM: (no minimum) Academic Aptitude: (no minimum) Verbal: 15 Quantitative: 10 Competitive AFOQT Scores

There’s no magic set of AFOQT score thresholds that will guarantee you will be selected with a Pilot slot. Applicants at the upper end of the spectrum are sometimes not selected, just as applicants with unimpressive scores sometimes snag slots. The rest of your application is obviously very important.

  1. That said, it’s always a good idea to do everything within your control to maximize your odds, so you might as well study hard and do the best you possibly can.
  2. We’re often asked, “What AFOQT scores do I need to be competitive?” I call this the “how do I compare” statistic.
  3. The following AFOQT score figures are based on a fairly small sample size of 46 Pilot selectees from some of the Officer Training School selection boards for fiscal years 2013 through 2017.

In this example we averaged the scores (in each category) for the individuals who were selected to pilot training. It’s important to note that these statistics don’t actually represent one individual person. Instead it is simply an average. So here is what we found (keep in mind this is a small sample size and it always depends).

  • Average Pilot Selectee AFOQT Scores (based on individual subscores) Pilot: 90.8 Navigator/CSO: 89 Academic Aptitude: 79.3 Verbal: 78.3 Quantitative: 73.6 Here is another “how do I compare example” from an official Air Force Reserve site (sample size unknown).
  • Air Force Reserve Command (AFRC) publishes official statistics following most of their unsponsored rated selection boards.

The following are the average AFOQT subscores for Pilot selectees from the first board of fiscal year 2016 (16-01). AFRC 16-01 Average Pilot Selectee AFOQT Scores (based on individual subscores) Pilot: 91.5 Navigator/CSO: 76.2 Academic Aptitude: 64.4 Verbal: 60.3 Quantitative: 61 Ok thats enough statics for one article.

  1. Don’t get wrapped up in the comparison game.
  2. You have to do your best on every part of the test and that is all you can control.
  3. It’s important to note that GPA and (which utilizes the AFOQT Pilot subscore in its calculation) are also important aptitude factors that are reviewed as parts of your application.

But as you can see, you don’t have to score above the 90th percentile in each component to get a Pilot slot. In fact, since the AFOQT Pilot score directly affects your PCSM score, often that’s the one that truly matters. In my experience, a 90+ Pilot score with sub-50s in every other subsection is more competitive than 80’s across the board.

They’re hiring you to fly, not write a novel, so make sure you focus on knocking the Pilot sections out of the park! It’s impossible, however, to predict exactly how much weight each member of a selection board will put into aptitude scores and it’s easy to drive yourself crazy comparing yourself to others.

Keep in mind that board members are aware that standardized testing is not a perfectly accurate measure of potential military aviator performance and that other factors about character and work ethic are sometimes better indicators of potential for success.

  • Make the rest of your application as outstanding as you possibly can and the selection board might give you the benefit of the doubt if your scores don’t seem competitive.
  • Can The AFOQT Be Taken Multiple Times? states that two AFOQT test attempts are authorized without the need for a waiver, but the retest must occur at least 90 days after the first testing attempt.

These regulations also indicate that a waiver to retake the test within this waiting period is a possibility if justification is sent to the AFPC Testing Office for approval, but it is likely that this would require extenuating circumstances. Taking the AFOQT a third time is a possibility with a waiver, but approval requires an applicant to provide substantive proof of pursuing relevant education since the last test attempt, such as completing a related college course or gaining significant flight experience.

  • Those who have not yet taken the Form T version of the test but have taken Form S twice are also permitted to take the test one more time, but must submit a request to the AFPC Testing Office to gain approval.
  • It is important to note that the scores from the most recent test attempt are the ones that count, even if they are worse than the original ones.

Prepare well and be sure that you will make an improvement if you retest. Next Steps After Taking the AFOQT If you’re not happy with your AFOQT scores, don’t beat yourself up. You can retake the test 90 days after your first attempt and just having the experience of knowing what to expect the second time is sure to make a positive difference.

Discipline yourself and create a regimented study routine. By the time you’re eligible to retest, you’ll have gained a wealth of knowledge and will be able to approach your retake with confidence. Just be sure that you put in the effort and truly commit to studying. If you do worse on your retake, you’re out of luck because the most recent scores are the valid ones.

Be absolutely sure that you’re significantly more prepared so that you don’t waste your retake. If you’re satisfied with your AFOQT scores, then congratulations — you’ve gotten one of the most important (and stressful) components of your application out of the way! If you haven’t already taken the TBAS, you can now do so and receive a PCSM score.

  1. If you’ve taken the TBAS before, your PCSM score will now be available since it utilizes the AFOQT Pilot subscore in its calculation.
  2. Breathe a sigh of relief and start making sure the rest of your application is top notch.
  3. Aptitude scores are important, but the “whole-person concept” is a reality and the selection boards want to see that you’re a well-rounded person.

Acing the AFOQT is a huge help but it doesn’t guarantee selection. Your scores should augment a well-crafted application rather than attempt to make up for an otherwise subpar application. Conclusion We hope you have learned a ton and enjoyed this three part series.

BogiDope enjoyed putting it together and hopes it will help you prepare for the AFOQT. It might seem overwhelming to you but it’s just another step in the process. The path to the cockpit is a long journey. Keep taking strides to attain your dream and continue to put one foot in front of the other. Note: this article was written using mulitple different sources.

These sources include, the Pilot Candidate Selection Method website, prep books for the AFOQT test, USAF AFPC Official AFOQT Form T Prep Course and multiple phone calls to understand the process. Welcome back to Part 2 of our series about career progression for Air Force pilots, from the pilot perspective.

  • If you haven’t already read Part Part 1: Air Force Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (AFROTC) Table of Contents What is AFROTC? How to Join and Requirements Scholarship Opportunities Cadet Life – If you’re headed to pilot training, you absolutely must read our 3-part series on Winning UPT.
  • It explains how to perform well in your training We’re going to discuss career progression today.

As a former Active Duty pilot, I’ll admit I don’t love this topic. You have to understand: I’m Have you seen Top Gun or any of the (objectively terrible) Iron Eagle movies more times than you’re willing to admit? Do you daydream of : The Air Force Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT) Explained – Part 3
View complete answer

Do I need to study for the Afoqt?

Preparing for the AFOQT In most cases, examinees are only allowed to take the exam twice, so it’s imperative that you prepare extensively in order to pass the exam before you run out of attempts. Some of the tools and study guides that you can use to improve your score and pass the exam are outlined below.
View complete answer

Is the Afoqt easier than the SAT?

The AFOQT is not too difficult, but it’s very different from most tests most people have taken. It’s more similar to an IQ test than it is to, say, the SATs. The geospatial sections and navigation sections are not particularly difficult, but if you’ve never seen them before, it will take some time to figure it out.
View complete answer