How Old Are High School Freshmen?

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How Old Are High School Freshmen
United States – In the United States, ninth grade is usually the first year in high school, In this system, ninth graders are also often referred to as freshmen, It can also be the last year of junior high school. The typical age for U.S.9th grade students is 14 to 15 years.

  1. In the math curriculum, ninth graders are usually taught algebra, but advanced math includes geometry or algebra II,
  2. Advanced courses are usually available to ninth graders who are prepared for a more rigorous curriculum, depending on the school district.
  3. Some districts across the country allow their 10th graders to take trigonometry or AP Statistics, or even calculus if the district provides, but most often, the highest level available to be taken as a 10th grader is pre-calculus,

In the English curriculum, most schools still have the same levels of basic courses, advanced courses, and honors courses. The basic level for a 9th grader is often listed as English I (may also be called English 9). This course will often teach the fundamentals of higher-level literature and how to analyze and respond to such literature.

  • The advanced course is often English II (may also be called English 10) depending on the school district and is usually a genre studies type of English class, but it may instead be focused on one type of literature, such as American literature or British literature,
  • In the social studies curriculum, there is a variety of different courses that may be offered.

Most often, though, the course is either a geography class, a government class, or a world history class. In the science curriculum, ninth grade students are required, in most areas, to take biology, Most high school students are required to have one carnegie unit of computer science, one unit of physical education, and one unit of health education to graduate.
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How old is a college freshman?

How Old Are Freshman in College? – ​ The typical age for a freshman in college is usually between 17 to 18 years old, as the term describes a student in their first year of college. However, for those who take a gap period between high school and attending college, a freshman could be older than that.
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How old is a college junior?

How young—or old—can college juniors be? – Although most commonly, college juniors are 20 or 21, people choose to go to college at all ages. Recent data from the National Center for Education Statistics reviews that people are increasingly starting college at all different points throughout their lives. How Old Are High School Freshmen Find more statistics at Statista This means that you’re increasingly likely to be in a classroom with juniors who are in their 20s, 30s, or beyond. How Old Are High School Freshmen Noah graduated Summa Cum Laude from Worcester state University with a Communications major and Writing minor. At school, he was the Executive Editor of the online newspaper, a tutor at the school’s writing center, and an all-around good guy. He is the Founder and Content Manager of Edu FAQs, and is here to clear up your questions and make your college experience as exciting as it is educational.
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What is a junior student?

A junior is a person in the third year at an educational institution ; usually at a secondary school or at the college and university level, but also in other forms of post-secondary educational institutions. In United States high schools, a junior is equivalent to an eleventh grade student.
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How old are freshmen in Korea?

High school – Animation Vocational High School in Henan, South Korea High schools in South Korea teach students for three years, from first grade (age 15–16) to third grade (age 17–18), and students commonly graduate at age 17 or 18. High school students are commonly expected to study increasingly long hours each year moving toward graduation, to become competitive and enter extremely attractive universities in Korea.

  1. Many high school students wake and leave home in the morning at 5 am.
  2. When the school is over at 4 pm, they usually go to a studying room in the school or to a library to study instead of going home.
  3. This is called “yaja”, which literally means “evening self-study”.
  4. They do not need to go home to eat dinner since most schools provide paid dinner for students.

After finishing yaja (which usually ends at 11:00 pm, but later than 12:00 am at some schools), they return home after studying, then usually return to specialty study schools ( hagwon ) often until 3 am, from Monday to Friday. In addition, they often study on weekends.

  1. The yaja (야자, 야간자율학습, night self study) had not been truly “self” study for more than 30 years; all high school students were forced to do it.
  2. From the 2010s, the Ministry of Education has encouraged high schools to free students of yaja and to allow them to do it whenever they want.
  3. Many standard public high schools near Seoul are now no longer forcing students do it.

But private high schools, special-purpose high schools (such as science high schools and foreign language high schools), or normal schools far from Seoul are still forcing students to do yaja. A common saying in Korea is: “If you sleep three hours each night, you may get into a top ‘SKY university’ (Seoul National University, Korea University, and Yonsei University).

If you sleep four hours each night, you may get into another university. If you sleep five or more hours each night, especially in your last year of high school, forget about getting into any university.” Accordingly, many high school students in their final year do not have any free time for holidays, birthdays or vacations before the CSATs (College Scholastic Ability Test, Korean: 수능, Suneung ), which are university entrance exams held by the Ministry of Education.

Surprisingly, some high school students are offered chances to travel with family to enjoy fun and relaxing vacations, but these offers are often refused on the first suggestion by the students themselves, and increasingly on later additional trips if any, due to peer influences and a fear of “falling behind” in classes.

  1. Many high school students seem to prefer staying with friends and studying, rather than taking a break.
  2. Truancy is extremely rare in Korea.
  3. Rebellious students will often stay in class and use smartphones connected to the internet to chat with friends behind the teacher’s back during classes, which usually get them in trouble if caught.

High schools in Korea can be divided into specialty tracks that accord with a student’s interest and career path or a normal state high school. For special high schools, there are science ( Science high school ), foreign language, international, and art specialty high schools that students can attend by passing entrance examinations which are generally highly competitive.

  • These schools are called special-purpose high schools.
  • Autonomous private high schools are relatively free of the policy of the Ministry of Education.
  • Also, there are schools for gifted students.
  • Tuition of many special-purpose high schools, autonomous private high schools, and schools for gifted students are extremely expensive (the average of tuition of special-purpose or autonomous private high school is US$5,614 per year.) One of the schools for gifted students is US$7,858 per year.

There are a few schools that require more than what is calculated as an average. CheongShim International Academy, Hankuk Academy of Foreign Studies, Korean Minjok Leadership Academy, and Hana Academy Seoul are infamous for their expensive tuition. Simultaneously, these schools are known for students’ high academic achievement and college results, sending more than 50% of their students to “SKY universities” yearly.

Other types of high schools include standard public high schools and standard private high schools, both with or without entrance examinations. These high schools do not specialize in a particular field but are more focused on sending their students to top and popular colleges. However, since the emergence of special-purpose, autonomous private schools, international schools, and schools for gifted students, standard high schools struggle to send students to “top and popular” universities.

Standard high schools generally cannot compete with specialized schools’ infrastructures, teaching resources, and activities that improve students’ school records. As such, for a student at a standard high school, it is difficult to enter “SKY”. Excellent students and their parents therefore avoid entering into standard high schools.

Only students whose grades are too low to enter vocational school (or whose grades are simply average) enter normal high schools. This continues to discourage excellent students from attending normal high schools because the academic level of students is low. This vicious cycle turned standard schools into “slums” in the public eye.

As a result, the admissions committees of top universities tend to reject students from standard schools; there is a preference to admit students from special-purpose, autonomous private schools, international schools, and schools for gifted students.

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This has made the competition of entering such high schools as difficult as entering top universities. The Korean government has tried to crack down on such damaging study habits in order to allow a more balanced system, mostly by fining many privately run specialty study institutes ( hakwon ) for running classes as late as 12 am.

To solve this problem, the Korean government made a law that bans hakwon s from running classes after 10:00 PM, which is often not conformed to. The standard government-issued school curriculum is often noted as rigorous, with as many as 16 or so subjects.

Most students choose to also attend hakwon to boost their academic performance. Core subjects include Korean, English and mathematics, with adequate emphasis on social and physical science subjects. Students do not typically ask questions in the classroom, but prefer to memorize details. As memorization is an out-dated and ineffective means of true mastery of a subject, compared against contemporary education standards focusing on global comprehension, application, and critical thinking, the vast majority of South Korean students transferring to a modernized education system of a highly developed country almost exclusively are found to be far behind their peers with poor ability for independent determination or complete concept understanding and synthesis,

World-wide South Korean graduates are some of the least sought for Western university recruitment or career recruitment as they consistently fail to demonstrate logical and critical thinking and application skills. It is critical to note that the type and level of subjects may differ from school to school, depending on the degree of selectivity and specialization of the school,

Specialty, optional, expensive, study schools help students memorize questions and answers from previous years’ CSAT tests and universities’ interview questions. High school is not mandatory, unlike middle school education in Korea. However, according to a 2005 study of Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) member countries, some 97% of South Korea’s young adults do complete high school.

This was the highest percentage recorded in any country. However, this is mainly due to the fact that there is no such thing as a failing grade in Korea, and most graduate as long as they attend school a certain number of days. This system of graduation solely based on attendance further devalues a South Korean student when being evaluated for university admission in Western countries, especially as many are phasing out entrance examinations.

South Korean views on high-school selection and perceived elitism of certain schools are contrary to most Western educational systems which rigorously focus on academics, but also place a high value on diversity of the student body in a variety of aspects to maximize student exposure to differing perspectives and experiences while achieving sophisticated understanding and socialization.

As it stands, the Korean secondary system of education is highly successful at preparing students for teacher-centric education, in which teachers directly communicate information to students. However, this does not hold true for classroom environments where students are expected to take on self-reliant roles wherein, for the most part, active and creative personalities seem to lead to success.
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How old is a freshman in America?

United States – In the United States, ninth grade is usually the first year in high school, In this system, ninth graders are also often referred to as freshmen, It can also be the last year of junior high school. The typical age for U.S.9th grade students is 14 to 15 years.

In the math curriculum, ninth graders are usually taught algebra, but advanced math includes geometry or algebra II, Advanced courses are usually available to ninth graders who are prepared for a more rigorous curriculum, depending on the school district. Some districts across the country allow their 10th graders to take trigonometry or AP Statistics, or even calculus if the district provides, but most often, the highest level available to be taken as a 10th grader is pre-calculus,

In the English curriculum, most schools still have the same levels of basic courses, advanced courses, and honors courses. The basic level for a 9th grader is often listed as English I (may also be called English 9). This course will often teach the fundamentals of higher-level literature and how to analyze and respond to such literature.

  1. The advanced course is often English II (may also be called English 10) depending on the school district and is usually a genre studies type of English class, but it may instead be focused on one type of literature, such as American literature or British literature,
  2. In the social studies curriculum, there is a variety of different courses that may be offered.

Most often, though, the course is either a geography class, a government class, or a world history class. In the science curriculum, ninth grade students are required, in most areas, to take biology, Most high school students are required to have one carnegie unit of computer science, one unit of physical education, and one unit of health education to graduate.
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What age is high school in the US?

Educational stages

Category School Grade Level Ages
High school 9th grade / Freshman 14-15
10th grade / Sophomore 15-16
11th grade / Junior 16-17
12th grade / Senior 17-18

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How old is a sophomore USA?

High school – The 10th grade is the second year of a student’s high school period (usually aged 15–16) and is referred to as sophomore year, so in a four year course the stages are freshman, sophomore, junior and senior, In How to Read a Book, the Aristotelean philosopher and founder of the ” Great Books of the Western World ” program Mortimer Adler says, “There have always been literate ignoramuses, who have read too widely, and not well.

The Greeks had a name for such a mixture of learning and folly which might be applied to the bookish but poorly read of all ages. They are all ‘sophomores’.” This oxymoron points at the Greek words σοφός (wise) and μωρός (fool). High-school sophomores are expected to begin preparing for the college application process, including increasing and focusing their extracurricular activities.

Students at this level are also considered to be developing greater ability for abstract thinking. The 1911 Sophomore class of Riverside Military Academy in Macon, Georgia.
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What age are most college students?

COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE AVERAGE AGE | Dartmouth Alumni Magazine | August, 1923 The average age at which students enter college is about 18 years 6 months. There is always a certain, rather small, percentage who enter considerably younger than the average.

They range all the way down to a little under 16 years of age. The number of these younger men is getting larger year by year. Recently there has been a good deal of discussion, chiefly among college presidents, dents, as to the advisability of having students begin their college work very much under the present average age.

Some presidents argue that men should be encouraged to begin their college career at the age of 17 or less. They maintain that students who enter young stand higher in scholarship as a rule than do the older ones and that the long preparation commercial careers tends to force men to begin their life work too late.

  • They believe that in some way the secondary school preparation should be speeded up.
  • The demands of the professional schools and of business are gradually being extended.
  • In some instances the length of the professional course has increased and in the majority of cases there is greater insistence upon a long preliminary academic training.
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Business, too, has taken on more of a professional character. Its technique has improved, its content in actual knowledge enlarged and its demand for more thorough and more intensive non-professional preparation is insistent. Those who argue against early entrance to college base their opinion almost exclusively upon the belief that those under- graduates who are below the average in age do not gain what they might gain in the way of social and personal development.

  • It is claimed that the youngest students for the most part lose decidedly in the matter of fellowship and participation in the varied life of (an undergraduate body.
  • In view of this discussion President Hopkins has asked that the history of the men who had entered Dartmouth at an early age be compiled.

He knew that the many questions involved demanded more than a theoretical discussion and that an opinion should be based only upon discoverable facts. For the purpose of this study he chose the men who had entered the classes of 1901 to 1922 under 17 years of age.

Mr. Conant, Assistant to the Dean, prepared a systematic statement of the age, the scholarship standing and the student activities of each of the younger men who entered in these classes. This included both those who received degrees and those who did not. The record was then turned over to this office for analysis.

Obviously there are two parts to any such discussion. One should know the history of these men while they were undergraduates and should learn as much of their subsequent careers as may be possible. The first part of this inquiry is comparatively easy; the second part is extremely difficult.

  1. For the present only the undergraduate history of the younger men of the twenty-two classes under consideration will be discussed.
  2. The total number under 17 years of age who entered college in the twenty-two two classes was 224, of whom 167 received degrees.
  3. A review of the group will be made from the standpoints of scholarship, mental alertness, preparatory schools, student activities, social development and entrance upon graduate study.

From the standpoint of scholarship the younger group is conspicuous. In the first place the losses out of the group by failure, withdrawal and other causes are very small. There were only about 25% of them who failed to get degrees, while the normal loss in one class after another seems to be approximately 45%.

In the percentage of those taking honor rank the group stands remarkably high. Out of 224 in the group there were 54 who received honors, or almost 25% of the total. It is difficult to make a comclasses parison with any of the recent graduating because the interruption caused by the war has undoubtedly upset any scheme of statistics that might normally be applicable.

It seems best, therefore, to compare this total group with the class graduating just as we entered the war. In the Class of 1917 there were 38 who received honors. This is a little less than 10% of the total number who entered with that class. The contrast of 10% with 25% is very significant.

  1. More than 16% of the younger group received Phi Beta Kappa standing.
  2. The class of 1917 had about 6% of Phi Beta Kappa men.
  3. The percentages given for those who took high rank seem to be merely the same kind of percentages that might be made provided the whole group of younger men were compared with the total who entered college.

It would be a long and very laborious undertaking to discover whether this is true or not, but an examination of the standing at graduation of each of the 167 men who did graduate seems to show that on the average their rank was higher than that of others in their classes.

  1. It is a common statement that those men who enter college younger than the average have made greater progress in their school work because they are the brighter boys.
  2. Until the last two or three years such a statement could be based only on general impression.
  3. There was no evidence to prove it.
  4. At present we give a Mental Alertness Test to all freshmen and this test appears in a general way to distinguish the men of the class on the basis of their acquired information, their accuracy, their quickness of perception and to some degree on their reasoning power.

After students have taken their Mental Alertness Test the class is distributed into five groups according to their performance on the test. We believe that the tests given to the classes of 1925 and 1926 are rather better adapted to distinguish between men than were the tests given to earlier classes.

  • In these two classes there was 68 who were under 17 years of age when they entered college.
  • In the highest group on the basis of the Mental Alertness Test, called Group 1, there were twenty-six members of these two classes, in Group 2 eighteen, Group 3 ten, Group 4 twelve and in Group 5 two.
  • If this showing is typical of all classes, the opinion of those who have believed that the men who entered college at an early age were on the whole unusually alert mentally seems to be substantiated.

It is sometimes said that the younger men are those who have had a better preparation for college work. This would be true provided it could be proved that they come from better preparatory schools than others do. The fact, however, is that the schools from which the younger men have come since the entrance of the class of 1901 were of all sizes and all degrees of reputation.

  1. There is no distinction to be made between these schools and the schools at which other men were prepared.
  2. The rapid progress of this group of students would seem to depend upon their own ability or their industry rather than upon a special quality of teaching or upon especially good school facilities.

The objection most frequently raised to early entrance to college is that the younger men get less out of college life than do those who enter at the average or above the average age. This is an extremely difficult point to handle. One can illustrate the degree to which they participate in the life of the college by trying to find out how much they have engaged in student activities, what percentage were accepted into fraternities and any other incidental evidence that may be gathered.

  1. Of the 224 members of the younger men 65 are recorded as having engaged in organized student activities.
  2. This amounts to 22.4% of the total number.
  3. In ath- letics there were 17 who achieved some success, 9 obtained organization managerships, 23 were connected with col- lege publications, 3 took part in dramatics, 11 belonged to musical organizations.

These figures are probably inadequate since the only records available are those given in the Aegis. In the preparation of class records for publication in the Aegis the material is furnished by the men themselves. The modest man may not give a full account of himself, another type of man may overstress his achievements.

  • Moreover one cannot tell from the Aegis just how long or how arduously the men were engaged in the organizations with which they specify that they were connected.
  • For these reasons no percentage comparison should be made, but it certainly seems to be the case that the activity of the younger men in college organizations was smaller than that of the average of the class.
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This is particularly true of athletics. The younger men appear to have obtained their full measure of managerships and to have had an unusually large connection with the college publications. The showing on this point is the spot in which the younger group is deficient.

  1. It is evident, however, that their tendency as a group was to take part in those student activities that were literary and intellectual in character rather than athletic.
  2. There may be a wide variance in opinion regarding the social position or social development of the unusually young men.
  3. This is not the place for a full discussion of the subject.

It is appropriate, only to state certain facts that bear upon the problem and suggest ways in which the discussion might then proceed. There is an interesting saying among undergraduates that students with a big preparatory school reputation seldom retain that reputation through their college course.

  1. It seems that the vital factor here is precisely this matter of age.
  2. One notices in each succeeding freshman class that the older members are the leaders and that it is from these older members that the majority of class officers are chosen.
  3. The distinction in age is less significant as a class advances toward graduation.

In senior year it seems to be the case that the men of average or less than average age have overtaken the older men, hold the major part of the class offices and take their place distinctly in leadership of class opinion. Another piece of evidence as to the social qualifications of students may be illustrated by admission to fraternities.

In the twenty-two classes under discussion there were 167 men under 17 years of age at entrance who remained in collage and received degrees. Out of these there were 102 who were admitted to fraternities, while 65 were not. This means that practically two-thirds of the very young men became fraternity men.

No effort has been made to make a complete comparison for all of the twenty-two classes, from 1901,to 1922, but three classes have been chosen at equal intervals throughout that period. These are the classes of 1902, 1912 and 1922. In the class of 1902 there were 69 fraternity men and 62 non-fraternity men.

  1. In the class of 1912 there were 115 who joined fraternities and 97 who did not.
  2. In the class of 1922 there were 180 fraternity men and 49 non-fraternity men.
  3. In the three classes the total number of fraternity men was 364, while 208 were not taken into fraternities.
  4. That is to say, slightly less than 64% of the members of these three classes entered fraternities.

If these three classes may be regarded as typical of the twenty-two classes in succession it would seem that the younger men were fully up to the average of their classes, provided admission to fraternities may be taken as evidence of social success.

  1. So much for the facts that are obtainable regarding the success of the younger men among their fellows.
  2. Several interesting problems are presented.
  3. One is at liberty to maintain that those who enter college at the age of 18 or more have wasted one or two years.
  4. They may have had interests other than those connected with their preparatory school course, or they may be less intellectually inclined.

For these reasons and for other reasons they have lagged behind instead of maintaining the normal rate of progress. Again one might speculate as to the social condition of a college if the majority of students entered at the age of 17 or less. It would probably make a considerable difference in the efficiency of athletic teams and of various college organizations, it might even lower the standard of college -publications, although that is doubtful when one remem- bers how many of the younger men have in the past been on editorial boards, and even editors-in-chief.

  • One may also wonder who would be the leaders of college opinion provided the younger and very bright men were not overshadowed as they are today by their older classmates.
  • In fact there is room for much debate as to the whole undergraduate life of a college provided all students in high school; could be speeded up to the pace now set by those below the average in age.

There is one further point concerning the younger men that is deserving of attention. They evidently maintain their strong intellectual interests beyond the time of their graduation from college. This is proved by the fact that out of the 167 who graduated from the twenty-two two classes there were 77 who entered graduate schools in order to prepare themselves for professions or occupations demanding additional study.

  • The nature of their graduate study is of all types including engineering, chemistry, law, medicine, ministry, teaching and commerce.
  • It may be mentioned that one of them became a Rhodes Scholar and another after a short period spent in teaching obtained a rather prominent position in one of the foundations for the advancement of scholarship.

In the class of 1922 about 30% have entered graduate schools for one purpose or another. This may be contrasted with the 46% of the younger men under consideration. eration. A study of this kind is incomplete and inconclusive without the additional history of these same men since graduation.

  • In order to determine the total degree of their success it would be necessary to follow them after graduation and make a comparison between their accomplishment and that of their older classmates.
  • Records are not yet available to make this study with the thoroughness that would enable us to draw satisfactory conclusions.

Material will be accumulated gradually and the study completed at an early date. The head of the procession : COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE AVERAGE AGE | Dartmouth Alumni Magazine | August, 1923
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How old are juniors in America?

Year / Grade Placement

Age UK Years US/International Grades
14 – 15 Year 10 9th Grade (Freshman)
15 – 16 Year 11 10th Grade (Sophomore)
16 – 17 Year 12 / Lower 6th 11th Grade (Junior)
17 – 18 Year 13 / Upper 6th 12th Grade (Senior)

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What age is junior in UK?

Primary education is for children aged 4 to 11 in maintained schools in Cambridgeshire. This includes the following school types:

Primary schools Infant schools Junior schools First schools Middle schools Special schools

School types and corresponding school years

School type School years covered
Primary school Reception + Years 1 to 6
Infant school Reception + Years 1 and 2
Junior school Years 3 to 6
First school Reception + Years 1 to 4
Middle school Years 5 to 8

These schools all follow the same curriculum (the main difference between them is the age of the pupils they admit).
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How old is a junior kid?

Children and kids sizing is roughly based on their age. Junior sizing is for ages 7 (about) and up while kid sizing is for ages 7 and under.
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What grade is a 17 16?

A score of 16 out of 17 on a test, assignment or class is a 94.12% percentage grade.1 questions were wrong or points missed. A 94% is an A letter grade.
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