How To Study For A Test The Night Before?

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How To Study For A Test The Night Before
Exam Revision: The Ultimate Guide to Pulling an All-Nighter

  1. Target select and important information.
  2. Leave the caffeine alone.
  3. Don’t work in bed, on the floor or on a sofa.
  4. Get an all-night study buddy.
  5. Make a schedule – with breaks.
  6. Try and get some sleep at some point.
  7. More last-minute revision tips.

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Should I study the night before a test?

4. Cramming last-minute studying – Cramming the night before an exam is one of the biggest mistakes a student could make. In this study, 160 students were asked about their studying behaviours. They found that cramming was associated with a lower GPA score.

This was also found in another study, where students who spaced out their learning achieved on average 74% on their final test, compared to those who crammed and got a 49% average. One reason why cramming doesn’t work is that it doesn’t allow time for information to be cemented into students’ long-term memory.

Studying last minute can also cause students to feel stressed. Although a little stress can be good, too much can be detrimental to their academic performance. Therefore, encourage your students to avoid cramming the night before for them to be relaxed and in the right mindset during their exams.
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Is test anxiety real?

What Can You Do? – Test anxiety can be a real problem if you’re so stressed out over a test that you can’t get past the nervousness to focus on the test questions and do your best work. Feeling ready to meet the challenge, though, can keep test anxiety at a manageable level.

  1. Use a little stress to your advantage.
  2. Stress is your body’s warning mechanism — it’s a signal that helps you prepare for something important that’s about to happen.
  3. So use it to your advantage.
  4. Instead of reacting to the stress by dreading, complaining, or fretting about the test with friends, take an active approach.

Let stress remind you to study well in advance of a test. Chances are, you’ll keep your stress from spinning out of control. After all, nobody ever feels stressed out by thoughts that they might do well on a test. Ask for help. Although a little test anxiety can be a good thing, an overdose of it is another story.

If sitting for a test gets you so stressed out that your mind goes blank and causes you to miss answers that you know, then your level of test anxiety probably needs some attention. Your teacher, a school guidance counselor, or a tutor can be good people to talk to test anxiety gets to be too much to handle Be prepared.

Some students think that going to class is all it should take to learn and do well on tests. But there’s much more to learning than just hoping to soak up everything in class. That’s why good and skills are so important — and why no amount of cramming or studying the night before a test can take the place of the deeper level of learning that happens over time with good study skills.

Many students find that their test anxiety eases when they start to study better or more regularly. It makes sense — the more you know the material, the more confident you’ll feel. Having going into a test means you expect to do well. When you expect to do well, you’ll be able to relax into a test after the normal first-moment jitters pass.

Watch what you’re thinking. If expecting to do well on a test can help you relax, what about if you expect you won’t do well? Watch out for any negative messages you might be sending yourself about the test. They can contribute to your anxiety. If you find yourself thinking negative thoughts (“I’m never any good at taking tests” or “It’s going to be terrible if I do badly on this test”), replace them with positive messages.

  • Not unrealistic positive messages, of course, but ones that are practical and true, such as “I’ve studied hard and I know the material, so I’m ready to do the best I can.” Accept mistakes.
  • Another thing you can do is to learn to keep mistakes in perspective — especially if you’re a perfectionist or you tend to be hard on yourself.

Everyone makes mistakes, and you may have even heard teachers or coaches refer to mistakes as “learning opportunities.” Learning to tolerate small failures and mistakes — like that one problem you got wrong in the math pop quiz — is a valuable skill.

How To Study For A Test The Night Before This breathing exercise can help you lift stress or switch from a difficult mood to a more positive one. How To Study For A Test The Night Before Finger count breathing is a good way to slow down and hit your internal “pause” button. How To Study For A Test The Night Before When we’re relaxed, air naturally flows deeper into our lungs. Practicing belly breathing can help you create these feelings of relaxation and calm.

And, of course, taking care of your health — such as getting, exercise, and healthy eats before a test — can help keep your mind working at its best. Everything takes time and practice, and learning to beat test anxiety is no different. Although it won’t go away overnight, facing and dealing with test anxiety will help you learn stress management, which can prove to be a valuable skill in many situations besides taking tests.
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Is it better to sleep the night before the exam?

Get a good night’s sleep – We all know how much harder it is to concentrate and retain information when we’re tired. While you might be tempted to pull all-nighter to cram for your exam tomorrow, it may have the opposite effect. Research has shown that memory and learning are consolidated during sleep, particularly in the Rapid Eye Movement (REM) phase,

  • To ensure you perform well on exam day, Dr Skeffington recommends getting 8 to 10 hours of sleep.
  • The amount of sleep you need may be different from your friends; however, most of us need between 8 to 10 hours of sleep each night.
  • If you’re getting less than this, it may impact your physical and emotional health.” To ensure you aren’t kept awake mulling over tomorrow’s exam, avoid using your phone, laptop or tablet about 30 minutes before you head to bed.

This is because most of these screens use blue light, which suppresses the secretion of melatonin, the hormone which makes us sleepy,
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Should I wake up at 2am to study?

If you are a student, studying is part and parcel of your life. It takes patience and practice to establish the best time for you to study. For some people, mornings are better 1 for studying, while for others, evening or night time enables to focus better on their studies.

According to the science of “good timing” – also known as chronobiology 2 – peak performance is hardwired into our DNA. Our biological clock, which is an inner clock embedded inside our brain since young, actually helps us decide when is our perfect timing for studying. Although new discoveries prove that timing may not be everything, it is important if you want to create and perform at your best consistently.

That said, science has indicated that learning is most effective between 10 am to 2 pm and from 4 pm to 10 pm, when the brain is in an acquisition mode. On the other hand, the least effective learning time is between 4 am and 7 am. While there is really no one best time of the day to study, let’s take a look at the benefits of studying in the morning versus the other times of the day.

Studying i n the Morning Most people would think that morning is the best time to study, as our brains tend to be the sharpest in the morning after a refreshing night’s sleep and breakfast. The natural light available is also good for your eyes and keep you alert. This period is great for opening a textbook to learn a new theory, or just reviewing your lecturer’s notes from the previous day because mornings generally give you a better recollection ability.

Studying i n the Afternoon In the afternoon, students’ brains are good at integrating new information with what they already know. During this time of day, students are able to create connections and make the information they have learned more meaningful.

  • Mornings and afternoons are better for studying also because if you get stuck midway through your study, you can always call your peers or teachers to clarify quickly, as it is the time when people are most active, or even visit the library for more information.
  • Studying a t Night For some students, they have more energy later in the day.

Hence, the evening or night time is a more effective time for them to read and study. Studying at this time also helps to improve your concentration and creativity as there are fewer distractions, and with everyone in bed, there is definitely peace and quiet.

Sleeping after studying is also said to consolidate information and improve recall. One thing to note though, do make sure you are still getting an average of 8 to 9 hours of sleep nightly. Interestingly, some research has suggested that studying at your most tired time can help your brain retain higher concentrations of new skills, such as speaking a foreign language,

This apparently even has a name to it: sleep-learning 3, Because during slow-wave sleep, the memory-consolidation process does its best work and your brain could be receiving the restoration and reactivation that it needs during its time of rest. This means that studying before bedtime can help your brain learn new things, even in your sleep.

How to find your best time to study? That said, different timings work for different students and you can find your best time of the day to study if you consider the following factors 4, Firstly, when are you most alert? Think about that, but different qualities of memories and alertness seem to be better at different times of the day for different people.

For example, you can have a better visual memory in the morning, but your critical thinking ability peaks in the afternoon. Secondly, if your optimal time is prone to distractions, such as dinner time, which might disrupt your routine, It is best to find another timing.

Lastly, make sure you select a time that you can stick to consistently, at least for a few days every week because consistency helps ensure you study daily and improves the quality of your study time. Just like each student has a unique learning style, different students may learn better at different times of the day.

But if you study at the same time every day, you will condition your mind and body gradually and soon, you will be in your best frame of mind for study. Once you know what works best for yourself, you can start your studying routine more effectively and efficiently.
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Can I pull an all-nighter to study?

How to Stay Awake After an All-Nighter – Let’s say you pulled an all-nighter to study for a final exam. Your goal goes beyond staying up all night — you also want to perform well the next day. Unfortunately, a night without sleep will affect your academic performance.

Get Outside: Sunlight helps your body recognize that it’s no longer time to sleep. So get outside as soon as possible. Fresh air will also help you stay awake. Take a Cold Shower: A cold shower will shock your body into alertness, helping you combat grogginess. It can also signal the start of a new day to your system. Exercise: Exercise might be the last thing on your mind after an all-nighter, but even a brisk walk can help your body wake up. Have a Cup of Coffee: Consider having a cup of coffee or tea in the morning to give you an energy and focus boost. But avoid caffeine later in the day, since you’ll need a good night of sleep to recover. Sleep Soon : The longer you stay awake, the more you’ll experience the negative effects of sleep deprivation. So make a plan to nap as soon as you can.

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Is it possible to study the night before and pass?

Download Article Download Article Have you ever been in a situation where it’s the night before a big test and you haven’t even cracked open a textbook or skimmed your notes? We’ve all been there. Recent research shows, however, that the lack of sleep caused by cramming may cause you to perform poorly, defeating the purpose.

  1. 1 Find a nice quiet spot to study, Make sure it’s not comfortable (like on your bed or sprawling out on the couch) because you will risk falling asleep.
    • Find or create a well-lit area. When it’s too dark around you, your body thinks, “Hey! It’s time to hit the hay!” Fool it by turning on plenty of lights, simulating daytime.
  2. 2 Remove yourself from all distractions. That means putting your phone away. You may have spent the entire semester texting during lectures, and this may be your punishment. Turn it off. While you’re at it, stay away from the iPad and laptop, too (unless you have study material on your computer) – Facebook, fantasy baseball, and Pinterest do not exist in your book right now. Advertisement
  3. 3 Eat something healthy. You may think 16 cans of cold Red Bull and five Snickers bars are the best way to go, but, sadly, they’re not. Hyping yourself up on caffeine may keep you awake initially, but you’ll just end up crashing harder later – when it’s actually test time.
    • Go for fruits. An apple does a better job at keeping you focused and awake than caffeine. It’s higher in natural sugars and it is nutritious. Nutrition should be thought of as energy in this circumstance.
    • If you’re full, you won’t be thinking about food, another reason you’ll be able to stay focused.
  4. 4 Set your alarm. Alright, so, worse comes to worst: You wake up in a pile of apple cores with ink emblazoned onto your cheek because you fell asleep on your chemistry notes. But you remembered to set your alarm, so you’re not going to miss the test. So, do it now, before you accidentally fall asleep. You may be grateful that you did.
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  1. 1 Stay calm, This part may be hard but just take a deep breath and try to gather your thoughts! Remember where you left all those textbooks and gather together some spare pieces of paper and pens. Highlighters and flashcards are also a good idea.
    • If you still have your syllabus, great. Use it as an outline. The topics that pop up more than once are likely to be on the test.
  2. 2 Start at the beginning; don’t focus on the little details! Concentrate on the bigger picture – highlight the important facts that you think could be on the test. Also remember to look closely at the vocabulary! It will obviously help your understanding if you know what a word means.
    • Read the chapter summaries (they usually do a good job at summarizing the important points). If there are no chapter summaries, then skim through the text and write down key ideas.
  3. 3 Prioritize. This is the most important part of cramming, You have a very limited amount of time – you must use it as efficiently as possible. Get down to the nitty-gritty and only study what you think is worthy of being on the test.
    • Focus on the main ideas and learn key formulas. Skip the details for now and only come back to them if you see that you have time after you have learned the key points.
    • Don’t attempt to learn everything; focus on things that will get you the most points on the exam. If your professor said the essay will be 75% of your grade, you’re best off preparing for that and skipping the multiple choice.
  4. 4 Write out important info or recite small bits out loud. This will help your brain process the material better. If you just skim your textbooks or notes you probably won’t remember anything!
    • If you’re lucky enough to have an insomniac for a roommate, grab them. Ask them to listen to you spout off about certain concepts. Relaying information to another individual is a surefire way to guarantee you understand the ins and outs of the ideas.
  5. 5 Make flash cards, This is a good way to quiz yourself and it also helps you process the information when you write out the flashcards and read them out loud! Use different colors for different topics or chapters.
    • Look for parallels, metaphors, and other memory-triggers to help you wrap your brain around complicated concepts. Write the keywords of your metaphor down to jog your memory while studying.
    • Write the information down in mnemonic devices. Dumb Kids Playing Catch On Freeway Get Squashed – Domain, Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, Species (for a happy example).
  6. 6 Take breaks. It may seem counter-intuitive, but your brain will be able to process more information if you’re not so hard on it. Study in bursts – cramming like the Energizer bunny is inefficient and saturates your mind, preventing it from taking in more. Though you’re studying a bit less, you’ll be retaining more.
    • After 45 minutes or so, get up. Stretch your body and walk around. Grab a drink, get a snack, and hop back to it in 5 to 10 minutes. You should feel a bit more refreshed and ready for action.
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  1. 1 Go to bed, If you stay up all night you will be so tired in the morning chances are you won’t remember anything! Get up in the morning about 30-45 minutes earlier and familiarize yourself with the highlighted parts of your notes and textbooks. If you made flashcards, go through them again.
    • Try to get in at least 3 hours; that’s one full sleep cycle. Waking up in the middle of one less than well-rested will be detrimental to your test score.
  2. 2 Eat breakfast. You’ve heard from everybody that a nutritious meal before an exam will help you use your brain better. Stick to a fairly normal breakfast (you don’t want to get sick) and don’t load up on anything too heavy if you have anxiety.
    • Think about this: The more food you eat before your exam, the less you will be thinking about how hungry you are, so help yourself by just eating something before your exam so you can stay at least somewhat focused.
  3. 3 Take a deep breath, Go through the information a couple of times on your way to school. Chances are if you paid attention in class and got in some good studying the night before you should be fine.
  4. 4 Ask your friend to quiz you before the test. There’s likely a few minutes before the teacher walks in, so utilize them! Take turns asking each other questions. Start with the points you are foggiest on – that way they’ll be fresh in your memory.
    • Don’t do this while you’re taking the test – getting caught cheating will result in a much worse score than you were going to get if you hadn’t.
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Add New Question

  • Question What should I do if I’m frustrated with studying? If you are frustrated with studying a boring topic, take a breather to calm yourself down. Next, force yourself to be interested in the topic. Even if you need to prepare for the most boring test, it is easier to remember something if you read it more excitedly than if you stay frustrated and reread the same material over and over because you didn’t absorb it.
  • Question The biggest exam of my life is coming up in another 3 weeks. Should I start cramming now? Yes. The early you start, the better.
  • Question Can I study early in the morning if I don’t have time to sit and study the night before? Yes, but try to study the night before if you can, even if it is only for a little bit.You can also study in the car, on the bus, or during your break/lunch.

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  • Don’t try to memorize everything word for word. Try to understand what you are reading and make sure you get the main point.
  • Make sure to stay hydrated! Water is good for your body and will nourish you while you cram.
  • Instead of memorizing everything you pose your eyes on, try to understand what you’re reading. By doing this, you won’t have any problems with remembering information when doing your exam.

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  • Don’t get distracted by anything on the computer (music, in this case, will probably not help you but make studying harder)
  • Don’t drink too much coffee or too much of an energy drink – it is dangerous to your health and will keep you up past your desire!
  • Remember that cramming is not always a way out. It lessens your chances of actually retaining the material. Cramming for one test is fine, but don’t cram for all of them, especially big ones or exams. if you do cram, you will waste some time trying to remember and then understand what is being asked.
  • If you are going to study on your way to school, make sure you are not the one driving; your concentration needs to be on the road!
  • If you can’t remember the answer on a test, never cheat, as this may have some serious consequences. It is always better to lose a game of integrity than to win a game of dishonesty.

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  • Textbooks
  • Notes
  • Highlighters
  • Pens/Pencils
  • Spare pieces of paper
  • Flashcards
  • Quiet Spot
  • Water (Optional)
  • Dictionary

Article Summary X To cram the night before a test, only focus on the main ideas or formulas that will be on the test so you’re not wasting time on smaller, less-important details. Also, try to find summaries of any chapters you need to study, or just skim them and write down any key ideas.
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How do I get out of a final exam?

Valid Excuses During the course many possible situations may arise that would result in your inability to attend class, attend exams, or perform at a minimally acceptable level during an examination. Illness or injury, family emergencies, certain University-approved curricular and extra-curricular activities, and religious holidays can be legitimate reasons to miss class or to be excused from a scheduled examination.

  • With regard to family emergencies, you must provide verifiable documentation of the emergency.
  • Given the vast array of family emergencies the instructor will provide precise guidance as to what constitutes adequate documentation.
  • Unless the emergency is critical you should notify the instructor in advance of your absence from the scheduled course event.

In cases of critical emergencies, you must notify the instructor within one week of your absence. For University-approved curricular and extra-curricular activities, verifiable documentation is also required. The student should obtain from the unit or department sponsoring the activity a letter (or class absence form) indicating the anticipated absence(s).

  1. The letter must be presented to the instructor at least one week prior to the first absence.
  2. In the case of religious holidays, the student should notify the instructor by the third week of the course of any potential conflicts.
  3. An important note for final exams: Early flights home, bus tickets to leave town, and family vacations are NOT valid excuses to miss or reschedule a final exam.

Students should make plans to leave campus AFTER all their scheduled exams are completed. It is best not to book flights that leave during finals week. Instructors are required to give the final exams according to the University schedule, and cannot give makeups or reschedules for non-valid or non-approved excuses.

(preferred) The student will take a timely make-up version for the missed evaluative event.If a timely makeup exam is not feasible, the student will be excused from the missed event, and the weight of that event in the overall course grade will be reassigned to either the course final exam or to a subset of the subsequent evaluative events in the course.

: Valid Excuses
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Does test anxiety affect IQ?

– Several studies in recent years have explored the connection between anxiety and intelligence. In a 2018 study, researchers discovered that people with a higher IQ had a higher chance of being diagnosed with psychological disorders such as:

mood disorders attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) autism spectrum disorder

In the study, more than 3,000 members of the group Mensa — an organization composed of members who score in the top percentages of standardized IQ tests — were surveyed. They were asked to share whether they had experienced symptoms of specific mental and physical disorders or conditions and if they had ever received any formal diagnoses.

  • Researchers found that Mensa members reported experiencing high levels of stress and anxiety, with 20% of them reporting an anxiety disorder diagnosis.
  • Another 26% shared that they had received a diagnosis for other mood disorders such as depressive disorder, dysthymic disorder, and bipolar disorder,

These results also supported the “hyper brain-hyper body” theory that explores the relationship between intelligence and physical and psychological reactions — particularly those associated with stress. A 2011 study discovered that people with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) were more likely to worry and have a higher IQ.

  1. Researchers used a series of questionnaires and imaging technology to assess 44 participants.
  2. Of these, 26 had been diagnosed with GAD.
  3. The remaining 18 had not received a diagnosis.
  4. Those with GAD scored higher in both worry and IQ levels.
  5. Those without anxiety disorders scored lower.
  6. These findings support a direct link between intelligence and anxiety.

Emotional intelligence may also play a role in anxiety and other mood disorders. A 2021 study suggests that different levels of emotional intelligence can be tied to emotional distress, including symptoms of anxiety, depression, and worry.
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Is test anxiety ADHD?

ADHD and exams are two things that shouldn’t exist together. However, they do exist together, and quite likely they always will. You don’t have to love taking tests if you have ADHD, but you also don’t have to be stuck cursing tests, either. There are ways you can deal with tests, and take them well, despite ADHD.

Identifying key information Organizing thoughts into linear arguments (for essays) Poor time awareness so that you don’t pace yourself right Rushing and making careless mistakes Memory recall issues (that mind-going-blank experience) Distractibility Following directions

Anxiety and poor testing performance come from a lack of confidence in your own ability to do well on a test. People with ADHD often have a history of negative or disappointing test taking experiences, and this carries over into current situations. Know this: ADHD doesn’t have to do with intelligence,

Study well in advance, for short bursts several consecutive nights before the test rather than cramming for hours the night before ( How to Study When You Have ADHD: 5 ADHD Studying Tips ) Exercise, ideally right before the test if that’s at all possible Eat well, putting nutrients into your body and keeping junk out Drink plenty of water Visualize yourself staying calm and doing well on the test Talk to your teacher to discover what material will be on the test and to ask questions you may have Ask for accommodations such as extra time, a different testing environment, the ability to take breaks, and more. (You might be required to have a 504 plan to receive accommodations.)

You can also do things during the test to help you manage the task of taking an exam.

Look at the entire text before beginning. Use a highlighter (or multiple highlighters of different colors) to emphasize directions, different sections, and keywords. Exactly what you highlight will depend on the actual test. Carefully read the directions as you highlight them. Divide your test into equal segments (with your highlighter), and quickly estimate the amount of time you can spend on each section. Use a timer if it’s allowed, otherwise, pace yourself using the segments of color, making sure you’re progressing through. Wear earplugs if allowed to block out noises. Have a focus object to look at as you think and to turn your attention to when you catch yourself wandering. This can be a small object you place on your desk, your pencil, your shoe—anything to draw your attention and help you concentrate. Double check your answers when you finish to catch any careless mistakes.

Successful test taking with ADHD is largely about knowing what makes exams challenging for you and then developing strategies to compensate. Play around with the ideas above to see what works for you, and experiment with other strategies, too ( Ten Steps for Student Success for College and Adult Students with ADHD ).

  1. You’ll build a repertoire of test-taking strategies for ADHD that work.
  2. A final thought: Keep your perspective.
  3. To avoid panicking when that test is placed in front of you, remind yourself that this is just one test.
  4. While important, it doesn’t have the power to make or break the grand scheme of your life.

APA Reference Peterson, T. (2021, December 20). ADHD and Exams: Test Taking Strategies for ADHD Students, HealthyPlace. Retrieved on 2023, April 25 from https://www.healthyplace.com/self-help/adhd/adhd-and-exams-test-taking-strategies-for-adhd-students Last Updated: January 2, 2022
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Why am I not good at taking tests?

Some students perform poorly on tests for reasons other than lack of preparation or poor study skills. This common problem is called test anxiety and it occurs when students are too nervous to recall learned material during an exam.
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Is 6 hours enough for a test?

How to sleep well and study better –

Get at least eight hours The most important habit is to get enough sleep. The Sleep Foundation says that college-aged adults often need more sleep than the average adult. Eight hours is the bare minimum, and some students need as many as ten hours. Aim for eight at the very least, but pay attention to your body. If you’re not feeling rested, aim for more. Be consistent Thanks to your natural circadian (24-hour) rhythms, your body and mind function at their best in a predictable daily routine. Try to go to bed, sleep and wake up at the same time every day – even on your days off – to regulate your natural sleep-wake cycle. Create a wind-down routine In the spirit of routine, create a relaxing wind-down routine every night. For example, you could do yoga, take a shower, and then get into bed and read a book. Repeat this every night and, as your body starts to associate it with sleep, you’ll notice that it gets easier and easier to wind down. Take a nap If you’re really flagging during a study session, your learning ability is probably suffering too. A nap was found to improve memory scores on a test in one study, suggesting that a quick sleep could help to refresh your mind and consolidate all that learning. Keep it short though; any more than 20-30 minutes and you could find it difficult to fall asleep later on. Work smarter, not harder Cramming is generally not the best way to learn, even if you’re not pulling all-nighters! You can only focus for so long before cognitive fatigue sets in, after which point your ability to process and retain information starts to rapidly decline. Instead of marathon study sessions, set aside blocks of 2-3 hours at a time, and make sure to recharge in between. Avoid late-night study Studying right before bedtime keeps your mind active when it should be winding down. If you’re using a laptop or tablet, the blue light from these devices will also interrupt the release of melatonin, the hormone that brings on sleepiness. You can prevent this by switching off blue-light devices and closing your textbooks at least two hours before bedtime. Keep books out of the bedroom If possible, study anywhere but your bedroom. It’s harder to wind down when your mind associates your sleeping environment with hard work, study and exam stress, so save your bedroom for rest only. Don’t overdo the coffee If your study sessions are powered by lattes, or you take the edge off your study stress with a beer or a cigarette, you might be sabotaging your sleep. Instead, when its time to sleep, try a drink that may be calming and help you sleep. Try to limit your caffeine and have your last coffee or energy drink at least eight hours before bedtime. Even though it makes you feel drowsy, alcohol reduces sleep quality, so stick to one or two drinks at most, and steer clear altogether the night before an exam.

Making sure that you’re well-rested for your exams begins long before the big day, so start building these good habits as far in advance as possible to set yourself up for success. We wish you the best of luck!
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Should I sleep or keep studying?

Failed to save article – Please try again This article is more than 9 years old. How To Study For A Test The Night Before Getty Getting enough sleep is an under-valued but crucial part of learning. Contrary to students’ belief that staying up all night to cram for an exam will lead to higher scores, truth is, the need for a good night’s rest is even more important than finishing homework or studying for a test.

A recent study in the journal Child Development showed that sacrificing sleep in order to study will actually backfire. The study followed 535 Los Angeles high school students for 14 days, tracking how long they slept, as well as how well they understood material being taught in class and how they performed on a test, quiz, or homework.

“Although the researchers expected that extra hours of studying that ate into sleep time might create problems in terms of students’ understanding of what they were taught in class, they were surprised to find that diminishing sleep in order to study was actually associated with doing more poorly on a test, quiz, or homework,” Science Daily wrote,

  1. Reduced sleep,
  2. Accounts for the increase in academic problems that occurs after days of increased studying,” said UCLA scientist Andrew Fuligni.
  3. Although these nights of extra studying may seem necessary, they can come at a cost.” In another study by a research team at the University of York, researchers found that sleep even helps boost language acquisition skills in young children.

“Children’s ability to recall and recognize new words improved approximately 12 hours after training, but only if sleep occurs,” said Dr. Lisa Henderson, a lead researcher on the study. “The key effects were maintained one week later, suggesting that these new words are retained in long-term memory.” The study, published in Developmental Science, shows that when they sleep enough, children show the same learning patterns as adults.
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Is it possible to study the night before and pass?

Download Article Download Article Have you ever been in a situation where it’s the night before a big test and you haven’t even cracked open a textbook or skimmed your notes? We’ve all been there. Recent research shows, however, that the lack of sleep caused by cramming may cause you to perform poorly, defeating the purpose.

  1. 1 Find a nice quiet spot to study, Make sure it’s not comfortable (like on your bed or sprawling out on the couch) because you will risk falling asleep.
    • Find or create a well-lit area. When it’s too dark around you, your body thinks, “Hey! It’s time to hit the hay!” Fool it by turning on plenty of lights, simulating daytime.
  2. 2 Remove yourself from all distractions. That means putting your phone away. You may have spent the entire semester texting during lectures, and this may be your punishment. Turn it off. While you’re at it, stay away from the iPad and laptop, too (unless you have study material on your computer) – Facebook, fantasy baseball, and Pinterest do not exist in your book right now. Advertisement
  3. 3 Eat something healthy. You may think 16 cans of cold Red Bull and five Snickers bars are the best way to go, but, sadly, they’re not. Hyping yourself up on caffeine may keep you awake initially, but you’ll just end up crashing harder later – when it’s actually test time.
    • Go for fruits. An apple does a better job at keeping you focused and awake than caffeine. It’s higher in natural sugars and it is nutritious. Nutrition should be thought of as energy in this circumstance.
    • If you’re full, you won’t be thinking about food, another reason you’ll be able to stay focused.
  4. 4 Set your alarm. Alright, so, worse comes to worst: You wake up in a pile of apple cores with ink emblazoned onto your cheek because you fell asleep on your chemistry notes. But you remembered to set your alarm, so you’re not going to miss the test. So, do it now, before you accidentally fall asleep. You may be grateful that you did.
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  1. 1 Stay calm, This part may be hard but just take a deep breath and try to gather your thoughts! Remember where you left all those textbooks and gather together some spare pieces of paper and pens. Highlighters and flashcards are also a good idea.
    • If you still have your syllabus, great. Use it as an outline. The topics that pop up more than once are likely to be on the test.
  2. 2 Start at the beginning; don’t focus on the little details! Concentrate on the bigger picture – highlight the important facts that you think could be on the test. Also remember to look closely at the vocabulary! It will obviously help your understanding if you know what a word means.
    • Read the chapter summaries (they usually do a good job at summarizing the important points). If there are no chapter summaries, then skim through the text and write down key ideas.
  3. 3 Prioritize. This is the most important part of cramming, You have a very limited amount of time – you must use it as efficiently as possible. Get down to the nitty-gritty and only study what you think is worthy of being on the test.
    • Focus on the main ideas and learn key formulas. Skip the details for now and only come back to them if you see that you have time after you have learned the key points.
    • Don’t attempt to learn everything; focus on things that will get you the most points on the exam. If your professor said the essay will be 75% of your grade, you’re best off preparing for that and skipping the multiple choice.
  4. 4 Write out important info or recite small bits out loud. This will help your brain process the material better. If you just skim your textbooks or notes you probably won’t remember anything!
    • If you’re lucky enough to have an insomniac for a roommate, grab them. Ask them to listen to you spout off about certain concepts. Relaying information to another individual is a surefire way to guarantee you understand the ins and outs of the ideas.
  5. 5 Make flash cards, This is a good way to quiz yourself and it also helps you process the information when you write out the flashcards and read them out loud! Use different colors for different topics or chapters.
    • Look for parallels, metaphors, and other memory-triggers to help you wrap your brain around complicated concepts. Write the keywords of your metaphor down to jog your memory while studying.
    • Write the information down in mnemonic devices. Dumb Kids Playing Catch On Freeway Get Squashed – Domain, Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, Species (for a happy example).
  6. 6 Take breaks. It may seem counter-intuitive, but your brain will be able to process more information if you’re not so hard on it. Study in bursts – cramming like the Energizer bunny is inefficient and saturates your mind, preventing it from taking in more. Though you’re studying a bit less, you’ll be retaining more.
    • After 45 minutes or so, get up. Stretch your body and walk around. Grab a drink, get a snack, and hop back to it in 5 to 10 minutes. You should feel a bit more refreshed and ready for action.
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  1. 1 Go to bed, If you stay up all night you will be so tired in the morning chances are you won’t remember anything! Get up in the morning about 30-45 minutes earlier and familiarize yourself with the highlighted parts of your notes and textbooks. If you made flashcards, go through them again.
    • Try to get in at least 3 hours; that’s one full sleep cycle. Waking up in the middle of one less than well-rested will be detrimental to your test score.
  2. 2 Eat breakfast. You’ve heard from everybody that a nutritious meal before an exam will help you use your brain better. Stick to a fairly normal breakfast (you don’t want to get sick) and don’t load up on anything too heavy if you have anxiety.
    • Think about this: The more food you eat before your exam, the less you will be thinking about how hungry you are, so help yourself by just eating something before your exam so you can stay at least somewhat focused.
  3. 3 Take a deep breath, Go through the information a couple of times on your way to school. Chances are if you paid attention in class and got in some good studying the night before you should be fine.
  4. 4 Ask your friend to quiz you before the test. There’s likely a few minutes before the teacher walks in, so utilize them! Take turns asking each other questions. Start with the points you are foggiest on – that way they’ll be fresh in your memory.
    • Don’t do this while you’re taking the test – getting caught cheating will result in a much worse score than you were going to get if you hadn’t.
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Add New Question

  • Question What should I do if I’m frustrated with studying? If you are frustrated with studying a boring topic, take a breather to calm yourself down. Next, force yourself to be interested in the topic. Even if you need to prepare for the most boring test, it is easier to remember something if you read it more excitedly than if you stay frustrated and reread the same material over and over because you didn’t absorb it.
  • Question The biggest exam of my life is coming up in another 3 weeks. Should I start cramming now? Yes. The early you start, the better.
  • Question Can I study early in the morning if I don’t have time to sit and study the night before? Yes, but try to study the night before if you can, even if it is only for a little bit.You can also study in the car, on the bus, or during your break/lunch.

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  • Don’t try to memorize everything word for word. Try to understand what you are reading and make sure you get the main point.
  • Make sure to stay hydrated! Water is good for your body and will nourish you while you cram.
  • Instead of memorizing everything you pose your eyes on, try to understand what you’re reading. By doing this, you won’t have any problems with remembering information when doing your exam.

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  • Don’t get distracted by anything on the computer (music, in this case, will probably not help you but make studying harder)
  • Don’t drink too much coffee or too much of an energy drink – it is dangerous to your health and will keep you up past your desire!
  • Remember that cramming is not always a way out. It lessens your chances of actually retaining the material. Cramming for one test is fine, but don’t cram for all of them, especially big ones or exams. if you do cram, you will waste some time trying to remember and then understand what is being asked.
  • If you are going to study on your way to school, make sure you are not the one driving; your concentration needs to be on the road!
  • If you can’t remember the answer on a test, never cheat, as this may have some serious consequences. It is always better to lose a game of integrity than to win a game of dishonesty.

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  • Textbooks
  • Notes
  • Highlighters
  • Pens/Pencils
  • Spare pieces of paper
  • Flashcards
  • Quiet Spot
  • Water (Optional)
  • Dictionary

Article Summary X To cram the night before a test, only focus on the main ideas or formulas that will be on the test so you’re not wasting time on smaller, less-important details. Also, try to find summaries of any chapters you need to study, or just skim them and write down any key ideas.
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What night time is best to study?

Mid- Morning/ Mid- Day/Evening – A good share of the students chooses to have this time slot for studying. This is generally preferred by the aspirants who are Neither a Morning bird nor a Night Owl. Yes, you read it right. Students who get up late in the morning usually sleep by midnight.
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What is the best time to take an exam?

It makes sense. New research says that you’ll get the best results if you do an exam in the morning as opposed to later on in the day. Spotted on The Mirror, researchers working for the academic journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences or PNAS, found that ‘cognitive power’ lessens as the day progresses. The earlier the better for an exam it seems. The study conducted at the Danish National Centre for Social Research pointed out that this is not just for people of school-going age and can apply to anyone, young or old. To defeat ‘cognitive fatigue’ the researchers say taking a proper break is of utmost importance.
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What should I eat the night before a test?

Photo by from – The night before the test is an important one for making smart eating choices. Even if you’re nervous, try to eat a full meal with protein, carbs, and vegetables. A good idea is to go for fish, greens, and healthy carbohydrates such as rice or whole wheat pasta.

Try fruit or dark chocolate for dessert. Even if you’re doing some last-minute studying, avoid drinking coffee late as it will affect your sleep quality and ability to fall asleep. And for goodness sake, no alcohol the night before! Save the celebrating for when you’ve finished the test. Here’s an important tip: Don’t try any new foods the night before a test.

You don’t know how your stomach might react to a new food even if it seems safe. The last thing you want is to spend the night before a test with an upset stomach, or having to head to the restroom often throughout the test. In some cases, it may not even be allowed! Finally, the day before the test, make sure you are eating throughout the day.
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