How To Get Into Law School Without A Degree?

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How To Get Into Law School Without A Degree
option for exceptional applicants – The law school allows exceptional students to matriculate without an earned bachelor’s degree. Applicants can apply with either two-years (60 credits) of undergraduate work applicable towards a bachelor’s degree or an earned associate’s degree.

  1. There is also an option to apply with three-quarters (90 credits) of the work done applicable towards a bachelor’s degree.
  2. Candidates interested in applying under this policy should do their own research to determine if the state bar they are interested in applying to requires applicants to have earned a bachelor’s degree.

The Admissions review process for candidates without a bachelor’s degree is more stringent than for candidates who will have earned degrees before matriculating, so applicants should have strong undergraduate grade point averages from the work they have completed, and they should have a strong LSAT score when applying.
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Can you go to Harvard Law School without a degree?

J.D. Admission Facts and Statistics –

Where can I get more information about applying to HLS? If you have questions about applying to the J.D. program, how best to prepare for Law School, enrollment statistics, and other J.D. Admissions-related subjects, you may also be interested in viewing FAQs compiled by the J.D. Admissions Office, What is the first-year class profile? View the first-year class profile for the current class. What are the eligibility requirements for applying to the Harvard Law School J.D. program? You are eligible to apply if you will have a bachelor’s degree by August of the year you intend to enroll at HLS. You must also take either the LSAT or GRE tests as part of your application requirements. The J.D. degree requires three years of full-time study, and new students begin their studies only in the fall semester of each year. Apart from for practicing lawyers, we have no part-time, distance, on-line or summer programs. Does HLS offer any part-time or summer programs? Except for continuing legal education for practicing lawyers, HLS does not have any part-time or summer programs. What are the range of standardized test scores and GPAs of last year’s admitted applicants? Admission decisions are based on the Admission Committee’s experienced judgment applied to individual cases, and many factors are taken into account. Each application is given a thorough review, taking account of all available information. Because GPA and standardized test scores alone do not fully or adequately summarize information about individuals that is important to admission decisions, these “numbers” often prove poor predictors of admission decisions on individual applications. At no point on the GPA or standardized scales are the chances of admission to HLS ‘0′ or ‘100′ percent. The 2017-2018 application cycle is the first year HLS will be accepting the GRE. We do not have information available regarding prior class statistics. For more information about LSAT statistics, please review our class profile, Is financial aid available? All students who demonstrate financial need according to a combination of federal and institutional guidelines receive adequate financial assistance to complete their course of study. For more information about financial aid, please consult our current application for admission or visit the HLS Student Financial Services website. How can I afford HLS if I am interested in public service? The Low Income Protection Plan (LIPP) is one of the most generous loan repayment programs in the nation. This program helps relieve the burden of repayment of educational loans for J.D. graduates in qualifying jobs. Qualifying jobs include all full-time jobs in non-profits, government, or academia and some law-related jobs in the private sector. What is the best “pre-law” curriculum? How does one prepare for law school? The Harvard Law School faculty prescribes no fixed requirements with respect to the content of pre-legal education. The nature of candidates’ college work, as well as the quality of academic performance, is taken into account in the selection process. As preparation for law school, a broad college education is usually preferable to one that is narrowly specialized. The Admissions Committee looks for a showing of thorough learning in a field of your choice, such as history, economics, government, philosophy, mathematics, science, literature or the classics (and many others), rather than a concentration in courses given primarily as vocational training. The Admissions Committee considers that those programs approaching their subjects on a more theoretical level, with attention to educational breadth, are better preparatory training for the legal profession than those emphasizing the practical. Does Harvard Law School offer concurrent or joint degree programs? Harvard Law School offers joint degree programs, with the Harvard Business School (J.D./MBA), the Harvard School of Public Health (J.D./MPH), the Harvard Kennedy School of Government (J.D./MPP or MPA/ID), the Harvard Graduate School of Design (J.D./MUP), and the Cambridge University Faculty of Law (J.D./LL.M.) and the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (J.D./PhD). For those interested in combining a legal education with advanced training in a field in which a joint degree is not offered, we offer a number of concurrent degree opportunities with other graduate schools. Learn more about joint and concurrent degree programs, and the coordinated J.D./PhD program, as well as cross-registration and study abroad.

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Can you get into Harvard Law without a bachelor’s degree?

Do you need to get a particular undergraduate degree to get into Harvard Law? – Harvard Law School does not require applicants to pursue any particular undergraduate degree program. Instead, the school accepts students from all different undergraduate degree programs,

The school prefers that students have a broad college education instead of taking many courses that are designed to provide vocational training. The admissions officers at Harvard Law School will be interested in the quality of your classes and your academic performance in them. They want to see that you have engaged in thorough learning in a major field area of your choice, including mathematics, government, science, philosophy, the classics, economics, history, or others.

Some students wonder if Harvard Law has a preference for applicants from STEM backgrounds. The school emphasizes that it accepts applicants from all academic programs. If you do have a STEM degree, Harvard Law encourages you to gain a couple of years of experience in your undergraduate degree field.
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Can you go to law school without a degree UK?

Do I need a law degree? – To become a solicitor or barrister you will need a degree (whether this is gained through university study or via an apprenticeship) but this degree doesn’t necessarily have to be in law. You can become a lawyer without a law degree but if you studied an unrelated subject at undergraduate level you’ll likely need to complete some sort of law conversion course before taking on the SQE (solicitors) or a Bar course (barristers).

If on the other hand you do study law at undergraduate level, ensure that your course is a qualifying degree – meaning it’s approved by the SRA (for solicitors) or the Bar Standards Board (BSB) (for barristers) – a requirement if you’re to become a practising lawyer. As previously mentioned, it’s possible to join the legal profession without going to university at all.

The CILEx CPQ route (where you can study to become a paralegal (Foundation), advanced paralegal (Advanced) or lawyer (Professional)) does not require a degree, or equivalent qualifications and experience. Legal apprenticeships are also available and these provide another viable alternative to university study.
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How hard is it to get a 170 on the LSAT?

One of the most frequently asked questions we receive is, “How hard is the LSAT?” Most students have heard the test is difficult, but unless they’ve taken an LSAT already, they don’t have a good idea of whether the test really is hard, or whether it’s just like any other college test.

  1. So let’s take a look at some numbers and see what the real story is here.
  2. First, we have to understand the scores that are produced by the test, because those scores help us measure difficulty.
  3. Our LSAT Scoring Scale discussion explains how the 120 to 180 scoring scale works, and the key discussion points relate to how many questions you can miss to achieve certain scores, as well as what percentile is represented by each score.

Let’s start by looking at the number of people who score a 180, which is a perfect score. In theory, the easier the test, the higher the number of perfect scores. Think about what would happen if you gave a very basic, first grade level spelling test to a group of college-educated adults, a test that included words like “cat” and “dog.” That should be pretty easy (right?), and you’d expect a large number of perfect scores! On the other hand, if you gave an advanced calculus test to fourth graders, it would be pretty amazing (inhuman, almost) to see even one perfect score.

Again, the easier the test relative to the test takers, the more perfect scores you should see. With the LSAT, the percentile for a 180 is 99.97%. Thus, in numerical terms, if you have a 180, then in a room of 10,000 people you have one of the three highest scores. With roughly 100,000 LSATs administered in the past year, that would suggest that about 30 people received a perfect score.

When only 30 people achieve this score out of 100,000 test takers, the inference is that this is a very, very difficult exam! Achieving a 180 is also interesting in that to do so does not require perfection. That is, you don’t have to answer all of the questions correctly in order to receive a 180.

This page contains a brief overview of scoring scales for the LSATs from June 2005 to the present, and it shows that to get a 180, you can typically miss around 2 to 3 questions per test. So, to produce a 3-in-10,000 score, you don’t even have to be perfect; you can miss a few questions and still make it happen.

Next, let’s focus on a score of 170, which is a highly desirable LSAT score, and one that almost every LSAT taker would be thrilled to receive. A 170 represents a percentile of 97.4%, meaning that test takers with a score of 170 have a score higher than 97.4% of all LSAT takers.

So, that’s pretty good! But what does it take to achieve that score? On the most recent LSAT, you would have to answer at least 89 out of 101 questions to receive a 170. In other words, you can miss 12 questions, and still be above 97.4% of testers (alternate view: you can miss 11.88% of the questions but still be in the top 2.5% of scores).

Considered alone, this suggests you have some latitude in missing LSAT questions, and that missing a few questions still allows you to achieve a very high score. That by itself is a sign of the difficulty of the test, but to bring the point home a bit more, let’s compare it to a grading scale that most people are familiar with: the scales used in college.

  1. At most colleges, if you were to get 89 out of 100 on a test, you’d be looking at a B+, or perhaps a B.
  2. That’s certainly a solid grade, but it isn’t one that is considered outstanding or highly desirable.
  3. But, on the LSAT, getting 89 right results in a score that is considered highly desirable, and this too indicates that the LSAT is, in general, a very difficult test.
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The final piece of evidence regarding test difficulty relates to the guessing policy enforced by LSAC. Unlike many other standardized tests, there is no guessing penalty on the LSAT, and you are strongly encouraged to guess on the questions that you cannot finish.

There is no penalty for missing a question, but if you guess correctly, you receive full credit. Think about that for a second, because what it suggests is that this test is so hard that the test makers don’t even care if you guess; they don’t think it will materially change your score! Their view is that even someone who performs extremely well on the questions they do answer will still not be able to blindly guess their way to a very different score.

The conclusion in all of this is that yes indeed, the LSAT is a very hard test. From any objective measure, it’s a challenge to score well on this exam. But there is good news here because in difficulty lies opportunity! The LSAT is a learnable test, and you can improve your performance by studying and preparing properly.
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Who has the easiest bar exam?

Easiest Bar Exams – Now that we’ve gone over the hardest bar exams by state, let’s talk about the easiest. Keep in mind the bar exam is a high-level test and is not easy in any state. The following are simply considered to be less challenging than others in the US:

South Dakota (Pass rate: 68% )Wisconsin (Pass rate: 59% )Nebraska (Pass rate: 80% )Iowa (Pass rate: 79% )Montana (Pass rate: 77% )

The above states each have comparatively easy bar exams. We have included the pass rate for each, but the pass rate is not the only factor we use to determine the difficulty of the bar. We calculate bar exam difficulty by length, subject matter, pass rate, and popular opinion. ‍ Note: Pass rates have been rounded to the nearest percentage
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Is law a useful degree UK?

What to do with a law degree? – Studying for a law degree opens up a legal career as a Solicitor or a Barrister. Other legal career options include Arbitrator, Mediator, Chartered Legal Executive, Company Secretary, Costs Lawyer, Paralegal, Detective and Licensed Conveyancer,

A law degree offers many options beyond the legal profession. Many employers accept applications from graduates with any subject. Your law degree can be helpful if you would like to work in politics, finance & banking, HR departments, property development and many more. *Based on known destinations Written by Imogen Burton, Director of Business Development, The University of Law Imogen qualified as a solicitor and specialised in real estate work in the City.

During her time at the University she has designed and taught courses for the postgraduate programmes, written resource books, been Course Director, and also the Centre Director in Guildford before moving to her current role.
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Who scored 180 on the LSAT?

How To Get Into Law School Without A Degree I was on my way to a science degree. I had all-nighters studying organic chemistry under my belt. I had completed hours and hours of lab work. That last part was what changed my mind. My career plan had been to become a researcher at a pharmaceutical company, but I just didn’t enjoy spending hot days in a glove box measuring out micrograms of catalysts for reactions that almost certainly wouldn’t work.

  • Yes, I’m impatient.
  • So, what was I to do? Law school, of course! It was a respectable profession that would allow me to deal with the cool part of science — when something’s been created and it’s time to get a patent.
  • The rationale was half-baked at best.
  • That decision, and the LSAT it necessitated, changed my life.

My LSAT prep process was an absolute mess. I registered at the last minute (end of August for the October exam), which meant I needed to travel from Boston to the suburbs of Philly to take the test. Rather than use prep books to learn test strategy and structure, I focused solely on taking PrepTests to figure it all out from scratch; rather than hire a car, I had decided to reinvent the wheel.

  1. And take PrepTests I did — every day.
  2. That’s right.
  3. I’d wake up, hit the gym, take a test, and review it.
  4. Eat, go back to the gym, take another test, and review that one.
  5. Then, I’d watch an episode of King of the Hill, go to bed, and do it all over again the next day.
  6. Why was I doing daily double sessions at the gym, you ask? Two reasons: 1.

My friends and I were really into the “300” workout at the time; 2. Science tells us that exercise improves learning. Why King of the Hill ? You sure ask a lot of questions, huh? It’s just a good show and was a useful way to wind down at the end of the day.

  • I nearly lost my mind.
  • My neck hurt so badly from leaning over books that my girlfriend was convinced I had meningitis.
  • I spent at least three times as many hours as I should have spent studying since I was brute forcing my way to understanding instead of using materials to learn from someone else.
  • I did see results (my PrepTest score went up about 20 points in that month), but my study plan was massively inefficient.

I spent way more time and energy than was necessary in my preparation and quite possibly shaved years off of my life in the process. I didn’t believe my score at first; I thought it was a typo. But I looked at the test, checking my answer sheet against the credited responses, and the score was right.

  • I had received a perfect 180.
  • I had been on the fence for law school, but my score opened doors that clinched my decision.
  • I ended up enrolling at Harvard Law School and received my J.D. in 2009.
  • After law school, I chose not to practice law (firm life just wasn’t for me), but I’m glad I went.
  • I learned a lot during my time there.

I met many people who challenged me to consider new viewpoints, and I feel I grew a lot as a person. It definitely helped me frame my own beliefs and arguments better. I also met my wife there, so, of course, no regrets. In lieu of practicing law, I started teaching the LSAT, and I found using my knowledge to help others to be profoundly rewarding.

  1. Today, I’ve built the LSAT program for an education company I believe in.
  2. My month in LSAT prep hell was completely avoidable, and my career since has been devoted to finding the most efficient, effective way to prep for the test.
  3. At Manhattan Prep, we’ve developed an LSAT curriculum and course structure based on the latest research in learning science, and we’re continuing to work everyday toward perfecting that formula.

The LSAT paved the way to my law school experience and a career I love. I just wish I knew then what I know now about the most painless way to prep for the test. Want to learn from Matt about how to tackle the LSAT efficiently, for free? Sign up for THE BRIEF, Manhattan Prep’s free LSAT Prep email series.

  • THE BRIEF is a complete LSAT prep experience, with 60+ emails guiding you through key LSAT concepts with in-depth breakdowns and a study schedule that’s easy to follow.
  • It’s a comprehensive, clear, and digestible way to prep for the LSAT on your own.
  • Matt Shinners is an LSAT Instructor and Head of LSAT Academics for Manhattan Prep,

A graduate of Harvard Law School, Matt owns a perfect 180 LSAT score and has made a career combining his passion for teaching with knowledge of the test to help students achieve their goals. Manhattan Prep is a leader in LSAT prep, with courses engineered using the latest techniques in learning science to optimize high-level learning.
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Is 149 a good LSAT score?

Faced with financial pressure, many law schools lowered admissions standards, but not without risking lower bar pass rates and sanctions.

Risk Band LSAT
Score Percentile
Minimal Risk 156-180 ≥ 67.4
Low Risk 153-155 55.6 – 63.9
Modest Risk 150-152 44.3 – 52.5
High Risk 147-149 33 – 40.3
Very High Risk 145-146 26.1 – 29.5
Extreme Risk 120-144 ≤ 22.9

The LSAT is the best predictor before law school as to whether a student will pass or fail the bar exam. The table (left) shows the risk of bar failure by LSAT score. The chart (right) shows how many schools fell into each risk category between 2010 and 2022.

Schools that admit students who face a high risk of failing the bar may be taking advantage of them for their tuition dollars. However, the LSAT score is just a starting point for such an assessment. Undergraduate GPA, bar exam difficulty, and academic programs mitigate or exacerbate this starting point.

Tip On the left panel At the top of the page, you can change the data scope to view admissions standards from different angles. In 2010, only eight schools were classified as very high or extreme risk. That means that at least a quarter of students enrolled at each school reported a highest score of less than 146, which is the 29.6 percentile.

As schools grew more desperate in subsequent years, the number of schools in these categories continued to grow, peaking at 50 law schools in 2016. The number declined to 42 in 2017 and to 24 in 2018, although three of the schools from 2016 stopped enrolling new students in 2017. In 2018, two more law schools stopped enrolling new students, of which one was high risk in 2017 and one was extreme risk.

The chart above has three parts: 1. LSAT Distribution: The shaded blue area shows the distribution of LSAT scores for all people who took the LSAT during the last three years. LSAT scores range from 120 to 180. A student scoring 120 is in the 0 percentile because the student scored better than 0% of test-takers.

A student scoring a 180 is in the 99.9 percentile because the student scored better than 99.9% of test-takers. A student scoring a 160 is in the 80.4 percentile because the student scored better than 80.4% of test-takers. You can hover over the blue outline to see a tooltip for all each LSAT/percentile combinations.2.

Black and Green Bars: Each school has a bar. The start point for each bar, a purple marker, is the school’s 25th percentile LSAT score for students who entered in 2010, The end point is the 25th percentile LSAT score for students who entered in 2022,

If the 25th percentile went up, the bar is green. If it went down, the bar is black. If the score is the same, there is only a purple marker (no bar). You can hover over the bar (or marker) to see the school and how its 25th percentile LSAT score has changed.3. Risk Overlays: We highlight the three highest risk areas, from high to extreme.

Using these indicators, you can see which schools’ bottom quartile students are most likely to struggle to complete school and pass the bar exam. Learn more. The table below presents the chart’s underlying data:

School 2010 Entering Class 2022 Entering Class Change
Enr. 25th Percentile LSAT Enr. 25th Percentile LSAT Enr. 25th Percentile LSAT
Score (%ile Rank) Risk Band Score (%ile Rank) Risk Band Score %ile Risk Band
Albany Law School 236 152 (52.2) Modest 199 153 (55.6) Low -15.7% 1 +3.4
American University 502 158 (74.6) Minimal 396 156 (67.4) Minimal -21.1% 2 -7.2
Appalachian School of Law 127 146 (29.5) Very High 56 144 (22.9) Extreme -55.9% 2 -6.6
Arizona State University 191 158 (74.6) Minimal 288 158 (74.6) Minimal +50.8% 0
Ave Maria School of Law 203 147 (33) High 99 149 (40.3) High -51.2% 2 +7.3
Barry University 254 149 (40.3) High 267 147 (33) High +5.1% 2 -7.3
Baylor University 183 160 (80.4) Minimal 127 159 (77.6) Minimal -30.6% 1 -2.8
Boston College 261 163 (88.1) Minimal 212 162 (85.9) Minimal -18.8% 1 -2.2
Boston University 268 164 (90) Minimal 216 164 (90) Minimal -19.4% 0
Brigham Young University 150 161 (83.4) Minimal 121 165 (92) Minimal -19.3% 4 +8.6
Brooklyn Law School 486 162 (85.9) Minimal 390 157 (70.9) Minimal -19.8% 5 -15
California Western School of Law 382 151 (48.1) Modest 245 151 (48.1) Modest -35.9% 0
Campbell University 162 154 (59.7) Low 210 152 (52.2) Modest +29.6% 2 -7.5
Capital University 246 150 (44.3) Modest 159 148 (36.3) High -35.4% 2 -8
Case Western Reserve University 236 157 (70.9) Minimal 152 153 (55.6) Low -35.6% 4 -15.3
Catholic University of America 274 156 (67.4) Minimal 131 156 (67.4) Minimal -52.2% 0
Chapman University 212 155 (63.9) Low 139 155 (63.9) Low -34.4% 0
Charleston School of Law 237 151 (48.1) Modest 224 149 (40.3) High -5.5% 2 -7.8
Cleveland-Marshall College of Law 195 153 (55.6) Low 135 151 (48.1) Modest -30.8% 2 -7.5
William and Mary 217 160 (80.4) Minimal 212 160 (80.4) Minimal -2.3% 0
Columbia University 404 170 (97.4) Minimal 402 171 (98) Minimal -0.5% 1 +0.6
Cornell University 205 166 (93.2) Minimal 210 170 (97.4) Minimal +2.4% 4 +4.2
Creighton University 144 151 (48.1) Modest 122 149 (40.3) High -15.3% 2 -7.8
CUNY 163 152 (52.2) Modest 217 151 (48.1) Modest +33.1% 1 -4.1
DePaul University 312 156 (67.4) Minimal 177 152 (52.2) Modest -43.3% 4 -15.2
Drake University 155 153 (55.6) Low 110 151 (48.1) Modest -29% 2 -7.5
Drexel University 146 156 (67.4) Minimal 137 152 (52.2) Modest -6.2% 4 -15.2
Duke University 238 168 (95.9) Minimal 227 168 (95.9) Minimal -4.6% 0
Duquesne University 212 151 (48.1) Modest 167 153 (55.6) Low -21.2% 2 +7.5
Elon Law School 132 153 (55.6) Low 167 149 (40.3) High +26.5% 4 -15.3
Emory University 293 166 (93.2) Minimal 236 161 (83.4) Minimal -19.5% 5 -9.8
Faulkner University 145 148 (36.3) High 103 147 (33) High -29% 1 -3.3
Florida A&M University 288 144 (22.9) Extreme 132 148 (36.3) High -54.2% 4 +13.4
Florida International University 161 152 (52.2) Modest 142 156 (67.4) Minimal -11.8% 4 +15.2
Florida State University 199 161 (83.4) Minimal 113 159 (77.6) Minimal -43.2% 2 -5.8
Fordham University 477 163 (88.1) Minimal 423 164 (90) Minimal -11.3% 1 +1.9
University of New Hampshire 132 150 (44.3) Modest 194 152 (52.2) Modest +47% 2 +7.9
George Mason University 303 158 (74.6) Minimal 159 158 (74.6) Minimal -47.5% 0
George Washington University 523 162 (85.9) Minimal 515 162 (85.9) Minimal -1.5% 0
Georgetown University 591 168 (95.9) Minimal 593 166 (93.2) Minimal +0.3% 2 -2.7
Georgia State University 224 159 (77.6) Minimal 201 157 (70.9) Minimal -10.3% 2 -6.7
Golden Gate University 320 151 (48.1) Modest 43 152 (52.2) Modest -86.6% 1 +4.1
Gonzaga University 183 154 (59.7) Low 205 152 (52.2) Modest +12% 2 -7.5
Harvard University 561 171 (98) Minimal 564 170 (97.4) Minimal +0.5% 1 -0.6
Hofstra University 365 156 (67.4) Minimal 263 151 (48.1) Modest -27.9% 5 -19.3
Howard University 156 151 (48.1) Modest 160 151 (48.1) Modest +2.6% 0
Chicago-Kent College of Law 310 155 (63.9) Low 230 155 (63.9) Low -25.8% 0
Indiana University – Bloomington 250 156 (67.4) Minimal 154 158 (74.6) Minimal -38.4% 2 +7.2
Indiana University – Indianapolis 282 151 (48.1) Modest 227 151 (48.1) Modest -19.5% 0
University of Illinois Chicago School of Law 539 151 (48.1) Modest 343 149 (40.3) High -36.4% 2 -7.8
Lewis and Clark College 247 157 (70.9) Minimal 149 158 (74.6) Minimal -39.7% 1 +3.7
Liberty University 135 148 (36.3) High 125 150 (44.3) Modest -7.4% 2 +8
Louisiana State University 222 155 (63.9) Low 208 154 (59.7) Low -6.3% 1 -4.2
Loyola Marymount University 403 158 (74.6) Minimal 307 157 (70.9) Minimal -23.8% 1 -3.7
Loyola University Chicago 292 157 (70.9) Minimal 272 157 (70.9) Minimal -6.8% 0
Loyola University New Orleans 246 150 (44.3) Modest 209 149 (40.3) High -15% 1 -4
Marquette University 247 154 (59.7) Low 183 153 (55.6) Low -25.9% 1 -4.1
Mercer University 166 153 (55.6) Low 150 153 (55.6) Low -9.6% 0
Michigan State University 299 152 (52.2) Modest 212 153 (55.6) Low -29.1% 1 +3.4
Mississippi College 212 147 (33) High 126 146 (29.5) Very High -40.6% 1 -3.5
New England School of Law 393 151 (48.1) Modest 360 149 (40.3) High -8.4% 2 -7.8
New York Law School 641 153 (55.6) Low 358 152 (52.2) Modest -44.1% 1 -3.4
New York University 476 169 (96.7) Minimal 376 169 (96.7) Minimal -21% 0
North Carolina Central University 206 143 (20.5) Extreme 158 145 (26.1) Very High -23.3% 2 +5.6
Northeastern University 220 155 (63.9) Low 234 158 (74.6) Minimal +6.4% 3 +10.7
Northern Illinois University 135 150 (44.3) Modest 117 147 (33) High -13.3% 3 -11.3
Northern Kentucky University 199 152 (52.2) Modest 93 150 (44.3) Modest -53.3% 2 -7.9
Northwestern University 274 166 (93.2) Minimal 238 166 (93.2) Minimal -13.1% 0
Nova Southeastern University 386 148 (36.3) High 221 150 (44.3) Modest -42.7% 2 +8
Ohio Northern University 120 149 (40.3) High 62 146 (29.5) Very High -48.3% 3 -10.8
Ohio State University 230 160 (80.4) Minimal 158 159 (77.6) Minimal -31.3% 1 -2.8
Oklahoma City University 224 149 (40.3) High 148 146 (29.5) Very High -33.9% 3 -10.8
Pace University 299 152 (52.2) Modest 293 150 (44.3) Modest -2% 2 -7.9
Pepperdine University 222 159 (77.6) Minimal 192 159 (77.6) Minimal -13.5% 0
Quinnipiac University 163 154 (59.7) Low 123 149 (40.3) High -24.5% 5 -19.4
Regent University 168 150 (44.3) Modest 114 153 (55.6) Low -32.1% 3 +11.3
Roger Williams University 198 149 (40.3) High 181 148 (36.3) High -8.6% 1 -4
Samford University 166 153 (55.6) Low 146 152 (52.2) Modest -12% 1 -3.4
Santa Clara University 314 158 (74.6) Minimal 203 155 (63.9) Low -35.4% 3 -10.7
Seattle University 324 155 (63.9) Low 221 152 (52.2) Modest -31.8% 3 -11.7
Seton Hall University 358 155 (63.9) Low 215 154 (59.7) Low -39.9% 1 -4.2
South Texas College of Law Houston 461 151 (48.1) Modest 366 151 (48.1) Modest -20.6% 0
Southern Illinois University 144 151 (48.1) Modest 89 147 (33) High -38.2% 4 -15.1
Southern Methodist University 254 156 (67.4) Minimal 226 160 (80.4) Minimal -11% 4 +13
Southern University Law Center 320 143 (20.5) Extreme 292 144 (22.9) Extreme -8.8% 1 +2.4
Southwestern Law School 410 152 (52.2) Modest 343 152 (52.2) Modest -16.3% 0
St. John’s University 341 156 (67.4) Minimal 235 154 (59.7) Low -31.1% 2 -7.7
St. Louis University 334 153 (55.6) Low 184 153 (55.6) Low -44.9% 0
St. Mary’s University 301 151 (48.1) Modest 277 150 (44.3) Modest -8% 1 -3.8
St. Thomas University – Florida 275 148 (36.3) High 227 150 (44.3) Modest -17.5% 2 +8
Stanford University 180 167 (94.6) Minimal 178 170 (97.4) Minimal -1.1% 3 +2.8
Stetson University 360 154 (59.7) Low 306 156 (67.4) Minimal -15% 2 +7.7
Suffolk University 531 152 (52.2) Modest 445 150 (44.3) Modest -16.2% 2 -7.9
Syracuse University 252 153 (55.6) Low 238 154 (59.7) Low -5.6% 1 +4.1
Temple University 326 159 (77.6) Minimal 201 160 (80.4) Minimal -38.3% 1 +2.8
Texas Southern University 212 145 (26.1) Very High 195 149 (40.3) High -8% 4 +14.2
Texas Tech University 244 153 (55.6) Low 157 154 (59.7) Low -35.7% 1 +4.1
Texas A&M 253 151 (48.1) Modest 125 158 (74.6) Minimal -50.6% 7 +26.5
Western Michigan University – Cooley Law School 1583 144 (22.9) Extreme 191 146 (29.5) Very High -87.9% 2 +6.6
Touro College 280 149 (40.3) High 202 149 (40.3) High -27.9% 0
Tulane University 258 160 (80.4) Minimal 219 157 (70.9) Minimal -15.1% 3 -9.5
SUNY Buffalo 219 155 (63.9) Low 141 153 (55.6) Low -35.6% 2 -8.3
University of Akron 177 152 (52.2) Modest 137 151 (48.1) Modest -22.6% 1 -4.1
University of Alabama 161 159 (77.6) Minimal 149 159 (77.6) Minimal -7.5% 0
University of Arizona 157 161 (83.4) Minimal 124 158 (74.6) Minimal -21% 3 -8.8
University of Arkansas – Fayetteville 138 153 (55.6) Low 122 153 (55.6) Low -11.6% 0
University of Arkansas – Little Rock 157 151 (48.1) Modest 143 149 (40.3) High -8.9% 2 -7.8
University of Baltimore 363 151 (48.1) Modest 229 151 (48.1) Modest -36.9% 0
University of California – Hastings 383 160 (80.4) Minimal 389 157 (70.9) Minimal +1.6% 3 -9.5
University of California – Berkeley 286 162 (85.9) Minimal 278 167 (94.6) Minimal -2.8% 5 +8.7
University of California – Davis 196 160 (80.4) Minimal 206 163 (88.1) Minimal +5.1% 3 +7.7
University of California – Los Angeles 308 165 (92) Minimal 308 166 (93.2) Minimal 0% 1 +1.2
University of Chicago 205 168 (95.9) Minimal 203 169 (96.7) Minimal -1% 1 +0.8
University of Cincinnati 144 157 (70.9) Minimal 130 156 (67.4) Minimal -9.7% 1 -3.5
University of Colorado 180 161 (83.4) Minimal 165 159 (77.6) Minimal -8.3% 2 -5.8
University of Connecticut 186 158 (74.6) Minimal 153 156 (67.4) Minimal -17.7% 2 -7.2
University of Dayton 207 150 (44.3) Modest 133 152 (52.2) Modest -35.7% 2 +7.9
University of Denver 301 156 (67.4) Minimal 280 156 (67.4) Minimal -7% 0
University of Detroit Mercy 257 146 (29.5) Very High 210 150 (44.3) Modest -18.3% 4 +14.8
University of Florida 310 160 (80.4) Minimal 196 162 (85.9) Minimal -36.8% 2 +5.5
University of Georgia 248 162 (85.9) Minimal 169 156 (67.4) Minimal -31.9% 6 -18.5
University of Hawaii 113 153 (55.6) Low 89 154 (59.7) Low -21.2% 1 +4.1
University of Houston 266 159 (77.6) Minimal 256 157 (70.9) Minimal -3.8% 2 -6.7
University of Idaho 130 151 (48.1) Modest 148 149 (40.3) High +13.8% 2 -7.8
University of Illinois 228 163 (88.1) Minimal 163 162 (85.9) Minimal -28.5% 1 -2.2
University of Iowa 203 158 (74.6) Minimal 141 161 (83.4) Minimal -30.5% 3 +8.8
University of Kansas 165 155 (63.9) Low 137 153 (55.6) Low -17% 2 -8.3
University of Kentucky 135 157 (70.9) Minimal 120 155 (63.9) Low -11.1% 2 -7
University of Louisville 143 155 (63.9) Low 120 152 (52.2) Modest -16.1% 3 -11.7
University of Maine 95 153 (55.6) Low 84 153 (55.6) Low -11.6% 0
University of Maryland 296 157 (70.9) Minimal 205 157 (70.9) Minimal -30.7% 0
University of Memphis 158 153 (55.6) Low 101 152 (52.2) Modest -36.1% 1 -3.4
University of Miami 489 156 (67.4) Minimal 360 156 (67.4) Minimal -26.4% 0
University of Michigan 376 168 (95.9) Minimal 334 166 (93.2) Minimal -11.2% 2 -2.7
University of Minnesota 260 159 (77.6) Minimal 222 162 (85.9) Minimal -14.6% 3 +8.3
University of Mississippi 199 151 (48.1) Modest 176 153 (55.6) Low -11.6% 2 +7.5
University of Missouri – Columbia 148 157 (70.9) Minimal 128 156 (67.4) Minimal -13.5% 1 -3.5
University of Missouri – Kansas City 156 154 (59.7) Low 141 152 (52.2) Modest -9.6% 2 -7.5
University of Montana 85 153 (55.6) Low 91 151 (48.1) Modest +7.1% 2 -7.5
University of Nebraska 145 153 (55.6) Low 147 155 (63.9) Low +1.4% 2 +8.3
University of Nevada – Las Vegas 145 156 (67.4) Minimal 124 155 (63.9) Low -14.5% 1 -3.5
University of New Mexico 116 153 (55.6) Low 99 152 (52.2) Modest -14.7% 1 -3.4
University of North Carolina 254 159 (77.6) Minimal 188 162 (85.9) Minimal -26% 3 +8.3
University of North Dakota 83 148 (36.3) High 86 146 (29.5) Very High +3.6% 2 -6.8
University of Notre Dame 172 162 (85.9) Minimal 166 163 (88.1) Minimal -3.5% 1 +2.2
University of Oklahoma 174 157 (70.9) Minimal 172 155 (63.9) Low -1.1% 2 -7
University of Oregon 177 157 (70.9) Minimal 160 155 (63.9) Low -9.6% 2 -7
University of Pennsylvania 250 166 (93.2) Minimal 246 167 (94.6) Minimal -1.6% 1 +1.4
University of Pittsburgh 259 158 (74.6) Minimal 121 159 (77.6) Minimal -53.3% 1 +3
University of Richmond 146 159 (77.6) Minimal 121 158 (74.6) Minimal -17.1% 1 -3
University of San Diego 330 159 (77.6) Minimal 254 157 (70.9) Minimal -23% 2 -6.7
University of San Francisco 251 155 (63.9) Low 135 152 (52.2) Modest -46.2% 3 -11.7
University of South Carolina 239 156 (67.4) Minimal 206 156 (67.4) Minimal -13.8% 0
University of South Dakota 75 149 (40.3) High 87 148 (36.3) High +16% 1 -4
University of Southern California 220 166 (93.2) Minimal 223 165 (92) Minimal +1.4% 1 -1.2
University of St. Thomas – Minneapolis 168 154 (59.7) Low 157 152 (52.2) Modest -6.5% 2 -7.5
University of Tennessee 169 156 (67.4) Minimal 136 156 (67.4) Minimal -19.5% 0
University of Texas 389 164 (90) Minimal 292 166 (93.2) Minimal -24.9% 2 +3.2
University of The District of Columbia 131 149 (40.3) High 80 147 (33) High -38.9% 2 -7.3
University of the Pacific – McGeorge 346 155 (63.9) Low 175 152 (52.2) Modest -49.4% 3 -11.7
University of Toledo 157 150 (44.3) Modest 94 149 (40.3) High -40.1% 1 -4
University of Tulsa 146 152 (52.2) Modest 129 151 (48.1) Modest -11.6% 1 -4.1
University of Utah 122 157 (70.9) Minimal 96 158 (74.6) Minimal -21.3% 1 +3.7
University of Virginia 368 166 (93.2) Minimal 315 166 (93.2) Minimal -14.4% 0
University of Washington 186 160 (80.4) Minimal 181 160 (80.4) Minimal -2.7% 0
University of Wisconsin 246 158 (74.6) Minimal 242 157 (70.9) Minimal -1.6% 1 -3.7
University of Wyoming 82 151 (48.1) Modest 68 152 (52.2) Modest -17.1% 1 +4.1
Vanderbilt University 193 165 (92) Minimal 155 163 (88.1) Minimal -19.7% 2 -3.9
Vermont Law School 212 153 (55.6) Low 170 149 (40.3) High -19.8% 4 -15.3
Villanova University 251 159 (77.6) Minimal 181 158 (74.6) Minimal -27.9% 1 -3
Wake Forest University 165 160 (80.4) Minimal 158 159 (77.6) Minimal -4.2% 1 -2.8
Washburn University 169 153 (55.6) Low 92 150 (44.3) Modest -45.6% 3 -11.3
Washington and Lee University 144 161 (83.4) Minimal 123 159 (77.6) Minimal -14.6% 2 -5.8
Washington University in St Louis 276 162 (85.9) Minimal 260 164 (90) Minimal -5.8% 2 +4.1
Wayne State University 197 153 (55.6) Low 126 154 (59.7) Low -36% 1 +4.1
West Virginia University 137 151 (48.1) Modest 103 152 (52.2) Modest -24.8% 1 +4.1
Western New England University School of Law 168 151 (48.1) Modest 95 146 (29.5) Very High -43.5% 5 -18.6
Western State University 242 148 (36.3) High 131 150 (44.3) Modest -45.9% 2 +8
Willamette University 158 154 (59.7) Low 113 151 (48.1) Modest -28.5% 3 -11.6
Yale University 205 171 (98) Minimal 197 171 (98) Minimal -3.9% 0
Cardozo-Yeshiva University 382 160 (80.4) Minimal 315 159 (77.6) Minimal -17.5% 1 -2.8
John Marshall Law School – Atlanta 265 148 (36.3) High 131 148 (36.3) High -50.6% 0
Widener University – Pennsylvania 178 148 (36.3) High 142 146 (29.5) Very High -20.2% 2 -6.8
Widener University – Delaware 389 150 (44.3) Modest 234 148 (36.3) High -39.8% 2 -8
University of California – Irvine 83 163 (88.1) Minimal 172 162 (85.9) Minimal +107.2% 1 -2.2

Puerto Rican schools have been excluded from the chart above because the LSAT is in English and the bar exam in Puerto Rico may be taken in Spanish. Admissions and enrollment data come from the American Bar Association.
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Is Harvard Law School easy to get into?

Admission statistics – Harvard Law School’s overall acceptance rate: Harvard Law school has one of the lowest law school acceptance rates in the country. This tells us that Harvard law school is highly selective. Additionally, the average GPA and LSAT scores of its most recent matriculants confirm that you need to have a strong academic background to be granted admission.
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