How Much Education Do You Need To Be A Pharmacist?

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How Much Education Do You Need To Be A Pharmacist
A question we hear a lot is, “H ow long does it take to become a pharmacist?” To practice pharmacy in the U.S., you must earn a Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) degree from an accredited pharmacy institution and pass a state pharmacy licensure exam.U.S. pharmacy institutions are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education ( ACPE ).

  • A degree in pharmaceutical science or related discipline will not prepare or permit you to practice pharmacy in the U.S.
  • How long does it take to earn a PharmD degree? The Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) degree program requires at least two years of specific undergraduate college study followed by four academic years (or three calendar years) of professional pharmacy study.

Most students enter a pharmacy degree program after completion of three or more years of college. Are there any accelerated Doctor of Pharmacy degree programs? Institutions offering a three-calendar year PharmD degree program to students who have completed all college-level prerequisites for admission are listed in Table 1 of the Pharmacy School Admissions Requirements (PSAR).

I already have a degree in healthcare (or related science). Generally, a degree in a related discipline does not reduce the time it takes to complete the PharmD degree program. Applicants who have earned an undergraduate or graduate degree in a related field must still complete the entire pharmacy degree program (four academic years or three calendar years). Please contact the institution directly to determine if you are eligible for course waivers.

I am a practicing pharmacist with a B.S. in pharmacy degree. Some pharmacy colleges and schools have nontraditional educational programs which award a PharmD degree to practitioners who complete them. Other programs offer practitioners the opportunity to enroll in specific academic courses or educational programs specifically designed to impart a defined set of practice competencies to practitioner/students. These latter courses are often called “certificate programs” because a certificate of completion is given to practitioners who complete the requirements of the programs. The following schools offer nontraditional PharmD programs and MAY also offer certificate or specific courses to practitioners. For pharmacy school contact information, use the PharmCAS School Directory, For more information on these programs, refer to PSAR tables 2 and 7.

There has never been a better time for students to consider a rewarding career in pharmacy. The demand for trained pharmacy professionals has increased in recent years due to the rapid growth of the healthcare and pharmaceutical industries, especially for the growing elderly population. How Much Education Do You Need To Be A Pharmacist
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What is the shortest time to become a pharmacist?

What is the quickest way to become a pharmacist? The fastest ways to become a pharmacist include completing a two-year pre-pharmacy program followed by a four-year Pharm.D. program, or a direct-entry six-year program.
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What are the requirements for pharmacy?

All candidates must have a NSC with Bachelor’s : In order to be admitted to degree studies, the candidate should have attained a minimum of 33 points – BPharm 38 points.
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What is the hardest year of pharmacy?

First year the hardest? I wouldn’t say hardest, at least not at USC. I’d say it was the most tedious. For us it was prereq redos mostly. A/P, Biochem, Med Chem with a little bit of pharmacy sprinkled in for good measure. Now, the prereq regurg was more pharmacy oriented than the first go around, but it was still boring as all get out.

  1. Instead of “memorize the TCA cycle” it was “memorize the TCA cycle, oh and remember G6PD deficiency occurs in some people which is potentially fatal”.
  2. At least 2nd year we started the therapeutics modules, so I felt that I actually went to pharmacy school instead of over-priced undergrad.
  3. Right now, P3 is kicking my butt.

Not that my grades are dropping, but I’m finding less and less time to devote to the little things, like sleep. Anyway, just my $.02 For me: P1 year – 85% review P2 year – most information presented to you, most tests, hardest P3 year – presentations, projects, time-consuming assignments, not as hard as P2 year but less time to accomplish all your tasks.

P4 year – ? Last edited: Feb 18, 2010 P2 is hardest here at Rutgers 1st year= a joke 2nd year=first semester easy, second challenging 3rd year=a lot more work-need to study more 4th year= hopefully when everything comes together and I learn the most P1 is where you learn a bunch of background info about diseases and whole bunch of irrelevant information that has absolutely nothing to do with being a pharmacist.

It’s actually probably the easiest year. P2 is pretty much universally the hardest year of pharmacy school. Pharmacology and kinetics/pharmaceutics are generally pretty rough P3- less material with more review, but a lot of random assignments and projects and other time-consuming BS that makes you feel a little stressed out at times P4-???- I’ve heard this is when you actually learn to, you know, be a pharmacist and stuff I’ve spoken to students at several Texas pharmacy schools and it seems like the prevailing trend is for P1 year to be the most difficult.

Some say it’s due to the shift from undergrad to graduate-level work. Others say that it just gets easier as you go on. Did most of you find P1 to be the hardest year? So far it’s harder than any undergrad stuff I’ve done. By the way, how old is your grandmother? Are you guys learning many drugs in the P1 year? We are on the block system here and I’ve lost track of all the drugs I knew for the exam and now can’t remember.

We usually don’t learn dosing until the P2 year but we do learn indications/contraindications, MOAs, ADRs, and major drug interactions. It definitely feels like I’m in pharmacy school and not just spending a year in review. I think first year is very easy.2nd year is getting harder b/c a lot of stuffs to memorize.

  1. They say it’s hard b/c 1st year.u learn about pharmacokenetics and a lot of students are not good at chemistry.
  2. I think P2 was the worst year but P3 was harder.
  3. P2 sucked because I didn’t like the classes whereas P3 was difficult but interesting and enjoyable.
  4. When I was looking to transfer schools and was told I would have to repeat my P2 year, I said hell no.

P1 year is supposed to be hard from getting used to things. P2 year is difficult due to a full load of classes without any BS or intro classes. P3 year is the most work and putting everything together on your own time so that you can understand it well enough by the time that exams come around.

  • P4 year is just rotations, so it’s only as difficult as you let it be (I think).
  • P1 was easy to me.but I didn’t have a job, so the opinion is a little biased I guess you could say.
  • P2 so far has been more difficult.
  • Especially this semester considering I’m taking 18 credit hours and working about 4 hours every day.

I can say this year, although quite stressful, is definitely fun. I’ve never learned so much in my life, but I just wish I actually had more time to read systematic reviews of drug classes and treatment guidelines P3, as has been stated, is apparently a bunch of “busy” work.

It must vary between schools. I’ve heard first yr. is the easiest, and that 2nd/3rd yr are absolute hell. P-1 was a piece of cake, mostly review.my school purposefully left drugs out of the curriculum (save for my OTC/self-care course) and focused on the pathophys and biochem/immunology of stuff. P-2 – I kind of hate it.we’re crunching through the basics of P&T and kinetics.

We’re being taught in case-study format for P&T which I like better.all of my preceptors agree that’s the way they would rather go vs. strict didactic + random case studies thrown in. My classmates whine a lot about it, boohoo. But no it’s tougher than I thought it’d be. I’ve spoken to students at several Texas pharmacy schools and it seems like the prevailing trend is for P1 year to be the most difficult. Some say it’s due to the shift from undergrad to graduate-level work. Others say that it just gets easier as you go on.

Did most of you find P1 to be the hardest year? Did you speak to a couple students of the UH College of Pharmacy? Because, I don’t think they would have said that P1 was the hardest. It’s P2 or P3 that is the hardest. Which of two years is hardest is debatable. P4 is all about your work ethic and attitude for rotations.

For the University of Texas College of Pharmacy I heard P1 may be the hardest and if you can pass that year then you should be fine with the next 3 yrs, but that is just what I heard and not my first hand experience. Did you speak to a couple students of the UH College of Pharmacy? Because, I don’t think they would have said that P1 was the hardest.

It’s P2 or P3 that is the hardest. Which of two years is hardest is debatable. P4 is all about your work ethic and attitude for rotations. For the University of Texas College of Pharmacy I heard P1 may be the hardest and if you can pass that year then you should be fine with the next 3 yrs, but that is just what I heard and not my first hand experience.

I spoke to students at UT and Texas A&M. Thanks for all the responses, everyone. So far it’s harder than any undergrad stuff I’ve done. By the way, how old is your grandmother? P-1 was a piece of cake, mostly review.my school purposefully left drugs out of the curriculum (save for my OTC/self-care course) and focused on the pathophys and biochem/immunology of stuff. P-2 – I kind of hate it.we’re crunching through the basics of P&T and kinetics. I was gonna take the Bioterrorism class but it was actually more of just some review of the history of Biowarfare and like disaster preparedness. I thought the class would be on how to use, make, and counter-act Bioterror agents. I was gonna take the Bioterrorism class but it was actually more of just some review of the history of Biowarfare and like disaster preparedness.

I thought the class would be on how to use, make, and counter-act Bioterror agents. haha. like “introduction to bioterrorism: how to” I spoke to students at UT and Texas A&M. Thanks for all the responses, everyone. Since I’m at Texas A&M, I feel a bit obligated to respond. I know many of my classmates felt that their P1 year was the worst, but I didn’t feel that it was that bad.

Certainly, there was the pressure of a new environment and the need to adjust to how things work, but it didn’t feel particularly overwhelming. I don’t mean to say that there weren’t any bad weeks. But, I don’t feel like I was smothered in my first year.

Several people at A&M have also said that the first semester of the P2 year would be pretty bad because of having to drive off to our weekly rotation sites every Monday. Personally, I had to drive 135 miles to my site (so, a total of 270 miles forwards and back), which as I understand was in the top 5 furthest sites.

It certainly added some time-crunch to the week, but the classes that we had weren’t too bad (Pharmaceutics and Basic Pharmacokinetics were well-taught and fairly lightweight in the difficulty of the material). If anything, I would say that the most recent semester has been the roughest for me because of the monumental feeling of senioritis that I’ve been getting.

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I think that kinda articulates the importance of your mindset from semester to semester. I have the feeling that a lot of students come into pharmacy school feeling a bit complacent. For a lot of students, acceptance into a school of pharmacy fulfills their primary goal, and so they come into their first semester lacking a certain degree of drive that is needed to prosper.

I think that is part of the reason why some students struggle in their first semester. The other side to why some students struggle in their first semester is that maybe their work in undergraduate school did not prepare them for the rigors of pharmacy school.

  1. Quite often, people draw comparisons between 4-year universities and community colleges, but I do not think that such an easy distinction can not be made (for the record, I went to the University of Texas at Austin, and I have taken summer classes and then post-UT classes at a community college).
  2. The point remains, though, that some colleges offer a different quality of education.

It’s hard to measure how well a GPA of 4.0 at one university will compare to a 3.0 at another university. Now, although that argument may be a wash, I think it’s still important to consider how a person will view their GPA. Will a person let their 4.0 inflate their ego, even on a subliminal level? Will a person with a 2.8 feel an inferiority complex when surrounded by their peers? Personally, I think the most important thing that I got out of my time in UT-Austin is that I know how to pull an all-nighter, and the idea of a week-to-week time-crunch isn’t anything abnormal to me.

  • I’ve run into plenty of people in pharmacy school who are, by all intents and purposes, smarter than me.
  • The only reason that I can ascertain as to why their grades aren’t as high as mine is that they either don’t put enough effort into things, or they have some sort of psychological block that’s pulling them for a loop.

So, perspective has a lot to do with what semester will be your worst semester. If you want to play it safe, I would try to get into the mentality that every semester is going to be pretty ugly. On that note, I should probably start reading something. -Garfield3d umm actually first year first semester was some of the best grades i gotten i got a cumulative 94 average, we don’t use letter grades at nova.

  1. Its not so much tough as all review, luckily i went to a good undergrad and did my best to learn so everything i picked up really quick like the biotransformation in the liver step 1 and 2 and all the ochem thats involved.
  2. Our load for first year is 4 science class which is definitely an up from undergrad where i only took 2 and social science classes.

Right now second semester we’re taking kinetics(not clinical pk yet), a/p, dynamics 2, pharmeutics 2, marketing, drug information + IPPE so about 19 hours credit word, its definitely gotten a bit harder with kinetic and esp dynamics being a lot more case study focused with drugs but its doable i just hate freaking test every week no time 2 do anything i wanta do Hm.

If @ ucsf you would consider first year is the hardest. then it’s probably a good idea to consider going to another school. ‘cuz it DOES NOT get any better or easier. P1 is pretty tough here at UMD: the transition + we start therapeutics in our second semester. First year is cake. I worked 30 hrs a week and spent time with my wife and pulled a low B average.

That year is about the level I would expect an educated and tenured pharmacy tech to be at.2nd year 1st semester was a royal butt kicking as well as the 1st half of the 2nd semester. After spring break second year things calm down.3rd year is about the same as the end of 2nd year with a lot of papers, research, presentations and comprehensive patient care.
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How much does it cost to study pharmacy in UK?

Masters in Pharmacy in UK: Highlights

Degree Types MS in Pharmacy | Master of Pharmacy (4 years)
English Proficiency IELTS: 7.0 | TOEFL: 96
Tuition Fee 16,700-35,000 GBP (16.61-34.82 lakhs INR)
Average Salary 40,000 GBP (39.80 lakhs INR)

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How much money do pharmacists make in the UK?

Salary rate Annual Month Biweekly Weekly Day Hour How much does a Pharmacist make in United Kingdom? The average pharmacist salary in the United Kingdom is £47,708 per year or £24.47 per hour. Entry level positions start at £41,144 per year while most experienced workers make up to £58,500 per year. How Much Education Do You Need To Be A Pharmacist
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What hobbies should a pharmacist have?

Pharmacists – Interests – Interests Pharmacists typically have the following interests:

Have investigative interests. They like work activities that have to do with ideas and thinking. They like to search for facts and figure out solutions to problems mentally. Have conventional interests. They like work activities that follow set procedures, routines, and standards. They like to work with data and detail. They prefer working where there is a clear line of authority to follow. Have social interests. They like work activities that assist others and promote learning and personal development. They like to communicate with others: to teach, give advice, help, or otherwise be of service to others.

Values Pharmacists typically have the following work values:

Consider recognition important. They like to work in jobs which have opportunities for them to advance, be recognized for their work, and direct and instruct others. They usually prefer jobs in which they are looked up to by others. Consider support from their employer important. They like to be treated fairly and have supervisors who will back them up. They prefer jobs where they are trained well. Consider relationships important. They like to work in a friendly, non-competitive environment. They like to do things for other people. They prefer jobs where they are not pressured to do things that go against their sense of right and wrong. Consider independence important. They like to make decisions and try out ideas on their own. They prefer jobs where they can plan their work with little supervision. Consider good working conditions important. They like jobs offering steady employment and good pay. They want employment that fits their individual work style. They may prefer doing a variety of tasks, working alone, or being busy all the time. Consider achievement important. They like to see the results of their work and to use their strongest abilities. They like to get a feeling of accomplishment from their work.

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What type of person is a pharmacist?

The Pharmacist Personality Type on Crystal The average Pharmacist tends to be loyal, supportive, and helpful. They can be a stabilizing force in a group and will likely invest lots of time building relationships with their peers. They will probably work best in a serene work environment, avoiding chaos and sudden change. : The Pharmacist Personality Type on Crystal
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Who creates drugs?

What do pharmaceutical scientists do? – Pharmaceutical scientists are individuals who perform a variety of tasks related to the research, discovery, development, and testing of drugs and other pharmaceutical treatments. They are most commonly employed by pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, though they can also work in other fields such as government lobbying, as well.

Collecting and analyzing data about the use and efficacy of treatments in various stages of preclinical development Collaborating with members of the lab team, as well as other stakeholders not directly involved in preclinical research (such as marketing or legal) Designing and executing experiments to determine the specific mechanisms responsible for how a drug functions Testing and optimizing compounds and the means to deliver them to patients to improve their safety and efficacy while reducing the risk of adverse outcomes

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Below we explore a number of specific steps that you can follow to make this career your reality.
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What is the difference between pharmaceutical and pharmacist?

Pharmaceutical scientists focus on the research and testing of new drugs and treatments. Pharmacists deal with the safe and effective administration and distribution of existing medications and ensure patients have the appropriate medications.
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What is the hardest part of being a pharmacist?

I would say that one of the most challenging things is being ready for a very extensive learning process to prepare yourself to be ready for your patients. You will be tested and learning your entire career as pharmacy is a critical part of the healthcare process for patients.
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What are the hardest pharmacy law exams?

By: Elaine Nguyen, PharmD, MHA To practice as a licensed pharmacist in California, an individual must first pass two exams: The North American Pharmacist Licensure Exam (NAPLEX) and the California Practice Standards and Jurisprudence Examination for Pharmacists (CPJE).

And the CPJE is considered by many to be one of the hardest pharmacy law exams in the United States. Unlike California, most states require their pharmacist candidates to take the Multistate Pharmacy Jurisprudence Exam (MPJE) for licensure. The MPJE is designed to assess candidates’ application of laws and regulations for specific states/jurisdiction; whereas the CPJE is designed to assess candidates’ application patient medications and outcomes, and pharmacy operations.

One of the main differences between the exams is that the MPJE is based on a national blueprint of pharmacy jurisprudence competencies and the CPJE is more specific to California law and clinically based. Between October 2020 to March 2021, the CPJE and NAPLEX overall pass rates were 50.8% (710/1397) and 88% (1078/1225) respectively.

  1. The average pass rate for the CPJE is typically between 47-58%, while the average for the MPJE is between 77-84%.
  2. With the Multistate Pharmacy Jurisprudence Exam (MPJE), each jurisdiction/state write, review, and select the exam items, and item sharing is optional across jurisdictions.
  3. Unlike the CPJE, individuals who successfully pass the MPJE are eligible to transfer their existing pharmacist license to one or more states or jurisdictions.

Currently, 46 states including the District of Colombia (DC) require passing of the MPJE in order to practice or transfer licensure; and 37 states including DC do not require applicants wishing to transfer their license to take the original examination.

  1. On April 30, 2021, the California Board of Pharmacy unanimously approved a recommendation to switch California Practice Standards and Jurisprudence Examination for Pharmacists (CPJE) to Multistate Pharmacy Jurisprudence Exam (MPJE).
  2. The change over to the new test may occur after the Office of Professional Examination Services (OPES) conducts its official audit of the CPJE.

What does that mean for pharmacy students or licensed pharmacists seeking to practice in California? Doctor of Pharmacy programs in California may have to change their curriculum or pharmacy law courses to prepare their students for the MPJE. This may also make it easier for pharmacists practice out-of-state to get their California Pharmacist license. How Much Education Do You Need To Be A Pharmacist How Much Education Do You Need To Be A Pharmacist (Figures 1 and 2 taken from the presentation by the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy on the Multistate Pharmacy Jurisprudence Examination on April 21, 2021) References: MPJE Pass Rate 2020. National Association of Boards of Pharmacy, 2020, https://nabp.pharmacy/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/MPJE-Pass-Rates-2020.pdf Licensure Transfer State Restrictions.
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Why does it take so long at the pharmacist?

The pharmacist needs to run all your prescription through the system – There are a few reasons why it may take a pharmacist a little longer to fill your prescription. One reason is that they need to check for any possible drug interactions with other medicines you are taking.

  • They will also need to get the information from the physician’s office before filling a prescription.
  • This helps to ensure that the patient is getting the right medication and that there are no potential problems with taking multiple medications.
  • There are a few reasons that it might take some time for the pharmacist to fill your prescription.

Often, they need to verify the prescription with the doctor and then run it through the system. This process can take some time, but ultimately, it’s important that they get it right.
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What are the strengths of a pharmacist?

Excellent communication and interpersonal skills As a pharmacist, you spend most of your time communicating with patients, mostly on drug prescriptions. You need to explain to them the need for a specific medication and any possible side effects. A pharmacist interacts with patients who have different personalities.
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What are the qualities of a ten star pharmacist?

Keywords : the “Ten-star pharmacist” concept, the pharmaceutical specialist, the pharmacy student, professional roles Introduction The main task of pharmaceutical practice is to focus on helping the patient. Over the years, due to the development of the pharmaceutical industry, there has been a reorientation of professional roles (PRs) of the pharmaceutical specialist (PhS).

They are now a full-fledged participants in the health sector, and the current epidemiological situation caused by the Covid-19 has only confirmed this.77% of Ukrainians would like to receive basic medical advice in a pharmacy, whereas, in Poland, it was proposed to expand their powers, at the legislative level, namely to allow vaccination within the pharmacy,

In addition, PhSs always provide pre-medical care, determine the mistakenly dose prescribed by a doctor, and in the course of pharmaceutical care can recognize life-threatening conditions, as a result, the patient will be accompanied until the ambulance arrives,

The versatility of the PhS became a key aspect for the creation of the “seven-star pharmacist” concept by the World Health Organization advisory group, in 1997, which was adopted three years later by the International Pharmaceutical Federation, Subsequently, the rapid development of the pharmaceutical sector led to the addition of scientists of three more PRs, so now this doctrine is interpreted as the “ten-star pharmacist” concept and includes ten PRs such as a caregiver, a decision-maker, a communicator, a manager, a life-long-learner, a teacher, a leader, a researcher, an entrepreneur and an agent of positive change,

Materials and methods Questionnaires, mathematical statistics, generalization, and interpretation of results were the methods used in the research. The questionnaire, which consisted of two blocks of questions, was developed for the surve y, The first block (passport part) collected data about age and sex, for the students their training course, for the PhSs their educational level, position, presence/absence of qualification category and scientific degree, as well as work experience.

In the second block, respondents were offered a definition of ten pharmacist PRs and two unrelated to them (sample questionnaires are presented in appendices 1 and 2), The term of the survey in Ukraine was February – April 2020, in Poland – June – September 2020. The questionnaire was anonymous and distributed through a paper (disseminate by teachers among students) and online google form (for PhSs), which in Ukraine was posted in four pharmaceutical groups of the social network “Facebook”, and in Poland it was distributed via e-mail.

Participation in the study was voluntary and anonymous. Respondents were: – PhSs from different regions of Ukraine, except for the annexed Autonomous Republic of Crimea and the occupied territories of Donetsk and Luhansk oblasts, and Poland; – senior students of the pharmaceutical faculties of Danylo Halytsky Lviv National Medical University, Odesa National Medical University, Zaporizhzhia State Medical University, and Lviv Polytechnic National University (Ukraine) and Poznan University of Medical Sciences (Poland).

We received 614 (528 qualitatively completed) questionnaires of PhSs and 516 (511 qualitatively completed) questionnaires of students from Ukraine, 209 and 475 respectively from Poland. Among the surveyed PhSs (95.5% in Ukraine and 81.8% in Poland) and students (89.0% and 73.3% respectively) women were the absolute majority.

The age of Ukrainian PhSs ranged from 18 to 65 years, the average – 33.6 years, students – from 20 to 51 and the average 23.1 years, respectively. The age of Polish PhSs ranged from 25 to 67 years, the average – 39.9 years, students – from 19 to 24 and the average 23.5 years, respectively (Table 1).

Since among the Ukrainian respondents, 35.6% were persons with secondary pharmaceutical education (pharmacy assistant), this affected the discrepancy in the minimum age with Polish specialists. We made a joint decision to include these specialists in the survey, since this is a significant number of people working in pharmacies.

They directly interact with patients and influence the formation of trust in pharmaceutical activity. That is, the term PhS in the article refers to pharmacists and pharmacy assistant. Table 1. Social profile of respondents.

Indexes PhSs Students
Ukraine Poland Ukraine Poland
The number of questionnaires received, units 614 209 516 475
Qualitatively completed questionnaires, units 528 209 511 475
Women persons 504 171 455 348
% 95.5 81.8 89.0 73.3
Man persons 24 38 56 127
% 4.5 18.2 11.0 26.7
Age, years Minimum 18 25 20 19
Maximum 65 67 51 24
Average 33.6 39.9 23.1 23.5

Among Ukrainian PhSs, only 4.8% had a scientific degree (0.4% – doctoral, 2.3% – candidate, 2.1% are applicants). In Ukraine, PhSs has the right to obtain a qualification category, according to which a certain tariff category is established for it. This mostly applies to state and communal pharmacies.

At the same time, PhSs who possess theoretical and practical knowledge and have the appropriate work experience, namely at least 5 years for the second, 7 for the first, and 10 for the higher, have the right to assign or confirm the qualification category, T he absolute majority (69.3%) did not have a qualification category (available only in 7.4% – the second, 13.1% – the first and 10.2% – the highest).

As for Polish PhSs, all (100%) had a master’s degree in pharmacy, but only 1% of them had a doctorate and 9.1% had a specialization.26.7% of Ukrainian and 12.0% of Polish PhSs were head of a pharmacy or it’s structural unit. Since 72.7% of Ukrainian PhSs and 89.0% of Polish PhSs had 5 years or more of work experience, among the surveyed students were students from the senior courses, this testifies to their competence and experience, and proved that the received information was qualitative and objective.

Statistical analysis was performed using a spreadsheet Microsoft Excel. The countries were compared in a chi-square test of independence, Results It was found that the opinions of PhSs and pharmacy students of both countries on the PRs of PhS had some differences (Table 2). In general, according to the coincidence of awareness about PRs, the views of the PhSs of these states were divided into four groups: 1) high agreement in opinion (difference from 0 to 10%): – 96.0% of Ukrainian PhSs and 95.2% of Polish PhSs believed that the PhS should be a decision-maker; – 89.0% and 92.8% (hereinafter the first number refers to the PhSs from Ukraine, the second- to Poland) agreed that the PhS should be an agent of positive change; – 90.9% and 99.5% thought that PhS should be a life-long-learner; – 87.3% and 96.2% believed that PhS should be a teacher.2) the presence of a moderate difference of opinion (difference from 10 to 20%): – 80.3% and 69.9% agreed that PhS should be a manager; – 86.7% and 100.0% thought that PhS should be a specialist who provides care.3) low level of agreement (difference from 20 to 30%): – 92.8% and 64.1% believed that PhS should be a communicator.4) the presence of complete disagreement (over 30%): – 90.6% and 60.3% agreed that PhS should be a researcher; – 64.4% and 99.0% thought that PhS should be an entrepreneur; – 94.1% and 57.4% believed that PhS should be a leader.

Table 2. Opinions of PhSs and students of Ukraine and Poland on PRs of pharmacist.

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PRs of PhS Answer PhSs Students
Ukraine Poland Ukraine Poland
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Caregiver Agree with PR 86.7 % (n=458) 100.0 % (n=209) p<0.0 0 1 84.0 % (n=429) 90.5 % (n=430) p=0.003
Disagree / Hesitate with PR 7.8 % (n=70) 0.0 % (n=0) 16.0 % (n=82) 9.5 % (n=45)
Decision-maker Agree with PR 96.0 % ( n=507 ) 95.2 % ( n= 199) p= 0.623 93.7 % ( n= 479) 100.0 % ( n= 475) p <0.0 0 1
Disagree / Hesitate with PR 4.0 % ( n=21 ) 4.8 % ( n= 1 0 ) 6.3 % ( n= 32) 0.0 % ( n =0)
Communicator Agree with PR 92.8 % ( n =490) 64.1 % ( n =134) p <0.001 88.1 % ( n= 450) 75.2 % ( n= 357) p <0.0 0 1
Disagree / Hesitate with PR 7.2 % ( n =38) 35.9 % ( n = 75 ) 11.9 % ( n= 61) 2 4.8 % ( n= 1 18 )
Manager Agree with PR 80.3 % ( n= 424) 69.9 % ( n= 146) p= 0.003 82.2 % ( n= 420) 77.9 % ( n= 370) p = 0.092
Disagree / Hesitate with PR 19.7 % ( n= 104) 30.1 % ( n= 63) 17.8 % ( n= 91) 22.1 % ( n= 105)
Life-long-learner Agree with PR 90.9 % ( n= 480) 99.5 % ( n= 208) p <0.0 0 1 86.3 % ( n =441) 100.0 % ( n =475) p <0.0 0 1
Disagree / Hesitate with PR 9.1 % ( n= 48) 0.5 % ( n =1) 13.7 % ( n =70) 0.0 % ( n =0)
Teacher Agree with PR 87.3 % ( n =461) 96.2 % ( n= 201) p <0.0 0 1 76.3 % ( n= 390) 96.9 % ( n= 460) p <0.0 0 1
Disagree / Hesitate with PR 17.3 % (n=67) 3.8 % (n=8) 23.7 % (n=121) 3.1 % (n=15)
Leader Agree with PR 94.1 % ( n= 497) 57.4 % ( n =120) p <0.0 0 1 90.6 % ( n= 463) 36.8 % ( n= 175) p <0.0 0 1
Disagree / Hesitate with PR 5.9 % (n=31) 42.6 % (n=89) 9.4 % (n=48) 63.2 % (n=300)

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1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Researcher Agree with PR 90.6 % ( n =478) 60.3 % ( n =126) p <0.0 0 1 83.2 % ( n= 425) 42.7 % ( n= 203) p <0.0 0 1 Disagree / Hesitate with PR 9.4 % ( n =50) 3 9,7 % ( n=8 3) 16.8 % ( n= 86) 57.3 % ( n= 272) Entrepreneur Agree with PR 64.4 % ( n= 340) 99.0 % ( n= 207) p <0.0 0 1 75.3 % ( n =385) 98.3 % ( n =467) p <0.0 0 1 Disagree / Hesitate with PR 35.6 % ( n= 188) 1.0 % ( n =2) 24.7 % ( n =126) 1,7 % ( n =8) Agent of positive change Agree with PR 89.0 % ( n =470) 92.8 % ( n= 194) p = 0.119 80.4 % ( n= 411) 94.7 % ( n= 450) p <0.0 0 1 Disagree / Hesitate with PR 11.0 % ( n= 58) 7.2 % ( n= 15) 19.6 % ( n=100 ) 5.3 % ( n= 25)

According to Ukrainian PhSs, first of all, he/she should be a person who is able to be a decision-maker (96.0 %), a leader (94.1 %), a communicator (92.8 %), a life-long-learner (90.9 %), and a researcher (90.6 %), further – an agent of positive change (89.0 %), a teacher (87.3 %), a caregiver (86.7 %) and a manager (80.3 %), and at the end – an entrepreneur (64.4 %).

In turn, Polish colleagues believed that the PhS should be in the first place a caregiver (100.0 %), a life-long-learner (99.5 %) and an entrepreneur (99.0 %), then a teacher (96.2 %), a decision-maker (95.2 %) and an agent of positive change (92.8 %), nextly – a manager (69.9 %), a communicator (64.1 %), a researcher (60.3 %), and at the end – a leader (57.4 %).

It is worth noting that the Ukrainian PhSs did not respond (100%) to any PR, while all respondents in Poland agree with the PR as a caregiver. According to Ukrainians, the lowest percentage was occupied by component an entrepreneur (64.4%), while the Poles – a leader (57.4%) ( Graph 1 ), Graph 1. Comparative analysis of the opinions of the PhSs of Ukraine and Poland regarding PRs of a pharmacist. It was also found that a significant part of the Polish PhSs was more in favor of the answer “hesitate” than to the position of “agree” or “disagree” with respect to several PRs.

In fact, a third of them hesitated in the need for a specialist to perform functions a researcher (36.4 %), a leader (35.4 %), a manager (26.3 %), and about one-fifth choose option “hesitate” (17.7 %) and “disagree” (18.2 %) regarding PR a communicator. The opposite tendency has been revealed among Ukrainian specialists because as more than a quarter of them (26,1 %) did not agree with PR an entrepreneur, 13.1 % – a manager, and less than one-tenth (9.5 %) hesitated about PR an entrepreneur.

For other PRs, the level of disagreement and hesitation in both groups was below 10%. The views of students were also divided into four groups: 1) high agreement in opinion (difference from 0 to 10%): – 82.2 % of students from Ukraine and 77.9 % students from Poland agreed that PhS should be a manager; – 93.7 % and 100.0 % (here and further the first number belongs to Ukrainian students, the second – to Polish) thought that PhS should be a decision-maker; – 84.0 % and 90.5 % believed that PhS should be a caregiver.2) the presence of a moderate difference of opinion (difference from 10 to 20%): – 88.1 % and 75.2 % agreed that PhS should be a communicator; – 86.3 % and 100.0 % thought that PhS should be a life-long-learner; – 80.4 % and 94.7 % believed that PhS should be an agent of positive change.3) low level of agreement (difference from 20 to 30%): – 76.3 % and 96.9 % agreed that PhS should be a teacher; – 75.3 % and 98.3 % thought that PhS should be an entrepreneur,4) the presence of complete disagreement (over 30%): – 83.2 % and 42.7 % believed that PhS should be a researcher ; – 90.6 % and 36.8 % agreed that PhS should be a leader.

Thus, Ukrainian students believed that the PhS should primarily be a decision-maker (93.7 %) and a leader (90.6 %), further – a communicator (88.1 %), a life-long-learner (86.3 %), a caregiver (84.0 %), a researcher (83.2 %), a manager (82.2 %) and an agent of positive change, and at the end – a teacher (76.3 %) and an entrepreneur (75.3 %).

According to Polish colleagues, the PhS should be primarily a decision-maker and a life-long-learner (on 100 %), then – an entrepreneur (98.3 %), a teacher (96.9 %), an agent of positive change (94.7 %), and a caregiver (90.5 %), then – a manager (77.9 %), a communicator (75.2 %), and finally – a researcher (42.7 %) and a leader (36.8 %). Graph 2. A comparative analysis of the opinions students of Ukraine and Poland regarding PRs of a pharmacist. If we talk about commitment to answers “hesitate”, so the students from Poland had a prerogative, too. More than half of them were hesitant about PR a researcher (55.0 %), about one-fifth – a communicator (20.4 %), and a manager (18.3 %).

It was also worth paying attention to the PR a leader, after all, more than a third of respondents did not agree (36.0 %) with this role, and about a third hesitated (27.2 %). Among the answers of Ukrainian students, the opposite situation was typical. Actually, one-sixth (16.3 %) did not agree with the PR of a teacher, one-seventh (14.3 %) – an entrepreneur, about one-ninth – a manager (10.8 %), and a caregiver (10.3 %) and only one-ninth (11.6 %) hesitated about the role an agent of positive change and an entrepreneur (10.4 %).

For three PRs, Ukrainian students had the same opinion (the difference reached 1.0%), regarding disagree and hesitation such as a leader (4.5 % and 4.9 %), a researcher (8.0 % and 8.8 %), and a decision-maker (3.7 % and 2.6 %), while, among Polish students, this was not observed.

As for PR that does not belong to the “ten-star pharmacist” concept, we have chosen similar basic competencies such as a psychologist (provides psychological assistance to patients, and helps to solve their problems and build relationships with others) and an IT specialist (develops and tests computer programs to optimize pharmaceutical activity).

Among students of both countries, similarities were found in terms of PRs data (Table 3), while in the PhSs there was a difference. We would also like to note that PhSs Poland was more committed to PR, which does not belong to the “ten-star pharmacist” concept – an IT specialist (78.0%), than to the existing ones, such as a leader (57.4%), a researcher (60.3%), a communicator (64.1%) and a manager (69.9%).

PRs of PhS Answer PhSs Students
Ukraine Poland Ukraine Poland
Psychologist Agree with PR 32.4 % (n=171) 26.8 % (n=56) p=0.139 33.3 % (n=170) 31.6 % (n=150) p=0.572
Disagree / Hesitate with PR 67.6 % (n=357) 73.2 % (n=153) 66.7 % (n=341) 68.4 % (n=325)
IT specialist Agree with PR 38.8 % (n=205) 78.0 % (n=163) <0.001 44.2 % (n=226) 48.6 % (n=231) p= 0.043
Disagree / Hesitate with PR 61.2 % (n=323) 22,0 % (n=46) 55.8 % (n=285) 51.4 % (n=224)

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What is the personality of a pharmacist?

The Pharmacist Personality Type on Crystal The average Pharmacist tends to be loyal, supportive, and helpful. They can be a stabilizing force in a group and will likely invest lots of time building relationships with their peers. They will probably work best in a serene work environment, avoiding chaos and sudden change. : The Pharmacist Personality Type on Crystal
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