How Long Is Massage Therapy School In Texas?

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How Long Is Massage Therapy School In Texas
Students Attending a Texas College or Out-of-State School –

Applicants seeking licensure must complete all requirements of Texas Administrative Code Section 117.20 and Texas Occupations Code Sections 455.156 and 455.159 Applicants must submit a massage therapist license application to TDLR Once a license application is received and the education requirements have been verified, an exam eligibility e-mail will be issued to the applicant

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How much does it cost to go to massage school in Texas?

Time to complete this education training ranges from 2.6 months to 1 year depending on the qualification, with a median time to complete of 5.2 months. The cost to attend Texas School of Massage ranges from $1,500 to $5,500 depending on the qualification, with a median cost of $5,000.
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How many months does it take to become a massage therapist in Texas?

State License Requirements – 500 Education Hours Required to earn a massage therapy license Massage therapy licenses in Texas require a minimum of 500 hours education in the practice of massage therapy. The Texas Department of State Health Services requires at least 125 hours of this to be in the Swedish massage therapy theory and technique.

  • Other classes are required in anatomy, physiology, kinesiology, pathology, hydrotherapy, massage therapy laws, business practices, professional ethics, health and hygiene.
  • A 50-hour internship is completed, wherein the student performs massages in a student clinic under the supervision of a massage therapy instructor.

Following your education in the profession of massage therapy, you will need to pass either the NCETMB or the MBLEx national certification examination. The state can then issue a massage therapist license and you can be employed as a Licensed Massage Therapist in Texas.
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How much is the Texas massage therapy license?

How Long Is Massage Therapy School In Texas Online MBLEx Test Prep Passing the MBLEx exam is the biggest hurdle to becoming a Licensed Massage Therapist. Proper exam preparation is the KEY to your success and Massage-Exam.com provides the most thorough test prep in the massage education industry with over 3000 question, answers, and rationales.

Texas Massage Therapy Licensing Program – main website for the Department of Health Services in charge of massage licensing. Application – PDF for your submittal for a license to practice Massage Therapy. FAQ’s – Renew online – 12 CE Credits/ 2 years Texas Massage Schools – A list of massage schools in Texas As of September 1st 2007 the required minimum hours are 500.

The previous requirement was 300 hours. The applications and website do not show this new change as of yet. Check the Statutes/Laws page for new information. This requirement affects people who enrolled after September 1st 2007. Those who are under the new regulations will not have to participate in the State practical.

Students of massage will need to pass the MBLEx licensing exam from the FSMTB. The MBLEx exam can be taken at a Pearson Vue testing facility by appointment after the MBLEx application is approved. Texas Massage Therapy Laws – For the Jurisprudence Exam Applicants who were enrolled before this date must successfully complete the state administered written and practical examinations.

You are not eligible to take the exams until you have an approved application. Fees will be paid to the testing facility for the examination. Texas State Licensing Requirements, Massage-Exam.Com is a great resource to study for all your Massage examinations.

  1. Access to our site is unlimited during your subscribed time.
  2. For your convenience there are no limits to the amount of tests you can take.
  3. Reviewing for your exams has never been more comprehensive.
  4. There are over 3500 massage application/assessment, anatomy/physiology, kinesiology, pathology, body systems and business ethics questions to analyze.

Each graded question has a rationale that explains the information in the question and answer. Tests are scored in each category to help monitor your improvements and comprehension.

Web Information www.dshs.state.tx.us/massage
List of schools Texas Massage Schools
Education Requirements 500
Title Massage Therapist MT
Type of Credential License
State Law Test Jurisprudence Exam – Rules and Regulations – Laws & Statutes
State Practical or Written Exam Written
National Exam Requirement MBLEx
CEU’s 12/ 2 years – CE & Providers
Initial Cost of License Application fee $117 Examination fee $87
Require City License Check Local City & County Business Regulations
Renewal Fee $106/ 2 years
Liability ins Massage Therapy Insurance Comparison
Credentialed Practitioners 26,347

Department of Health Professional Licensing Massage Therapy Licensing Program PO Box 12197 Austin, TX 78711 1100 West 49th St. Austin, TX 78756 Phone: 512-834-6616 Fax: 512-834-6677 Email: [email protected]
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How long are most massage therapy programs?

How long is massage therapy school? – Typically, massage therapy school lasts for one to two years of full-time studies. Some programs may be completed by students through online learning while others will involve attendance at campuses located throughout the country.
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Can I give massages in Texas without a license?

In Texas, a state license is required to advertise or practice massage therapy.
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What state pays massage therapists the most?

Research Summary. After extensive research by the Zippia data science team, we identified these details of massage therapist salary by state for the United States:

  • Alaska has the highest massage therapist salary of $69,287
  • Florida has the lowest massage therapist salary of $46,229
  • The national average salary for massage therapists is $53,935
  • The national hourly pay for massage therapists is $25.93

You can read more on the specific methodology,
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Can I get my massage therapy license online in Texas?

Massage Therapist Multi-State Licensing Exam – To obtain a Texas massage therapist license, TDLR requires a passing score on the Massage and Bodywork Licensing Examination (MBLEX) administered by the Federation of State Massage Therapy Boards (FSMTB),

Applicant has completed a 500 or 500+ hour course and has passed an acceptable exam within the last two years. Applicant has completed a 500 or 500+ hour course and has taken and passed an acceptable exam within the last two years.

Individuals who currently hold a valid massage license in another state may have additional licensing options. Please see the Out of State Applicants page. NOTE: The current Board certification examination (the BCETMB exam) from the National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (NCBTMB), is not an acceptable licensing examination.
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How long is a massage therapy license good for in Texas?

Additional License Requirements – Getting a Texas massage therapy license has additional requirements. The applicant must also:

Be at least 18 years of agePass the Jurisprudence Exam for Massage Therapists

Massage therapists may apply for a Texas massage license online or by printing out the license application on their website. Below is a summary of the fees charged by the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation for massage therapy licensing:

Application fee: $100Jurisprudence exam fee: $34Renewal fee: $75

Texas massage therapy licenses are valid for 2 years beginning on the date the initial license is issued. The following must be done to complete your renewal application:

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Download and complete the renewal applicationComplete 12 CEU credit hours per renewal cycle. All of these continuing education hours may be done online. Each renewal must include 1 CE hour on human trafficking.Send renewal fee of $75

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How long is massage therapy school in Houston Texas?

Program Length

Day Classes Evening Classes
48 weeks 74 weeks

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How much does a massage instructor make in Texas?

How much does a Massage Therapist Instructor make in Texas? As of Mar 6, 2023, the average annual pay for a Massage Therapist Instructor in Texas is $40,501 a year. Just in case you need a simple salary calculator, that works out to be approximately $19.47 an hour. This is the equivalent of $778/week or $3,375/month.
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How much is massage school in Austin?

Time to complete this education training ranges from 8 months to 12 months depending on the qualification, with a median time to complete of 12 months. The cost to attend Austin Massage Academy ranges from $1,600 to $5,500 depending on the qualification, with a median cost of $5,500.
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How much is massage school in Houston?

About the school The cost to attend Houston School of Massage ranges from $2,300 to $6,000 depending on the qualification, with a median cost of $5,000. When asked how they paid for their training, most reviewers responded, ‘I paid for it myself’. To navigate, press the arrow keys.
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Do massage therapists get hard?

What is the, uh, etiquette for this? – Photo illustration/animation by Slate. Photos by Getty Images Plus. How to Do It is Slate’s sex advice column. Have a question? Send it to Stoya and Rich here. It’s anonymous! Dear How to Do It, I have had some unusual experiences with a new massage therapist.

I have been going to someone weekly or bi-weekly for several years. When the lady who normally saw me retired, I went with the lady they hired to take her place. Many times, with my original lady, I would get erect—sometimes briefly, sometimes not so briefly. She basically just ignored it and continued on with the massage.

Embarrassingly, I would sometimes ejaculate, which she simply ignored. The new therapist has not ignored it. When she gets to my inner thigh and I get erect, she tends to stay in that area massaging me. She’s actually gotten so close her hands have brushed my scrotum under the towel, and she even massages very low on my abdomen and brushed the base of the shaft of my penis.

She will continue to massage in that area until I ejaculate. She then wipes me off with the towel that covers me and often doesn’t replace it with another. Yesterday, as she was massaging my thighs, the towel slipped off my erection and she simply completely removed it and watched as I ejaculated everywhere since there wasn’t anything covering my penis.

She then wiped everything up and continued the massage. I am unsure of her motives and frankly don’t want to end up like certain celebrities who’ve been accused of being sexual misfits. Yet for some reason, I keep going back. Aren’t there rules of conduct here or some etiquette? Am I in the wrong for getting a boner during a massage? — Unsure and Aroused Dear Unsure and Aroused, “Yet for some reason, I keep going back,” he says as if life is a mystery and everyone must stand alone.

  • You aren’t wrong for getting erections during massages—that is common, seemingly out of your control, and most seasoned therapists are already aware that such a bodily response is possible.
  • I think if you’re going here specifically to show off your hard dick and/or somehow coerce the therapist into engaging with it, you should stop doing that.

People in the service industry already put up with enough without having your kink/dick thrust at them. If you’re having an inadvertent physiological reaction to a treatment that you’re seeking for nonsexual reasons, I don’t think there is that much to worry about.

  • Different therapists have different styles, and your current one seems somewhat more engaged with your erection than the last while being sure not to cross a line.
  • Maybe she finds your ability to ejaculate hands-free interesting.
  • I would! That’s not something you see every day.
  • At least, it’s not something I see every day, but then I’m not a massage therapist.) I think in this case, your job is to lay there, and her job is to do her job.

Left to her own devices, she gets to decide how much attention she wants to pay to any particular area. Since this is ambiguous to you, why don’t you cut through the silence with some directness. Next time your erection is unignorable, excuse yourself and ask if she’d like you to cover up more/turn on your stomach until it (theoretically) subsides.

  • You know, you can talk to her.
  • You’re clearly not a monk.
  • As a professional in this line of work, she undoubtedly has comfort boundaries, so allow her to voice them.
  • And tip her well, regardless.
  • Sex advice from Rich and Stoya, plus exclusive letter follow-ups, delivered weekly.
  • Dear How to Do It My friends have me at a loss.

Years ago, an ex-BF told me he’d end the relationship if I couldn’t do penis-in-vagina sex with him. He only revealed this minutes after he’d finally fucked me. I’d consented, albeit before he made it explicitly clear that being able to use my vag was more important than anything else about me.

  1. I was 18, he was in his early 20s.
  2. We were together for a few more months, broke up, and he wasn’t part of my life afterwards.
  3. I’ve since been in a healthy relationship for years with my loving partner, have a successful career, and am overall kicking ass at life.
  4. So, why are my friends and I even discussing this loser? Recently, multiple women who work in the same male-dominated fields that I do have alleged that he sexually harassed, assaulted, and/or traumatized them.

It’s made me reanalyze so many of our interactions. Well, during private conversations, two close friends used the R-word to describe him sexually coercing me throughout the relationship. Notably, though both are women who had been sexually abused in past relationships, they’re each from a different friend group, and their inferences were made separately.

One friend elaborated with “If he tells you that you don’t have value in a relationship unless you can provide sex, that’s rape.” The other said “Wearing someone down and guilting them until they agree is rape.” I do believe he was undeniably coercive by making PiV sex (which was frequently painful for me) a condition of the relationship and incredibly scummy to only tell me this right after he’d already notched my virginity on his belt.

At the same time, rape is such a serious label; considering how many young women/AFAB people get manipulated at least once by cis men into feeling like they’re not just some lay, my experience seems practically mundane (yikes, that’s its own issue). I’m mad at myself that I tacitly accepted his conditions; that seems like it would disqualify me from considering this rape.

  • I could have dumped him with minimal consequences.
  • It’s not like I was dependent on him; if anything, it was the opposite for a few weeks when he had a major life challenge.
  • I had options so many women don’t have the privilege of.
  • Being a strong, empowered woman is so core to my identity, yet instead of telling him to pack sand, I listened to him when he said that I was the unreasonable/immature one and acted as his sex toy for months until he got bored of me and moved on the next barely legal girl.

How should I respond to my friends? How should I classify what happened? I just want to know what the appropriate terminology is, correct those two friends if necessary, then re-bury this vat of toxic waste memories. — Rated R Dear Rated R, Some survivors of sexual assault/exploitation will minimize their experience by comparing it to more extreme abuse that others have endured.

  1. It wasn ‘ t that bad, not compared to how horrific it could have been, they say.
  2. Part of this, I think, must derive from a survival instinct—one way to resist feeling broken down by something is to frame it as incapable of breaking you down at all.
  3. I think part of this, too, is that patriarchy remains so dominant in the organization of our culture that a lot of wrongdoing by men has long been taken for granted.
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I think as a corrective to this interpretation, a lot of people have come to use the word “rape” in nontraditional contexts. The whole point, after all, is to refute the tradition of misogyny that has long endured without serious challenge. Understanding the culture of rape in all of its vastness is a direct challenge on cultural complicity.

Crucial to this widening definition of rape is an interrogation of the possibility of granting consent. Progressives, largely, agree that even if someone underage believes they have consented to sex, they haven’t, and they may only realize that with age. Inebriation, obviously, convolutes the notion of consent, as well, even when said inebriated person has seemingly granted it.

I have seen people online argue that someone who does not disclose or misrepresents their HIV status to a partner has withheld enough crucial information so that their partner cannot properly consent to the sex they are having and that sex ends up qualifying as rape.

  1. I have explained at length why I feel that particular scenario is more complicated than that, while not advocating that people lie about their HIV status.
  2. I understand the desire to paint all consent violations with the same broad brush to underline how serious these transgressions are, but I do think that sometimes this ends up steamrolling nuance.

In general, I tend to agree with you: There is a difference between rape and coercion. Both things can be wrong, harmful, predicated on a misogynist tradition, and yet, distinct. Moreover, you get to decide how you view your experience. I will assume that your friends are well-intentioned and want to afford you perspective that they feel that you are missing, but attempting to impart enlightenment can be extremely condescending and counterproductive.

  1. While hearing other people’s takes can be useful for your own processing, you don’t need correction here and attempting to provide one is insulting.
  2. I’d break the corrective cycle if I were you.
  3. You have people telling you how to view something that was personal to you; I don’t see what use it is to foist your enlightenment back on them.

Beams of light don’t push each other out of the way when crossed they just sit there. One thing I have noticed about a lot of this discourse, at least as it plays out online, is that people seem to urgently need people to agree with them. The belief in a monolithic truth, especially about something as subjective as the understanding of trauma, is at best idealistic and at worst its own kind of oppression.

It’s really okay for everyone to have different ideas about this stuff, as long as they’re aligned on the idea that predation is wrong and should be eliminated from our culture. Your friends feel the way they do based on their experiences. Let’s assume they have good arguments to back up why they think what happened to you qualifies as rape.

You don’t! The best you’ll do is agree to disagree. But the thing is, you can do that right now, in your head, and avoid whatever awkwardness and hurt feelings may arise from an argument on the subject. I recommend it. Help us keep giving the advice you crave every week.

  • Sign up for Slate Plus now,
  • Dear How to Do It, A few weeks ago, my girlfriend and I talked about fetishes.
  • We share the vast majority, but I did not say that I have some interest in practicing pegging, and I do not know how to talk about it and how she will react or if she is willing to try it.
  • Curious and Handsome Dear Curious, And you won’t know how she will react or whether she is willing to try it unless you bring it up and ask her about it.

It’s really that simple. You have to weigh whether your desire is enough to warrant the risk of being turned down. In most cases it is. A compassionate partner won’t view you differently after revealing that you’re into experimenting with butt stuff. I think you can help guide things in your favor by establishing this as something you’re interested in pursuing with her : present it as an adventure you go on together, a chance for a different kind of intimacy between the two of you.

Refer back to your conversation about fetishes: “Remember when we talked about that stuff and how much we had in common? Well, there’s actually something else I’d like to try with you ” You might want to work up to pegging, keeping things vague at first or suggesting you start with fingering and/or rimming (though depending on her particular predilections, rimming may seem the most extreme out of all these activities).

You can emphasize that you feel vulnerable or a bit anxious about revealing this stuff. To be sure, it is a risk to discuss such intimate matters, but it is also a compliment when someone feels comfortable enough to do so with their partner. Let her know that, too.

Did you write this or another letter we answered? Tell us what happened at [email protected], Dear How to Do It, I am a 27-year-old nonbinary vagina-owner, and I have a kind of serious problem. I ‘ m going to sugar coat this somewhat for the sake of other readers: About two years ago, I unintentionally got black-out drunk at a trusted friend ‘ s house, and had that drunkenness ” taken advantage of,” if you catch my drift.

That part isn ‘ t really the issue I ‘ m writing about, however. My greater concern is that sometime after this occurrence (and I don ‘ t know if this is because of the event itself? or maybe some of the maladaptive solo sexual activity I used to help me cope in the aftermath?), I discovered a somewhat significant tear in the wall of my vagina, one that is now more or less healed up, but not repaired.

I have not been sexually active with anyone since this event took place, and now I ‘ m terrified of the idea that this is something that can’t be fixed, that I ‘ ll have to live with this physical reminder of that event all my life, and that no one will be interested in sticking anything inside me anymore (least of all body parts!), which is something I ‘ ve always quite enjoyed sexually.

I feel ashamed and embarrassed about this problem, and haven ‘ t felt able to bring it to a doctor or even my therapist to begin to work through it, so I ‘ m hopeful that the anonymity your column provides can give me some of the answers I need. Is this something that can be repaired with medical help? If not, do you have any suggestions about how to approach this with any prospective future partners? I find it deeply uncomfortable and sometimes even painful in a dull, achy sort of way to be touched in the area of this tear now, but I ‘ m even more uncomfortable with discussing it with anyone.

What can I do? — Terrified and Torn Dear Terrified and Torn, I have good news: The kind of injury you describe can be fixed. However, that will depend on whether your self-diagnosis is correct (which is not guaranteed given your lack of medical training) and your willingness to talk to a doctor. If this were the kind of thing that could fix itself, it would have by now.

Dr. Tami Rowen, an OBGYN/professor at UCSF told me in an email that, “It’s entirely possible a laceration healed but not back to what the tissue was like before, so there is a defect or scar in the tissue. Usually this can be repaired by excising the scar tissue and reattaching the edges of skin/tissue to their original state.” This is naturally theoretical, as she has not examined you, but I hope it underlines how important it is to talk to someone about this.

  1. I understand your reluctance.
  2. It’s unfair that after being taken advantage of, which never should have happened in the first place, you now have to live with the effects of it.
  3. Unfortunately, no one is going to pick up your pieces for you—it falls on you to get the process started.
  4. It really comes down to deciding if you want to keep feeling the way that you do, or if you want to improve your situation.
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I think you’ve decided that you want to improve, and now you have to enact that decision. Good luck. — Rich
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How long can you last as a massage therapist?

Reports vary but word on the street is that the average career for a massage therapist lasts anywhere between 5-8 years!
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How many massages per month?

How often should you get a massage for stress? Have you ever wondered how often you should get massages if you want to get them regularly or sparingly? This is often brought up with therapists at the end of a great massage and it’s time to book the next appointment.

While it’s going to vary for each person’s individual needs, there is a general guideline to determine how often you should get them. You may have stress from an injury, from your athletic lifestyle, or simply from the life where a massage would help a great deal with reducing the stress. Take a look at this guide to help you determine your personal needs and how many times you should get a each month.

If you’re an athlete The easiest scenario to look at is when it comes to athletics. If you are an athlete, you’ll want to get massaged as frequently as needed for the specific sport you are in and your specific goals. Some athletes get massaged daily while others will do it before a certain event.

  • You’ll need to look at your training schedule and what your therapist recommends for your specific sport, training, and goals.
  • Pain management For others, pain management is the reason behind their visits and what is causing stress throughout the week.
  • If you are in pain from an injury and want to reduce or manage your pain, massage therapy is a great technique to do this.

Your pain management may be different from someone else’s and will mean that you need an individualized frequency and technique.

If you are in serious pain but it’s not something that requires medical intervention, you could get a massage 1 or 2 times on week one with reduced frequency as the weeks continue, unless two visits a week continues to be necessary.If you find that your pain is reduced or you’ve started your pain management treatment at a lower pain level, you likely would only need to get a massage once per week or every other week as the pain dissipates. Personal needs

Sometimes you just need to reduce stress in your life or have a way to manage the stress you can’t help but be faced with. Whether it’s stress from your career, having children, or other physical or mental demands, massage is a great way to reduce the stress and relieve the body.

  1. This is common for someone in a high-stress occupation or living situation, as well as travelers.
  2. You can cope with your lifestyle much easier with weekly or bi-weekly massage sessions.
  3. It’s helpful to reduce the stress levels and have something to look forward to each week.
  4. You may not realize how sore you are until you have a massage, even from just the normal stresses of daily life.

Can you get too many massages? A massage is a great tool for relieving stress, improving mood, and increasing the overall quality of life and productivity. You’ll often feel better for a full week before you’ll start to notice the need for a return visit unless you are dealing with pain or injury.

  1. Your tension headaches will disappear, your energy will increase, and your mental health will improve.
  2. Is there such a thing as too many massages when you have benefits like this? Actually, you can get massaged too frequently.
  3. Once a week is the most you should go unless you are dealing with pain or high-intensity sports.

Between you and your therapist, you’ll be able to determine the best frequency because your body’s response is a large part of this determination. You should go at least once per month, but as often as twice per week in severe pain situations. The longer you wait though, and the more often you’ll start the process over of loosening up your muscles because they tense up if you don’t go often enough.

Try different techniques, such as deep tissue massage and stress massage depending on your needs. When your body starts to feel stiff and sore, it’s telling you that it’s time for a massage again, but the type of massage you may need could vary depending on your body’s needs. If you’ve ever wondered how often you are supposed to get a massage, use this guide to learn how to listen to your body and the benefits of getting one frequently.

: How often should you get a massage for stress?
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What is the minimum age for massage in Texas?

(g) A licensee must obtain the written consent of a parent or guardian to provide massage therapy services to a person under the age of 17.
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What is the most demand massage?

1. Swedish Massage – Probably the most popular of the massages on our list, the Swedish massage relies on a variety of techniques—effleurage, percussion and kneading, among others—to relieve tension, improve blood circulation and give your mood a boost.
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How much does a massage instructor make in Texas?

How much does a Massage Therapist Instructor make in Texas? As of Mar 6, 2023, the average annual pay for a Massage Therapist Instructor in Texas is $40,501 a year. Just in case you need a simple salary calculator, that works out to be approximately $19.47 an hour. This is the equivalent of $778/week or $3,375/month.
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How much is massage school in Austin?

Time to complete this education training ranges from 8 months to 12 months depending on the qualification, with a median time to complete of 12 months. The cost to attend Austin Massage Academy ranges from $1,600 to $5,500 depending on the qualification, with a median cost of $5,500.
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How much does it cost to go to the Houston School of Massage?

The cost to attend Houston School of Massage ranges from $2,300 to $6,000 depending on the qualification, with a median cost of $5,000. When asked how they paid for their training, most reviewers responded, ‘I paid for it myself’. To navigate, press the arrow keys.
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How long is a massage therapy license good for in Texas?

Additional License Requirements – Getting a Texas massage therapy license has additional requirements. The applicant must also:

Be at least 18 years of agePass the Jurisprudence Exam for Massage Therapists

Massage therapists may apply for a Texas massage license online or by printing out the license application on their website. Below is a summary of the fees charged by the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation for massage therapy licensing:

Application fee: $100Jurisprudence exam fee: $34Renewal fee: $75

Texas massage therapy licenses are valid for 2 years beginning on the date the initial license is issued. The following must be done to complete your renewal application:

Download and complete the renewal applicationComplete 12 CEU credit hours per renewal cycle. All of these continuing education hours may be done online. Each renewal must include 1 CE hour on human trafficking.Send renewal fee of $75

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