How To Study For Step 3?

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How To Study For Step 3
How to plan for Step 3 exam prep: – 1. Realize that USMLE Step 3 is not like the others. Step 3 is different from the other components of the USMLE in many ways. As a result, preparing for it requires a tailored approach that may not be the same as what you utilized for Step 1 or Step 2 CK.

  1. First of all, the exam is divided into two separate days that can be, but do not have to be, contiguous.
  2. The first day consists of your standard multiple choice questions in a timed setting, while the second day is similar but with the addition of clinical cases.
  3. The cases cover a variety of clinical scenarios from emergency, to acute care, to chronic care, and you’ll need to familiarize yourself with triage as well as treatment.

Overall, Step 3 heavily emphasizes triage and the delivery of care. And of course, don’t forget to study ethics and biostatistics.2. Establish a timeline and a test date. The first step in any study plan is to develop a timeline to establish boundaries regarding when you plan to take the exam and how much time you will have to prepare.

  • We must reiterate that leaving an open-ended Step 3 test date is strongly discouraged, as the associated perception that you have an unlimited amount of time to study may lead to inefficiency and procrastination.
  • Moreover, when you later attempt to book your test date, you may find that the dates previously available are no longer options and you have to defer your exam to later or travel to a distant testing center.

Which dates to select for the exam should be based on consideration of your schedule and when would be reasonable for you to both prepare for the test and have two days off to take it. Specifically, you should be realistic about when you will have time to study.

  • If you have a series of challenging rotations on which you will be putting in long hours, it’s probably not wise to schedule your exam at the end of said block.
  • What would be preferable is to identify a period of time when you may be off or have a lighter workload, during which you may have nights and/or weekends available for studying.

Finally, one last aspect is how you want to schedule the two days relative to each other. Many people elect to take both parts back to back and finish the exam in two days, while others might prefer to have a break in between the days. The decision is personal, though I’d recommend taking a few days in between to recuperate and prepare a bit more for the clinical cases as they are lengthy, have a difficult user interface, and are something you have not yet encountered in your career.3.

Don’t neglect practice questions and practice tests. The single most important component of any study plan is incorporating practice questions. Among qbanks, the best and go-to option is UWorld which, much like it did for Step 1 and Step 2 CK, incorporates the highest-yield concepts into questions with well-written and researched explanations.

In fact, this is the best place to start your studying, and you should make it a priority to get through a first pass with reasonable efficiency to afford time to return to these questions and do as much of a second pass as possible. One great advantage to the UWorld qbank is that it accounts for, and will test you on, the higher-level ethics and biostatistics questions that you will encounter in the first test day.

  • If you finish UWorld once, or even twice, and have time remaining in your study period, you may be looking for more questions.
  • AMBOSS is a newer qbank that also offers Step 3-specific questions through which you can work.
  • The AMBOSS questions tend to be slightly more challenging, in that they require you to pick up on minute details in longer vignettes in order to arrive at the right answer.

Regarding practice tests, your choices are the same as they were for the previous board exams and specifically are the NBMEs and UWorld Self-Assessments. It is worthwhile to at least do the latter and then consider also purchasing the former as time permits.

While these tests will result in a three-digit conversion of your raw score, you should note that they are not full-length and only cover concepts tested in the multiple choice components on the exam days; they do not incorporate the CCS component which you will have to practice separately as described below.4.

Buy a textbook to assist your Step 3 studying. Regarding textbooks for Step 3, much like Step 2 CK, a single stand-alone textbook does not exist as the go-to resource in the way that First Aid is for Step 1. To that end, there is no single option that you should feel compelled to use.

One textbook that is worth looking into is First Aid for the USMLE Step 3, While it’s not realistic or practical to read this or another similar resource from cover to cover, one way that it may be incorporated is by using it as a secondary resource to take a deeper dive into certain topics you self-diagnose as areas of opportunity.

For example, if you feel like you are consistently getting questions about the indications for different classes of antiarrhythmics wrong and, despite the question explanations, still do not have a clear framework for how to think about these medications, it may be worthwhile to review this section in the textbook you choose.

What is not necessary or advisable is spending excess time reviewing the entire cardiology chapter to relearn concepts with which you already felt comfortable.5. Use computer-based case simulations. A unique aspect of Step 3 is the Primum® Computer-based Case Simulations (CCS) component of the exam. While the multiple choice components of Step 3 may be very similar to what you had experienced on Step 1 and Step 2 CK, this part will be very different.

The single most important recommendation for approaching these cases is to become familiar with the software and how you will be timed and scored. Specifically, on the day of the exam, you will be presented with thirteen cases which start with a brief patient vignette including whether the context is an emergency department or an outpatient clinic and routine vitals signs.

It is then your responsibility to perform a physical examination and begin to order diagnostic tests and begin to develop a therapeutic plan. As you work through these cases, there are two simultaneous clocks running. One clock counts down how much real-world time you have remaining in the simulation which generally starts at ten or twenty minutes.

The other clock moves forward in simulated time to correspond to the evolution of the condition of a patient. If this seems confusing, you should rest assured that it is not intuitive for most people. However, for that reason, it is all the more important to do the practice cases within the UWorld interface to develop dexterity with placing orders in this simulated context and hone your clinical reasoning.

If you finish these with time to spare, there are so-called printable cases that walk through additional examples so that you can continue to familiarize yourself with the rubrics with which you will be scored. The Bottom Line In short, Step 3 is not the same as Step 1 or Step 2 CK and therefore requires a specialized approach.

While practice questions and supplementary textbooks remain the backbone of tackling the multiple choice questions, handling the CCS cases and the logistics of having the test span two days create added levels of complexity to the testing experience.
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How long do you need to study for Step 3?

How long does it take to prepare for STEP 3 USMLE? – Generally, students take between 2 to 8 weeks to prepare for Step 3. However, the time to prepare for USMLE STEP 3 varies based on your prior knowledge but. For me, I had a good foundation from my STEP 1 and STEP 2CK; therefore, it took me around four weeks to prepare for this exam. Get personalized study plan and schedule, study resources, and subject-specific tutoring to ace your USMLE exam!
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How many months to prepare for Step 3?

How Did You Perform on Prior Exams? – Ultimately, the of future performance are prior performance. This includes percentages on UWorld question banks, NMBE practice tests, and the prior USMLE exams for which you sat. If you passed Step 1, and passed Step 2 by a comfortable margin (Step 2 passing score is 214) then you likely have a strong knowledge base that will give you an advantage going into your Step 3 preparation.
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Is Step 3 hard to pass?

3. Is the USMLE Step 3 Hard? – Yes, Step 3 of the USMLE is longer than both previous exams (two days in length) and consists of 412 multiple choice questions as well as 13 case simulation questions. However, you shouldn’t have a hard time with the exam if you are well-prepared. The test has an overall pass-rate of 97%.
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Is Step 3 the easiest?

Is It Hard To Pass Step 3? – Compared to the preceding two steps of USMLE, Step 3 is not as hard, However, that does not mean that you can take this exam easily. You will have to prepare for it well enough and familiarize yourself with the CCS cases, as these make the exam unique and on its own.

As much as possible, try to answer at least 60% of the questions correctly to reach the passing score. Keep in mind that your overall performance on the case simulations will greatly affect your score and is the bid determinant of whether you will pass or not. Most people claim this is the easiest step among the three, but it is still essential that you match your knowledge with your skills, timing, and understanding of the cases,

You can do this by participating in practice tests before the actual date of the examination.
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Is Step 1 2 or 3 hardest?

Which USMLE Exam is Hardest? – So which USMLE step exam is hardest? While many factors might influence the answer to this question, we can look to the data to give us some insight. According to the 2021 Performance Data from the USMLE, Step 1 had the lowest passing rate, with 95% of US/Canadian students passing and 77% of examinees from non-US/Canadian schools passing.

  1. Step 3 had a slightly better pass rate, with 97% of US/Canadian examinees and 87% of non-US/Canadian examinees passing.
  2. Step 2 had the highest passing rates for both US/Canadian students (98%) and non-US/Canadian test takers (88%).
  3. This data suggests that Step 1 was the hardest exam to pass.
  4. No matter which step you are preparing for, the USMLE exams are challenging.

It is important to plan your study schedule, start early, and do lots of practice questions and exams. If you are struggling with any aspect of your preparation, a tutor can help get you on track to succeed. Contact Elite Medical Prep to schedule a complimentary consultation today!
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Does anyone care about Step 3 score?

Does the Step 3 Score Matter? – Your Step 3 grading will not impact your medical licensing unless you fail because you likely have a residency before you take this Step. If you plan to apply for a fellowship, your Step 3 score matters a bit more because it can bolster your application to help you achieve a better spot.

In that case, you should strive to do more than pass. A 230 or 240 will look much better than a barely passing score. Whether you plan to apply for a fellowship or not, you should maintain the consistent study habits you developed for the earlier tests. Set aside time every day for a few months to study question banks and other focused materials.

During heavier rotations, you may decrease your review time. Then, reserve more study time during lighter rotations. Creating a schedule can increase your chances of passing the exam on your first attempt.
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Is UWorld similar to Step 3?

UWorld’s Step 3 self-assessments closely replicate the experience of the actual Step 3 exam to help you prepare and boost your confidence for the test day. Know when you are ready to take the exam with our self-assessments.
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Is Step 2 or 3 harder?

What are the differences between STEP I, STEP II and STEP III? Why are there three STEP Papers I hear you ask? The STEP Papers (Sixth Term Examination Papers) had the original purpose of being entrance tests for Cambridge University Maths Courses. A-levels just weren’t hard enough to give a good enough indication of whether a student would survive the notorious Cambridge Maths Degree.

STEP I and STEP II if they only did Maths A-level STEP II and STEP III if they did Further Maths too.

STEP I and STEP II contain material from the Maths Syllabus, with the addition of a couple of extra topics such as proof by induction and the need to understand “necessary and sufficient conditions”. In addition, the applied sections of the paper will contain topics found in the Statistics 1 & 2 (S1/S2) and Mechanics 1 & 2 (M1/M2) modules.

STEP III contains material from the Further Maths Syllabus: Further Pure 1, 2, and 3 (FP1/FP2/FP3). Some of the applied questions may require knowledge of concepts found in the more advanced applied modules such as M3/M4/M5 or S3/S4. A couple of topics not found in these applied modules such as moment generating functions in probability, could also make an appearance in STEP III.

As most students don’t cover these more tricky applied modules, we at recommend that students devote a higher proportion of their preparation time to the Pure Maths questions. Difficulty STEP I is meant to be the easier of the three Cambridge STEP papers.

  • STEP II and III are meant to be equivalent in difficulty, mainly differing in the topics they tests.
  • However, as STEP III contains more challenging topics anyway, it would be considered by most as the hardest paper by far.
  • Not only is it the hardest of the STEP papers, but probably the most difficult entrance exam of any university course, ever.

Do other universities ask for STEP II and III? Naturally, ever offer will be different. But, as a general rule, most other universities who give STEP offers (Warwick, Bath, UCL, Bristol) ask for a particular grade (often 1 or 2) in ANY STEP paper. Naturally, you’d probably go for the easier one, ie STEP I.

But if you happened to have a bad day on the day of the exam, you might appreciate the chance to take the STEP II exam too, in case you fared better! Also, practising questions from both STEP I and II would undoubtedly give you better grounding and preparation for STEP style questions overall. is brilliant preparation for the style of questions you will encounter at university.

Even if you don’t need it, you’ll be doing yourself a massive favour in the long term, if you seriously study some STEP III questions. We at will be running over the next few months. To be the first to hear about our course launches, please sign up to the right.
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Is 1 month enough to study for Step 3?

Timing is everything – Some eager medical students want to take Step 3 as soon as possible. I applaud the proactivity and desire to knock this test out immediately, but – shhh- there’s a way to make your life easier, Step 3 becomes way more approachable after a few months of intern level work.

  • The questions on the test have a lot of alignment with the day to day practice of an intern.
  • Naturally, the more all-encompassing disciplines (like internal medicine or general surgery) will afford you a better -balanced education than a surgical subspecialty.
  • But the amount of medicine that you get entrenched in as an intern is magnitudes greater than what you see as a student.

It’s been said that the first 6 weeks of internship equated to the 4 previous years of medical school. Put simply, the more intern work you do, the easier the test will be. USMLE Step 3 requires a solid month of preparation, so for the sake of your sanity see if you can schedule it for the second half of intern year, during a time which might give you a chance to study (e.g.
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How do you know if I will pass Step 3?

What is a Passing Score on USMLE Step 3? – Currently, the passing score for Step 3 is 198. Per the USMLE website, that typically translates to getting about 60% of questions correct on the exam. This can be a good marker to use when completing practice questions and helps assess your readiness for the exam.
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What time of year should I take Step 3?

WHEN SHOULD I TAKE STEP 3? – One important thing to note about Step 3 is that the 2 days do not have to be completed back-to-back, You are free to schedule them as you please. Many people want to knock the test out in 2 consecutive days and be done with it.

  • I was one of them.
  • Others scheduled the test on 2 spaced out days during the same week, or even 1 week apart.
  • There is no right answer.
  • Go about this how you please and however is feasible in terms of scheduling with your residency program.
  • The next thing to consider is what point during the year to take the exam.

In general, Step 3 is taken during intern year of residency, so that license applications can be completed at the end of intern year and received during second year. Different programs may have more specific requirements, but sometime during intern year is the general rule.

  • There is no right answer as to when to take the exam.
  • The most influential factor will be your residency schedule.
  • I would recommend finding a time during the year when you might have a few weeks or even a month of consecutive outpatient or consult time (if possible—I know this is less feasible in certain specialties).

It is easiest to schedule Step 3 for an outpatient block when you will not miss the clinical duties of inpatient and require coverage. Maybe more importantly, if you schedule at the end of one month of outpatient, you will have those first 3 weeks to prepare.
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Has anyone failed Step 3?

How To Study For Step 3 Dr. David Sola-Del Valle and Dr. Taylor Purvis contributed to this post. After surviving medical school, Step 1, Step 2 CK, and possibly even an internship and parts of residency, you have just failed the last test standing in your way of obtaining a permanent medical license: Step 3.

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As of January 1, 2020, the passing score for USMLE Step 3 is 198. After so many years of studying and so many exams passed, you cannot fathom how on earth you failed Step 3. Let me assure you that you are not alone. Many people fail Step 3 every year, especially after new changes were made to the exam format and content in recent years.

There is now more emphasis on statistics and the inclusion of Step 1-esque material.
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Does Step 3 score matter for residency?

So, does Step 3 matter? – It depends on your situation. If you already matched into residency, your score doesn’t matter, but it does matter that you pass the exam for both licensing and potentially fellowship applications. However, if you have only matched into a prelim or transitional year, Step 3 can help bolster your application for a categorical spot.
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Is there a curve on Step 3?

The USMLE® Exams

Students and physicians trained outside the US take the same test, and are scored by the same standard as US medical school students.USMLE examination is designed to test problem solving, not simple memorization.

USMLE Step 1 is a multiple choice computerized USMLE examination that tests knowledge of subjects learned in the first two years of US Medical School and most of EU Medical Schools.

Basic Medical Science ExamAssesses mastery of basic medical knowledge using clinical vignettes350 questions / 7 hours + 45 minutes break timeAverage Question Length: 60 to 70 words We recommend that this USMLE exam be taken first!

How To Study For Step 3 How To Study For Step 3 USMLE Step 2 CK is a multiple choice computerized USMLE examination that tests clinical subjects learned during the last years of Medical School.

CK = Clinical KnowledgeBasic clinical problems assessing preparedness to practice under supervision.370 questions / 8 hours + 45 minute break timeAverage Question Length: 100 to 110 wordsPrimary Care focus with emphasis on Internal Medicine (60% of more of the exam)A good background in Basic Sciences essential to do well. We recommend that this USMLE exam be taken after Step 1.

USMLE Step 2 CS is a “practical” live exam using standardized patients that is meant to test a doctor’s interpersonal, communication and clinical skills, The Step 2 CS USMLE exam tests how doctors take a patient history, perform a physical exam, and write up the appropriate patient note. It also evaluates “bedside manner”, patient interaction, and spoken English skills.

CS = Clinical SkillsOne day exam with 12 simulated patients (11 scored, 1 experimental)Can only be taken in the US (Atlanta, Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles and Philadelphia)Exam Basics25 minutes per encounter (15 minutes per patient / 10 minutes for clinical note)Step 2 CS Scoring; 3 dimensionsIntegrated Clinical Encounter (ICE)Communication/Interpersonal skill (CIS)Spoken English proficience (SEP) Failing one part of CS, means failing ALL ! Standardized patients do the scoring using a prepared check-listEncounters are videotaped, and a subset scored independently to ensure reliabilityStep 2 CS can be taken whenever students want, but we recommend that it be taken after the completion of Step 1 and 2CK.

How To Study For Step 3 How To Study For Step 3 USMLE Step 3 combines multiple choice questions and free-form clinical cases on computer, and also tests patient management skills at the level of the 1 st year of Residency.

Two day exam (16 hour examination)480 multiple-choice questions and 9 clinical case simulations (computerized)Assesses capacity for independent medical practiceComplex issues/patients

Results for the USMLE Step 1, Step 2 CK and Step 3 exams are provided using 3-digit scoring scale.

Exam 3-digit passing score
Step 1 194
Step 2 CK 209
Step 3 196
Step 2 CS Pass/Fail

Many people misunderstand what these scores mean. The 3-digit score does NOT mean the number of questions. (The USMLE does not publish percentile information.) Understand that 3-digit scale is invented scoring scale intended to obscure information like how many questions the student got correct in USMLE exam.

  1. All the student will really know when they see their results is that higher is better and lower is worse.
  2. To have a reasonable chance at getting a residency position, student should try to score about 220 on the 3-digit scale.
  3. If they fall short of this mark, they can still get a residency position, but it will be harder.

Note that the USMLE examination is not scored “on a curve”. Students are not scored against each other, but relative to a per-set annual standard. This standard is constant for the year. Both US medical students and IMGs are scored using the same standard. How To Study For Step 3 : The USMLE® Exams
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How many questions should I do for Step 3?

Step 3 Exam Content How To Study For Step 3 Step 3 is designed to assess the knowledge and skills of physicians who are assuming independent responsibility for providing general medical care to patients, with emphasis on patient management in ambulatory settings. It is the final examination in the USMLE sequence leading to a license to practice medicine without supervision.

  1. The examination material is prepared by examination committees broadly representing the medical profession.
  2. The committees comprise recognized experts in their fields, including both academic and non-academic practitioners, as well as members of state medical licensing boards.
  3. Step 3 content reflects a data-based model of generalist medical practice in the United States.

The test items and cases reflect the clinical situations that a general, as-yet undifferentiated, physician might encounter within the context of a specific setting. Step 3 provides a final assessment of physicians assuming independent responsibility for delivering general medical care.

  • The Step 3 examination devotes attention to the importance of assessing the knowledge and skills of physicians who are assuming independent responsibility for providing general medical care to patients.
  • The first day of the Step 3 examination is referred to as Foundations of Independent Practice (FIP), and the second day is referred to as Advanced Clinical Medicine (ACM).

Step 3 consists of multiple-choice questions (MCQs), also known as items, and computer-based case simulations. Step 3 is a two-day examination. The first day of testing includes 232 multiple-choice items divided into 6 blocks of 38-39 items; 60 minutes are allotted for completion of each block of test items.

  1. There are approximately 7 hours in the test session on the first day, including 45 minutes of break time and a 5-minute optional tutorial.
  2. Note that the amount of time available for breaks may be increased by finishing a block of test items or the optional tutorial before the allotted time expires.
  3. There are approximately 9 hours in the test session on the second day.

This day of testing includes a 5-minute optional tutorial followed by 180 multiple-choice items, divided into 6 blocks of 30 items; 45 minutes are allotted for completion of each block of test items. The second day also includes a 7-minute CCS tutorial.

This is followed by 13 case simulations, each of which is allotted a maximum of 10 or 20 minutes of real time. A minimum of 45 minutes is available for break time. There is an optional survey at the end of the second day, which can be completed if time allows. This test day focuses on assessment of knowledge of basic medical and scientific principles essential for effective health care.

Content areas covered include application of foundational sciences; understanding of biostatistics and epidemiology/population health, and interpretation of the medical literature; and application of social sciences, including communication and interpersonal skills, medical ethics, systems-based practice, and patient safety.

The test day also includes content assessing knowledge of diagnosis and management, particularly focused on knowledge of history and physical examination, diagnosis, and use of diagnostic studies. This test day consists solely of multiple-choice questions and includes some of the newer item formats, such as those based on scientific abstracts and pharmaceutical advertisements.

This test day focuses on assessment of the ability to apply comprehensive knowledge of health and disease in the context of patient management and the evolving manifestation of disease over time. Content areas covered include assessment of knowledge of diagnosis and management, particularly focused on prognosis and outcome, health maintenance and screening, therapeutics, and medical decision making.
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Is Step 3 necessary?

Step 3 is the final exam in the USMLE series of examinations. It is part of the licensing requirements for Doctors of Medicine (M.D.), including international medical graduates aiming to practice medicine in the United States. Generally, it is a pre-requisite of the majority of the state licensing boards.
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What is the highest possible Step 3 score?

Reported scores for Step 1, Step 2 CK, and Step 3 range from 1 to 300.
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Is Step 1 as tricky as UWorld?

What Is UWorld? – UWorld is an online learning platform that features thought-provoking questions, thorough explanations and customizable study blocks that will help you with USMLE exam preparation. The frequently updated content ensures you learn and master the most relevant material that helps confront your individual USMLE Step 1 strengths and weaknesses.
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What is the most difficult medical exam in the world?

United States Medical Licensing Examination This one among the 20 toughest exams in world has three stages. It is not easy to practise medicine in United States. A pass in USMLE is a must if one has to practise medicine in USA. USMLE (United States Medical Licensing Examination) is said to be a very tough test.
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Is Step 2 as bad as Step 1?

Neeta Malviya, Class of 2017 – About the Test Step 2 CK is a 9-hour exam taken at the beginning of the fourth year of medical school after completing the core clerkships. The test essentially feels like a really long shelf exam, but the style of questions is very similar since the NBME writes all of these exams.

  1. The majority of people do much better on Step 2 than on Step 1 even with less studying.
  2. This test focuses more on the next step in a patient presentation.
  3. Questions such as which lab or test to order next.
  4. There will also be plenty of diagnosis questions as well.
  5. Overall the test seems to be less memorization heavy than Step 1 given that there is none of the nitty gritty biochemistry, pathway, or mechanism questions.

Study Materials UWorld (a must): You will be using UWorld throughout the year to prepare for your individual clerkship shelf examinations. While studying for Step 2CK you can reset the QBank for free and redo all of the questions from the year. Again, you should focus on understanding the explanations and really reading through all of them well.

  • The exam is very similar to UWorld.
  • First Aid for the USMLE Step 2 CK (optional): I did not personally use this resource but I know several people who did.
  • The general consensus was that it was definitely not as good as First Aid for Step 1 and was lacking in organization.
  • You can use this as a reference for individual topics that you feel that you are weak in based on your performance on UWorld.

Master the Boards Step 2 CK (optional): I liked having a book to read through for the exam and this was the one that I ended up picking. I felt that it highlighted in bullet points some important concepts for the exam. Beware that certain aspects of this book are outdated in regards to guidelines and recommendations.

NBME Practice tests (optional): I found the practice tests helpful because it let me know where I was standing in regards to my score and if I was in the range I was aiming for on the real test. While these tests do not provide you with answers they do provide you with the questions that you missed and you can go back and read about it on your own to figure out the answer.

Individual Shelf Prep Books (optional): I had accumulated these books throughout MS3 from studying for shelves and only pulled them out if wanted to review a very specific topic that I felt that I maybe had forgotten. Peds was my first clerkship so I felt very rusty on those questions, which is why I brushed up a little bit on some of the chapters from my peds shelf books.

  • Otherwise, you really do not to be reading entire shelf prep books.
  • Prep Time Depending on your own pace and preferences, you can choose to take a dedicated month to study for CK or you can study while concurrently on a lighter elective month.
  • Plenty of people have chosen either route and have done well.

Step 2 does not require the same degree of intensive studying as Step 1 did as you will have already completed a year long of shelf exams and studying for those will have you pretty prepared for CK. Scheduling Your Test Schedule your test as early as you are able to so that you have the most dates to choose from and can take it in your desired testing center.

  1. The school now requires Step 2 CK to be taken by the last week of September due to certain residency programs wanting to see the score prior to granting interviews.
  2. Plan accordingly because it is during this time frame that you will be completing your Sub-I, away rotations, and residency applications.

Taking it sooner rather than later is definitely sound advice so that you still have MS3 fresh in your head and you can get CK out of the way before you have to worry about residency applications and away rotations. I ended up having to take CK in the middle of an away rotation, which was not fun, so take it as early as possible! Other Advice Step 2CK really tests your endurance more than anything else.

  1. You know your stuff from studying throughout the year, so make sure you do your best to prepare to take an exhausting 9 hour exam.
  2. Bring plenty of food, snacks, and ibuprofen/acetaminophen just in case.
  3. Be careful of your caffeine intake if it has you running to the restroom too often during the exam.

I took a simulated full length test by doing 8 blocks together under the same timing and break conditions as the real test in order to plan out my breaks. Resist the urge to rush through the last block because you are tired. I took a longer break before the last block and stretched to wake myself up.
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Is 1 month enough to study for Step 3?

Timing is everything – Some eager medical students want to take Step 3 as soon as possible. I applaud the proactivity and desire to knock this test out immediately, but – shhh- there’s a way to make your life easier, Step 3 becomes way more approachable after a few months of intern level work.

  1. The questions on the test have a lot of alignment with the day to day practice of an intern.
  2. Naturally, the more all-encompassing disciplines (like internal medicine or general surgery) will afford you a better -balanced education than a surgical subspecialty.
  3. But the amount of medicine that you get entrenched in as an intern is magnitudes greater than what you see as a student.

It’s been said that the first 6 weeks of internship equated to the 4 previous years of medical school. Put simply, the more intern work you do, the easier the test will be. USMLE Step 3 requires a solid month of preparation, so for the sake of your sanity see if you can schedule it for the second half of intern year, during a time which might give you a chance to study (e.g.
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Is 3 months enough for step?

Before you create your USMLE Step 1 Study Plan: Know where you stand – Have you already taken the NBME assessment exam ? If you haven’t already taken this comprehensive, timed practice exam, take one at least two months before you the clock starts ticking on your USMLE Step 1 schedule.

Your NBME results will help you prepare for USMLE Step 1 studying by knowing what you need to cover to achieve your desired score. If you scored 200 or better, you have a good knowledge base and your USMLE Step 1 preparation time should primarily focus on review and practice questions. If you scored below that, you’re going to have to put in a significant amount of effort to relearn topics to achieve a more competitive Step 1 score or to pass easily the first time.

Be realistic about your baseline of knowledge as you set up your study schedule so you improve your odds of success ! How To Study For Step 3 Most USMLE Step 1 test-takers suggest you should begin studying at least 3 months before the exam to get the best results, but 6 months is optimal, Alternatively, students who study internationally, had a tough time in their pre-clinical years, or who have taken extended breaks from their studies will want to start reviewing a year in advance.
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Is 3 weeks enough to study for Step 2?

USMLE Step2 CS is an exam which requires practice over anything else. If clinical concepts are strong then a practice period of 3–4 weeks is more than enough for the exam. If clinical concepts (such as arriving at a differential ) are weaker then about 2 months might be required to be comfortable.
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Is Step 2 or 3 harder?

What are the differences between STEP I, STEP II and STEP III? Why are there three STEP Papers I hear you ask? The STEP Papers (Sixth Term Examination Papers) had the original purpose of being entrance tests for Cambridge University Maths Courses. A-levels just weren’t hard enough to give a good enough indication of whether a student would survive the notorious Cambridge Maths Degree.

STEP I and STEP II if they only did Maths A-level STEP II and STEP III if they did Further Maths too.

STEP I and STEP II contain material from the Maths Syllabus, with the addition of a couple of extra topics such as proof by induction and the need to understand “necessary and sufficient conditions”. In addition, the applied sections of the paper will contain topics found in the Statistics 1 & 2 (S1/S2) and Mechanics 1 & 2 (M1/M2) modules.

  1. STEP III contains material from the Further Maths Syllabus: Further Pure 1, 2, and 3 (FP1/FP2/FP3).
  2. Some of the applied questions may require knowledge of concepts found in the more advanced applied modules such as M3/M4/M5 or S3/S4.
  3. A couple of topics not found in these applied modules such as moment generating functions in probability, could also make an appearance in STEP III.

As most students don’t cover these more tricky applied modules, we at recommend that students devote a higher proportion of their preparation time to the Pure Maths questions. Difficulty STEP I is meant to be the easier of the three Cambridge STEP papers.

STEP II and III are meant to be equivalent in difficulty, mainly differing in the topics they tests. However, as STEP III contains more challenging topics anyway, it would be considered by most as the hardest paper by far. Not only is it the hardest of the STEP papers, but probably the most difficult entrance exam of any university course, ever.

Do other universities ask for STEP II and III? Naturally, ever offer will be different. But, as a general rule, most other universities who give STEP offers (Warwick, Bath, UCL, Bristol) ask for a particular grade (often 1 or 2) in ANY STEP paper. Naturally, you’d probably go for the easier one, ie STEP I.

  • But if you happened to have a bad day on the day of the exam, you might appreciate the chance to take the STEP II exam too, in case you fared better! Also, practising questions from both STEP I and II would undoubtedly give you better grounding and preparation for STEP style questions overall.
  • Is brilliant preparation for the style of questions you will encounter at university.

Even if you don’t need it, you’ll be doing yourself a massive favour in the long term, if you seriously study some STEP III questions. We at will be running over the next few months. To be the first to hear about our course launches, please sign up to the right.
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