How Long Does It Take To Study For Lsat?

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How Long Does It Take To Study For Lsat
Tip #2: Aim for 250 to 300 hours of LSAT preparation – For most students, a three-month period of preparation (of approximately 20 hours per week) is a great goal. This is, of course, an estimate; most students are not all students. To find out how much LSAT prep time you’re likely to need, we recommend taking a to get a baseline score.

Students scoring close to their goal scores may need less than that three-month period. Those scoring more than ten points from their goals are likely to need additional prep time. Practical considerations, such as work and personal commitments, will come into play here, as will your own unique needs and learning style.

Nonetheless, 250 to 300 hours of LSAT preparation over a period of a few months is a good benchmark. Most students who dedicate significantly less time won’t maximize their LSAT scores. While you may ultimately need more than three months to prepare if you don’t get the score increases you need within that time frame, it’s best not to start too long before your planned test date.
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Can you study for the LSAT in 2 months?

Model LSAT 2-Month Study Plan – To make the most out of your 2-month LSAT study plan, consider the following:

  • Two months is the optimal LSAT prep schedule for many students. While you can make great score improvements with one intense month of study, practice, and review, most expert LSAT faculty will recommend a longer schedule if one is possible for you. While three months will be great for some students who have very busy schedules, it can be hard to sustain your focus for that length of time. So, two months hits the sweet spot for many individual preppers. Once you’ve taken a full-length practice test under timed conditions, compare your score to your goal score. Then, factor in the amount of time you’ll have to study. Are you looking for an LSAT score improvement of, say, 10 or even 15 points? Are you working or going to school during your prep? Do you have other family obligations? Use your answers to those questions to tailor the following schedule to your personal needs. If it turns out that a 2-month plan isn’t the right fit, Please check out Kaplan’s model 1- and 3-month study plans. For more insight, chat or call a Kaplan LSAT expert about your study plans.
  • Adapt the model to meet your needs. No model study schedule will be exactly right for you. Apply the principles illustrated here to your own calendar, and then keep the times you’ve allocated to LSAT study and practice free from other obligations and interruptions. Depending on your work, school, and family schedule, you’ll need to shift the assignments listed here to fit your life. Throughout the model plan, you’ll find notes to help you make those adjustments to get most of your study and practice time. After the model, there is an important section with additional tips on how to personalize your LSAT study and practice.
    • Keep in mind that while the chapters listed in the study plan below are specific to the Kaplan LSAT Prep Plus 2020-2021 book, you can likely find coinciding chapters in whatever LSAT book you have. If you don’t have the Kaplan book, take some time before you begin studying to customize your study plan by identifying readings for each assignment and writing them down.

How Long Does It Take To Study For Lsat LSAT Study Schedule: Week 1
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Is it hard to get 170 on LSAT?

One of the most frequently asked questions we receive is, “How hard is the LSAT?” Most students have heard the test is difficult, but unless they’ve taken an LSAT already, they don’t have a good idea of whether the test really is hard, or whether it’s just like any other college test.

  1. So let’s take a look at some numbers and see what the real story is here.
  2. First, we have to understand the scores that are produced by the test, because those scores help us measure difficulty.
  3. Our LSAT Scoring Scale discussion explains how the 120 to 180 scoring scale works, and the key discussion points relate to how many questions you can miss to achieve certain scores, as well as what percentile is represented by each score.

Let’s start by looking at the number of people who score a 180, which is a perfect score. In theory, the easier the test, the higher the number of perfect scores. Think about what would happen if you gave a very basic, first grade level spelling test to a group of college-educated adults, a test that included words like “cat” and “dog.” That should be pretty easy (right?), and you’d expect a large number of perfect scores! On the other hand, if you gave an advanced calculus test to fourth graders, it would be pretty amazing (inhuman, almost) to see even one perfect score.

  • Again, the easier the test relative to the test takers, the more perfect scores you should see.
  • With the LSAT, the percentile for a 180 is 99.97%.
  • Thus, in numerical terms, if you have a 180, then in a room of 10,000 people you have one of the three highest scores.
  • With roughly 100,000 LSATs administered in the past year, that would suggest that about 30 people received a perfect score.

When only 30 people achieve this score out of 100,000 test takers, the inference is that this is a very, very difficult exam! Achieving a 180 is also interesting in that to do so does not require perfection. That is, you don’t have to answer all of the questions correctly in order to receive a 180.

  1. This page contains a brief overview of scoring scales for the LSATs from June 2005 to the present, and it shows that to get a 180, you can typically miss around 2 to 3 questions per test.
  2. So, to produce a 3-in-10,000 score, you don’t even have to be perfect; you can miss a few questions and still make it happen.

Next, let’s focus on a score of 170, which is a highly desirable LSAT score, and one that almost every LSAT taker would be thrilled to receive. A 170 represents a percentile of 97.4%, meaning that test takers with a score of 170 have a score higher than 97.4% of all LSAT takers.

So, that’s pretty good! But what does it take to achieve that score? On the most recent LSAT, you would have to answer at least 89 out of 101 questions to receive a 170. In other words, you can miss 12 questions, and still be above 97.4% of testers (alternate view: you can miss 11.88% of the questions but still be in the top 2.5% of scores).

Considered alone, this suggests you have some latitude in missing LSAT questions, and that missing a few questions still allows you to achieve a very high score. That by itself is a sign of the difficulty of the test, but to bring the point home a bit more, let’s compare it to a grading scale that most people are familiar with: the scales used in college.

  1. At most colleges, if you were to get 89 out of 100 on a test, you’d be looking at a B+, or perhaps a B.
  2. That’s certainly a solid grade, but it isn’t one that is considered outstanding or highly desirable.
  3. But, on the LSAT, getting 89 right results in a score that is considered highly desirable, and this too indicates that the LSAT is, in general, a very difficult test.

The final piece of evidence regarding test difficulty relates to the guessing policy enforced by LSAC. Unlike many other standardized tests, there is no guessing penalty on the LSAT, and you are strongly encouraged to guess on the questions that you cannot finish.

There is no penalty for missing a question, but if you guess correctly, you receive full credit. Think about that for a second, because what it suggests is that this test is so hard that the test makers don’t even care if you guess; they don’t think it will materially change your score! Their view is that even someone who performs extremely well on the questions they do answer will still not be able to blindly guess their way to a very different score.

The conclusion in all of this is that yes indeed, the LSAT is a very hard test. From any objective measure, it’s a challenge to score well on this exam. But there is good news here because in difficulty lies opportunity! The LSAT is a learnable test, and you can improve your performance by studying and preparing properly.
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What LSAT score do I need for Harvard?

What LSAT and GPA do you need for Harvard Law School? While Harvard Law School claims there are no numerical cut-offs for score or GPA, the reality is that most admitted applicants have LSAT scores in the top percentiles and exceptional undergraduate academic records.

  1. Founded in 1817, Harvard Law School is the oldest continually-operating law school in the United States.
  2. HLS provides unmatched opportunities to study law and related disciplines in a rigorous and collaborative environment.
  3. Harvard Law School has the largest class size of any law school ranked in the top 150 with approximately 560 students per class.

In fact, HLS has nearly twice as many law students as Yale Law School and Stanford Law School combined. The first year class is broken into seven sections with approximately 80 students per section, who will take the majority of their 1L classes together.

Harvard Law School’s scope is measured in its unparalleled breadth and depth of courses and clinics, its wide array of research programs, its diverse student body drawn from across the nation and around the world, and its extensive network of distinguished alumni including the 44th president of the United States Barack Obama and his wife Michelle Obama—former president candidates, Mitt Romney, Michael Dukakis and Ralph Nader—U.S.

senators Ted Cruz, Mike Crapo, Tim Kaine, Jack Reed, Chuck Schumer, Tom Cotton and Mark Warner. Additionally, fourteen of the school’s graduates have served on the Supreme Court of the United States, more than any other law school. Four of the current eight members of the Supreme Court are graduates of Harvard Law School, including Chief Justice John G.

  • Roberts Jr.
  • And associate Justices, Anthony M.
  • Ennedy, Stephen G.
  • Beyer and Elena Kagan, who served as the dean of HLS from 2003 to 2009—will be five of nine if Donald Trump’s nominee Neil Gorsuch is confirmed.
  • Ruth Bader Ginsburg attended Harvard Law School for her 1L year before transferring to Columbia Law School.

Past Supreme Court Justices from HLS include David H. Souter, Harry A. Blackmun, William J. Brennan Jr., Louis Dembitz Brandies, Felix Frankfurter, Lewis F. Powell Jr., Harold Hitz Burton, Edward Terry Sanford, William Henry Moody, Henry Billings Brown, Melville Weston Fuller, Horace Gray, Benjamin Robbins Curtis, Oliver Wendall Holmes Jr., and Antonin Scalia.

Harvard Law School also boasts the most Fortune 500 CEOs of any law school and second most of any school behind only Harvard Business School, including the current chairman and CEO of Goldman Sachs, Lloyd Blankfein. Gaining admission to HLS is extremely competitive with only 16.5% of applicants offered admission to the class of 2019 (average for all law schools ~52%).

Not surprisingly, of those students lucky enough to be offered admission, 62% enrolled, which is one of the highest percent yields for all law schools (average for all law schools ~27%).

  • So let’s take a look at what it actually takes to have a chance of being admitted to the most prestigious and preeminent law school in the world.
  • Here are the Harvard Law School class profile statistics for the past three years:
  • Class of 2019 Profile

GPA 75th/ 50th/ 25th percentiles: 3.94 / 3.86/ 3.76 LSAT 75th/ 50th / 25th percentiles: 175 / 172 / 170

  1. Number of Applications: 5,485 Number of Admission Offers: 908 Percentage Offered Admission: 16.5%
  2. Newly Enrolled 1Ls: 562
  3. Class of 2018 Profile

GPA 75th/ 50th/ 25th percentiles: 3.96 / 3.86 / 3.75 LSAT 75th/ 50th / 25th percentiles: 175 / 173 / 170

  • Number of Applications: 5,207 Number of Admission Offers: 931 Percentage Offered Admission: 17.8%
  • Newly Enrolled 1Ls: 560
  • Class of 2017 Profile

GPA 75th/ 50th/ 25th percentiles: 3.95 / 3.87 / 3.75 LSAT 75th/ 50th / 25th percentiles: 175 / 173 / 170

  1. Number of Applications: 5,973 Number of Admission Offers: 918 Percentage Offered Admission: 15.4%
  2. Newly Enrolled 1Ls: 560

As you can see from these numbers, an LSAT score of 170 or higher and a GPA above 3.75 will give you a chance of gaining admission to Harvard Law School. If you have a GPA of 3.94 or higher and above a 175, you are pretty much a lock for admission, particularly given the class size of ~560.

  • When will the HLS application materials be available?
  • Harvard Law School’s electronic application becomes available in mid-September.
  • When does HLS begin accepting applications?

Applications to HLS are accepted as soon as the application materials are made available. Like most law schools, admissions decisions are made on a rolling basis, which means you can expect a decision anytime between December and May.

  1. How are applications to HLS submitted?
  2. All applications to HLS must be submitted electronically through LSAC.
  3. Does HLS have an “early admission” or an “early decision” process?
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No. HLS exclusively uses a rolling admission process. This means that applications are reviewed in the order they are completed, which means all required materials have been received and processed.

  • How much is the application fee and when is the deadline?
  • Application deadline: February 1st Application fee: $85.00
  • Financial aid deadline: April 15th
  • Does HLS grant interviews?

Yes, but evaluative interviews are available by invitation only. All interviews are conducted via Skype. The rumor is that every single admitted student is offered an invitation to interview, so if you do not receive an interview request from HLS, you shouldn’t hold your breathe. Try Risk Free ✓ No card required ✓ 1 minute setup : What LSAT and GPA do you need for Harvard Law School?
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Is 170 LSAT enough for Harvard?

What LSAT score do you need to get into Harvard Law? Over 3 years ago, I was fortunate enough to get into Harvard Law. While I’ll never know exactly what part of my application pushed me over the edge, my conversations with admissions officers (both at Harvard and other schools) and other admitted students since then have revealed just how much my LSAT score likely helped.

  • Here, I’ll break down everything I learned about how Harvard Law and other AdComs look at your LSAT score.
  • Medians: When talking about how your LSAT score plays into your admission chances, our most important guide is a law school’s LSAT median.
  • The median represents the “middle” LSAT score of a school’s first-year class.

Let’s say the Apollo School of Law had 3 incoming students with LSAT scores of 153, 155, and 156. If we put those scores in order from lowest to higher, the “middle”, or median, score would be 155. Now, if Apollo admitted 2 more students with a 151 and a 152, their incoming class now looks like this: 151, 152, 153, 155, 156 The median (middle score) is now 153.

Note that it doesn’t actually matter how far below median the accepted students are – even if both scored 130, the middle (median) number would still be 153:130, 130, 153, 155, 156As you can see, schools have a very strong reason to care if you’re above or below median, and a weaker one to care how far above or below median you are.

Therefore, the simplest answer to the question posed in the title of this post is found by looking at Harvard Law’s median LSAT score. As of the most recent application cycle, Harvard Law’s median LSAT score is 174. Assuming the rest of your application is perfectly “average” for Harvard Law, if your LSAT score is below 174, your chances of getting in are below average.

  1. If it’s above 174, your chances are above average.
  2. This process obviously doesn’t just apply to Harvard Law – you can find out any ABA-accredited law school’s medians with a quick Google search.25th and 75th percentiles In addition to their medians, every law school also publishes their 25th and 75th percentile LSAT scores.

If a school’s 25th percentile LSAT score is 158, for example, that means that 25% of their incoming class has a score at or below 158. If their 75th percentile score is 164, that means 75% of their incoming class has a score at or below 164. As of this year, Harvard’s 25th percentile LSAT score is 170, and their 75% percentile LSAT score is 176.

If your score is above the 75th percentile, your application will be very competitive (assuming the rest of your application is strong). If it’s below the 25th, you’re in the bottom quarter of matriculating students, which means the rest of your application will need to be much stronger to make up for it.

What’s the minimum LSAT score you need to get into Harvard Law? We’ve already established that if your score is below 174, you’ll have a harder than average time getting in, and if it’s below 170, you’re facing an especially uphill battle. Once your score is below 170, though, things get muddier.

  1. Just like medians, 25th percentiles aren’t affected by outliers – meaning that accepting a 140 will pull down Harvard’s 25th percentile LSAT score just as much as accepting a 169.
  2. This means that when considering its group of sub-170 applicants, Harvard Law is using LSAT scores less as a tool for moving up in the rankings and more as predictors of law school success.

Because of this, things get far more unpredictable in this pool. I know students in my class with scores in the mid-160s who got in on the strength of their GPAs and/or incredible personal stories. So, the short answer to the above question is that there is no “hard” minimum.

  1. The lowest scores I’ve heard of getting into Harvard Law tend to be around the mid-160s, but there’s no reason they can’t dip below that for a truly once-in-a-lifetime candidate.
  2. How does GPA play into this?/ What GPA do you need to get into Harvard Law? Stories of students with “lower” (by HLS standards) LSAT scores getting into Harvard Law are real, inspiring, and surprisingly common.

After all, 25% of Harvard’s incoming class has a score at or below 170, by definition. However, keep in mind that these students got in despite their LSAT scores, not because of them. Barring those students with incredible personal stories or accomplishments, the one thing that the vast majority of sub-170 scorers admitted to Harvard Law have in common is exceptional GPAs.

  • Here’s the golden rule of law school admissions: If both your LSAT and your GPA are above the medians at a certain school, you have a great shot at getting in.
  • If only one of them is above the median and the other is below, it’s a toss-up.
  • If both your LSAT and your GPA are below the median, your chances of getting in are slim.

Bringing it back to Harvard: if your undergrad GPA is above 3.92 (median GPA at Harvard Law), you have some leeway on your LSAT, meaning you can fall in the 25th percentile to median range (170-174) and still have a strong chance at getting in. If your GPA is below 3.92, your LSAT should ideally be above median to keep you competitive – 174+.

Ultimately, while law school admissions are very numbers-driven, remember that admissions committees aren’t vending machines – you can’t put in a certain combination of numbers and get a guaranteed outcome. The best you can do is get the highest LSAT score (and GPA) possible, then craft a compelling application around it that showcases your unique personality and strengths to the admission committee.

Want help finding your own path to Harvard Law? We can help! : What LSAT score do you need to get into Harvard Law?
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What LSAT is needed for Yale?

Yale Law School admissions statistics – With an incoming class size of around 200 students per year and a 4:1 student to faculty ratio, Yale Law School is on the smaller end of top-tier law schools, in a way that can make it seem like an even more elite club. Here are some statistics on Yale Law School’s class of 2025 :

Number of applicants: 4,202 Number of offers of admission: 236 (5.62%) Class of 2022 incoming size: 197 GPA distribution and range:

25th percentile: 3.87/4.0 50th percentile: 3.94/4.0 75th percentile: 3.99/4.0 Range: 3.17–4.21

LSAT distribution and range:

25th percentile: 171/180 50th percentile: 175/180 75th percentile: 178/180 Range: 154–180

Though there is no minimum GPA or LSAT score for applicants, the lowest GPA and LSAT scores received by a member of Yale Law School’s class of 2025 were 3.17 and 154 respectively. Admitted students with very low scores likely have other aspects of their applications that are extraordinary in some way.

  • To get into Yale Law School, you should spend your undergraduate years working as hard as you can to earn top grades.
  • You should also invest plenty of time in studying for the LSAT in order to aim for a score of at least 175, and preferably 176 or above.
  • Remember that while it’s absolutely possible to get in with a lower score, 50% of successful applicants scored a 175 or higher.

Note: For the 2019-2020 cycle, Yale began accepting GRE scores in lieu of the LSAT.
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Does Yale accept LSAT?

The 250 Word Essay – The 250 word essay is an opportunity to write about an idea or issue from your academic, extracurricular, or professional work that is of particular interest to you. Although there are many ways to approach this essay, one option is to write about a time when you changed your mind about an idea or issue that is of interest to you.

The idea or issue you choose does not have to be law-related; the essay is simply another opportunity for faculty readers to learn more about how you would engage in the Law School community. You will have the opportunity to include a diversity statement and optional addenda to your application if any are necessary for a full representation of your candidacy.

Yale Law School welcomes, but does not require, a diversity statement, which many applicants submit to help us learn more about them and how they would contribute to our community. Other applicants choose not to include diversity statements, especially if they have otherwise covered key aspects of their backgrounds and experiences in their applications.

  1. One way to decide whether to include a diversity statement is to consider those aspects of your identity that are core to who you are, and make sure they are represented in your application.
  2. Separate from a diversity statement, you may include optional addenda, for example, explanations related to test scores or transcripts.

It is not necessary to include any, and many applicants do not include addenda. Yale Law School requires at least two letters of recommendation. We strongly prefer letters from at least two professors with whom you have studied who can speak to your academic performance and who have had a chance to personally evaluate significant aspects of your academic work.

Letters from employers, college deans, coaches, chaplains, colleagues, and others may be helpful, but are not preferred. If possible, they should not replace letters from two faculty recommenders. Applicants who have been out of school for some time or who are otherwise unable to obtain two faculty recommendations may substitute letters from employers or others who know them well.

These letters should address the qualities that academic recommendations typically address, for example: the applicant’s ability to write and think critically, as well as their overall suitability for the study and practice of law. A tip sheet for your recommenders can be found here,

  • All letters of recommendation must be transmitted through the LSAC Letter of Recommendation Service, which is included as part of your CAS subscription.
  • We will begin review of your application as soon as we have received two letters of recommendation.
  • We will not hold your application in order to wait for additional letters.

To ensure that all of your recommendations are available for consideration, please verify that they are on file with LSAC prior to applying to the Law School. Applicants are required to submit a statement of activities to help us understand what you did during your undergraduate education and after graduation (if applicable).

The college activities section asks three questions: 1) what you did during those terms when you were not in school, including summers and any other terms off (e.g., employment, internships, or study abroad); 2) what you did during the terms while you were also taking classes (e.g., extracurricular activities, employment, or internships); and 3) a catch all question where you may briefly describe any other activities that you consider relevant (e.g., a significant thesis or capstone project, or significant personal or familial responsibilities).

If it has been more than three months since you attended college, you must also describe what you have been doing since graduation in any format you choose. You should include graduate or professional education, paid or unpaid employment, as well as any other activities that you consider relevant.

  • The activities in these sections should be listed in order of their relative importance to you.
  • For each activity, you must provide a brief description, state the approximate start and end dates, estimate the weekly hourly commitment, and note whether the activity was paid or unpaid.
  • Please note that we anticipate significant duplication between these sections and your résumé.

These sections should be brief, and, in general, applicants should answer the college activities questions in no more than 1–2 pages and the post-college activities question in no more than one page. Yale Law School accepts results from the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) and the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) General Test,

  • Additionally, the Law School accepts results from the LSAT-Flex and the GRE General Test at Home,
  • We do not have a preference among these standardized tests.
  • However, you may submit score(s) from one standardized test only.
  • If you have a reportable LSAT score, you may not submit a GRE score for consideration.

If you choose to apply with the LSAT, you must take the LSAT no later than January 2023. LSAC automatically reports all LSAT scores from the past five years. The oldest LSAT score we will accept is June 2017. If you have taken the LSAT since June 2017, you do not have the option not to report your score(s) to the Law School—your score(s) will be included in the information that we receive in your CAS report from LSAC.

  • LSAC requires at least one LSAT writing sample, taken either at the time of the LSAT examination or via LSAT Writing, in order to generate your CAS report.
  • Yale Law School requires only one LSAT writing sample.
  • Applicants who take the LSAT more than once do not need to submit multiple writing samples.
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It may take up to three weeks for LSAC to process and report your LSAT Writing. Therefore, you should complete your LSAT Writing no later than January 25, 2023 to ensure we receive it by Yale Law School’s application deadline. If you choose to apply using the GRE General Test, we must receive your GRE scores from the Educational Testing Service (ETS) by our application deadline, February 15, 2023.

  1. Because it may take up to 15 calendar days for ETS to transmit your scores once you complete the exam, you should take the GRE no later than February 1, 2023.
  2. Applicants who have taken the GRE can log into their ETS accounts and select Yale Law School as a recipient of GRE results using the school code 4542.

To maintain parity between our evaluation of LSAT and GRE results, applicants who apply using the GRE must submit all GRE scores from the past five years. When reporting your GRE scores to Yale Law School, please select the option to report your entire testing history.

Selecting this option will report all of your GRE scores for the past five years. Additionally, please ensure that the GRE score report submitted with your application is generated on or after the date you submit your Yale Law School application. A failure to comply with these policies may prevent the review of your application or result in the withdrawal of an offer of admission.

Yale Law School does not require a dean’s certification form as part of the initial application. In the event an offer of admission is extended to you and you choose to accept that offer, you will be required to submit a dean’s certification form from each college or university degree program in which you are, or have been, enrolled, regardless of whether a degree was awarded.
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How soon is too soon to study for the LSAT?

It requires you to retrain your brain. – When you prep for the LSAT, you must train your brain to think in a specialized way that might seem unnatural for most non-lawyers. This can be a lengthy process. Keep in mind that equally competent individuals can vary in how long they need to hone the skills required for the LSAT.
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How many hours of LSAT prep a day?

How Many Hours a Day Should You Study for the LSAT? – So, how many hours should you study for the LSAT every day? How many hours a week should you study? The answer to these questions depends on how many months you are preparing for the test. In order to maximize your LSAT score, you should plan on studying for a total of 250-350 hours.

  • In order to fit 250 to 350 hours of LSAT prep into a 3 month period, you’ll need to spend between 20 and 30 hours a week studying.
  • If you study 5 days a week, that means you’ll need to study for the LSAT for approximately 4 to 6 hours a day.
  • On a 4-month schedule, your aim would be to study for between 15 and 22 hours every week, which comes out to between 3 and 4.5 hours per day, if you study 5 days each week.

If take 5 months to study for the LSAT, you’d need to spend between 12 to 18 hours every week, on average. This means you’d need to spend between 2.5 and 3.5 hours a day studying, 5 days a week. If you are on an extended 6-month schedule, you only need to study a manageable 10 to 15 hours per week.
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How long should I study LSAT every day?

Determining how many hours you need for LSAT prep – First of all, let’s talk bare minimum: you’ll need to allocate 120 hours worth of preparation to get well acquainted with the test in general. The keyword here is “minimum.” If you are looking for a massive score increase or want to spend more time diving into test skills according to your needs, this should not be your LSAT prep goal in terms of how many hours you set aside.

  • We recommend that most students look to spend 150–300 hours on LSAT prep; that’s a healthy range over a two or three-month period at around 20–25 hours per week, which is a standard amount for most students.
  • Eep in mind that those hours include any classes or private LSAT tutoring sessions you might be using.

If you are DIY LSAT prep, you should nudge toward the higher end of that time recommendation because you will have to do more of the analysis and organization of the material yourself.
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Why is LSAT so hard?

Challenge #1: The LSAT tests unfamiliar skills in unfamiliar ways. – Standardized tests like the SAT,, and assess skills and subjects that most test takers have experience with. While you obviously still have to study, it can be comforting to just refresh or build on content that you have already learned in school.

The LSAT takes a different approach. Instead of testing content, the LSAT is an analytical exam that tests critical thinking skills across three subjects:,, and, What makes the LSAT so challenging is that it approaches these subjects in a manner that is best described as counterintuitive. The vast majority of test takers will not be able to lean on what they have learned in school to help them answer most LSAT questions.

This confounding nature of the exam presents itself in several ways:

First, LSAT questions often include an overload of information. This makes keeping track of what is happening in the questions very difficult. Second, LSAT questions are often subtly and confusingly worded to throw you off. This makes questions even harder to follow and diverts mental energy away from solving the problem to just staying focused on the questions’ many moving pieces. Lastly, each section of the LSAT has its own approach to subtlety and information overload. This means that you have to have a develop a broad skillset in order to master the entire exam.

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What is the highest LSAT score ever?

Guide to Your LSAT Scores Your LSAT score is the most important factor for admission to law school. The highest LSAT score is a 180. The average LSAT score is about a 152. A “good” LSAT score depends on the law schools you are considering. Compare your LSAT scores to the score ranges for admitted students at on your list. Read on to learn more about LSAT scoring. How Long Does It Take To Study For Lsat
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How is 120 the lowest LSAT score?

Faced with financial pressure, many law schools lowered admissions standards, but not without risking lower bar pass rates and sanctions.

Risk Band LSAT
Score Percentile
Minimal Risk 156-180 ≥ 67.4
Low Risk 153-155 55.6 – 63.9
Modest Risk 150-152 44.3 – 52.5
High Risk 147-149 33 – 40.3
Very High Risk 145-146 26.1 – 29.5
Extreme Risk 120-144 ≤ 22.9

The LSAT is the best predictor before law school as to whether a student will pass or fail the bar exam. The table (left) shows the risk of bar failure by LSAT score. The chart (right) shows how many schools fell into each risk category between 2010 and 2022.

  • Schools that admit students who face a high risk of failing the bar may be taking advantage of them for their tuition dollars.
  • However, the LSAT score is just a starting point for such an assessment.
  • Undergraduate GPA, bar exam difficulty, and academic programs mitigate or exacerbate this starting point.

Tip On the left panel At the top of the page, you can change the data scope to view admissions standards from different angles. In 2010, only eight schools were classified as very high or extreme risk. That means that at least a quarter of students enrolled at each school reported a highest score of less than 146, which is the 29.6 percentile.

As schools grew more desperate in subsequent years, the number of schools in these categories continued to grow, peaking at 50 law schools in 2016. The number declined to 42 in 2017 and to 24 in 2018, although three of the schools from 2016 stopped enrolling new students in 2017. In 2018, two more law schools stopped enrolling new students, of which one was high risk in 2017 and one was extreme risk.

The chart above has three parts: 1. LSAT Distribution: The shaded blue area shows the distribution of LSAT scores for all people who took the LSAT during the last three years. LSAT scores range from 120 to 180. A student scoring 120 is in the 0 percentile because the student scored better than 0% of test-takers.

A student scoring a 180 is in the 99.9 percentile because the student scored better than 99.9% of test-takers. A student scoring a 160 is in the 80.4 percentile because the student scored better than 80.4% of test-takers. You can hover over the blue outline to see a tooltip for all each LSAT/percentile combinations.2.

Black and Green Bars: Each school has a bar. The start point for each bar, a purple marker, is the school’s 25th percentile LSAT score for students who entered in 2010, The end point is the 25th percentile LSAT score for students who entered in 2022,

  • If the 25th percentile went up, the bar is green.
  • If it went down, the bar is black.
  • If the score is the same, there is only a purple marker (no bar).
  • You can hover over the bar (or marker) to see the school and how its 25th percentile LSAT score has changed.3.
  • Risk Overlays: We highlight the three highest risk areas, from high to extreme.

Using these indicators, you can see which schools’ bottom quartile students are most likely to struggle to complete school and pass the bar exam. Learn more. The table below presents the chart’s underlying data:

School 2010 Entering Class 2022 Entering Class Change
Enr. 25th Percentile LSAT Enr. 25th Percentile LSAT Enr. 25th Percentile LSAT
Score (%ile Rank) Risk Band Score (%ile Rank) Risk Band Score %ile Risk Band
Albany Law School 236 152 (52.2) Modest 199 153 (55.6) Low -15.7% 1 +3.4
American University 502 158 (74.6) Minimal 396 156 (67.4) Minimal -21.1% 2 -7.2
Appalachian School of Law 127 146 (29.5) Very High 56 144 (22.9) Extreme -55.9% 2 -6.6
Arizona State University 191 158 (74.6) Minimal 288 158 (74.6) Minimal +50.8% 0
Ave Maria School of Law 203 147 (33) High 99 149 (40.3) High -51.2% 2 +7.3
Barry University 254 149 (40.3) High 267 147 (33) High +5.1% 2 -7.3
Baylor University 183 160 (80.4) Minimal 127 159 (77.6) Minimal -30.6% 1 -2.8
Boston College 261 163 (88.1) Minimal 212 162 (85.9) Minimal -18.8% 1 -2.2
Boston University 268 164 (90) Minimal 216 164 (90) Minimal -19.4% 0
Brigham Young University 150 161 (83.4) Minimal 121 165 (92) Minimal -19.3% 4 +8.6
Brooklyn Law School 486 162 (85.9) Minimal 390 157 (70.9) Minimal -19.8% 5 -15
California Western School of Law 382 151 (48.1) Modest 245 151 (48.1) Modest -35.9% 0
Campbell University 162 154 (59.7) Low 210 152 (52.2) Modest +29.6% 2 -7.5
Capital University 246 150 (44.3) Modest 159 148 (36.3) High -35.4% 2 -8
Case Western Reserve University 236 157 (70.9) Minimal 152 153 (55.6) Low -35.6% 4 -15.3
Catholic University of America 274 156 (67.4) Minimal 131 156 (67.4) Minimal -52.2% 0
Chapman University 212 155 (63.9) Low 139 155 (63.9) Low -34.4% 0
Charleston School of Law 237 151 (48.1) Modest 224 149 (40.3) High -5.5% 2 -7.8
Cleveland-Marshall College of Law 195 153 (55.6) Low 135 151 (48.1) Modest -30.8% 2 -7.5
William and Mary 217 160 (80.4) Minimal 212 160 (80.4) Minimal -2.3% 0
Columbia University 404 170 (97.4) Minimal 402 171 (98) Minimal -0.5% 1 +0.6
Cornell University 205 166 (93.2) Minimal 210 170 (97.4) Minimal +2.4% 4 +4.2
Creighton University 144 151 (48.1) Modest 122 149 (40.3) High -15.3% 2 -7.8
CUNY 163 152 (52.2) Modest 217 151 (48.1) Modest +33.1% 1 -4.1
DePaul University 312 156 (67.4) Minimal 177 152 (52.2) Modest -43.3% 4 -15.2
Drake University 155 153 (55.6) Low 110 151 (48.1) Modest -29% 2 -7.5
Drexel University 146 156 (67.4) Minimal 137 152 (52.2) Modest -6.2% 4 -15.2
Duke University 238 168 (95.9) Minimal 227 168 (95.9) Minimal -4.6% 0
Duquesne University 212 151 (48.1) Modest 167 153 (55.6) Low -21.2% 2 +7.5
Elon Law School 132 153 (55.6) Low 167 149 (40.3) High +26.5% 4 -15.3
Emory University 293 166 (93.2) Minimal 236 161 (83.4) Minimal -19.5% 5 -9.8
Faulkner University 145 148 (36.3) High 103 147 (33) High -29% 1 -3.3
Florida A&M University 288 144 (22.9) Extreme 132 148 (36.3) High -54.2% 4 +13.4
Florida International University 161 152 (52.2) Modest 142 156 (67.4) Minimal -11.8% 4 +15.2
Florida State University 199 161 (83.4) Minimal 113 159 (77.6) Minimal -43.2% 2 -5.8
Fordham University 477 163 (88.1) Minimal 423 164 (90) Minimal -11.3% 1 +1.9
University of New Hampshire 132 150 (44.3) Modest 194 152 (52.2) Modest +47% 2 +7.9
George Mason University 303 158 (74.6) Minimal 159 158 (74.6) Minimal -47.5% 0
George Washington University 523 162 (85.9) Minimal 515 162 (85.9) Minimal -1.5% 0
Georgetown University 591 168 (95.9) Minimal 593 166 (93.2) Minimal +0.3% 2 -2.7
Georgia State University 224 159 (77.6) Minimal 201 157 (70.9) Minimal -10.3% 2 -6.7
Golden Gate University 320 151 (48.1) Modest 43 152 (52.2) Modest -86.6% 1 +4.1
Gonzaga University 183 154 (59.7) Low 205 152 (52.2) Modest +12% 2 -7.5
Harvard University 561 171 (98) Minimal 564 170 (97.4) Minimal +0.5% 1 -0.6
Hofstra University 365 156 (67.4) Minimal 263 151 (48.1) Modest -27.9% 5 -19.3
Howard University 156 151 (48.1) Modest 160 151 (48.1) Modest +2.6% 0
Chicago-Kent College of Law 310 155 (63.9) Low 230 155 (63.9) Low -25.8% 0
Indiana University – Bloomington 250 156 (67.4) Minimal 154 158 (74.6) Minimal -38.4% 2 +7.2
Indiana University – Indianapolis 282 151 (48.1) Modest 227 151 (48.1) Modest -19.5% 0
University of Illinois Chicago School of Law 539 151 (48.1) Modest 343 149 (40.3) High -36.4% 2 -7.8
Lewis and Clark College 247 157 (70.9) Minimal 149 158 (74.6) Minimal -39.7% 1 +3.7
Liberty University 135 148 (36.3) High 125 150 (44.3) Modest -7.4% 2 +8
Louisiana State University 222 155 (63.9) Low 208 154 (59.7) Low -6.3% 1 -4.2
Loyola Marymount University 403 158 (74.6) Minimal 307 157 (70.9) Minimal -23.8% 1 -3.7
Loyola University Chicago 292 157 (70.9) Minimal 272 157 (70.9) Minimal -6.8% 0
Loyola University New Orleans 246 150 (44.3) Modest 209 149 (40.3) High -15% 1 -4
Marquette University 247 154 (59.7) Low 183 153 (55.6) Low -25.9% 1 -4.1
Mercer University 166 153 (55.6) Low 150 153 (55.6) Low -9.6% 0
Michigan State University 299 152 (52.2) Modest 212 153 (55.6) Low -29.1% 1 +3.4
Mississippi College 212 147 (33) High 126 146 (29.5) Very High -40.6% 1 -3.5
New England School of Law 393 151 (48.1) Modest 360 149 (40.3) High -8.4% 2 -7.8
New York Law School 641 153 (55.6) Low 358 152 (52.2) Modest -44.1% 1 -3.4
New York University 476 169 (96.7) Minimal 376 169 (96.7) Minimal -21% 0
North Carolina Central University 206 143 (20.5) Extreme 158 145 (26.1) Very High -23.3% 2 +5.6
Northeastern University 220 155 (63.9) Low 234 158 (74.6) Minimal +6.4% 3 +10.7
Northern Illinois University 135 150 (44.3) Modest 117 147 (33) High -13.3% 3 -11.3
Northern Kentucky University 199 152 (52.2) Modest 93 150 (44.3) Modest -53.3% 2 -7.9
Northwestern University 274 166 (93.2) Minimal 238 166 (93.2) Minimal -13.1% 0
Nova Southeastern University 386 148 (36.3) High 221 150 (44.3) Modest -42.7% 2 +8
Ohio Northern University 120 149 (40.3) High 62 146 (29.5) Very High -48.3% 3 -10.8
Ohio State University 230 160 (80.4) Minimal 158 159 (77.6) Minimal -31.3% 1 -2.8
Oklahoma City University 224 149 (40.3) High 148 146 (29.5) Very High -33.9% 3 -10.8
Pace University 299 152 (52.2) Modest 293 150 (44.3) Modest -2% 2 -7.9
Pepperdine University 222 159 (77.6) Minimal 192 159 (77.6) Minimal -13.5% 0
Quinnipiac University 163 154 (59.7) Low 123 149 (40.3) High -24.5% 5 -19.4
Regent University 168 150 (44.3) Modest 114 153 (55.6) Low -32.1% 3 +11.3
Roger Williams University 198 149 (40.3) High 181 148 (36.3) High -8.6% 1 -4
Samford University 166 153 (55.6) Low 146 152 (52.2) Modest -12% 1 -3.4
Santa Clara University 314 158 (74.6) Minimal 203 155 (63.9) Low -35.4% 3 -10.7
Seattle University 324 155 (63.9) Low 221 152 (52.2) Modest -31.8% 3 -11.7
Seton Hall University 358 155 (63.9) Low 215 154 (59.7) Low -39.9% 1 -4.2
South Texas College of Law Houston 461 151 (48.1) Modest 366 151 (48.1) Modest -20.6% 0
Southern Illinois University 144 151 (48.1) Modest 89 147 (33) High -38.2% 4 -15.1
Southern Methodist University 254 156 (67.4) Minimal 226 160 (80.4) Minimal -11% 4 +13
Southern University Law Center 320 143 (20.5) Extreme 292 144 (22.9) Extreme -8.8% 1 +2.4
Southwestern Law School 410 152 (52.2) Modest 343 152 (52.2) Modest -16.3% 0
St. John’s University 341 156 (67.4) Minimal 235 154 (59.7) Low -31.1% 2 -7.7
St. Louis University 334 153 (55.6) Low 184 153 (55.6) Low -44.9% 0
St. Mary’s University 301 151 (48.1) Modest 277 150 (44.3) Modest -8% 1 -3.8
St. Thomas University – Florida 275 148 (36.3) High 227 150 (44.3) Modest -17.5% 2 +8
Stanford University 180 167 (94.6) Minimal 178 170 (97.4) Minimal -1.1% 3 +2.8
Stetson University 360 154 (59.7) Low 306 156 (67.4) Minimal -15% 2 +7.7
Suffolk University 531 152 (52.2) Modest 445 150 (44.3) Modest -16.2% 2 -7.9
Syracuse University 252 153 (55.6) Low 238 154 (59.7) Low -5.6% 1 +4.1
Temple University 326 159 (77.6) Minimal 201 160 (80.4) Minimal -38.3% 1 +2.8
Texas Southern University 212 145 (26.1) Very High 195 149 (40.3) High -8% 4 +14.2
Texas Tech University 244 153 (55.6) Low 157 154 (59.7) Low -35.7% 1 +4.1
Texas A&M 253 151 (48.1) Modest 125 158 (74.6) Minimal -50.6% 7 +26.5
Western Michigan University – Cooley Law School 1583 144 (22.9) Extreme 191 146 (29.5) Very High -87.9% 2 +6.6
Touro College 280 149 (40.3) High 202 149 (40.3) High -27.9% 0
Tulane University 258 160 (80.4) Minimal 219 157 (70.9) Minimal -15.1% 3 -9.5
SUNY Buffalo 219 155 (63.9) Low 141 153 (55.6) Low -35.6% 2 -8.3
University of Akron 177 152 (52.2) Modest 137 151 (48.1) Modest -22.6% 1 -4.1
University of Alabama 161 159 (77.6) Minimal 149 159 (77.6) Minimal -7.5% 0
University of Arizona 157 161 (83.4) Minimal 124 158 (74.6) Minimal -21% 3 -8.8
University of Arkansas – Fayetteville 138 153 (55.6) Low 122 153 (55.6) Low -11.6% 0
University of Arkansas – Little Rock 157 151 (48.1) Modest 143 149 (40.3) High -8.9% 2 -7.8
University of Baltimore 363 151 (48.1) Modest 229 151 (48.1) Modest -36.9% 0
University of California – Hastings 383 160 (80.4) Minimal 389 157 (70.9) Minimal +1.6% 3 -9.5
University of California – Berkeley 286 162 (85.9) Minimal 278 167 (94.6) Minimal -2.8% 5 +8.7
University of California – Davis 196 160 (80.4) Minimal 206 163 (88.1) Minimal +5.1% 3 +7.7
University of California – Los Angeles 308 165 (92) Minimal 308 166 (93.2) Minimal 0% 1 +1.2
University of Chicago 205 168 (95.9) Minimal 203 169 (96.7) Minimal -1% 1 +0.8
University of Cincinnati 144 157 (70.9) Minimal 130 156 (67.4) Minimal -9.7% 1 -3.5
University of Colorado 180 161 (83.4) Minimal 165 159 (77.6) Minimal -8.3% 2 -5.8
University of Connecticut 186 158 (74.6) Minimal 153 156 (67.4) Minimal -17.7% 2 -7.2
University of Dayton 207 150 (44.3) Modest 133 152 (52.2) Modest -35.7% 2 +7.9
University of Denver 301 156 (67.4) Minimal 280 156 (67.4) Minimal -7% 0
University of Detroit Mercy 257 146 (29.5) Very High 210 150 (44.3) Modest -18.3% 4 +14.8
University of Florida 310 160 (80.4) Minimal 196 162 (85.9) Minimal -36.8% 2 +5.5
University of Georgia 248 162 (85.9) Minimal 169 156 (67.4) Minimal -31.9% 6 -18.5
University of Hawaii 113 153 (55.6) Low 89 154 (59.7) Low -21.2% 1 +4.1
University of Houston 266 159 (77.6) Minimal 256 157 (70.9) Minimal -3.8% 2 -6.7
University of Idaho 130 151 (48.1) Modest 148 149 (40.3) High +13.8% 2 -7.8
University of Illinois 228 163 (88.1) Minimal 163 162 (85.9) Minimal -28.5% 1 -2.2
University of Iowa 203 158 (74.6) Minimal 141 161 (83.4) Minimal -30.5% 3 +8.8
University of Kansas 165 155 (63.9) Low 137 153 (55.6) Low -17% 2 -8.3
University of Kentucky 135 157 (70.9) Minimal 120 155 (63.9) Low -11.1% 2 -7
University of Louisville 143 155 (63.9) Low 120 152 (52.2) Modest -16.1% 3 -11.7
University of Maine 95 153 (55.6) Low 84 153 (55.6) Low -11.6% 0
University of Maryland 296 157 (70.9) Minimal 205 157 (70.9) Minimal -30.7% 0
University of Memphis 158 153 (55.6) Low 101 152 (52.2) Modest -36.1% 1 -3.4
University of Miami 489 156 (67.4) Minimal 360 156 (67.4) Minimal -26.4% 0
University of Michigan 376 168 (95.9) Minimal 334 166 (93.2) Minimal -11.2% 2 -2.7
University of Minnesota 260 159 (77.6) Minimal 222 162 (85.9) Minimal -14.6% 3 +8.3
University of Mississippi 199 151 (48.1) Modest 176 153 (55.6) Low -11.6% 2 +7.5
University of Missouri – Columbia 148 157 (70.9) Minimal 128 156 (67.4) Minimal -13.5% 1 -3.5
University of Missouri – Kansas City 156 154 (59.7) Low 141 152 (52.2) Modest -9.6% 2 -7.5
University of Montana 85 153 (55.6) Low 91 151 (48.1) Modest +7.1% 2 -7.5
University of Nebraska 145 153 (55.6) Low 147 155 (63.9) Low +1.4% 2 +8.3
University of Nevada – Las Vegas 145 156 (67.4) Minimal 124 155 (63.9) Low -14.5% 1 -3.5
University of New Mexico 116 153 (55.6) Low 99 152 (52.2) Modest -14.7% 1 -3.4
University of North Carolina 254 159 (77.6) Minimal 188 162 (85.9) Minimal -26% 3 +8.3
University of North Dakota 83 148 (36.3) High 86 146 (29.5) Very High +3.6% 2 -6.8
University of Notre Dame 172 162 (85.9) Minimal 166 163 (88.1) Minimal -3.5% 1 +2.2
University of Oklahoma 174 157 (70.9) Minimal 172 155 (63.9) Low -1.1% 2 -7
University of Oregon 177 157 (70.9) Minimal 160 155 (63.9) Low -9.6% 2 -7
University of Pennsylvania 250 166 (93.2) Minimal 246 167 (94.6) Minimal -1.6% 1 +1.4
University of Pittsburgh 259 158 (74.6) Minimal 121 159 (77.6) Minimal -53.3% 1 +3
University of Richmond 146 159 (77.6) Minimal 121 158 (74.6) Minimal -17.1% 1 -3
University of San Diego 330 159 (77.6) Minimal 254 157 (70.9) Minimal -23% 2 -6.7
University of San Francisco 251 155 (63.9) Low 135 152 (52.2) Modest -46.2% 3 -11.7
University of South Carolina 239 156 (67.4) Minimal 206 156 (67.4) Minimal -13.8% 0
University of South Dakota 75 149 (40.3) High 87 148 (36.3) High +16% 1 -4
University of Southern California 220 166 (93.2) Minimal 223 165 (92) Minimal +1.4% 1 -1.2
University of St. Thomas – Minneapolis 168 154 (59.7) Low 157 152 (52.2) Modest -6.5% 2 -7.5
University of Tennessee 169 156 (67.4) Minimal 136 156 (67.4) Minimal -19.5% 0
University of Texas 389 164 (90) Minimal 292 166 (93.2) Minimal -24.9% 2 +3.2
University of The District of Columbia 131 149 (40.3) High 80 147 (33) High -38.9% 2 -7.3
University of the Pacific – McGeorge 346 155 (63.9) Low 175 152 (52.2) Modest -49.4% 3 -11.7
University of Toledo 157 150 (44.3) Modest 94 149 (40.3) High -40.1% 1 -4
University of Tulsa 146 152 (52.2) Modest 129 151 (48.1) Modest -11.6% 1 -4.1
University of Utah 122 157 (70.9) Minimal 96 158 (74.6) Minimal -21.3% 1 +3.7
University of Virginia 368 166 (93.2) Minimal 315 166 (93.2) Minimal -14.4% 0
University of Washington 186 160 (80.4) Minimal 181 160 (80.4) Minimal -2.7% 0
University of Wisconsin 246 158 (74.6) Minimal 242 157 (70.9) Minimal -1.6% 1 -3.7
University of Wyoming 82 151 (48.1) Modest 68 152 (52.2) Modest -17.1% 1 +4.1
Vanderbilt University 193 165 (92) Minimal 155 163 (88.1) Minimal -19.7% 2 -3.9
Vermont Law School 212 153 (55.6) Low 170 149 (40.3) High -19.8% 4 -15.3
Villanova University 251 159 (77.6) Minimal 181 158 (74.6) Minimal -27.9% 1 -3
Wake Forest University 165 160 (80.4) Minimal 158 159 (77.6) Minimal -4.2% 1 -2.8
Washburn University 169 153 (55.6) Low 92 150 (44.3) Modest -45.6% 3 -11.3
Washington and Lee University 144 161 (83.4) Minimal 123 159 (77.6) Minimal -14.6% 2 -5.8
Washington University in St Louis 276 162 (85.9) Minimal 260 164 (90) Minimal -5.8% 2 +4.1
Wayne State University 197 153 (55.6) Low 126 154 (59.7) Low -36% 1 +4.1
West Virginia University 137 151 (48.1) Modest 103 152 (52.2) Modest -24.8% 1 +4.1
Western New England University School of Law 168 151 (48.1) Modest 95 146 (29.5) Very High -43.5% 5 -18.6
Western State University 242 148 (36.3) High 131 150 (44.3) Modest -45.9% 2 +8
Willamette University 158 154 (59.7) Low 113 151 (48.1) Modest -28.5% 3 -11.6
Yale University 205 171 (98) Minimal 197 171 (98) Minimal -3.9% 0
Cardozo-Yeshiva University 382 160 (80.4) Minimal 315 159 (77.6) Minimal -17.5% 1 -2.8
John Marshall Law School – Atlanta 265 148 (36.3) High 131 148 (36.3) High -50.6% 0
Widener University – Pennsylvania 178 148 (36.3) High 142 146 (29.5) Very High -20.2% 2 -6.8
Widener University – Delaware 389 150 (44.3) Modest 234 148 (36.3) High -39.8% 2 -8
University of California – Irvine 83 163 (88.1) Minimal 172 162 (85.9) Minimal +107.2% 1 -2.2

Puerto Rican schools have been excluded from the chart above because the LSAT is in English and the bar exam in Puerto Rico may be taken in Spanish. Admissions and enrollment data come from the American Bar Association.
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Is there math on LSAT?

No, the LSAT does not explicitly test math. You may see some questions about percentages in the logical reasoning (arguments) section, and some analytical reasoning questions (i.e., logic games) may resemble math problems, but these questions are designed to test your logical reasoning, not your mathematical knowledge.
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Is 8 weeks enough to study for LSAT?

Tip #2: Aim for 250 to 300 hours of LSAT preparation – For most students, a three-month period of preparation (of approximately 20 hours per week) is a great goal. This is, of course, an estimate; most students are not all students. To find out how much LSAT prep time you’re likely to need, we recommend taking a to get a baseline score.

Students scoring close to their goal scores may need less than that three-month period. Those scoring more than ten points from their goals are likely to need additional prep time. Practical considerations, such as work and personal commitments, will come into play here, as will your own unique needs and learning style.

Nonetheless, 250 to 300 hours of LSAT preparation over a period of a few months is a good benchmark. Most students who dedicate significantly less time won’t maximize their LSAT scores. While you may ultimately need more than three months to prepare if you don’t get the score increases you need within that time frame, it’s best not to start too long before your planned test date.
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