How To Start A Truck Driving School?

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How To Start A Truck Driving School
Start a truck driving school by following these 10 steps: –

  1. Plan your Truck Driving School
  2. Form your Truck Driving School into a Legal Entity
  3. Register your Truck Driving School for Taxes
  4. Open a Business Bank Account & Credit Card
  5. Set up Accounting for your Truck Driving School
  6. Get the Necessary Permits & Licenses for your Truck Driving School
  7. Get Truck Driving School Insurance
  8. Define your Truck Driving School Brand
  9. Create your Truck Driving School Website
  10. Set up your Business Phone System

There is more to starting a business than just registering it with the state. We have put together this simple guide to starting your truck driving school. These steps will ensure that your new business is well planned out, registered properly and legally compliant. Exploring your options? Check out other small business ideas,
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How to open a driving school in Texas?

General requirements – To operate a driving school in Texas, you will need to be licensed by the state. Licenses are valid for 1 year from the date of filing with the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation (TDLR), Applications must use the Departments forms, which will be linked below.

A completed application form–which included many of the forms noted below. A bone or other form of security in the amount of $10,000 plus $5,000 per branch. A staff roster. A list of vehicles and copies of the insurance declarations pages noting coverage for those vehicles. The motor vehicle fleet form (in the packet). A school course list. Your curriculum if you have created your own.

The Texas Regulations for Driving Schools are fairly straightforward, Texas requires the following minimum liability insurance coverage:

$30,000 per injured person, up to $60,000 per accident. $25,000 property damage per accident. Uninsured motorist coverage.

If you have employees, you must carry workers’ compensation insurance covering them–and you–in the event of injury while on the job.
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How much does it cost to go to truck driving school in Canada?

What are the expected costs? – Most truck driving training programs and courses will cost you anywhere from $5,000 to up to $15,000. Yes, that’s expensive for a course that might last a month or two, but it’s mandatory training. However, you can look for funding, especially from an employer who is willing to offer you a truck driving job and will pay for at least a part of your tuition.

Canada-Ontario Job Grant (COJG): This provides financial support to employers who want to deliver short-term training for their existing and new employees. If you can get a transportation company in Ontario to offer you a job, this program helps the company pay the costs of your truck driving course. Second Career: this provides living expenses and helps with tuition for unemployed and laid-off workers in Ontario. Ontario Works: also helps with the cost of training programs for recipients of this program. Work BC – B.C. Employer Training Grant – this provides up to $10,000 per employee to the employer to cover up to 80% of the cost of training. This is done to help their employees upgrade their skills. Canada-Alberta Job Grant (CAJG): this is similar to COJG and involves the employer applying on behalf of current and future employees to obtain funding for their training costs. Funding is provided by the government through the Workforce Development Agreement. The government funds 2/3 of the cost and the employer funds 1/3 of the cost. If the employee is an unemployed Albertan, then the government can fund up to 100% of the cost.

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How much does trucking school cost in Ontario?

What Does this Course Cover? –

  • Pre-Trip Inspection
  • Airbrakes Practical and Safety Inspections
  • Defensive Driving
  • Route Planning
  • Cargo/ Load Security
  • Regulatory and legal requirements in Canada and the US
  • Highway Training
  • Turns, Backing, Shifting
  • Safety Requirements
  • Emergency Procedures
  • Depending on your experience (or lack of experience) you can register for a combination of training programs that suit your needs.
  • Each Driving Lesson is scheduled for 1 Full Hour.
  • Topics covered during training include Vehicle Inspections, On the Road Training and Yard Work and Safety Procedures.

*Note: Training is completed on a 48 Passenger, Automatic School Bus. This vehicle is approved by the MTO for D Class testing. However students who would like to obtain their D class Licence as well as their Z (Airbrake Endorsement) will also be required to complete the Z Airbrake Course: Lessons can be scheduled 7 days a week, from 8am-10pm.

8 Hours of DZ Training + 16 hours of Air Brake Course, road test scheduling, and vehicle for Road Test $1448.99 tax included
10 Hours of DZ Training + 16 hours of Air Brake Course, road test scheduling, and vehicle for Road Test $1648.99 tax included
12 Hours of DZ Training + 16 hours of Air Brake Course, road test scheduling, and vehicle for Road Test $1848.99 tax included
14 Hours of DZ Training + 16 hours of Air Brake Course, road test scheduling, and vehicle for Road Test $2048.99 tax included
16 Hours of DZ Training + 16 hours of Air Brake Course, road test scheduling, and vehicle for Road Test $2248.99 tax included
Extra Road Test $442.48 + Tax = $500.00
Air Brake Z Endorsement + Retest if Required $349.99 (Tax included)
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Upon successfully completing a Road Test with the MTO (Ministry of Transportation Ontario) Students will receive an Ontario DZ Driver’s License.
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How long are most trucking schools?

3-6 weeks – With different schools, your CDL-A training can last anywhere between 3-7 weeks. Instead of most training that take several months or years to complete, you can choose to take the CDL-A training in as little as 3 weeks. When you take it this way, you need to take a full-time training course that runs 5 days a week.
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What is the shortest trucking school?

The Class B CDL course is the shortest program of the three, it only takes 3-weeks to complete.
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How to open a CDL school in NJ?

General requirements – To operate a driving school in New Jersey, you will need to be licensed by the state. Licenses are valid for 1 year, and expire in December–suggesting you should apply later in the year for a school to start in January/February.

A completed application signed by an owner, officer, or partner. Copies of your deed or lease and phone bill or phone installation order for the business A designated supervising instructor A list of all driving instructors Proof of Worker’s Compensation coverage for all employees. A Certificate of Insurance. A surety bond Samples of advertising which cannot be readily changed–such as telephone directory listings. Other items outlined in the application packet.

The current regulations for driver training schools are available at New Jersey Administrative Code Title 13, Chapter 23, The Motor Vehicle Commission links to the forms you need on their website. New Jersey requires the following minimum liability insurance coverage:

$250,000 bodily injury for one person $500,000 bodily injury for two or more people $50,000 property damage.

If you have employees, you must carry workers’ compensation insurance covering them–and you–in the event of injury while on the job.
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How much is driving school in us?

Driving school prices – Driving schools cost $200 to $800 for an all-inclusive training package or $50 to $100 per hour for private driving lessons. Driving schools give a mix of in-classroom lessons on road safety and a particular number of hours of driving.

  • Each state has mandated a number of hours of driving instruction before a teenager can take the test.
  • States also have age limits of when a teen student can and cannot drive, which means their driving experience graduates as they develop their driving skills.
  • According to the IIHS-HLDI, limits include “nighttime driving, restricting teen passengers, and making sure teens get lots of supervised practice.

Graduated licensing has reduced teen crashes 10-30 percent on average.” Check this list to see the rules in your state. Driving lesson
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Can I go to Canada as a truck driver?

Is there an actual demand for truck drivers in Canada? – There will always be a need for qualified truck drivers because Canada depends on freight trucks to transport its goods. In fact, according to data from Trucking HR Canada ( THRC ), the overall number of trucking job openings across the Canadian economy is predicted to increase to 55,000 by 2024.
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How much is trucking school NYC?

Time to complete this education training ranges from 26 hours to 1 year depending on the qualification, with a median time to complete of 4 months. The cost to attend Queens Trucking School ranges from $1,200 to $5,000 depending on the qualification, with a median cost of $3,680.
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Is trucking in Canada worth it?

2. It Pays Well – Many people are surprised to find out just how well trucking pays. On average,, with some variance depending on the province you’re working in, your level of experience, and the number of hours you choose to work. Not only is the income relatively high, but there’s also always the potential to earn more.
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How much is trucking school in Georgia?

The cost to attend Atlanta Truck Driving School ranges from $10 to $7,000 depending on the qualification, with a median cost of $2,700.
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Who regulates driving schools in Ontario?

Beginner driving schools in Ontario are regulated by MTO.’
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How long is truck driving school in Ontario?

Legal Training Requirements – In Ontario, truck driving schools are subject to government-mandated minimums. These regulations dictate the time to train at a truck driving school. As of 2022, all prospective truck drivers must take at least 103.5 hours of instruction. These hours break down into the following:

5 hours of in-class theory training 17 hours in the yard (practicing outside of roadways) 50 hours of in-cab training behind the wheel with an instructor

Additionally, the driver must pass two government-mandated tests: the Class Z Air Brake Endorsement Test and the Class A or Class D Road Test. The Class Z Air Brake Endorsement Test is necessary because most trucks utilize air brakes, meaning that a Class A or Class D Road Test is insufficient to become a professional truck driver.

The Class Z Air Brakes Endorsement Test is a short commitment: 6.5 hours in the classroom and 2 hours in the yard. They are typically divided into two or three days, although it is possible to do all the training in one day. Notably, the 103.5 hours of instruction is only the minimum mandated by the government.

Additional training may be required depending on the individual’s experience level. It is also important to note that trucking companies may require additional training from their drivers in addition to the government-mandated minimums.
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What education is required to be a truck driver in Canada?

Employment requirements Completion of an accredited driver training course of up to three months duration, through a vocational school or community college, may be required. A Class 3 or D licence is required to drive straight-body trucks. A Class 1 or A licence is required to drive long combination vehicles.
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How much does the melt program cost in Ontario?

Mandatory Entry Level Training (or MELT for short) is being implemented throughout Canada. In today’s blog post, we will be going over some key points about this new commercial training requirement. While MELT is now a reality in British Columbia, Ontario, Saskatchewan, Alberta, and Manitoba, each province has slightly different requirements for MELT, which we will be going over below. Ontario was the first to implement mandatory training in July of 2017.

  1. Any person looking to obtain a Class A (tractor trailer) licence is required to take at least 103.5 hours of classroom and on-road training before being eligible for a road test.
  2. The MELT program designates 36.5 hours for classroom time, 17 hours for yard training, 32 hours mandatory on-road training and 18 hours off-road training behind the wheel.

Training providers or schools in Ontario are able to set their own costs and programs vary in cost. There are programs from $4900 to $15,000, depending on the school and the experiences provided. To help off-set some of the costs associated with this training requirement, Ontario does offer funding options.

There are government programs available such as Second Career, which helps to cover program costs and living expenses for unemployed and laid-off workers, Workplace Safety Insurance Board, which helps rehabilitate injured workers into a new career, and Ontario Works, which will cover the cost of the program for recipients.

There are also programs set up for Aboriginal Band members to help cover costs, Employers are also able to apply for funding directly to help pay for new employees to get their licenses. This is done through the Canada-Ontario Jobs Grant, and is a great way to hire the employee you want, even if they don’t have the required licence or training time completed.

The most recent addition to Mandatory Entry Level Training (March 15th, 2019), Saskatchewan requires a minimum of 121.5 hours of training, including classroom and on-road time for Class 1 (tractor-trailer) learner licence holders. Any person who passed a Class 1 road test prior to the implementation date will be grandfathered in and not required to retest.

If you are looking to move to Saskatchewan, and have already obtained a Class 1 or equivalent licence, there are a few things to keep in mind. Drivers that have already completed the MELT program with another province or have held their Class 1 equivalent for more than two years are able to transfer directly into a Class 1 Saskatchewan licence,

A driver that has held their Class 1 for one year to two years, are able to transfer it up front; however, would be required to take a knowledge test and road test within the year of transfer or the licence would be downgraded to a Class 3 equivalent. Any drivers that have had a Class 1 licence for less than one year, would be transferred to a Class 3 licence, and would then be required to complete the Saskatchewan MELT program to upgrade to a Class 1 again.

Of the 121.5 hours of training required by MELT, 47 hours are designated for classroom time and 17.5 hours of yard training. Class 1 training in Saskatchewan will cost between $6,000 and $8,500, and grants may be available to help with the expense. There have been talks of having the training costs covered under the federal student loan program; however, there is no confirmed information at this time.

Effective March 1st, 2019, Alberta now requires 113 hours of training, including classroom and on-road time for Class 1 (tractor trailer) learner licence holders. So far, Alberta is the only province with a mandatory entry level training requirement for Class 2 (bus) licensing, which is for 50 hours of training.

Alberta has also instituted training requirements for Class 2-S, which is required to drive a school bus, of 53.5 hours. Any Class 1 drivers that received their licence in Alberta prior to October 11th, 2018 are not required to retest or take the MELT program.

  • Anyone who received a full Class 1 licence between October 11th, 2018 and February 28th, 2019 will be required to take a knowledge test and road test to keep the licence.
  • Alberta has followed very closely to Saskatchewan’s model for transferring a licence from another province.
  • Drivers that have already completed the MELT program with another province or have held their Class 1 for more than two years are able to transfer directly into a Class 1 Alberta licence.

A driver that has held their full Class 1 for one year to two years are required to take a knowledge test and road test to receive the licence. If a driver is unsuccessful on their initial attempt, they would be required to take the MELT program. Any drivers that have had a full Class 1 licence for less than one year, are required to complete the MELT program to obtain that Class of licence again.

  • For a Class 1 licence, 40.5 hours of the MELT program is designated for classroom time, 15.5 hours for yard training, 57 hours of practical training.
  • Alberta does not have an on-road or off-road requirement for behind the wheel training.
  • The Class 2 licence has 18 hours of designated classroom time, 10.6 hours of yard training, and 21.25 hours for practical training.
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The Class 2-S has slightly more required training, with 18.5 hours of classroom time, 11 hours of yard time, and 24 hours of practical training. To help students receive a fair rate for training, Alberta has introduced a cap of $10,000 for the Class 1 MELT program and a cap of $5000 for the Class 2 and 2-S.

Average cost for MELT in Alberta is approximately $8900. New Information (October 2019) While the Alberta government recently released some changes to their MELT requirements, allowing school bus drivers and agricultural farmers and farm workers an exemption from taking additional training or testing, they have now taken a step back are reverting to their original outline.

This exemption would have applied to Class 2 drivers that only operate school buses and Class 1 drivers that only operate for farming use, and only upon a review of the drivers’ history. Drivers with clean driving records (no demerits, violations, or suspensions) wouldn’t have had to re-test.

  1. The government had put out a statement, saying that drivers who are eligble for this exemption would have received a letter in the mail before the end of the year, outlining details on the next step.
  2. As this is no longer the plan that they are moving forward with, if you receive something in the mail you should contact them directly for specific information regarding your own licence.

Manitoba has implemented a MELT program on September 1st, 2019, They will require 121.5 hours of training, consisting of 40.5 hours in-class, 40 hours in-yard and 41 hours in-cab. Any driver that completes the road test and obtains a full Class 1 licence prior to the September 1st implementation date will be able to continue to hold the licence without any additional training or testing.

Uniquely, Manitoba does have a 244-hour Professional Truck Driver Training Course which is offered at private institutes and will be considered equivalent to the MELT program. Students that are making their way through the Professional Truck Driver Training Course will be able to continue their training program and complete their road test after September 1st, 2019.

Out-of-province drivers with a full Class 1 licence can move to Manitoba and transfer their licence without any additional training or testing, as long as they have already completed the Mandatory Entry Level Training in a different province or have held their licence for a minimum of two years.

Out-of-province applicants with one to two years of experience will be allowed to write a knowledge test and road test within one year of transferring the licence. Successfully passing both tests will waive the need for any additional training. Any person that has held a Class 1 licence for less than one year will be required to take the MELT program and complete both a knowledge test and road test.

Costs can vary for MELT in Manitoba, with prices ranging from $6,000 to $9,000 depending on the driver training facility. New Information (March 31, 2021) On March 31, 2021, the Ministry of Transportation & Infrastructure and ICBC announced that Mandatory entry-level training (MELT) is being introduced for drivers who wish to obtain a Class 1 commercial BC driver’s licence.

Drivers will need to successfully complete a MELT course before taking their Class 1 road test. Much like Ontario, Saskatchewan, Alberta, and Manitoba, British Columbia will now have mandatory training for Class 1 drivers as well. Mandatory Entry Level Training (MELT) is a new requirement in British Columbia that requires all Class 1 learner’s licence holders to have a minimum number of hours of training time (classroom, yard time, on-road time) completed prior to attempting an ICBC road test.

ICBC is the regulatory body for driver training schools and Instructors in B.C. and is consulting with the commercial driving industry, the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure and Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General to finalize the curriculum.

BC’s program will exceed the minimum requirements set by the National Safety Code Standard for entry-level training of class 1 drivers. The program will be delivered by licensed driver training schools in BC beginning in early summer 2021. Consultation with the trucking and driver training industries in 2019 has provided valuable input to support the development of BC’s MELT program.

The Class 1 MELT program is being designed to align with the new Standard 16-Class 1 Entry-Level Training framework introduced as part of the National Safety Code in February 2020, and with mandatory Class 1 entry-level training standards in other Canadian jurisdictions.

Legislation to support the introduction of BC’s Class 1 MELT program was passed in August 2020 by the Province in Bill 2, the Motor Vehicle Amendment Act, 2020. MELT for Class 1 driver’s licence applicants will become a prerequisite for Class 1 road testing starting Oct.18, 2021. BC’s program will include best practices from other Canadian jurisdictions, and emphasize safe operating practices for mountainous geography and diverse driving conditions to ensure commercial drivers are prepared for BC’s highway network and the changing weather patterns encountered in the mountains.

Vist our Class 1 MELT program page regarding Valley Driving School’s course or our MELT FAQ page for more information. Update: Effective October 18, 2021 Mandatory Entry Level Training (MELT) is now a requirement prior to an ICBC Class 1 road test in British Columbia.
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